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Minnesota Gene Pool Blog

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Researchers Identify Biomarker For Lung Cancer

Researchers at Boston University have identified a set of 80 genes whose expression profile is 90% sensitive in identifying people with smoking-related lung cancer. This could be really important. The research is published on March 1, 2007 in Nature Medicine. Here is the PubMed Abstract.

Spira A, et al. Airway epithelial gene expression in the diagnostic evaluation of smokers with suspect lung cancer.
Nat Med. 2007 Mar;13(3):361-6.

See the news release from Boston University Medical School below.

Researchers Identify Biomarker For Lung Cancer

(Boston) — Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified a gene expression marker that distinguishes smokers with lung cancer from smokers without the disease.

The findings, reported in the March 1, 2007 advanced on-line edition of Nature Medicine, (March print edition), may have immediate clinical relevance and public health impact.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in the United States and the world. The high mortality rate (80-85 percent with five years) results in part from a lack of effective tools to diagnose the disease at an early stage. As a result, most patients require invasive diagnostic tests which delay treatment and generate additional costs and risk for complications.

Given that cigarette smoke creates injury throughout the airway, the researchers sought to determine if gene expression in normal large-airwave epithelial cells obtained during a bronchoscopy (a relatively non-invasive diagnostic test) from smokers with a suspicion of lung cancer could be used as a lung cancer biomarker. Using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarrays, the researchers performed gene-expression profiling of these airway cells and identified an 80-gene biomarker that distinguished smokers with and without lung cancer.

The researchers then went on to test the biomarker on an additional 52 patients with an accuracy of 83 percent. They also received similar results on a prospective series of subjects (35 patients) independently obtained from five medical centers. The researchers found the biomarker approximately 90 percent sensitive for identifying stage 1 lung cancer, a potentially curable stage of disease.

“Our study has identified an airway gene-expression biomarker that will impact the diagnostic evaluation of smokers with suspect lung cancer. Our data also suggests that combining cytopathology of lower airway cells with the gene expression biomarker improves the diagnostic sensitivity of the overall bronchoscopy procedure from 53 to 95 percent,� said lead author Avrum Spira, MD, MSc, an assistant professor of medicine and pathology at BUSM.

This study was supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, US National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and National Institutes of Heal/National Cancer Institute.

Posted by Kristin Oehlke on March 13, 2007 10:42 PM |



Comments

Off topic. I have always wondered about a real cure for Mesothelioma cancer, some kind of genetically engineered treatment. One day, I'll find a cure for cancer that doesn't involve pain for patients.

Posted by: Dan | May 3, 2007 3:00 AM

The researchers then went on to test the biomarker on an additional 52 patients with an accuracy of 83 percent. They also received similar results on a prospective series of subjects (35 patients) independently obtained from five medical centers. The researchers found the biomarker approximately 90 percent sensitive for identifying stage 1 lung cancer, a potentially curable stage of disease. +1


nice blog!!1


Alternative Medicine

Posted by: alternative medicine | May 20, 2007 11:03 AM

Just like to say thankyou very much for all you time and effort in keeping this blog updated with this great information.

It's a pleasure reading this stuff, please keep it up......Joanne.

Posted by: Jo | June 23, 2007 1:26 PM

Thanks for the share, I have been readin online all day and this was actully worth reading. Thanks

Posted by: Maple Story Meso | July 14, 2011 9:19 AM