Analysis: Data

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In the Star Tribune's article, "Disabled students face dangerous discipline in Minnesota," the author examined state reports of complaints filed by students or their parents regarding physical discipline that teachers or school staff used on a special education student.

The author found several anecdotal cases that he used in his story to show the extreme type of punishment that is used in some cases. He also used the data to find interview sources, such as the mother of a son who a school staff person harshly disciplined.

People filed nearly 22,000 complaints last year, so the author probably had some type of data analysis program or perhaps the state already filed some type of report that the author had access to. He probably spent a fair amount of time going through the records himself to find the anecdotal cases.

The story included an infographic that included a diagram explaining different holds school staff use to restrain a student. The graphic also included a map that displayed which states banned certain types of holds and forms of discipline.

The article also featured video interview links and related articles in the side column of the website.

UMN may adopt smoke-free campus policy

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The University Senate passed Thursday a smoke-free resolution for the Twin Cities campus, the Minnesota Daily reported.

President Eric Kaler is a supporter of making the University a smoke-free campus and must approve the resolution before it can take effect, the Daily reported.

University of Minnesota Crookston, University of Minnesota Duluth and 23 other Minnesota post-secondary institutions are already tobacco- or smoke- free, according to Healthy Campus: Tobacco-Free, a Boynton Health Service affiliate at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

The University already has a smoke-free indoor policy that also prohibits smoking "within 25 feet of the exterior entrances to University owned facilities or facilities fully leased to the University," according to the University's administrative policy.

Kaler is waiting on campus-wide approval before agreeing to go smoke-free, the Daily reported.

UMN may adopt smoke-free campus policy

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The University Senate passed Thursday a smoke-free resolution for the Twin Cities campus, the Minnesota Daily reported.

President Eric Kaler is a supporter of making the University a smoke-free campus and must approve the resolution before it can take effect, the Daily reported.

University of Minnesota Crookston, University of Minnesota Duluth and 23 other Minnesota post-secondary institutions are already tobacco- or smoke- free, according to Healthy Campus: Tobacco-Free, a Boynton Health Service affiliate at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

The University already has a smoke-free indoor policy that also prohibits smoking "within 25 feet of the exterior entrances to University owned facilities or facilities fully leased to the University," according to the University's administrative policy.

Kaler is waiting on campus-wide approval before agreeing to go smoke-free, the Daily reported.

Minnesota House votes to raise minimum wage

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The Minnesota House moved Friday to raise the state's minimum wage from $6.15, one of the nation's lowest, to $9.50 by 2015, the Star Tribune reported.

The Senate will vote Wednesday on increasing wages to $7.75, although Gov. Mark Dayton supports a wage level closer to the House's, the Grand Forks Herald reported.

Rep. Dan Fabian, R-Roseau said he is concerned that this legislation combined with others will make Minnesota less competitive with other states, the Herald reported.

Neighboring states North Dakota ($7.25), South Dakota ($7.25), Illinois ($8.25) and Iowa ($7.25) have higher minimum wages than Minnesota, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Washington is the only state with a minimum wage above $9, $1.75 more than the federal minimum wage standard of $7.25, according to the NCSL.

The Minnesota House wage bump would give about 350,000 workers a raise and would be tied to the cost of living, so the rate would rise over time with or without a vote, the Star Tribune reported.

Bangladeshi building collapse death toll rises

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Rescue workers uncovered 22 more bodies Saturday in the Bangladeshi garment factory wreckage, raising the total death count to 547, CNN reported.

Authorities report that more than 2,400 people were rescued from the wreckage after it collapsed more than a week ago in what is now considered the "deadliest accident in the history of the garment industry," The New York Times reported.

Police arrested engineer Abdur Razzak Khan, who worked as a construction consultant when the building's owner illegally added three floors to the building, and are holding him on a charge of negligence, CNN reported.

Building workers called Khan to inspect the building when cracks appeared in the structure, and he concluded that the building was dangerous and should be closed until experts could inspect it, The Times reported.

But police say that Sohel Rana, the building's owner, and the factory owners claim that Khan said the cracks were just a small problem, The Times reported. Police are investigating to determine who is telling the truth.

The collapse sparked widespread protest in Bangladesh over many factory employees' working conditions, CNN reported.

