February 2011 Archives

Wroblewski_Tammy 9029.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston Senior Tammy Wroblewski, Milwaukee, Wis., was named a recipient of a $1,000 North Central Turf Grass Association (NCGTA) scholarship. Wroblewski, a triple major in golf and turf management, horticulture, and communication, was awarded the scholarship during the NCTGA annual meeting held in Fargo, N.D., in late February.

Last summer, she completed an internship at the U of M, Crookston working in the areas of golf and turf management and horticulture. Her advisors are Kristina Walker, assistant professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and Rachel McCoppin, associate professor in the Liberal Arts and Education Department.

An active student at the U of M, Crookston, Wroblewski has been a member of the Golden Eagle Golf Team, served as an Ambassador, was named to the Athletic All-Academic Team, and worked as a tutor in the Academic Assistance Center.

The purpose of the North Central Turf Grass Association is to promote the turfgrass industry, to encourage and support the further study and research of turf, to gather and distribute this information, and to represent this group on matters of policy regarding the turf grass industry. To learn more, visit http://www.nctga.net.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Kristie Walker, assistant professor, Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8116 (kswalker@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston Turf Bowl Team placed 24th out of 87 turf bowl Turf Bowl Team 2011 2922.jpgteams from across the United States in the National Turf Bowl Competition held recently. Members of the team included: Theodore Gutman, a senior majoring in both golf and turf management and horticulture from Burlington, Iowa; Thomas Halver, a senior majoring in golf and turf management from Chaska, Minn.; Mark Michalski, a senior golf and turf management major from Silver Bay, Minn.; and Tammy Wroblewski, a triple major in golf and turf management, horticulture, and communications from Milwaukee, Wis.

The 3 ½ hour turf bowl exam  is comprised of nine sections including identification (turfgrass, seed, soil, weed, insect, and disease), turfgrass growth and development, soil and soil fertility, weed management, disease management, insect management, turfgrass calculations, business management, and  a case study essay. The competition was held during the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America Education and Trade Show on February 10, 2011, in Orlando, Fla.

The Crookston campus requires internships for students as part of its commitment to applied learning. Michalski interned at the U of M, Crookston in golf and turf management, during summer 2010, and Halver interned for at the Bluff Creek Golf Course in Chaska. Gutman interned at Spirit Hollow Golf Course, in Burlington, Iowa, and Wroblewski interned at the U of M, Crookston in both golf and turf management and horticulture.

The advisor of the U of M, Crookston Turf Bowl Team is Kristina S. Walker, Ph.D. She earned her doctoral and master's degrees in agronomy specializing in turfgrass management from Purdue University. Walker has been teaching courses in agronomy and turfgrass management since January 2009 at the Crookston Campus.

With a degree in golf and turf management, graduates are qualified for positions in the golf industry, sports field management, lawn care, sod production, grounds maintenance, sales or pursue an advanced degree. For more information on golf and turf management at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/agri/golfturf.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo (l to r): Tammy Wroblewski, Mark Michalski, Teddy Gutman, Tom Halver, with their advisor, Kristina Walker, Ph.D.
 

Contact: Kristie Walker, assistant professor, Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8116 (kswalker@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The first annual Justin Knebel Memorial Ice Fishing Tournament was held early in Ice Fishing Tournament Logo-2.jpgFebruary on Zippel Bay & Resort on Lake of the Woods in Williams, Minn., to raise money for scholarships. More than $6,000 was garnered in support of the Justin Knebel endowment fund and University of Minnesota, Crookston for student-athletes.

Thank you to all sponsors, donors, participants, Zippel Bay & Resort, and a special thank you to Tournament Sponsor, Roseau County Ford. The tournament ran from 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. with more than 70 fisher men & women participating.

"The Justin Knebel Memorial Ice Fishing Tournament was a fun experience. It was great to see all the people that came to support the event," said Jeffrey Kroll, Custom Stripes, Inc. It was pretty easy to convince me to be a part of the tournament. I got to go fishing and support education, what a great combo! I am already looking forward to next year."

icefishing.jpgSpecial thanks to Justin's parents, Mark and Janet, for their tremendous support and to the tournament committee members from the U of M, Crookston: Alysa Tulibaski, student experience and parent coordinator; Amber Bailey, e-communications manager; Corby Kemmer, director of development; Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising; Stephanie Helgeson, athletic director; and Rose Ulseth, executive accounts specialist in the Office of Development & Alumni Relations.

