The Great Debate

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The free will and determinism debate has been around for quite some time now and today is still going on with many open ends.This site http://www.thegreatdebate.org.uk/determinismandfreewill.html goes especially into great detail about each side for free will and determinism. puppet.jpg

After reading through the many arguments I would have to say that I am leaning towards determinism. If you really think about it, there really isn't anything that is "original". Everything is a factor or a branch off of something else. There just isn't that one original thought, idea, action, etc. In the article, they gave a supposedly example of free will is a spontaneous act. Such as the growth of plants or the impulsive movements of animals. But, you then ask, well why did the plant grow or why did the animal move? Well the plant grew because the seed was dropped there by a bird and there was ample sunshine and water; conditions just worked. Or, the animal moved because it was startled or saw something it liked and moved or maybe they have a muscle disorder that was caused by a disease picked up at the waterhole that was from...etc. You get the point. Everything factor is caused by another factor. Just as the book says, we may think we have free will but I personally think determinism is what truly exists.

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I agree with you, there is no doubt of the negative impact sugar has had on society. As a person who has to watch their sugar intake, I can tell you that a lot of the things you typically buy at the grocery store have added sugar or sucrose and as well as many articles of food that people don’t typically associate with having sugar, such as vegetables (which have fructose – a sugar found in nature). Since there is such a high consumption of sugar in the United States, it is said to be one of the causes of our type II diabetes and obesity epidemic. According to:
http://janicewhite.hubpages.com/hub/why-sugar-is-bad-for-you
Americans consume an average of 152.5lbs of sugar per person per year where as Japan only consumes an average of 66.32lbs of sugar per person per year. So when you compare the obesity rates of the United States (30.6%) and Japan (3.2%) [http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/hea_obe-health-obesity] it’s hard to believe that sugar couldn’t have a negative effect on us.

I agree with you, there is no doubt of the negative impact sugar has had on society. As a person who has to watch their sugar intake, I can tell you that a lot of the things you typically buy at the grocery store have added sugar or sucrose and as well as many articles of food that people don’t typically associate with having sugar, such as vegetables (which have fructose – a sugar found in nature). Since there is such a high consumption of sugar in the United States, it is said to be one of the causes of our type II diabetes and obesity epidemic. According to:
http://janicewhite.hubpages.com/hub/why-sugar-is-bad-for-you
Americans consume an average of 152.5lbs of sugar per person per year where as Japan only consumes an average of 66.32lbs of sugar per person per year. So when you compare the obesity rates of the United States (30.6%) and Japan (3.2%) [http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/hea_obe-health-obesity] it’s hard to believe that sugar couldn’t have a negative effect on us.

While you make some interesting points about "sugar" in general in this post, I think it is important to consider what your definition for sugar truly is. Keep in mind there are naturally occurring sugars like fructose that can found in things like fruit and honey. Refined sugar can be found in all forms too, such as sucrose which is the typical "table sugar" that we think of. The chemical compositions of these two forms of sugar are different, so our bodies react to them and digest them differently. I agree that sugar in general should be consumed in moderation, but I would like to add that it is also important to consider the type of sugar you are consuming.

I'm typically not one to enjoy reading summaries of articles, but the way you analyzed them were more interesting than the articles themselves. But then again who wouldn't be interested in reading about the heroine of the sweet-tooth world?

Interesting post! We live in a world dominated by high-calorie food and fast food joints on every corner. Avoiding sugar is a difficult temptation and might not be necessary. Like you mentioned, having sugar in moderate or controlled amounts will suffice. Giving up a craving will only lead to poorer food choices. Satisfy cravings every once in a while. Substituting "sugar-free" versions is not always the best option. In place of the sugar is usually a high load of carbohydrates, which are also not good for you in large proportions. Concluding, all foods should be eaten in healthy moderations.

It is interesting to think of sugar in so many differet ways. It's important for us to remember what we're putting into our bodies. Even though sugar can be defined many different ways, in the end it's still bad for us. We should remember that our stomach is not a garbage can, and that we should eat what is truly healthy for us, and avoid food with too much added sugar.

I loved reading about sugar, almost as much as I enjoy ingesting this addictive crystal. You left the article at a dramatic statement that suggests we all avoid or control our intake. In another article I would love to read practical tips on how we might do that. It's quite a difficult task. I think the rule of thumb for sugar as well as any other food item- do everything in moderation. Too much of anything is a bad thing- but as you state sugar "[has] only negative effects". As this is applied to small amounts, I would like to suggest that sugar can be beneficial. It sure makes me smile and most likely triggers pleasure sensors in the brain. Using something sugary or chocolaty as a reward can be pleasurable and increase mood and motivation.

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This page contains a single entry by yuxxx664 published on February 5, 2012 1:35 PM.

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