Dieting may not be so hard after all

| 1 Comment

http://health.yahoo.net/experts/joybauernutrition/6-diet-rules-you-can-break

The article I came across this week on Yahoo!News discussed the 6 diet "rules" you CAN break. Sometimes very overweight people do not want to diet, or can't stick to one because they think it is too hard. This all-or-nothing approach doesn't work in the long run. The article talked about these six diet misconceptions: exercise is necessary to lose weight, only weigh yourself once per week, desert is a no-no, portion control everything you eat, never skip breakfast, and salads are your best bet for losing weight.

I think this was a very informative article because people usually assume that in order to lose weight, they must never even look at chocolate, eating only salads and working out constantly. These misconceptions scare a lot of people off from trying to diet, when really they could make some small life changes and be healthier. Some obese people feel like because they are so overweight, and often can't exercise, that they are unable to lose weight but this isn't true. In order to lose weight, your body must take in less calories than it burns. As long as they keep a low-calorie diet they can effectively lose weight.

This article was also personally helpful because it is the first time I've actually heard that it is okay to skip breakfast. I like how the authors realized that some people just can't eat in the mornings, and that it is possible to have a healthy diet without eating something right away in the morning.

1 Comment

Did this article include any information about whether individuals taking part in such dieting practices are able to keep the weight off over a long period of time? This article supports the calculation for energy balance model (calories in-calories out)but defies the set point theory, which suggests that when a person gains or loses weight, compensatory mechanisms that resist changes are set off. Our bodies are like thermostats; our weights may be adjusted but eventually they tend to return to a point that is "normal." This theory suggests that dieting may be easy for short periods of time, but do not have lasting effects.Dieting isn't all about limiting calorie intake; internal bodily processes and genes will take precedence and regulate our weights for the most part.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by kroeg027 published on October 31, 2010 9:48 PM.

Corn-ucopia of Fast Food was the previous entry in this blog.

"Catching Obesity" is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.