July 2011 Archives

Preliminary design concepts for nature-based play spaces for the cities of Crookston and Warren, Minn. have now been completed, and community feedback is needed. The children's play space for Crookston is being designed for Castle Park, which is located off Castle Street to the west of the Crookston hospital complex. The play space for Warren is being designed for Island Park located off Warren's South Division Street.  

Two preliminary designs were prepared for each community. All four designs were a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota, Crookston and Twin Cities campuses. The Warren designs are being displayed at the Marshall County Fair from July 27-31 while the Crookston designs will be displayed on Tuesday, August 2 at National Night Out held in Crookston's Central Park.

The nature-based play space preliminary design concepts were created by Kristen Murray, U of M, Twin Cities landscape architecture graduate student, and Kristine Neu, U of M, Crookston environmental landscaping undergraduate. Both students were advised by Eric Castle, landscape architect and U of M, Crookston assistant professor of horticulture.

A nature-based play space is not the average playground. It looks more like woods, prairie, or garden. Unlike the open woods, the designs have a border, so that parents know where their children are, and children can play freely in the space. The designs incorporate plants and materials native to the area, with the intention of highlighting local stories and the talents and skills of people who live in the area.

Nature-based play puts kids in touch with nature by encouraging them to play with rocks, water, sand, leaves, sticks and other materials found outdoors. Nature-based play includes everything from active play (climbing, jumping, running) and creative play (make-believe, building, art-making). Usually this play is unstructured: kids can choose what they want to do, unlike in a structured group activity or class. Research is demonstrating that this is necessary for healthy child development.

The design process for both Castle and Island Park has been ongoing since early summer. In June there was a gathering of community members in each city to share ideas about how to transform a portion of their community's park into a nature-based play space. Further input was gathered from small group interactions with parents and children. The ideas gathered, along with countless hours of research, turned into the two preliminary designs for each community. The June brainstorming sessions were part of a larger process to develop plans, create, and install the play spaces.

Displaying the preliminary designs at the Marshall County Fair and National Night Out is part of the process of gathering community feedback about the designs. In the coming weeks the project team will be using community feedback to draft final designs for each site to be revealed in the end of August. Installation of the nature-based play spaces will begin this fall and carry over into next spring. The projects will likely be completed in phases.

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Members of the Children Discovering Nature in Northwest Minnesota project team at the Marshall County Fair in Warren, Minn. with two preliminary design concepts for a nature-based play space for the city of Warren. A similar presentation of designs for Castle Park in Crookston, Minn. will be made Tuesday, August 2 at National Night Out.  Pictured are (L to R) Daniel Handeen, U of M, Twin Cities Center for Sustainable Building Research; Kristen Murray, U of M, Twin Cities landscape architecture graduate student; Frances Tougas, North Valley Public Health SHIP coordinator; Kristine Neu, U of M, Crookston environmental landscaping undergraduate; and Eric Castle, landscape architect and U of M, Crookston Assistant Professor of Horticulture

In addition to creating new play spaces for children, the project is investigating how the process of designing these spaces can influence public health.  Assistant Professor Eric Castle remarked, "a main objective of this project is to stimulate people to start thinking about children's health as well as their own health, and getting people outdoors is a great way to do that."   

The nature-based play spaces in Crookston and Warren are two of several regional installations under the Children Discovering Nature in Northwest Minnesota Project, which is providing design and financial support for nature based-play spaces in six area communities. The project team also includes Daniel Handeen and Virajita Singh, both research fellows at the U of M, Twin Cities Center for Sustainable Building Research (CSBR), and Linda Kingery, executive director of the Northwest Minnesota Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP). Kirsten Fagerlund, interim Statewide Health Improvement (SHIP) coordinator on behalf of Sarah Reese, SHIP coordinator, is serving as the liaison between the community of Crookston and the project team. Frances Tougas, North Valley Public Health Statewide Health Improvement (SHIP) coordinator, is serving a similar role in Warren.

The team is working with city officials who will be instrumental in the approval of the design and installation of the space. In Warren, the team is also working with the Jaycees as the group will be providing a portion of the financial resources and volunteers to make the installation of their community's play space a reality. A portion of the financial support for the planning and implementation of both play spaces is being provided by a grant received from the Otto Bremer Foundation.