Next year, the second annual tournament is slated for Saturday, February 4, 2012, at the same location. For information, contact Corby Kemmer, director of Development & Alumni Relations at 218-281-8434.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo (l to r), standing: Bill Tyrrell, Amber Bailey, Stephanie Helgeson, and Corby Kemmer. Seated: Alysa Tulibaski.  

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director of development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A celebration in the spirit of Cinco de Mayo to be held at the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Friday, April 15, 2011, is part of a Minnesota Legacy Destination weekend. All "Fiesta in the Spirit of Cinco de Mayo" events are free and open to the public.
 
4:30 - 7 p.m. - Authentic Mexican dinner, traditional crafts and children's activities, aLegacyLogo.jpg marketplace, Mexican folk music and Mariachi music,  Fresh Voices Hispanic Youth Leadership photography exhibit and youth video previews.

7:30 - 9 p.m. - Dance troupe, Los Alegres Bailadores, and local children's troupe in Kiehle Auditorium.

9 p.m. - 12 a.m.
- Family dance featuring the music of Sonora Café

Made possible by a grant from the State of Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Foundation Legacy Amendment, University of Minnesota Crookston Concerts and Lectures fund and the Coke Community Initiative fund, a grant for cultural projects from the Crookston High School, and a donation from RiverView Health in Crookston.

For more information on the Legacy Destination weekend, visit www.exploreminnesota.com/travel-ideas/legacy/crookston/index.aspx.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Laurie Wilson, planning committee, 218-281-8587 (lwilson2@umn.edu) ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

University rewarded for rising to the Campus Energy Challenge

The University of Minnesota, Crookston, received a check for nearly $80,000 for results Otter Tail check 2916.jpgachieved through Otter Tail Power Company's Campus Energy Challenge. According to U of M, Crookston, Chancellor Charles H. Casey, this payment and the savings they expect to redirect to students, staff, and faculty later this year are great, but the real reward is the heightened energy-saving awareness that is developing. "When Otter Tail Power Company chose this school as its first Campus Energy Challenge participant, we knew the many opportunities for energy-efficient technology upgrades would result in savings," said Casey. "But our administration has been pleased to see how much difference operational and behavioral changes have made to our electric bills. We've also been very pleased with the efforts of our students, faculty, and staff and with the support and expertise everyone at Otter Tail Power Company has provided.  It has been a team effort."

otpOtterLogoColor.jpgOtter Tail Power Company Energy Management Representative Ken Johnson presented the check, which combines three Campus Energy Challenge payments. The two largest payments are for rebates on lighting upgrades ($33,109) and for variable-frequency drives with an automated control system ($26,518). These technologies enable the campus to reduce its electricity use by 655,300 kilowatt-hours a year. "The overall goal is a 10 percent to 15 percent reduction in electrical use, and these changes alone result in about 8.9 percent," said Johnson. "We're confident that with the ReDirect program's behavior-related savings they'll reach the 10 percent goal and may even approach 15 percent."

The third payment of $20,000 reimburses U of M, Crookston, for expenses related to the ReDirect program, another component of the Campus Energy Challenge. Developed by Eugene A. Scales & Associates, ReDirect helps schools and other large organizations incentivize their students and employees to reduce energy use by "redirecting" most of the savings back to these stakeholders.

"We've seen notable reductions in electric meter readings that date back to our facilities staff's implementation of operations changes in their work order system.  I'm optimistic that with continued dedication by these employees, and even greater student, staff, and faculty behavioral changes through the end of the academic year, we'll be able to announce achievement of the goal during the Campus Energy Challenge's April 19 tree planting celebration," said Casey.  Governor Dayton, U.S. Senator Klobuchar, and many other state and local leaders and the public are invited to join the campus for that Earth Week event.

Otter Tail Power Company, a subsidiary of Otter Tail Corporation (NASDAQ Global Select Market: OTTR), is headquartered in Fergus Falls, Minnesota. It provides electricity and energy services to more than a quarter million people in Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. To learn more about Otter Tail Power Company visit www.otpco.com. To learn more about Otter Tail Corporation visit www.ottertail.com.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: State Legislators LeRoy Stumpf and Deb Kiel were on hand for the equipment rebate check presentation by Otter Tail Power Company to the U of M, Crookston.  Left to Right:  Minnesota State Senator LeRoy Stumpf (District 1); Minnesota State Representative Deb Kiel (District 1B); Ken Johnson, Energy Management Representative, Otter Tail Power Company; U of M, Crookston Chancellor Charles H. Casey; and Tim Norton, Director of Facilities and Operations, U of M, Crookston.

