The vocal ensemble Six Appeal (in photo) will be performing in Kiehle Auditorium at the University of 
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Minnesota Crookston at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, November 12, 2014, as part of the weekly series What's on Wednesday (W.O.W.). The cost of admission is $5 per person and free for U of M Crookston students. 

Lisa Samuelson, director of activities, encourages everyone to come to hear Six Appeal. "Each year I'm asked what event I'm most looking forward to and this year is no different in my reply, it's the a cappella group, Six Appeal," says Samuelson. "Vocal ensembles always do such a great job at involving the audience and truly providing quality entertainment for all ages."

The event is sponsored by the Student Programming and Activities for Campus Entertainment (S.P.A.C.E.) Board. To learn more about Six Appeal, visit www.sixappealvocalband.com.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director of Student Activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Austin Laney (in photo at right), a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Fargo, N.D., 
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majoring in law enforcement aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Ali Jaffari, and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Joe Jore, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Houston, Minn., 
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majoring in agricultural aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Nic Huber, and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photo, left to right, are Flight Instructor Nic Huber, left, congratulates Joe Jore following the completion of his first student solo flight. 

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Three to be Honored with 2014 Torch & Shield Award at the U of M Crookston

The highest honor awarded by the University of Minnesota Crookston, the Northwest combined_T&S.jpgResearch and Outreach Center, and Extension is the Torch & Shield Award. On Wednesday evening, October 29, two individuals and an organization will be recognized with the prestigious award including Susan A. Hagstrum, Ph.D.; Pete Wasberg; and the Minnesota Wheat Research and Promotion Council. Along with the Torch & Shield Awards, a special donor recognition will also take place. 

Hosting the recognition event are University of Minnesota Crookston Chancellor Fred Wood and Albert Sims, director of operations at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center. Music will be provided by the U of M Crookston choir and special guests include Kathy Schmidlkofer, president and CEO of the University of Minnesota Foundation, who will bring greetings on behalf of the Foundation. Senior Jesse Jennings will speak on behalf of student scholarship recipients and Brian Dingmann, Ph.D., will present his research featuring three of his student research assistants: Julia Rinn, Serena Stoeck, and Brooke Vatthauer. 

Susan A. Hagstrum, Ph. D.

Susan Hagstrum holds a B.S. in speech pathology from Northwestern University and an M. A. in speech pathology and a Ph. D. in education policy and administration, awarded by the University of Minnesota.  She enjoyed a 27-year career in preK-12 public education in Minnesota before establishing her own small business to provide leadership to non-profit organizations as they worked to improve results.

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She placed her business on hold in 2003 to devote full-time attention to serving as one of University of Minnesota's ambassadors and major volunteers.  Her husband, Robert H. Bruininks, served as the fifteenth president of the University of Minnesota from 2002 through 2011.  She hosted University groups and guests at Eastcliff, the historic home of the University president, and served in a major role in publicly representing the University, and in fundraising with friends, community groups, alumni and staff of the University.

Susan enjoyed her visits to the University of Minnesota's statewide campuses during her husband's presidency and worked to raise funds on behalf of students and programs on the Crookston campus.  She served on several University museum boards, including the Weisman Art Museum, the Bell Museum of Natural History, and the Tweed Museum on the Duluth campus.  She was a founding member of the Women's Philanthropic Leadership Circle in the College of Education and Human Development.  Susan also served on several University boards of advisors for the College of Education and Human Development, the College of Design, and the Medical School on the Twin Cities campus.

Susan is currently a board member of the Minnesota Orchestra.  She is also a member of the Minnesota Women's Economic Roundtable and is a past board member of the Tyrone Guthrie Theater.  Her University of Minnesota volunteer activities include serving on the Advisory Council of the University Libraries and the Neuroscience Advisory Council of the Academic Health Center.

Peter Wasberg

Pete is the director of Human Resources & Safety, and has been a member of the executive team at Otter Tail Power Company since 2008.  Pete was the human resources manager for three years prior to being named to his current position.  Before moving to the Human Resources Department in 2004, Pete spent the first fourteen years of his career in various positions with Otter Tail Power Company in their Milbank, S.D., Bemidji, Hallock, and Crookston Customer Service Centers, and was promoted to division manager in 1997 and area manager in 2002.  Pete also spent a legislative session in the company's Legislative Affairs Department.  

Along with his work at Otter Tail Power Company, Pete has been active in community and area activities.  Currently, Pete is a member of the board of directors for Crookston National Bank, a member of the Fergus Falls Noon Day Rotary Club, and serves on the College Advisory and Advancement Board for the University of Minnesota Crookston.  

Pete has served on the executed committee of UMC Teambackers; the Enactus Advisory Board, an organization for students in business; chancellor search committees, and the Valley Technology Park Board of Directors. He is a past chairman of the Crookston Area Chamber of Commerce, past president of the Crookston Rotary Club, served on the Riverview Healthcare Board of Trustees and the Bemidji Area Chamber of Commerce Board.  Pete also completed two terms on the Lake Region Halfway House Board of Directors.

Pete has a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Concordia College in Moorhead, where he majored in business administration and psychology. 

Minnesota Wheat Research and Promotion Council

Established in 1978, the Minnesota Wheat Research and Promotion Council is a non-profit organization that invests wheat check-off dollars for the benefit of wheat producers. The Council is directed by a nine member board made up of wheat producers, elected by their peers. The Council's activities are funded from a 2-cent assessment on all wheat bushels sold and stored in Minnesota. About 50 percent of the check-off funds are allocated to research, 25 percent to promotion and 25 percent to communication of information to growers. The Minnesota Wheat Council offices are located in Red Lake Falls, a central location to 90% of the wheat grown in Minnesota. 

Throughout Minnesota Wheat Council's history they have worked closely with University of Minnesota, NWROC,  and U of M Extension to advance wheat production efficiency and profitability in Minnesota through research and education. The Council worked with U of M Extension and NWROC staff to start the Small Grains Institute which continues today as the International Crops Expo. 

The Council was a supporter and promoter of the NWROC plan to create a center of excellence in small grains at the Crookston location. The Council helped advocate for and fund four key research and extension positions at the NWROC. These positions continue to contribute to the economic viability of the region and state. Some of these positions help educate students at U of M Crookston.  The Council worked with local and regional extension educators to start an annual educational workshop called "Getting it Right"; it continues today as "Best of the Best in Wheat and Soybean Research".

Over its history, the Minnesota Wheat Council has contributed over $6.5 million to research. Of that, over $4.8 million went to U of M and U of M Extension. The Northwest Research and Outreach Center and NW MN Extension received approximately $1.5 million.  

Common goals and a desire to help wheat growers succeed have led to many long lasting connections and relationships between the MN Wheat Council, NWROC, and U of M Extension. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo at left, left to right, are Peter Wasberg, Susan Hagstum, and Pete Kappes, who represented the Minnesota Wheat Research and Promotion Council. 

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Chris Rohlfing (in photo), a sophomore at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Campbell, Minn.,
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 majoring in natural resources aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is George Steensma, and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Justin Kobberdahl, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Maple Grove, 
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Minn., majoring in natural resources aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Nic Huber, and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Nic Huber, flight instructor, with Justin Kobberdahl. 

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Charles Bausch (in photo), a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from 
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Mendota Heights, Minn., majoring in business recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Craig Radle, and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework 
specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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