Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP) is seeking community members in Northwestern Minnesota to serve on its board of directors. 

"We are one of five Regional Partnerships across the state that connects local communities and citizens with the resources of the University of Minnesota.  For example, our board has supported innovative projects in Northwest Minnesota like Community Gardens, Connecting Children and Nature and Sustainable Tourism Assessment.  We seek forward-thinking board members who will help us contribute to a more vibrant and sustainable Minnesota, now and into the future," says Abby Gold, current board chair.  

Each of the five Regional Partnerships (Southeast, Northwest, Northeast, Southwest, and Central) is citizen-driven, building community-University partnerships that create new opportunities and solve problems in Greater Minnesota. The Partnerships are a division of University of Minnesota Extension.

According to Linda Kingery, executive director, board members function as a team, working with local communities to identify and implement projects that foster sustainability in agriculture and food systems, tourism and resilient communities, natural resources, and clean energy.

Members of the NWRSDP board also:
•          solicit, evaluate, and vote on proposals
•          participate in regular boards and focus area work group meetings--both in-person and by conference calls--contributing time, energy, and insight to projects 
•          serve for three years with mileage and honorarium for agreed upon meetings and special assignments.

Board membership is open to residents of Greater Minnesota and University of Minnesota faculty, staff, and students. To be considered for a position, please submit your application by Friday, May 15, 2015 for terms starting in July of 2015.

 For more information, see "Board members information and application" at http://RSDP.umn.edu. 

The Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships (RSDPs) give communities in Greater Minnesota access to the University of Minnesota in order to help solve problems and take advantage of new opportunities. As a part of University of Minnesota Extension, NW RSDP brings together local talent and resources with University of Minnesota knowledge and seed funding to drive sustainability in four areas: agriculture and food systems, tourism and resilient communities, natural resources, and clean energy.

Contact: Linda Kingery, executive director, U of M Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership,218-281-8697 (kinge002@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota Crookston now delivers 31 bachelor's degree programs, 22 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus as well as 14 degree programs entirely online.  These degrees are offered in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Linda Kingery, executive director, U of M Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership,218-281-8697 (kinge002@umn.edu)

University of Minnesota Crookston Chancellor Fred Wood and wildlife biologist Dan Svedarsky will give a joint presentation on Africa, on Tuesday, April 21 at 6 p.m. in the Prairie Room, Sargeant Student Center. 

Chancellor Wood visited South Africa in December  2014 since he has a daughter in Swaziland serving as a Peace Corp Volunteer. While there, he also visited Kruger National Park.  "It was a rich cultural and natural history experience," notes Chancellor Wood. "The conditions are very different from North America in so many ways, and I now have a deeper appreciation for that part of the world."

Dan Svedarsky was in Durbin, South Africa, in 2012 presenting a paper at the International Wildlife Management Congress and also visited Kruger Park.

The joint presentation will feature many slides and accompanying narrative on the people, places, and incredible animals of the African Bush and Savannah. The event is open to the public and is part of Earth Month at the Crookston campus and sponsored by the Crookston Students for Sustainable Development. Light refreshments will be served.

For more information, contact Dan Svedarsky at 218-281-8129.

The University of Minnesota Crookston now delivers 31 bachelor's degree programs, 22 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus as well as 14 degree programs entirely online. These degrees are offered in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photo: Leopard with Reedbuck kill in Tanzania. Photo by James Ramaka.


Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, University Relations, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

TheBestSchools.jpg

The University of Minnesota Crookston recently had two of its online bachelor's degree programs ranked among the best in the U.S. by TheBestSchools.org, an online resource for campus and online education. The U of M Crookston's online bachelor's degree program in health management was ranked number five among The 20 Best Online Bachelor in Healthcare Management Degree Programs, and its online bachelor's degree program in accounting was listed at number twelve among The 25 Best Online Accounting Degree Programs

The selections were based on quality of program, types of courses provided, and faculty strength, as well as school awards, rankings, and reputation.

TheBestSchools.org has given the U of M Crookston's online degree programs accolades in the past. In 2014, the Crookston campus ranked at number four among The 20 Best Online Bachelor in Marketing Degree Programs; number five among The 20 Best Online Bachelor's in Business Management Degree Programs; and number eleven among The 20 Best Online Bachelor of Information Technology Degree Programs.

