"Cellphone Use Tied to Changes in Brain Activity"

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Cellphone use can speed up brain activity in the area of brain closest to the phone antenna, according to researchers from the National Institutes of Health. Researchers are skeptical of the findings because the effects on an individual's health are still unknown.

The researchers tested 47 people by placing a cellphone in each ear. In the first test, both phones were turned off. In the second test, the right phone was on a muted phone call. After almost one hour of tests, the brain scans showed increase consumption of glucose, or sugar, in areas of the brain near the activated phone.

This study raises the question of whether there are long-term consequences of repeated stimulation from electromagnetic radiation. This study continues to fuel the debate on the safety of cell phones.

This study proposes a controversial topic to does not result in any definitive conclusions. As the researchers stated in the beginning of the article, they are skeptical to make interpretations of the data because the effects on one's health are still unknown. I think the sample size of 47 participants is somewhat small, but yet still large enough to support that there is a consistent brain activity phenomenon as a result from the experiment. I am curious to know if there was a control group in these tests and if using a land-line phone would produce the same results (granted there is still an internal antenna). This is a topic I am personally interested in but it seems researchers are a long ways away from drawing any conclusions on the safety of cellphone use.


http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/22/cellphone-use-tied-to-changes-in-brain-activity/

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This page contains a single entry by reulx004 published on October 18, 2012 12:48 PM.

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