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Coaching Diversity

I read in the March 4th edition of the Star Tribune an article in the Sports section entitled, ‚ÄúDiversity makes staff stand out.‚Ä? This is a link to the article: http://www.startribune.com/512/story/1032386.html

The story told how new Gophers football coach Tim Brewster has hired six full-time black assistant coaches. Brewster has a total of nine full-time assistant coaches. The staff of Tim Brewster currently is tied for the highest number of minority football coaches in Bowl Championship college football teams. In the past, the Gophers athletic department has been criticized for its lack of minority coaches. Today it still currently has no minority head coaches. Brewster said his hiring decisions were based on the candidate’s ability to coach, recruit, and also connect with athletes. He said the ability of a coach to mentor students was also important.

As we have discussed in class, minorities in positions of power are often disproportionately left out. For example, African-American student athletes make up 46.1 percent of NCAA football players, yet the proportion of minority head and assistant coaches in college football is much less. Even though there are more minority assistant coaches on the Gophers staff, the head coach of the football team is white. I think the cause of the general inequality in college football is the same as in other areas we have discussed in class; it is related to the ideas of white privilege and minority disadvantage. Racial stereotyping has probably played an important role in this development.

Comments

Being a big sports fan, I hear a lot of mention of this top in most sports especially college football. There definitely may be a great deal of discrimination against black males for coaching positions especially the coordinator and head coach roles but I am opposed to the notion that there is any relevance to this topic that 46.1% of college football players are black. It is ludicrous that there should be some type of quota on coaching personnel. First of all this notion looks at race as a duality and completely ignores people of every race other than black and white, and assumes that they are not qualified or even interested in coaching football. Football players from Samoa are actually much greater represented per capita than blacks in college and the NFL, yet no one is clamoring for them leading men on the sidelines. Also I feel that socioeconomic factors steers young black college graduates away from the coaching ranks, as on average they are much less likely to be wealthy than their white counterparts who would be more apt to seek a low paying football assistant job while black males I feel are more likely to pursue more lucrative job offers after attaining a bachelors degree. Also football is not the most popular sport in the black community as it is in the country as a whole, so independent of ex players joining the ranks it would be logical to think blacks who never played the game at a high level to actually be underrepresented versus their counterparts of other races.

Being a big sports fan, I hear a lot of mention of this top in most sports especially college football. There definitely may be a great deal of discrimination against black males for coaching positions especially the coordinator and head coach roles but I am opposed to the notion that there is any relevance to this topic that 46.1% of college football players are black. It is ludicrous that there should be some type of quota on coaching personnel. First of all this notion looks at race as a duality and completely ignores people of every race other than black and white, and assumes that they are not qualified or even interested in coaching football. Football players from Samoa are actually much greater represented per capita than blacks in college and the NFL, yet no one is clamoring for them leading men on the sidelines. Also I feel that socioeconomic factors steers young black college graduates away from the coaching ranks, as on average they are much less likely to be wealthy than their white counterparts who would be more apt to seek a low paying football assistant job while black males I feel are more likely to pursue more lucrative job offers after attaining a bachelors degree. Also football is not the most popular sport in the black community as it is in the country as a whole, so independent of ex players joining the ranks it would be logical to think blacks who never played the game at a high level to actually be underrepresented versus their counterparts of other races.