To view the U of M Crookston's listing, go to www.thebestschools.org/rankings. To learn more about earning a bachelor's degree online, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/online.

The University of Minnesota Crookston now delivers 31 bachelor's degree programs, 22 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus as well as 14 degree programs entirely online.  These degrees are offered in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visitwww.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Andrew Svec, director of communications, marketing, and public relations, 218-281-8432 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

As instructor Chuck Lariviere looked at the list of students in his global seminar in agriculture 
Brazil_study_abroad_2015.jpg
and natural resources class and their majors, he began to adapt the planned spring break trip. Ten students with interests spanning all aspects of agriculture had an opportunity to learn more about culture, agriculture, business, and the natural beauty that is Brazil. 

One of the highlights of the trip was a tour of SLC Agricola's Paiaguas Farm, one of seventeen farm units of a Brazilian agricultural producer, founded in 1977 by the SLC Group, focused mainly on cotton, soybean and corn. The 915,000 acre corporate operation is owned by shareholders and the students were impressed by both its organization and its cleanliness. "If you walked into a show farm, it would look like SLC Agricola," says Junior Lee Borgerding, a double major in agriculture business and agricultural systems management from Brooten, Minn. 

Senior Katie Myhre, an animal science major from Whapeton, N.D., enjoyed a special opportunity to meet up with her former roommate while on the trip. "It was fun to reconnect with her and visit her in her home country," Myhre says. 

Brazil_scenic.jpg
What Lariviere likes best about the time in Brazil is showing students the many aspects of agriculture and offering them the chance to compare similarities and differences between the two countries. "We learned about issues related to the jungle and sustainability, urban issues, and topics related to ag business, farming, agricultural mechanics and facilities, and animal science," he says. "I hope they brought back an experience that taught them firsthand about things they had little knowledge of or they didn't know before, and that they can relate to their own previous experiences."

 For Lacey Greniger, a sophomore majoring in animal science from Nashwauk, Minn., the trip has sparked an interest in another learning abroad possibility in the future. "In the twelve days we were gone, I learned about culture and about the people, which I really enjoyed," she says. The grocery store was one place she saw a difference. "The Brazilian stores sell their 'junk food' in much smaller containers than you find in the U.S. and there were things we are used to that they do not have like peanut butter, chocolate chips, and pancakes and maple syrup."

Tareyn Stomberg, a junior from Menahga, Minn., double majoring in animal science and agricultural business, says that the trip taught her greater respect. "They have a highly competitive educational system, and in order to go to college, they must be in the top of their class," she explains. "I have an increased amount of respect for and a better understanding of the Brazilian students here, and I am also enjoying having things in common with them after visiting their country."

Along with Stomberg, Greniger, Borgerding, and Myhre, students on the trip included Kevin 
IMG_20150318_110202.jpg
Bunde, a fall 2014 graduate in agricultural systems management from Parkers Prairie, Minn.; Brady Gillespie, a senior majoring in agricultural systems management from Graceville, Minn.; Sam Jacobson, a junior majoring in agricultural systems management from New York Mills, Minn.; Sheila  Johnson, a senior majoring in agronomy from Viking, Minn.; Luke Lundeby, a senior majoring in agricultural systems management from Osnabrock, N.D.; and Amy Stadtherr, a junior majoring in agricultural business from New Ulm, Minn. 

The University of Minnesota Crookston now delivers 31 bachelor's degree programs, 22 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus as well as 14 degree programs entirely online. 
These degrees are offered in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos, left to right:
Top photo at Iguazu Falls Bird Park: Lee Borgerding, Chuck Lariviere, Kevin Bunde, Amy Stadtherr, Luke Lundby, Sam Jacobson, Tareyn Stomberg, Brady Gillespie, Sheila Johnson, Katie Myhre, Lacy Greniger, and Antonio Nogueira, who served as gide.
 
Middle photo -  Sugarloaf Mountain overlooking Copacabana Beach: Front Row  Katie Myhre, Tareyn Stomberg, Lacy Greniger, Middle Row - LtoR  Antonio Nogueira, Sheila Johnson, Amy Stadtherr, Sam Jacobson,   Back row - LtoR  Luke Lundby, Kevin Bunde, Brady Gillespie, Chuck Lariviere, and Lee Borgerding.

