Scientific Thinking Principles

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I think that 5 years from now what I will remember most from this psychology course are the scientific thinking principles:
-ruling out rival hypothesis
-correlation v. causation
-falsifiability
-replicability
-extraordinary claims
-occam's razor

I think that being able to distinguish what a pseudoscientific claim is will prove incredibly useful in the future when reading articles, or advertisements claiming something that may not be entirely true such as:
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Although the thinking principles may have bothered some people, especially with a colored arrow on seemingly every paragraph, I reflected on how important the principles really are in all sciences, not just psychology.

During the course I was amazed at many of the pseudoscientific and extraordinary claims that I have heard in the past from people, but never have searched for any evidence, or any evidence to falsify such claims. I found it incredibly interesting how many of us have heard pseudoscientific claims and don't look so far into them, which the textbook illustrated was extremely important. Being able to think critically about claims, and being able to question them is what drives scientists to run experiments, conduct research, and follow their line of study. The constant questioning, falsifying, identifying correlations, are all apart of science and leads us to a better understanding of ourselves, others, and our world.

2 Comments

I agree with you that the scientific thinking principles where an important part in our psychology course. What I like about them is that they are simple yet important specially in today's world. We live in a world were information and news travels quickly and the thing is, it might not always be true. By using these principles we can better distinguish the right from the wrong.

I do like the scientific thinking principles. They're applicable in so many different real-life situations. They make it easy to spot pseudoscientific stuff, like crystal power or homeopathy, and avoid it.

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This page contains a single entry by fries126 published on April 29, 2012 9:18 PM.

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