May 5, 2008

Two Suspects Arrested In Afghanistan

Afghan authorities arrested two men were are accused of involvement in last weeks’ attack on a military parade attended by President Hamid Karzai, according to the New York Times.
One suspect is believed to have worked for the defense ministry. The other man is believed to have worked for the interior ministry, according to the Afghanistan intelligence chief.
The Afghan government believes the militants behind the attack, which killed three people, are linked to al-Qaeda, according to the BBC.
A representative for the Taliban claims responsibility for the incident and that the group did not target the president but wanted to show how easily they could get access to such events.

Microsoft Withdraws Offer For Yahoo

Representatives for Microsoft announced their decision to withdraw the offer to buy Yahoo, according to the New York Times. Microsoft’s offer was to buy Yahoo for $33 a share, or $47.5 billion. But people close to Yahoo, which previously had said they wouldn’t settle for anything less than $37 a share, see Microsoft’s decision as beneficial. However, some shareholders had favored a deal at about $34-$35 a share.
The entire board of Yahoo backed the decision but unhappiness with the companies executive decisions could spread through the company.
Yahoo defended their decision by saying that it always thought Microsoft’s offer undervalued the company, according to the Los Angeles Times.
Yahoo’s next move could be merging with its archrival, Google. Some people believe this could happen because of a previous ad test involving the others website. It is believed that talks were active between the companies during negotiations with Microsoft.
Yahoo could also initiate stock buybacks to demonstrate to shareholders that they have faith in the company. As of March 31, the company had $2.3 billion in cash and cash equivalents.

Man Killed While Fighting Police

A suicidal man presumably on a controlled substance died Sunday morning after fighting with St. Paul police officers, according to the Star Tribune.
According to the police report, officers were called to a home in the 300 block of Wheelock Parkway about a suicide in progress with a controlled substance.
The man confronted and attacked the officers as they tried to calm him down. Officers sprayed a chemical substance on the man, which had no effect, so they used a taser. The man fought but restrained and became unresponsive, according to the Pioneer Press.
Paramedics treated him but he died at the scene.
The name of the man was not released.
The incident is under investigation.

Two Shot In St. Paul

A 19-year-old man and a 14-year-old boy were shot Saturday evening in St. Paul, according to the Star Tribune.
According to a police report, the boy is in critical condition at Regions Hospital in St. Paul after being shot in the back. The man was shot in the leg and is in stable condition.
The incidents took place in a one-block area but police can’t confirm if the incidents are related.
The department’s gang unit involved in the investigation is trying to determine what motives were used for the shootings.
St. Paul police stopped a suspicious car after the shootings took place and recovered a gun believed to be used on the attacks. Two teenagers have been taken into custody for questioning, according to the Pioneer Press.

35W Bridge To Be Completed Early

The constructors of the 35W bridge believe that the bridge will be open in the middle of September instead of late December, according to the Star Tribune.
During a public tour of the construction site on Saturday, representatives for Flatiron Constructors said that the bridge is "65 percent" complete and that the process of hanging concrete segments over the river could begin soon.
The recent projection of the bridge being complete in the middle of September comes right after the state holds the Republican National Convention from September 1st through the 4th. However, officials don't believe this had any influence on the bridge's work.
Flatiron Constructors was awarded the $234 million contract from the Minnesota Department of Transportation last September. The contract calls for the bridge to be completed by December 24th, but includes a $200,000 a-day incentive for each day the bridge is completed before then. The recent projection would put the total bonus awarded to $20 million, according to the Pioneer Press.
The total cost of the project, which includes the removal of the previous bridge, is expected to be nearly $400 million. The federal government is picking up nearly all of the cost.

April 21, 2008

Candidates Continue Attacks

Both Democratic candidates continued the attacks on each other as the campaign for Senator Hillary Clinton released an ad accusing Senator Barack Obama of taking money from lobbyists over the last 10 years, according to the New York Times.
Obama described Clinton's ad as misleading and complaining of "11th hour smears." He also said Clinton was a "slash-and-burn game player who will do anything to win."
These attacks come around the same time as a busy schedule keeps the candidates campaiging in each others strength areas in Pennsylvania.
Obama also expressed to voters that its time to make a choice in the Democratic race. But that may be hard because of how close the race is. A poll released Sunday, conducted for MSNBC and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, showed Clinton leading Obama by a 48 percent to 43 percent approval rating.

Zimbabwe In "War Situation"

Zimbabwe security general said that the country is "in a war situation on Sunday, according to the BBC.
This is in response to 10 people being killed, along with hundreds injured and thousands displaced by post-election violence.
The violence started after belief that election votes may have been tampered with. A recount was granted and was said to take up to three days, but instead has taken three weeks after the polls were held.
The losing party said they rightfully won the election and demanded the results be released, according to the Los Angeles Times..
Those that have been accused of tampering have also been said to be trying to prevent people being "seduced" into violence but are getting frustrated about the lack of jobs, food and medicine.
The 57 member African Union urged Zimbabwe to release the results as soon as possible and calling restraint from all parties.

Two Minneapolis Officers Put On Leave

The Minneapolis Police Department placed two officers on administrative leave Friday, according to the Star Tribune.
Officials would not disclose information about the two officers, except for their names, officer Michael Roberts and Lt. Lee Edwards. But officials did say the situation is under federal investigation.
Edwards is part of a discrimination suit against the department, according to the Pioneer Press.
The lawsuit, filed four months ago, claims the Chief of Police and other high-ranking officials passed over four black Minneapolis officers for promotions they deserved, created a hostile work environment and discriminated against them because they were black.
Edwards' attorney said there is no connection between the two officers.
The situation is under investigation.