Contact: Cindy Kuismi, project communications specialist, Otter Tail Power Company, 218-739-8751 (CKuismi@otpco.com); Andrew Svec, director, communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu)

The Honors Program and Alpha Lambda Delta at the University of Minnesota, Crookston Pi Run.pngare planning a Pi Run this spring. The Pi Run, meaning 5 km (3.1 miles), roughly equal to Pi, is a road race to benefit after school programs in the Crookston Public Schools and will take place at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 16, 2011.

Early registration for the race is open through Friday, April 1. Registration is $20 before April 1 and $25 following. Early registration participants are guaranteed a technical running shirt and there will be awards for the top three male and female competitors.

Race day registration will be held in the Kiehle Rotunda beginning at 8 a.m. with the race start at 10 a.m. All proceeds will go to the Crookston School District in a collaborative effort to encourage extracurricular activities and leadership development.

For more information, contact Heather at 321-276-1161 (umcald@umn.edu).

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Brian Dingmann, assistant professor, Math, Science and Technology Dept. 218-281-8249 dingm021@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

With International Women's Day on Tuesday, March 8, 2011, the University of Minnesota, Crookston has set aside the day to recognize Women's History Month on the campus. A reception and panel discussion featuring women in leadership from the region will begin at 4:30 p.m. in the Prairie Room, Sargeant Student Center. The community and campus are invited to the reception and panel discussion.

The members of the panel are women who have inspired us all with their leadership, passion, and daring including: Barb Erdman, Polk County sheriff; Jeannine Windels, former executive director of the Crookston Chamber of Commerce; Racha Khodr, a teaching specialist in the Liberal Arts and Education Department; Senior Halie Kang, a communication major from Seoul, South Korea, and Senior Lhakpa Gurung, an early childhood education major from Mustang, Nepal, among others.

The theme for International Women's Day is "The Rising of the Women is the Rising of Us Rising.jpg All" and recognizes the contribution of women across the globe and throughout history. International Women's Day has been observed since in the early 1900's, a time of great expansion and turbulence in the industrialized world that saw booming population growth and the rise of radical ideologies. 2011 marks the global centenary year for International Women's Day - 100 years since the first International Women's Day event. More than one million women and men attended rallies in 1911.

President Carter issued a presidential proclamation declaring the week of March 8, 1980, as the first National Women's History Week. Later, in 1987, Congress expanded the week into a month recognizing March as officially National Women's History Month. For more information, visit www.nwhp.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director, student activities, 218-281-8507, (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A concert by the award winning a cappella ensemble Chapter 6 will take place at the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Wednesday, March 2 at 7 p.m. The concert, held in Kiehle Auditorium, is being brought to campus by the Student Programming and Activities for Campus Entertainment (S.P.A.C.E.). The concert is a feature of What's on Wednesday chapter_6.jpg(W.O.W.) programming on the Crookston campus. The event is free for UMC students, faculty and staff; $3 for non-UMC students; and $5 for adults.

Chapter 6 has a diverse assortment of musical selections and styling. They are a high energy group utilizing pop and jazz harmonies and have both cover and original pieces in their repertoire including witty comedic tunes and entertaining medleys.

A professional a cappella ensemble from Illinois, Chapter 6 is comprised of six vocalists and one arranger. They are the only vocal ensemble to win both The International Competition of Collegiate A Cappella (2001) and the prestigious National Harmony Sweepstakes (2004).
 
Lisa Samuelson, director of student activities is looking forward to have the group on campus for a concert. "I have seen Chapter 6 on several occasions and the combination of their smooth melodies and humorous interpretations of well known songs makes them captivating to watch," says Samuelson.

Among subsequent honors, Chapter 6 has appeared with The National Symphony Orchestra at The Kennedy Center, and was featured on "American Idol: Season 7" in conjunction with bandmate Luke Menard's Top 16 run. Members of the group are Chuck Bosworth, Mark Grizzard, Jarrett Johnson, Luke Menard, John Musick,  Nathan Pufall, and A.D. Stonecipher. To learn more, visit www.chapter6.com.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director of student activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Office of International Programs at the University of Minnesota, Crookston is sponsoring a passport drive, Tuesday, March 8, 2011, from 1 -6 p.m. in the Northern Lights Lounge, Sargeant Student Center.  The drive is open to anyone from the campus or from the Crookston community. The passport drive is a convenient opportunity to get your passport since they are no longer issued locally.

Each individual applying for a passport will need to provide:  a certified copy of his or her birth certificate; a $25 check or money order made payable to the Grand Forks County (cash not accepted); and a $110 check or money order made payable to the U.S. Department of State (cash not accepted).  Passport photos will be taken and will cost $5 for UMC students and children under age 16; $10.00 for faculty, staff and the public.  Make checks or money orders for photos payable to UMC.  Be prepared to respond to questions regarding your mother/father's birth date information.

