September 24, 2010

University of Michigan joins Compact for Open-Access Publishing Equity

Excerpted from our CIC peer's September, 2010 press release:


The University of Michigan announces its participation in the Compact for Open-Access Publishing Equity (COPE).

COPE is a consortium of universities that support open-access publishing by subsidizing publication fees for open-access journals. Many leading universities and research centers are members of the compact, including Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Berkeley, University of Ottawa, Columbia University, and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. At the University of Michigan, the program will be administered and funded by the University Library.

"The University of Michigan recognizes the value of open access to scholarly works, and we are proud to join other leading universities in this innovative approach to supporting open-access publication," said U-M's Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, Philip J. Hanlon. "Ultimately, it can both reduce our own costs for journal acquisition and can help ensure that the work of our faculty is disseminated as broadly as possible."

[...]

The effectiveness of the program will be evaluated after a two-year trial period.

Peer-reviewed, scholarly articles accepted for publication in open-access journals are eligible for funding.

The Library has developed a set of principles to guide funding decisions for the immediate future listed at http://www.lib.umich.edu/cope.

The University is particularly interested in funding articles for which the author retains copyright and that will appear in fully open journals accessible immediately upon publication. The goal is to support as many U-M authors in as many disciplines as possible.

Posted by stemp003 at 4:32 PM | Comments (0)

September 16, 2010

Upcoming workshops: Your Intellectual Property in Journal and Book Contracts

Case Studies in Publishing: Your Intellectual Property in Journal and
Book Contracts

In this workshop, participants will work through common intellectual
property issues raised by journal article and book contracts. Relevant
context will be provided on academic publishing issues such as
copyright and author's rights, and cultural and economic norms.
Practical strategies and helpful tools will be discussed.

This event has been designated by the Office of the Vice President for
Research to satisfy the Awareness/Discussion component of the
Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) continuing education
requirement.

Thu, September 23, 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilson Library room S30A
register at http://z.umn.edu/1g7

Wed, September 29, 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Walter Library room 204 SMART Classroom
register at http://z.umn.edu/1g7

Sponsors: University Libraries and CLA Grants, Fellowships & Research Funding

Posted by fowle013 at 1:14 PM | Comments (0)

September 10, 2010

A compelling stat on the need for open access

Why should there be public access to the results of government-funded research?

Among other reasons, most government employees cannot access the research they fund!

According to former Department of Energy Program Manager and Director of the Chemistry Division Bob Marianelli: "Because of cost considerations, even at DOE Headquarters, only 5% of the employees have access to journals."

http://www.osti.gov/ostiblog/technical-reports-and-journal-articles

Marianelli goes on to illustrate, by contrast, the impact of open access technical reports:

At [the Office of Scientific and Technical Information], we find that these open access characteristics of unlimited distribution technical reports allow us to extend their reach and impact through collaborations with major search engines, such as Google. Through the adoption of the Sitemap protocol every word of these technical reports has been made searchable to patrons of major search engines. A large percentage of the total number of information transactions on OSTI web products are a direct result of referrals from major search engines.

Thanks for Peter Suber for bringing this blog post to light.

Posted by stemp003 at 3:53 PM | Comments (0)