To IQ or Not To IQ

| 11 Comments

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I found the debate that we had in discussion over whether IQ tests should be used as the determining factor for hiring managers in various companies. The test is suppose to cover all of the general areas of intelligence and it is claimed to have been written in a way that all people can take it and get accurate results. So on the surface it sounds like a good idea to use the IQ test to determine all hiring processes because in a perfect world a boss will be able to just look up people with the desired IQ and find the best candidates to interview.

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However this isn't a perfect world and there are a few things that the IQ test can't accurately measure. Some of these things include personality, experience, adaptability, ability to communicate effectively, etc. Though the test does a decent job of weeding out some of the people that don't really fit the job requirements, however it does not always pick the best possible candidate and can even cause you to deny the one person who would have filled the management spot the best. Though at the end of the day, this is a very circular argument because for every point one side makes, there is a conflicting point for the other side. This is just my take on the ongoing debate and I invite others to share their thoughts on the matter as well.

11 Comments

I understand that using IQ tests for hiring is an efficient and rather accurate method for determining someone's qualifications for a specific job, but at the same time, they are leaving out key personality characteristics. Maybe they should also have them take an EQ test (emotional) that would better predict their personalities. Even with both tests, you will never get the most accurate results to determine if this person is perfect for the job or not.

While using IQ tests can be helpful in choosing a candidate for a certain job or position, I agree with you that it should not be the only thing used in making these kinds of decisions. While IQ tests can determine certain qualifications, they can not determine personality or emotional characteristics. There are many other factors that should be considered in a hiring process depending on the job and the position, such as how one interacts with others and their work ethic.

If a company was in a time crunch, I can definitely see the benefits of using an IQ score to determine eligibility - definitely more quick and efficient. However, for a managerial position, I think that communication and social skills are just as important (if not more important) than intelligence.

I think that IQ could help in determining success for a position, but agree with the past comments that social skills and communication are equally as important, if not more, than overall intelligence. However, it is difficult during a hiring process to determine social skills or communication skills. Interviews could be helpful, but many people come prepared to answer certain questions and could be acting differently than their normal personality traits, something that an IQ test doesn't need to be worried about as it has proven to be a good indicator of success.

I agree that although intelligence is very important, things such as personality and people skills should be looked into before hiring an individual. Someone might be able to count and calculate like a professional but they might not have the communication skills to deal with costumers.

I disagree that IQ tests should be used - I am one that does not test well - however, I have a proven track record of being very successful. Another thing that I think people put too much weight on is GPA - it's a snap shot of time - times change and being judged on that - is it fair???

As much as I agree with your post, I think IQ
tests are good indicators of those with experience. Truly well experienced people in a certain field should be able to show that through on paper well. Being able to answer challenging questions about the position you're applying for can indicate to the HR that you have a lot of experience.

I agree with the comment above that in a time crunch it would be effective enough, but for those with more time, further evaluation would be better for choosing the strongest candidate. There are other measures that would be just as useful, if not more.

I agree with assessment as well. There are many forms of smartness, and there are many jobs for different types. If I am in PR, do I really need to be tested to see how mathematically sound I am? Great there is a correlation between intelligence in certain jobs. Does that mean these people would be better?

I think using IQ as a hiring method is more fitting in some career fields than in others. In computer science or engineering, one might rely more strongly on IQ tests to pick job candidates. However, in service or sales jobs, where personality and likability are very important, I don't think using IQ is a good measure of who will succeed at the job.
Overall, I don't think it's a good idea because in any work environment, you want to make sure new employees will fit in and work well with people already employed within the company, which IQ cannot measure.

This also is an interesting topic for me. I do not believe that IQ testing should be used when deciding whether or not to hire someone. I understand that an IQ test shows you general intelligence, it does not show you the best candidate for the job. I value an in person interview much higher than an IQ test when trying to hire someone for a specific position.

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This page contains a single entry by clayt105 published on April 10, 2012 2:02 PM.

If I don't have schizophrenia, does that mean I can't be a genius? was the previous entry in this blog.

Make-up Blog: Personality's Effect on Decision Making is the next entry in this blog.

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