You must have a copy of your birth certificate; photocopies are unacceptable. If you were born in Minnesota, you can obtain a copy of the certificate at the Polk County Courthouse in Crookston. If you were born out-of-state, you will need two forms of identification such as your driver's license and U-card. Passports may also be renewed at this drive. 

For more information regarding the passport drive, contact Rae French at 218-281-8339.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Rae French, coordinator, study abroad, 218-281-8339 (rfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

social1.jpgThe annual University of Minnesota, Crookston Arizona Social was held Friday, February 18, 2011, at the Terrace Green at ViewPoint Resort in Mesa, Ariz. The 2011 social was again a success with more than 90 alumni, friends, and supporters in attendance. Alumni from both the U of M, Crookston and its predecessor, the Northwest School of Agriculture, gathered for the time together.

The social was hosted by Corby Kemmer, director of Development & Alumni Relations with greetings from Chancellor Charles H. Casey and Barbara Muesing.

"This was great event, my thanks to the fabulous staff at the Terrace Green at ViewPointsocial2.jpg Resort in Mesa," Kemmer says. " I would like to extend a special thank you to Lorriane Love from the Class of 1954 for her support. We look forward to another successful Arizona Social in 2012 and strongly encourage all alumni and friends to attend".

Next year's Arizona Social will be held Friday, February 17, 2012, at the same location. For information, contact Corby Kemmer at 218-281-8434. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Photos taken at the 2011 Arizona Social at ViewPoint Resort in Mesa. 

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Are you: 1.  An involved citizen?  2.  A believer in volunteerism?  3.  Someone who likes to speak to your neighbors?  4.  A lover of trees?  Yes, yes, yes, yes?  Then we need you!

Be a part of Minnesota's one-of-a-kind program to prepare communities for the Emerald Ash Borer.  You may not be able to stop the borer, but you can help prevent catastrophic losses to your leafy communities.

The Emerald Ash Borer training is scheduled in Crookston from 6 - 8:30 p.m. on Friday, March 25 and from 8:45 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 26 in Kiehle 116.

eabadult.jpgThe University of Minnesota, University of Minnesota Extension, Minnesota Department of Agriculture and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has funded a program that helps communities get the best information for identifying and combating the nasty borer as well as replanting the streets and parks with a more diverse palette of trees.  However, we can't do it without you!

We are looking for a few good volunteers that will become EAB-Community Outreach Volunteers.  You will be the source of information for your community, the information that will help your town or county make the best decisions about managing the pest, recovering from the damage it causes, and planting a more diverse and healthy community forest for the future.

You will receive training on the use of a standardized Power Point program on emerald ash borer identification, management and recovery.  This training is 100% funded by the agency partners...we ask nothing more than your willingness to volunteer and help your community by providing the best, unbiased, research-based information.

The details:
1.    Training will consist of 8.5 hours of class activities and exercises.

2.    Small classes: 6-12 people.

3.    You will be provided with a compact disk of the standardized Power Point program on emerald ash borer identification, management and recovery for your use.

4.    You will receive ongoing support from the community preparedness team at the University of Minnesota, Department of Forest Resources and Extension.

5.    Training will be conducted in March and April in a community near you.

6.    Your role will be to voluntarily present the information to any group in your community that is looking for the best, University research-based information: county fairs, school programs, Arbor Day programs, city councils.  Yours will be the voice of accurate information.

For more information:  please contact Deborah Zak, Campus Regional Director, University of Minnesota Extension, Extension Regional Office, Crookston.  Call 1-888-241-0781 or e-mail, dzak@umn.edu.

Photo of adult emerald ash borer from www.extension.umn.edu/issues/eab/.

Contact: Deborah Zak, Campus Regional Director, University of Minnesota Extension, Extension Regional Office, Crookston, 1-888-241-0781 (dzak@umn.edu)

The Black Student Association (BSA) at the University of Minnesota, Crookston is holding a special tribute to recognize the meritorious service of African Americans in the military. The program, slated for Monday, February 28, 2011, will be held at 6 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. The program, entitled HONOR, will feature a presentation by Master Sargeant Tamika Morales-Long from the Grand Forks Air Force Base. The program is free and everyone is welcome.

HONOR will recognize the efforts of African Americans who have played a role in our nation's past and present military conflicts. The program also will touch on "Civil War and the Struggle for Black Self-Determination," the 2011 national theme for Black History Month, held annually in February.

