#depth

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http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/underwire/2009/06/alice-in-wonderland_2-1800.jpg

This is the image that Tim Burton takes Alice to weird Wonderland in the movie "Alice in Wonderland". We can see the big size of bright-colored flowers in the front of the image. Those flowers extended to the gate of the Wonderland. Alice stood at the gate in the smallest size of all the objects in the Wonderland. Inside the garden, all the mushrooms are very tall and big, and those mushrooms are all the way along the pathway. Alice had to look up to the mushrooms. And the trees are the tallest in the image, and it just shows half of the trees in the frame.
The flowers and mushrooms in the picture shows overlapping-plane principle, which is object (a) is partially covering objects (b), which is partially covering object (c) while all the objects obviously lie on the same plane to create depth. The depth is also created by a perception of "behind" and "in front of" position due to the reason that some mushrooms are partially blocked from our view by another mushrooms lie behind, which creates overlapping view. Also, we can see that the mushrooms that is the nearest to us seems bigger. This is because of relative size. The larger the mushroom appears relative to the screen boarders, the closer it seems to the viewer. The smaller the mushroom appears relative to the screen boarders, the father away it seems. I assume it is used of wide-angle Lens because usually the wide-angle greatly exaggerated relative size. The wild-angle Lens would make objects close to the camera look relatively large and those just a short distance father away on the z-axis look relatively small. Relative size is an important distance cue in determining Lens. For example, the mushroom in the scene boarders looks father apart than they really are.

2 Comments

I liked the picture you chose, there is definitly a lot of good depth shown. Those mushrooms are cool.

I really like that you chose this picture, it shows a good sense of depth. As an audience because of the depth you feel as if the land goes on forever. Everything seems so big and vibrant, especially due to the overlapping space. For example the flowers seem so huge due to how much of the scene they are covering.

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This page contains a single entry by zhao0453 published on March 9, 2013 1:12 PM.

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