November 2012 Archives

A St. Louis Park man is charged with second-degree assault with a firearm for threatening a group of boys with an AK-47 on Halloween for stealing candy, according to WCCO.

Orrin John Hager, 44, went after a group of boys, who he believed to have stolen Halloween candy from one of his kids, WCCO reports.

Hager confronted the group at 27th Street and Brunswick Avenue just after 9 p.m. and he told police none of the boys were taking him seriously and were giving him "attitude" so he pulled out the gun from his car, according to the criminal complaint reported by the St. Louis Park Patch
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The boys told police that Hager pulled out a "long gun" and they ran, according to WCCO. But Hager's attorney Joseph Tamburino said Hager never pointed the gun at anyone and regrets the confrontation, WCCO said.

The gun was unloaded, according to the Patch.

Hager faces a maximum penalty of seven years in prison with a $14,000 fine for the felony and the charge has a mandatory minimum penalty of three years in prison and a $4,200 fine, the Patch said.

Hager has been released from custody on a $100,000 bond, the Patch reports.

Gang member charged for threatening tattoo

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Antonio Jenkins, Jr., known member of the Bloods street gang, was charged with making a terroristic threat for the benefit of a gang Thursday, the Pioneer Press reports.

20-year-old Jenkins posted a picture on Facebook in late October of a new tattoo that depicted a person holding a pistol to the mouth of a pig dressed in a Minneapolis police uniform displaying the badge of officer Jeffrey Seidel, The Pioneer Press said.

According to Dale Carpenter, who teaches constitutional law at the University of Minnesota Law School, the tattoo isn't protected under the First Amendment if the police version of events is true. "It's a serious threat to the health or life of another person and such statements, no matter what form they're made in - written, verbal, put on Facebook or put on your body - it is unprotected," he said.

Police stopped Jenkins in early November and officers observed the tattoo. Jenkins reportedly admitted that the tattoo could lead to violence against the officer, according to KARE 11.

The Pioneer Press reports that this threat and others have been allegedly made in retaliation for the death of a reputed gang member who was shot by St. Paul police during a drug investigation in October.

Occupy Sandy: political movement turned relief effort

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Organizers of the Occupy Wall Street movement have found new project in Occupy Sandy helping with food, supplies and transportation in storm-ravaged neighborhoods surrounding New York City, the New York Times reported on Friday.

During the past two weeks, Occupy Sandy has set up distribution sites in a pair of Brooklyn churches were people can find cooked food and a wide variety of supplies, the Times said.

The organization has put together a motor pool of borrowed vehicles to shuttle volunteers to outlying neighborhoods and have construction teams and medical committees working in affected areas, according to the Times.

Volunteers who show up to the churches undergo orientation during which the volunteering process is explained as well as the group's guiding principles. They provide sensitivity training along with door-to-door training for those going out into the neighborhoods, according to the Washington Post in a story provided by the Associated Press.

Occupy Sandy now has relief centers across the city as they partner with local community and volunteer organizations to reach out to the most desperate areas, the Post said.

Man sentenced to multiple life terms for Arizona shooting

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Jared L Loughner was sentenced to multiple life terms of life plus 140 years in prison Thursday for killing six people, wounding 12 others and the assassination attempt of former Representative Gabby Giffords, the New York Times reports.

Loughner originally pleaded not guilty to 49 charges from the shooting spree based on a history of mental illness, but was ruled competent to stand trial in August, according to CNN.

Prosecutors agreed to a plea deal with Loughner if he pleaded guilty to 19 charges in exchange for the sentence to avoid the death penalty, but instead would face life in prison without possibility of parole, CNN said.

Loughner waived his right to address the court, but many of victims of the January 2011 shooting took the stand to give their testimony including Giffords, whose husband Mark Kelly spoke on her behalf, according to the New York Times.

"We have all come here today seeking something...resolution, closure...I came to the courtroom today seeking peace. Not just for today but for the days ahead," Pamela Simon testified.

The victims and their families approved of the plea deal, none wished to pursue the death penalty on account of Loughner's mental illness, but are satisfied he will be behind bars and unable to hurt others, CNN said.

Man sentenced to multiple life terms for Arizona shooting

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Jared L Loughner was sentenced to multiple life terms of life plus 140 years in prison Thursday for killing six people, wounding 12 others and the assassination attempt of former Representative Gabby Giffords, the New York Times reports.

Loughner originally pleaded not guilty to 49 charges from the shooting spree based on a history of mental illness, but was ruled competent to stand trial in August, according to CNN.

Prosecutors agreed to a plea deal with Loughner if he pleaded guilty to 19 charges in exchange for the sentence to avoid the death penalty, but instead would face life in prison without possibility of parole, CNN said.

Loughner waived his right to address the court, but many of victims of the January 2011 shooting took the stand to give their testimony including Giffords, whose husband Mark Kelly spoke on her behalf, according to the New York Times.

"We have all come here today seeking something...resolution, closure...I came to the courtroom today seeking peace. Not just for today but for the days ahead," Pamela Simon testified.

The victims and their families approved of the plea deal, none wished to pursue the death penalty on account of Loughner's mental illness, but are satisfied he will be behind bars and unable to hurt others, CNN said.

One-vote win triggers automatic recount

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One vote can really make a difference in an election as incumbent Mary Franson found out Tuesday night when she won against Bob Cuniff in Douglas County's Minnesota House race, the Echo Press reports.

Republican Mary Franson of Alexandria received 10,652 votes to Democrat challenger Cunniff's 10,651, which means an automatic recount after the state canvassing board meets on Nov. 27, according to the Star Tribune.

