University of Minnesota Crookston Homecoming Contest Winners

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On Saturday October 19, 2014, the University of Minnesota Crookston held their annual homecoming festivities. The theme for this year's homecoming was "Paint the Town." 

The parade was held on 10:30 a.m. on Saturday October 19, 2014, and the top three entries were awarded prizes. The prize for Best Theme went to Student Programming and Activities for Campus Entertainment (S.P.A.C.E.) (in photo, left); Best Crowd Pleaser went to the Natural Resources Club; and Best Community Entry went to the Crookston High School Band. Each entry was awarded prize money of $200, $100, and $50 respectively. 

The University of Minnesota Crookston student body encouraged businesses around town to participate in homecoming by decorating their place of business using the "Paint the Town" theme. 

Winners of the "Paint the Town" Contest were visited by Homecoming King and Queen Kevin 
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Bunde and Mikala Guidinger along with Regal the Eagle. First Place went to Crookston Eye Clinic (in photo, right); Second Place was awarded to Shear Sisters; Third Place to Montague's Flower Shop; and Fourth Place went to Hardware Hank. The first place business received a $200 Bookstore gift card to help them continue to display their maroon and gold spirit. The other winners received prizes including family passes to sporting events and meals from Sodexo Dining Services. Congratulations and thank you to all businesses that participated in "Paint the Town Maroon and Gold" for Homecoming 2014.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu); Tiffany Hulinsky, COMM 4000, huin008@crk.umn.edu

Two Named Outstanding Alumni by the University of Minnesota Crookston

Two Outstanding Alumni were chosen by the Universityof Minnesota Crookston to be 
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recognized during the annual Alumni Awards Celebration during homecoming on Friday October 17, 2014. The two Outstanding Alumni were Theresa Helgeson '96 and Wayne Schertler '83. 

The evening also included the induction of the '97 Football Team; Bill Tyrrell, who was athletic trainer for the Golden Eagles for 18 years and led athletic fundraising for 8 ½ years; Scott Strohmeier '99 (football); and Karla (Thormodson) Isley '98 (basketball) into the Athletic Hall of Fame. 

Of the nearly 200 in attendance, more than 25 members of the 1997 football team were joined by many family and friends of the honorees. 

Corby Kemmer, director of Development & Alumni Relations, along with Stephanie Helgeson, athletic director, served as emcees for the evening and special greetings from the campus came from Chancellor Fred Wood. 

The Outstanding Alumni Award is the highest honor bestowed on U of M Crookston alumni by the alumni association. The award recognizes alumni who have displayed exemplary commitment and service to community, church, education, family, or in their occupational field. More than 120 alumni have been honored with the Outstanding Alumni Award since its inception in 1980.

The accomplishments of this year's Outstanding Alumni include:

Theresa Helgeson is a lab services coordinator in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, and has worked at the U of M Crookston for more than 10 years. Helgeson coordinates the operations of the campus greenhouses, orders supplies for the labs, as well as, supervising 9 to12 work-study students each year. She coaches the U of M Crookston's highly successful Mid-American Horticultural Society (MACHS) Team and serves as advisor to the Horticulture Club.

She is a member of the Minnesota Horticulture Society, the National Hosta Society, and a certified professional of the Minnesota Nursery Landscape Association.

Wayne Schertler is a partner with entero, LLC, and provides leadership and advisory services to the company operations.

He has more than 20 years of experience in financial and executive management within the legal services, public accounting and professional consulting industries and an accumulated 20 years of executive-level experience in the legal industry with national law firms.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Wayne Schertler and Theresa Helgeson.

Contact: : Elizabeth Tollefson, University Relations, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu); Tiffany Hulinsky, COMM 4000 (hulin008@crk.umn.edu)

The Office of Diversity and Multicultural Programs is sponsoring Northstar Council Dance, 
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Drums, and Storytelling in recognition of Native American Heritage Month. The performance will be held on Sunday, November 2, 2014, at 3 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. All are welcome to the performance and no admission will be charged. 

Northstar Council is a non-profit organization located in Grand Forks, ND. Northstar strives to empower Native Americans via education and community development. Broadly, the council serves as a mechanism to link Native Americans to local schools, public services, and social-cultural organizations  within the Red River Valley. Learn more about Northstar Council at www.northstarcouncil.com.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lorna Hollowell, director, Diversity and Multicultural Services, 218-281-8580 (lhollowe@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Alex Viger, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Campbell, Minn., 
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majoring in agricultural aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Ali Jaffari, and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Alex Viger with Ali Jaffari. 

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Brian Lemay, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Roseville, Minn., 
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double major in natural resources law enforcement and law enforcement aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Ali Jaffari, and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, Brian Lemay with Ali Jaffari. 

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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