Students will pay tribute to a number of individuals they feel exemplify honor. Included in that list are: 54 Massachusetts Regiment; Tuskegee Airmen; 555th, better known as the "Triple Nickel"; along with veterans Comedian Bill Cosby; NBA star David Robinson, who played basketball for the San Antonio Spurs; Actor James Earl Jones, the voice of Star Wars, and others.

For more information about BSA or HONOR, contact Jamal Jihad, vice president of BSA, at jihad001@umn.edu.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Jamal Jihad, vice president, Black Student Association, 478-213-6492, jihad001@umn.edu ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Assistant Professor Alvin Killough quoted in Recent Study

This article written by Wynfred N. Russell, a public health writer at the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) at the University of Minnesota, quotes Assistant Professor Alvin Killough who teaches in the Liberal Arts and Education Department on the Crookston campus.

Fish is commonplace on most dinner tables of African American families in "stroke belt" states, which is a good thing, but a new study from Emory University in Atlanta finds that often times, the fish is fried; and, that may not be good for the heart.

The so-called stroke belt states comprising Arkansas, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, and South Carolina, are mainly in southeastern United States identified by public health officials for having increased rates of stroke and cardiovascular disease. "Stroke incidence in these eight states is about 20 percent higher than in the rest of the country," says Dr. Fadi Nahab, the lead author of the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a large U.S. government funded research.

Fish is good for you, he says. The omega-3 fatty acids found in most fish, have repeatedly been associated with a reduction in the risk of stroke and heart disease, when eaten at least two times a week. However, the process of frying the fish causes a loss of these helpful fatty contents.

Nahab and his research team interviewed, examined, and asked 21,675 people how often they ate fried fish and non-fried fish. Of the participants whose records were analyzed, 21 percent were from the "stroke buckle," the coastal plains of Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. The incidence of stroke in the stroke buckle is even higher than in the stroke belt. Another 34 percent were from other parts of the stroke belt, while 44 percent were from other states.

Researchers looked at geographical as well as racial differences, where African Americans have twice the stroke incidence as their white counterparts, even though blacks consumed fish at a higher rate. The study sought to understand what is contributing to the racial and geographic differences in stroke acquisition.

"We have to be aware of and pay attention to cooking methods and not just the food intake itself," he said in a recent telephone interview, adding, "The majority of the higher intake was the result of twice, on the average, of fried fish. That is one of the key things to take and specifically relate to the racial differences."

However, there may be other factors responsible for why blacks in the southeast predominately choose to fry their fish.

"Aside from tasting very good, frying foods as a cooking method is historically an Killough_Alvin 8772.jpg established tradition in the southern region," says Dr. Alvin Killough, a cultural and ecological psychologist in behavioral medicine at the University of Minnesota. "In many respects, frying was 'the' method of cooking the fish many African Americans had or still have access to economically, which we now know are optimally low in omega-3 fatty acids."

Clearly, descriptive studies of this sort are an important beginning in attempting to unravel the basis for the differential consumption and preparation of fish in the U.S., Killough says.

Nevertheless, Professor Nahab cautions that The REGARDS study does not prove causality. "It does not show a link between eating fried fish and getting stroke, or cardiovascular disease. That will have to be another study."

When asked what makes fried fish a problem, he says, "Frying fish increases calorie and fat content." He notes that fried fish typically sold at U.S. fast food restaurants--like cod and haddock--are species with lower healthy contents. "There are studies that have shown that if you fry any fish the omega-3 leeches out of the fish and are replaced by the cooking oil; and what happens is that you end up with [a] lower level of omega-3 content."

Nahab, who is also an assistant professor at Emory University School of Medicine, recommends broiling, grilling, or baking as alternative ways to prepare fish; the main goal is to limit excessive weight gain. He says people should eat at least five servings of fruits or vegetables per week; engage in 30 minutes of daily physical activity; see a doctor to check for high blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes; stop smoking; and limit alcohol use. "This study just assesses the habit of fish preparation, but based on what we know that absolutely avoiding fried fish and preferably going to the non fried options are better."

Researchers do not yet know if smoked or dried fish is a better healthy option to fried fish.

Contact: Alvin Killough, assistant professor, 218-281-8028 (killo010@umn.edu)

Encouraging and assisting entrepreneurs and small businesses in northwest Minnesota is the focus of a new a Web site launched recently by the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES) located at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. A grant funded by the U.S. Department of Education, CRES is designed to assist with the development and creation of entrepreneurial enterprises, the Web site showcases what the CRES has to offer. The Web address for the Center is www.umccres.org.   

cres_logos_final_wgold.jpgAn open house for CRES is planned for Tuesday, March 1, 2011, from 9 to 11 a.m. The open house will be held in the Prairie Room, Sargeant Student Center, with an informational presentation on the services offered by CRES at 9:30 a.m.  

