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January 16, 2007

bio

Graduate Student
Graduate Student Editorial Board, Contexts Magazine
1074 Social Sciences
winch023@umn.edu

Education
Currently pursuing a PhD in sociology at the University of Minnesota
M.A. Sociology - University of Missouri
B.A. Sociology - University of Missouri

Interest Areas
Culture, Religion, Morality, Embodiment, Knowledge, Cognition and Affect, Subjectivity and the Self, Social Theory, and Qualitative Methods (particularly ethnography)

Publications
2008. "Embodying the Faith: Religious Practice and the Making of a Muslim Moral Habitus" Social Forces 86(4): 1753-80.
Building off ethnographic research conducted for my M.A. thesis, this article examines how a group of Muslim converts in mid-Missouri developed new moral subjectivities through the utilization of embodied religious practices such as ritual prayer (salat), fasting (sawm), and covering (hijab). .

2009. "Nonprofits in Need," w/ Shannon Golden and Wes Longhofer. Exchange, Contexts 8(3).

Working Papers
"From Subtraction to Multiplicity: New Sociological Narratives of Morality under Modernity" w/ Mary Jo Neitz and Kevin McElmurry. For Publication in Routledge's Sociology of Culture: A Handbook, eds. John Hall, Laura Grindstaff, & Ming-cheng Lo.
We argue that while prominent classical and contemporary works on morality, ethics, and religion comprise a "subtraction story" of modern moral decline, a good deal of contemporary scholarship in cultural sociology and elsewhere is developing a new theoretical narrative - one not of subtraction but, rather, of multiplicity. We draw on this research to explore issues of moral 1) boundaries, 2) conflict, 3) hybridity, and 4) negotiating across difference.


"Diversity in Two Dimensions: A Comparison of Attitudes About Race and Religion from a New National Survey" w/ Douglas Hartmann, Joseph Gerteis, and Penny Edgell.
This paper uses nationally-representative survey data from the American Mosaic Project (AMP webpage) to analyze contemporary attitudes about race and religion in the United States. Our findings indicate that while race and religion are generally understood and experienced according to conventional cultural and scholarly assumptions, the differences are not as great as is often assumed or implied, and there are revealing deviations from this general pattern for specific racial and religious minority communities.
Get the full abstract here: AMP Publications and Working Papers.

Teaching Experience
I have taught Introduction to Sociology and a seminar in Culture and Mass Media.