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina urged protestors to delay protests so that government workers could focus on recovery efforts, CNN reported.

Rhode Island approves same-sex marriage

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Rhode Island became the 10th state to legally allow same-sex marriage when Governor Lincoln Chafee signed legislation Thursday, the Boston Globe reported.

Gay marriage is legal in all of New England, now that Rhode Island joined Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont with its bill approval, Reuters reported.

Chafee stated that the new law welcomes economic growth by enabling businesses that cater toward gay marriages to prosper in the area, the Globe reported.

Bishop Thomas J. Tobin, the head of the Diocese of Providence, said he disapproves of the legislation and urged Catholics to "examine their consciences" when deciding whether to endorse same-sex marriage or attend same-sex ceremonies, as doing so "might harm their relationship with God and cause significant scandal to others," the Globe reported.

Last November, Maryland and Washington state voters approved same-sex marriage, and Minnesotan voters rejected a constitutional amendment that would have defined marriage as a union between a man and a woman, Reuters reported. Iowa and the District of Columbia also legalized same-sex marriage.

Vikings draft picks; will sign Chris Carter's son

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The Minnesota Vikings gained nine new players in this year's draft pick, Vikings.com reported.

The team had three first round draft picks and selected defensive tackle Sharrif Floyd from Philadelphia, cornerback Xavier Rhodes from Florida State and wide receiver Cordarrelle Patterson from Tennessee, Vikings.com reported.

The Vikings will also sign undrafted free agent Duron Carter, former Vikings player Chris Carter's son, ESPN reported.

Carter showed lots of talent but comes with baggage, USA Today reported. He was "dismissed from the Ohio State and Alabama programs for academic (OSU) and unspecified (Alabama) reasons," USA Today reported.

Minnesota defeat North Dakota State

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The Gophers defeated North Dakota State 5-3 at Siebert Field on Wednesday, extending their winning streak to six games, The Minnesota Daily reported.

The Gophers also beat the Bison 4-2 at the Metrodome earlier in the season, MN Daily reported.

Bison second baseman Wes Satzinger hit a home run in the second inning and North Dakota State scored two runs in the eighth, NDSU Athletic Media Relations reported.

The Gophers took the lead in the fifth inning, MN Daily reported.

The Bison used eight pitchers throughout the game and the Gophers used five, NDSU Athletic Media Relations reported.

Analysis: Speech Coverage

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In NPR's article, "Obama's Bush Library Speech Leaves Iraq And More Unspoken" by Frank James, the author focused more on the context and circumstance of President Obama's speech at the dedication ceremony for former President George W. Bush's library than on the speech itself.

A transcript of President Obama's speech is available here.

The author reported the way Obama graciously handled the somewhat awkward situation of delivering a speech about Bush, a man whom Obama spent years publicly criticizing. The author read between the lines of the speech and talked about the significance of what Obama said and how he said it, rather than repeating the speech word for word.

The author highlighted times in the speech when Obama could have reminded the country of the way Bush handled the Iraq War, Hurricane Katrina or federal deficits, but instead chose to honor and respect the former president. The author presented the overall tone of the speech rather than several exact quotes.

The author compared Obama's speech with other speeches given by former presidents in tribute to the current president, such as Richard Nixon's speech at the dedication of the Lyndon B. Johnson's library, Ronald Reagan's speech at the dedication of Jimmy Carter's library, and George H.W. Bush's speech at the dedication of Nixon's library. This gave the story more historical context and allowed the reader to compare Obama's conduct with former presidents.

Bangladesh factory collapsed; death toll rising

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An eight-story building collapsed in Bangladesh Wednesday, news sources report.

The BBC reported at least 87 people were killed, while CNN and The Huffington Post reported the death toll at more than 120 victims and rising, as rescue workers discover more bodies.

More than 1,000 people were injured when the building collapsed outside the Bangladeshi capital, Dhaka, BBC reported. The building housed five garment manufacturers employing about 2,500 workers, CNN reported.

Many people are still trapped inside and rescue workers pass them water, food and supplies while they work through the rubble to release them, The Huffington Post reported.

Authorities have not yet determined the cause of the collapse, but several workers said a crack appeared Tuesday on the building's seventh floor, CNN reported. Workers said managers told them not to come to work Wednesday, but the factory owners reversed the order, telling them that the building was safe, CNN reported.