The CRES serves eleven counties including, Beltrami, Clearwater, Kittson, Lake of the Woods, Mahnomen, Marshall, Norman, Pennington, Polk, Red Lake County, and Roseau. Its mission is to encourage entrepreneurship through educational leadership, applied research, and technical assistance. It will engage the students, faculty, and research facilities of the Crookston campus in order to stimulate the entrepreneurial culture and strengthen the economic vitality of northwest Minnesota.

The services offered by the CRES are based on the client's needs which include but areCRES Staff 2343-1.jpg not limited to early-stage market analysis, product and service development management, lean evaluation, supply chain analysis, market extensions, sales forecasting, and other projects and services identified by regional companies.

Background for CRES

In August 2010, the U of M, Crookston Business Department received a congressionally-directed grant from the U.S. Department of Education for $550,000 to start the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies. Writing the grant was a collaborative effort between several faculty members in the Business Department including Kevin Cooper and Rachel Lundbohm, who serve as director and associate director respectively. They were joined by Sue Brorson, professor and head of the Business Department and Associate Professor Bruce Brorson in the effort. Congressman Collin Peterson played an integral leadership role in this entrepreneurial initiative and was supported by both Senators Al Franken and Amy Klobachar.

Two seniors at the U of M, Crookston have played an important role in the Center's establishment. Janessa DeBoer and Lindsey Fouts, serve in the CRES as interns. While Fouts focuses on the accounting and database side of the work, DeBoer focused on developing content for the Web site, promotional materials, and creating a one-year marking plan for the Center. 

The CRES is housed in Dowell Hall 117. For information, call 218-281-8595 (cres@tc.umn.edu), or visit www.umccres.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, CRES Staff (l to r): Janessa DeBoer, Kevin Cooper, Lindsey Fouts, and Rachel Lundbohm.


Contact: Rachel Lundbohm, associate director, CRES, 218-281-8190 (rlundboh@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Crookston Student Association (CSA), the student governing body at the University of terry_dullum.jpgMinnesota, Crookston, has invited Terry Dullum, anchor and producer of "WDAZ News at 5" as the keynote speaker for spring convocation scheduled for Thursday, March 3, 2011. Convocation will be held in the Kiehle Auditorium beginning at noon and the public is invited to attend the special recognition.
 
Dullum, a lifelong reporter, has covered more than 3,000 news stories during his more than 30 years at WDAZ-TV in Grand Forks.  While the North Dakota native is an army veteran and past graduate of the University of North Dakota, he can still remember his beginnings in a one-room schoolhouse. As the anchor and producer of "WDAZ News at 5," he anchors the newscast weeknights on Channel 8.  For 15 years, The Dullum File, his popular commentary, was showcased Friday evenings on WDAZ and WDAY-TV in Fargo.  He also blogs at http://dullumfile.areavoices.com - a commentary about current events and other items of interest.

A tradition dating back to the founding of the Crookston campus, convocation is an opportunity to recognize student academic and athletic achievements. During convocation, Chancellor Charles H. Casey will present plaques to the students achieving a 4.0 grade point average. Senior Shawn Friedland, president of CSA, will serve as the event's emcee.

For information, contact Lisa Sameulson at 218-281-8507.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director, student activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Three students from the University of Minnesota, Crookston were selected to represent the campus at a luncheon with the U of M Board of Regents on Thursday, February 10, 2011. Junior Yangchen Gurung, Mustang, Nepal, and seniors Heather Donati-Lewis, Narcoossee, Fla., and Derek Ricke, Menahga, Minn., were selected for their high academic standing as well as campus involvement and leadership.

High Achievers.jpgAlso attending the luncheon was the Crookston Student Association representative to the board, Lauren Snively, a junior majoring in communication from Herndon, Va. The luncheon was held in the Maroon & Gold Room, McNamara Center on the Minneapolis campus.

Yangchen Gurung, a business management major with a communication minor, is a member of the UMC Lions Club, and Multicultural and International Club. She has been active in Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) serving as vice president of business ethics and vice president of fundraising for the club. This spring Gurung was selected to be part of SIFE's presentation team, which will compete at the regional competition later in the spring semester.  She is a tutor in the Academic Assistance Center as well as a community advisor for Residential Life. She is one of several students representing both SIFE and the campus to offer computer training to elderly residents at the Villa St. Vincent in Crookston.

