Category "Human interest"

July 29, 2005

Wallets found at barracks provide trip back in time

July 26 Chicago Tribune
http://www.chicagotribune.com/services/site/premium/access-registered.intercept

Have you ever lost a wallet? Maybe youíll get it back in 60 years. Thatís what happened to Willard Groth of Hoyt Lakes. Heís 81 years old now, but he was a young Army private in 1944 when his wallet, and the $20 it contained, disappeared.

His was one of 25 wallets that was found in the heating ducts of an old military barracks in California. Because all of the wallets had one thing in common, a lack of cash, the Army theorizes that the wallets had been stolen and stashed there by the thief. More interesting, however, are the items that were left in the wallets. Driverís licenses, dog-tags, and even tips for surviving an atomic blast.

Willard Groth may have lost his 20 bucks, but what he got back is priceless.

Posted by at 9:32 PM | Human interest

Category "Human interest"

July 22, 2005

Deadly games

There is no link to this story in particular, but highlights of the current issue of Reader's Digest are available at http://www.rd.com.
This story highlights one boy's murderous rampage that, like other killing sprees perpetrated by teenagers, some blame on the violent content of video games. I personally believe that some members of our human race are more easily influenced than others, which is a trait that's true of some teenagers as well as some adults. In order for there to be even a potential solution to the problem of weak-minded individuals being influenced by violent video games, two things have to happen: PARENTS NEED TO PAY ATTENTION TO WHICH GAMES THEIR KIDS ARE PLAYING AND WHAT THEIR KIDS ARE DOING IN GENERAL. This is the biggest, most iportant part. If I ever found a copy of GTA Vice City in my house I would burn it at my son's feet. Secondly, there does have to be some responsibility taken on the part of the manufacturers and retailers of video games, I believe in the form of a strictly enforced rating system. A rating system is just about the only way a parent has to judge what's appropriate and what isn't.

Posted by at 7:41 PM | Human interest