Father Shoots Son In Hunting Accident

An 8-year-old Belle Plaine boy was killed after his father mistook him for a wild turkey Saturday evening while hunting in Sibley County, according to the Star Tribune.
Anthony Klaseus and son, Hunter, saw wild turkeys in a nearby farm close to Belle Plaine.
According to authorities, Klaseus told his son to stay put while he snuck up on the turkeys. After awhile, the boy decided to catch up to his father. The boy was about 20 to 30 yards away in a grassy field when Klaseus mistook him for a turkey and shot him in the chest with a 12-guage shotgun.
Klaseus called the police and carried his son a quarter-mile to emergency personnel.
Both father and son were wearing camoflauge.
The incident is under investigation.

U of M Professors Under Investigation

Two University of Minnesota professors are under investigation for receiving compensation after leaving another job, according to the Star Tribune.
Two university professors have been identified for collecting paychecks from Georgia Tech University after accepting jobs at the University of Minnesota.
Both professors, husband and wife, accepted jobs at the university in October and moved to Minnesota in January, according to the Pioneer Press.
Georgia Tech officials said the university renewed the professors contracts in October. However, officials noticed the issue in a review of expense records by an internal audit department.
The university has brought the issue to the Georgia attorneys general. Both professors, and the University of Minnesota, have said to be willing to cooperate with authorities.

April 7, 2008

St. Paul Testing LED Lights

The city of St. Paul is testing light-emitting diode, or LED lamps in street lights in hope that the new lamps would reduce the energy use, according to the Star Tribune.
The hope from city officials is that the new lamps will be whiter, brighter and cheaper to maintain.
St. Paul is one of many cities following in the footsteps of other eco-friendly cities, like Austin, Texas; and Ann Arbor, MI.
LED's are most commonly used in video screens, signs and traffic signals.
Each year, the city spends about $8.5 million on electricity and natural gas. The city began testing LED's in 2003 in traffic signals and walk signs. Overall, the city has saved $85,000 in labor costs and $180,000 in electricity.
Manufacturers say that they typically will reduce energy use by 50 percent, they have longer life and are need less maintenance than normal street lights.
The biggest disadvantage right now is the cost of the lights and getting the right color and lighting effect.

St. Paul Testing LED Lights

The city of St. Paul is testing light-emitting diode, or LED lamps in street lights in hope that the new lamps would reduce the energy use, according to the Star Tribune.
The hope from city officials is that the new lamps will be whiter, brighter and cheaper to maintain.
St. Paul is one of many cities following in the footsteps of other eco-friendly cities, like Austin, Texas; and Ann Arbor, MI.
LED's are most commonly used in video screens, signs and traffic signals.
Each year, the city spends about $8.5 million on electricity and natural gas. The city began testing LED's in 2003 in traffic signals and walk signs. Overall, the city has saved $85,000 in labor costs and $180,000 in electricity.
Manufacturers say that they typically will reduce energy use by 50 percent, they have longer life and are need less maintenance than normal street lights.
The biggest disadvantage right now is the cost of the lights and getting the right color and lighting effect.

St. Paul Testing LED Lights

The city of St. Paul is testing light-emitting diode, or LED lamps in street lights in hope that the new lamps would reduce the energy use, according to the Star Tribune.
The hope from city officials is that the new lamps will be whiter, brighter and cheaper to maintain.
St. Paul is one of many cities following in the footsteps of other eco-friendly cities, like Austin, Texas; and Ann Arbor, MI.
LED's are most commonly used in video screens, signs and traffic signals.
Each year, the city spends about $8.5 million on electricity and natural gas. The city began testing LED's in 2003 in traffic signals and walk signs. Overall, the city has saved $85,000 in labor costs and $180,000 in electricity.
Manufacturers say that they typically will reduce energy use by 50 percent, they have longer life and are need less maintenance than normal street lights.
The biggest disadvantage right now is the cost of the lights and getting the right color and lighting effect.

St. Paul Testing LED Lights

The city of St. Paul is testing light-emitting diode, or LED lamps in street lights in hope that the new lamps would reduce the energy use, according to the Star Tribune.
The hope from city officials is that the new lamps will be whiter, brighter and cheaper to maintain.
St. Paul is one of many cities following in the footsteps of other eco-friendly cities, like Austin, Texas; and Ann Arbor, MI.
LED's are most commonly used in video screens, signs and traffic signals.
Each year, the city spends about $8.5 million on electricity and natural gas. The city began testing LED's in 2003 in traffic signals and walk signs. Overall, the city has saved $85,000 in labor costs and $180,000 in electricity.
Manufacturers say that they typically will reduce energy use by 50 percent, they have longer life and are need less maintenance than normal street lights.
The biggest disadvantage right now is the cost of the lights and getting the right color and lighting effect.

Stolen Car Crash Kills Woman, Injures Children

A car speeding away from Minneapolis police officers Sunday morning crashed into another car, killing a woman and injuring two young children, according to the Star Tribune.
The two young children were taken to Hennepin County Medical Center. The names of the victims were not released.
According to a police department news release, officers first attempted to stop the car after a traffic violation. The driver refused to stop and sped away.
During the chase, dispatchers told officers the car was stolen and the patrol sergeant called off the chase because of the risk of public safety.
As the car sped away, police said they saw a cloud of debris rise in the air.
The suspect fled the scene but was later arrested in a nearby Kmart, according to the Pioneer Press.