The Tribune reports that state election law triggers an automatic recount in races that are decided by less than one-half of 1 percent of the vote.

Franson has been known for some controversial statements that attracted headlines earlier this year, according to the Star Tribune, saying that Earth Day was a "Pagan holiday" and compared food stamp recipients to wild animals.

The Tribune reports the canvassing board will meet on Nov. 27 to determine a location for the legislative recounts, which should be completed within several days.

Analysis: News Obituary

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The New York Times reported today that Han Suyin, a prolific Eurasian author most remembered for her best-selling semi-autobiography that inspired the 1955 film, "Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing," died Nov. 2 at the age of 95.

The author of the piece chose a standard obituary lead over an alternative one. It included her name, her major achievements, where she died and her age.

Given the large amount of information included in the obituary, the author most likely didn't attribute all of her sources, but a few were mentioned. Han's daughter Yung Mei Tang is attributed for confirming her mother's death. The author sourced a quote by Han to the Washington Post in 1982. Hailin Zhou, a professor at Villanova University's Institute for Global Interdisciplinary Studies, said a few words about Han's influence as a writer, and the author included a quote from a Time magazine review of Han's work in 1956.

Dr. Han published about two dozen novels, nonfiction books and memoirs, and countless essays during a time period spanning World War II, China's revolution, the Korean War and the rise of communism and the fall of colonialism in East Asia. Dr. Han's works were often set "against the backdrop of historical and generational upheaval in Asia," the Times wrote. She helped Western audiences understand the political and social developments of the East.

The most well-known product of Dr. Han's achievements is the 1955 film adaption, "Love is a Many-Splendored Thing," which featured two of the biggest Hollywood stars, William Holden and Jennifer Jones. The film included an Oscar-winning theme song and later spawned a daytime TV soap opera in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The obituary differs from a resume because it tells the story of the person's life. It includes personal details instead of only a job history and notable achievements. It also includes the negatives or the struggles in the person's life, not just the highlights.

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, officials are working over time to make sure voters can make it to the polls this Tuesday, the New York Times reported on Friday.

However, the number of votes is expected to be lower in affected areas. Many states on the East Coast, including Virginia and North Carolina, canceled early voting hours this week, and some polling places may still be without power on Election Day, according to the Times.

Areas in Pennsylvania and Ohio also experienced power outages after Sandy moved inland. The Huffington Post reported that as of Thursday, 77,000 homes were still without power in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, which includes strongly Democratic Cleveland, and the number of early voters has dropped since the storm.

Officials are worried that the chaos could create legitimacy problems and will create an incentive for the candidate losing in the affected states to look for reasons to argue the results, the Times says.

Sources say the storm-related voting disruptions are unlikely to change the overall outcome of the presidential election, since the largest problem areas are expected to go for President Obama. However, the president's share of the popular vote could drop.

Deer hunter dies after being shot

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A Bemidji man has died after being shot while hunting Saturday in Beltrami County, according to the Star Tribune.

Police received a call at 9 a.m. that a deer hunter had been shot by another hunter in Turtle River Township, the Tribune says. The shooter reportedly knew the victim but the two weren't hunting together.

The Pioneer Press, provided by the Associated Press, reports that family members of the victim say he was insistent upon firearms safety.

The victim, 66-year-old Don Bixby, had missed past deer season due to health issues, and was out this season with a handicap permit, according to the Pioneer Press.

Bixby was standing next to a pickup truck when he was shot on public land, the Pioneer Press says.

New iPad Mini greeted by smaller crowds

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Apple launched its new iPad Mini Friday to less fanfare than past gadgets have received, USA Today reports.

The iPad Mini launched in the U.S. and 33 other countries, priced at $329. Although Apple fans still lined up worldwide to receive the new gadget, the lines were shorter than a usual Apple launch, USA Today said.

However, CNN reports that more than 750 people lined up outside of Apple's flagship store in downtown New York City despite the damage from Hurricane Sandy.

The lackluster response may be due to Apple's requirement to pre-order the device and arrive to pick up at a scheduled time, CNN said.

Critics see this new launch as one of the first defensive moves made by Apple playing catch up with Amazon's Kindle Fire and Google's Nexus 7, CNN reports.

Major Herion Ring Busted in Twin Cities

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Federal investigators broke a major heroin ring in the Twin Cities and, according to the indictment released Wednesday, eleven men face charges, KSTP reports.

KARE 11 reports the heroin distribution ring has been operating since 2000.

Many of the defendants will also face distribution and possession with intent to distribute charges, KARE 11 says.

According to KSTP, ten of the men have pleaded not guilty and the trial has been set for January.

If convicted, the eleven defendants could face a maximum penalty of ten years to life in federal prison, KARE 11 reports.

Penguin & Random House to merge together

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Penguin and Random House publishers are merging together in an effort to compete against the rapidly growing digital marketplace, the New York Times reported on Monday.

This merger will create the largest global consumer book publisher with 25 percent of the market and combines an impressive contemporary book list of best-sellers from Random House with a backlist of classics from Penguin, according to the Times.

The Washington Post reports that Random House, owned by German media company Bertelsmann, will own 53 percent of the merger, known as Penguin Random House, and Penguin will own 47 percent.

The deal will close in the second half of 2013 following regulatory approval, according to the Post.

The Times reports that other major publishers may be soon to follow Penguin Random House's lead to compete against Internet giants like Google, Apple and Amazon.

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This page is an archive of entries from November 2012 listed from newest to oldest.

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