Minneapolis Miracle?

Doug Hartmann was interviewed by WCCO in response to The Atlantic Magazine article praising the "Miracle of Minneapolis" as a place of affordability, opportunity and wealth. Critics are saying that it is far from a miracle with some of the worst racial disparities in the nation.

New Books Released

Migration incorporation and change.jpgIn their new book, Migration, Incorporation, and Change in an Interconnected World, Syed Ali and Doug Hartmann take a unique approach to material students need to get a good sense of the empirical and theoretical trends in the field of migration studies. Written in engaging and approachable prose and short enough that professors can easily build their courses around it without hesitating to assign additional readings.

World Suffering2.pngProfessor Emeritus, Ron Anderson, has just released the first book tackling the topic of world suffering, World Suffering and Quality of Life. This edited volume brings together ideas and research experience from the best minds and leading researchers in the fields of pain, suffering, poverty, deprivation, disability and quality of life (including well-being and happiness) and a wealth of insights about the interaction between suffering and quality of life, the characterization of worldwide suffering, and the implications of these data for local and global policy on health and social well-being.

Second Chance for Ex-Felons

Chris Uggen was quoted in a StarTribune article regarding a new Minnesota law which helps low-level offenders seal their records from routine background checks.

70 Years After Auschwitz

Alejandro Baer and Steve Hunegs were featured in a Startribune op ed marking the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. The Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies and their community partners hosted, Bearing Witness 70 Years after the Liberation of Auschwitz, which included the unveiling of portraits and interviews of survivors. Visit their virtual museum.

Percentage of Students Held Back Falls by Half

Rob Warren's recently published findings, Patterns and Trends in Grade Retention Rates in the United States, 1995-2010, were the focus of an article by the Huffington Post on the decline in student retention rates.

Outdated Idea of Nine-To-Five

In a recent Atlantic article, Phyllis Moen was interviewed regarding how the sharing economy is altering when and how people earn money.

Caren Arbeit successfully defends!

Caren Arbeit successfully defended her dissertation, "The Context of Parental Job Loss on Children's Educational Attainment," on November 14, 2014. Her advisor is Professor Rob Warren. Dr. Arbeit is a Research Analyst at the Education and Workforce Development Division, RTI International in San Francisco. Congratulations, Dr. Arbeit!

Racist Origins of Felon Disenfranchisement

In a recent NY Times op-ed, Chris Uggen's (with alumni Angie Behrens & colleague Jeff Manza) AJS article, "Ballot Manipulation and the 'Menace of Negro Domination': Racial Threat and Felon Disenfranchisement in the United States, 1850-2002" was used to provide historical context to the laws that permanently denied people convicted of crimes the right to vote.

Child Care Tax Benefits Unchanged Since 1986

In a recent New York Times article, Erin Kelly was interviewed and her article on child care policy, The Strange History of Employer-Sponsored Child Care, referenced. Dependent Care Accounts legislated in 1986 were not indexed for inflation unlike other such accounts. The $5,000 limit would now be $10,859.08.

Congratulations, Dr. June Msechu!

June Msechu successfully defended her dissertation, Intergenerational Relationships and Eldercare in Rural Tanzania: A Life Course Perspective on the Implications of Social Change on Families on November 3, 2014. Dr. Msechu is advised by professors Ron Aminzade and Cawo Abdi. She will return to her position in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. Best wishes Dr. Msechu.

Monthly Archives

Pages

Powered by Movable Type 4.31-en