Heather Donati-Lewis, a pre-vet major with a minor in chemistry, served as a student orientation leader, and is active in many clubs including serving as president of Alpha Lambda Delta, the student honor society. A member of the National Society for Leadership and Success, Donati-Lewis also presented at the 2010 National Conference of Undergraduate Research (NCUR) on research conducted with Associate Professor Brian Dingmann and Assistant Professor Venu Mukku on the anti-fungal properties of thirty-seven different but common spices and herbs. She has also been active as a member of the communication working group on sustainability.

Derek Ricke, a sport and recreation management major with a minor in coaching, is the co-founder, captain, and president of the Hockey Club on campus. He also serves as president of the Sport and Recreation Management Association, and presented on his undergraduate research project titled: "The Recruitment of Student-Athletes: College Selection Factors." He has been on the Chancellor List numerous times for a 4.0 grade point average, volunteers as a youth hockey coach, and assisted with youth football events. In 2010, Ricke was named Outstanding Sport and Recreation Management Student at the annual student awards recognition held in the spring.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Photo by Patrick O'Leary, University Relations, U of M, Twin Cities.
 
In the photo ( l to r): U of M Board of Regent Chair Clyde Allen, Derek Ricke, Heather Donati-Lewis, Yangchen Gurung, U of M, Crookston Chancellor Charles H. Casey, Lauren Snively, and U of M President Robert Bruininks. 

Contact: Peter Phaiah, associate vice chancellor for student affairs, 218-281-8505(Phaiah@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The wonderful flavors and unique cultures of countries across the world are the center of the popular International Dinner Series at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Dinners in the 2011 series, featuring China, Ghana, and Nepal, are scheduled for March 7, 21, 28, and April 6, and begin each evening at 6 p.m. in the Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. Tickets for the dinner series are available by contacting Rae French at 218-281-8339 (rfrench@umn.edu). Adult and senior tickets are $15 per evening or $50 for the entire series. Children under 10 years of age are $10 per evening or $35 for the entire series. Tickets are limited.

Students representing each of the featured countries will share their favorite dishes and a special presentation related to their home country. The series concludes with an international dinner and showcase.

The evening of Monday, March 7, features the country of China.  Join Senior Qian Liu, a business management major from Guangdong, China, as she presents "So you think you know China?" Traditional dance along with special selections from the U of M, Crookston choir will highlight the evening.

On Monday, March 21, Ghana is the featured country for the evening. Senior Nana Boaten, a marketing major from Accura, Ghana, will present with Senior Shawn Friedland, a biology major from New Bern, N.C., who worked at a health clinic in a village in Ghana in the summer of 2010. Music from the U of M, Crookston choir will be a part of the evening.
 
For guests on the evening of Monday, March 28, the country of Nepal will be the focus. Senior Lhakpa Gurung, an early childhood education major from Mustang, Nepal, will share information on educational systems of Nepal. The evening will include traditional dancing and  music from the music department on the Crookston campus.

The final event in the series on Wednesday, April 6, is a dinner hosted by the InternationalInternational Display 8242.jpg and Multicultural Club and includes talent showcase, along with demonstrations, table displays, and entertainment from countries all over the world. At 4:30 p.m. students will present a showcase of talent followed by the dinner at 6 p.m.

The International Dinner Series is a longstanding tradition at the U of M, Crookston and highlights the culture and cuisine of selected countries annually. To learn more about international programs, visit www.umcrookston.edu/international.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Rae French, coordinator of study abroad at 218-281-8339 (rfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The hilarious spoof based on everyone's favorite vampire, "Dracula, the Musical?" will bedracula_2.jpg performed by the Theater and Music Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The musical-comedy, by Rick Abbott , is under the student direction of Freshman Beth Motley, an equine science major from Vadnais Heights, Minn. The play will be performed on Wednesday, February 16, 2011, at 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, February 18-19 at 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, February 20 at 3:30 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium.

Admission for the performance is $5 for adults, $3 for students and $2 for U of M, Crookston students. The Wednesday evening performance is free for all U of M, Crookston students. A light chili supper will be served after the Sunday performance for a free-will donation.

Dracula1.jpgMotley directs the 8 member cast of the play set in 19th Century England. It centers on a madhouse run by Dr. Seward whose new neighbor is Dracula, the Hungarian Count with designs on the doctor's daughter. Associate Professor George French of the Music and Theater Department on the Crookston campus plays the piano accompaniment. Costumes for the production were made by Andrea Thibert from Red Lake Falls, MInn.