Bottom photo is of students during the tour of SLC Agricola's Paiaguas Farm.

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, University Relations, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Two special band concerts will feature the music of the University of Minnesota Crookston 
Jazz Band.jpg
Jazz Band and the Community Band, both under the direction of TJ Chapman. The concerts are free and everyone is invited to attend. 

The Jazz Band Concert will take place on Saturday, April 25 at 7:30 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. The concert will feature guest artist Ted Chapman, a rock and blues guitarist from Hagerstown, Maryland. The audience will enjoy a cross section of music including swing, blues, rock, and funk. It will also feature several U of M Crookston students and members of the Crookston community.

On Sunday, April 26, the Community Band will perform a western-themed concert at 1 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. The concert will feature Rossini's William Tell Overture, Copland's Hoedown from "Rodeo," and selections from Rogers and Hammerstein's "Oklahoma" as well as others. 

The University of Minnesota Crookston now delivers 31 bachelor's degree programs, 22 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus as well as 14 degree programs entirely online.  These degrees are offered in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, University Relations, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

University of Minnesota Crookston business student Hunter Rauvola enjoys working with 
rauvola_h_small.jpg
numbers but chose his major based on a desire to also meet and work with people. The sophomore finance major has been enjoying his classes in business management along with those dealing with tax preparation and finance. 

Growing up on a farm near Floodwood, Minn., Rauvola was a three-sport athlete for Cromwell High School, and although he considered playing college sports, an ACL tear during his senior football season began to increase his focus on academics. He attended Lake Superior College as a senior in high school as a post-secondary enrollment option student. "The U of M Crookston accepted my credits and because the campus was transfer friendly, I chose to major in finance here," he says. 

"My dad went to school in Crookston in the late 1970s when it was a two-year institution, but I really chose the campus because I liked it when I visited, and the staff really worked with me and the credits I had accumulated," Rauvola continues. 

rauvola_h_alone_small.jpg
A tax preparation class, taught by Associate Professor Scott Leckie, has students preparing taxes for elderly people in the community, for students, and for those who meet the income requirement. Rauvola has been enjoying the work. "I like helping the people who come in and it fits with my interest in numbers and people," he says. "I also appreciate the patience people have with us as we learn to work in a real situation." During tax season, he spent four hours a week working on tax preparation as a service-learning project in the class. Students prepare the taxes and a tax professional reviews them before they are completed for the client. 

Lisa Loegering, assistant director in the Office of Community Engagement, has seen the benefits on both sides of this particular service-learning project. "An instructor could use other methods to teach many of the things students need to know when preparing taxes, but what makes this service-learning project special is that students are doing real work and learning valuable people skills as they deal with clients along the way," Loegering says. "This project does what service-learning is designed to do--offer students meaningful community service with instruction and reflection activities that meet course objectives and address community-defined needs. It truly benefits everyone involved." 

Since he came to campus last fall, Rauvola has been active in the Accounting & Finance Society and the National Society for Leadership and Success (NSLS) chapter on campus as well as serving as the chairman of fundraising for Enactus, a campus club that is part of the international non-profit organization that brings together student, academic and business leaders who are committed to using the power of entrepreneurial action to improve the quality of life and standard of living for people in need. 

Kenneth Johnson, management lecturer, has had the opportunity to get to know Rauvola as his principles of management instructor and as an advisor to NSLS.  "Hunter has a rare combination of excellent technical skills coupled with phenomenal communication skills," Johnson says. "Because he is so well-rounded, and has such an engaging personality, I see him going far in his future career."

This summer will find Rauvola at work in the Northview Bank in Floodwood, and he hopes to find a home in banking in the future. But, first, he plans to pursue his MBA after completing his bachelor's degree, and as he goes, discovering exactly where his passions lie and where future opportunities might take him. 

The University of Minnesota Crookston now delivers 31 bachelor's degree programs, 22 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus as well as 14 degree programs entirely online.  These degrees are offered in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, at top, are Hunter Rauvola (right) with Senior Ross Siegler working on tax preparation. 

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, University Relations, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Pages