The cast includes Austin Czichotzki, a junior  communication major from Barnesville, Minn.; Matthew Green, a junior ag systems management and agronomy major from Greenbush, Minn.; Joe Harren, a senior agronomy major from Eagle Bend, Minn.; Bethany Jenkins, a sophomore horticulture major from Grand Forks, N.D.; Daniel Kuske, a senior natural resources major from Belle Plaine, Minn.; Hionia Kutsev, a freshman health management major from Erskine, Minn.; Liz Massie, a freshman equine science major from Eagan, Minn.; Chelsey Wells, a senior equine science and animal science major from Paris, Mich.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo at top right. Front row: Standing (l to r): Beth Motley, Joe Harren, Matthew Green, Chelsey Wells, and Austin Czichotzki.  Seated: Hoinia Kustev and Liz Massie. Standing front, right: Bethany Jenkins and Daniel Kuske.

Contact: George French, associate professor, 218- 281-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Mixed Blood Theatre will present the play "3557_b.jpgAfrican America" on Tuesday, February 8, 2011, at 7 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. The event, sponsored by the UMC Office of Diversity Programs, is free and open to the public.

The plot of the production deals with the appearance of an African man which leads a modern interracial couple to a better understanding and appreciation of the experience of immigrants to Minnesota from Liberia, Ethiopia, and Somalia and helps them consider how to connect with and celebrate one's cultural heritage.

Mixed Blood Theatre is a professional, multi-racial performance company based in Minneapolis that promotes cultural pluralism and individual equality through artistic excellence.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: :Thomas Williams, director, diversity services, diversity and multicultural services, 218-281-8580 (willi3140@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Two University of Minnesota, Crookston professors are leading the fight in the war on germs. The duo is working on research to discover compounds to combat Staphylococcus (staph) bacteria, a type of germ common to even healthy individuals, but harboring the potential to cause serious infections.

Mukku_Venugopal -Venu- 5396.jpgIn order for Assistant Professor Venu Mukku (in photo, on left) and Associate Professor Brian Dingmann (in photo, on right) to conduct their research, the campus installed a level 2 biological safety cabinet purchased with help from a University of Minnesota Grant -In-Aid. Early research, using the facilities at RiverView Health in Crookston, began in August 2009. Because the Crookston campus lacked the necessary facilities, the partnership between RiverView Health and the U of M, Crookston was invaluable to Professor Mukku and his research.

"It is quite likely we would not have been awarded the Grant-In-Aid without the preliminary work Dr. Mukku conducted at RiverView," Dingmann explains. "The grant process is very competitive and having access to the facilities at the hospital was imperative for Dr. Mukku's research, in fact, it would not have been possible without it."
 
The research involves infecting worms with the pathogen of interest and checking theDingmann_Brian 8525.jpg efficacy of various natural product extracts. Based on historical drug discovery statistics the researchers believe that the next antibiotic is waiting to be discovered from Mother Nature. The biological safety cabinet allows the research to be conducted in a safe environment.

Pat Fall, director of laboratory services at RiverView, worked closely with Mukku and Dingmann to coordinate the lab's use. "We used the lab before 8 a.m. or after 3 p.m. so our work would not interfere with the hospital's use of their lab," Mukku explains. "I am extremely grateful to Pat and to RiverView Health for extending their facilities to facilitate our work."

Background on MRSA

Over time, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, caused by a strain of staph bacteria, has become resistant to the antibiotics used to treat ordinary staph infections. Dingmann, who teaches microbiology, and Mukku, who teaches organic chemistry, teamed up to examine plant extracts that might possess antibacterial activity.  The chemistry of natural products is a primary area of research for Mukku. He teaches organic chemistry and biochemistry on the Crookston campus. Dingmann provides the necessary expertise in microbiology. Together, the two will develop a library of plant and microbial extracts that could be tested in different biological assays in future, but for now, they will work to find solutions for fighting staph infection.

"There is a wealth of data in scientific and traditional literature about the medicinal properties of plants in and around Minnesota," Mukku explains. "We will examine extracts of different parts of those plants such as seeds, leaves, and bark for their efficacy in curing worms infected with different strains of staph. We will pursue a process known as bio-assay guided fractionation with the intent of isolating and characterizing compounds with activity."

Involved with Mukku and Dingmann are students Shawn Friedland, a senior biology major from Melbourne, Fla., and Heather Donati-Lewis, a senior pre-veterinary medicine major from Narcoossee, Fla.  The students work with the extraction process as well as other phases of the research. Students are encouraged to work directly with faculty on research projects in order to gain with experiential learning. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Venu Mukku, assistant professor, Math Science and Technology Department, 218-281-8097 (mukku002@umn.edu); Brian Dingmann, associate professor, Math, Science and Technology Department, 281-281-8249 (dingm021@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant directo

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