The project team is interested in forming a core advisory committee for the nature-based play space in each community. This committee would be comprised of a group of volunteers who will help make decisions, organize other volunteer efforts, and generally help create a vision for the play space into the future. If interested in being a part of the advisory committee in Crookston, community members are encouraged to contact Kirsten Fagerlund 218-281-3385 kfagerlund@pcphealth.org for more information. Community members of Warren should contact Frances Tougas 218-745-5154 ftougas@nvhc.net.

 

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Concepts for Castle Park in Crookston (above)
Concepts for Island Park in Warren (below)

 

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All community members and their children are encouraged to give feedback about the preliminary design concepts for Castle and Island Park . A short online feedback form is available at www.umcrookston.edu/childrenandnature; simply click on "Share Your Feedback" to give your much appreciated input.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

 

Contact: Eric Castle, assistant professor, castl047@umn.edu; Kristine Neu, communications assistant, neuxx019@umn.edu; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston will host its annual Ice Cream Social on ICSocialPoster2011v2.jpgWednesday, August 17 to kick off the 2011 Ox Cart Days celebration. The social will take place from 2 to 4:30 p.m. on the Campus Mall and will provide free ice cream and musical performances by The Valley Fiddlers. The event will also feature a reading, recipe demonstration, and book signing by Cooking Up the Good Life cookbook author, Susan Thurston, which will begin at 3 p.m.

The UMC bookstore will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be a special t-shirt on sale for $6.99 and tickets for the Minnesota State Fair will be offered at a reduced price. There will also be free balloons available for children.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and nearly 40 concentrations, including seven online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Jordan Melbye, communications assistant, University Relations, 218-281-8446 (melby085@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director of communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Since early July, volunteers have been out on the Minnesota prairie taking a very special census of a threatened prairie wildflower. The prairie fringed orchid has been on the U.S. List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants since 1989, and the annual census gives researchers important data necessary in the protection of the delicate orchid and its habitat.

Under the direction of Nancy Sather, botanist and the statewide orchid count coordinator, students with orchid.jpgvolunteers are out all over the state of Minnesota gathering data. Dan Svedarsky, director of the Center for Sustainability at the U of M, Crookston and research biologist with the Northwest Research and Outreach Center along with seniors Kristine Neu, Pelican Rapids, Minn., a double major in horticulture and communication; Ben Sullivan, Crookston, Minn.; and GreenCorps member Michael Knudson, Glencoe, Minn., both majoring in natural resources, recently  assisted with the census at the Pankratz Prairie located 11 miles southeast of Crookston and owned by The Nature Conservancy.  

"We are always working to better understand the threats and environmental factors affecting the flowering cycle of species like the prairie fringed orchid," Svedarsky explains. "We will be hosting a coordinating meeting on the Crookston campus on July 20 regarding this annual census and on-going research. This information is critical to protecting the prairie orchid. ; Polk County happens to be one of the hot spots for the orchid in our state."

FPO_closeup.jpgThe orchid's population has fluctuated over the years. Across 43 sites in Minnesota the count had declined steadily from 2001 to 2006. The plants prefer moist soil and warm temperatures, but like to grow on the higher side of ditches or hollows. The most common threats to the orchids are habitat destruction including the conversion of land for agricultural purposes, conversion of lands for housing or commercial uses, herbicide drift, and spread of invasive species.

"One of the places providing the perfect growing conditions for the orchid is near Glacial Ridge Project on the tallgrass prairie landscape of the Pembina Trail Preserve," says Svedarsky. "The Glacial Ridge Project, located 10 miles east of campus, is one of the largest wetland and prairie restoration projects in North America."

The prairie fringed orchid attracts hawk moths that feed on the nectar and transfer pollenorchid.jpg from flower to flower and plant to plant according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Web site (www.fws.gov). Pollination can be influenced by timing of the flowering, availability of other flowering species for the hawk moth, and the range of the pollinator in relation to the orchid populations. To learn more about the prairie fringed orchid, visit www.iucnredlist.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top, right: 

Ben Sullivan (center), a Shaver Environmental Landscaping intern working with the Northwest Research and Outreach Center, holding a Trimble GPS unit which is used to plot the precise location of the endangered plant in the foreground; Michael Knudson (left), a Minnesota GreenCorps stormwater management specialist working with the Center for Sustainability; and Kristine Neu (right), who is working with the Connecting Children to Nature in Northwest project this summer. Photo by Dan Svedarsky.

Bottom, left and right: Western Prairie Fringed Orchid on the Pankratz Prairie near Crookston, Minn. Photos by Ben Sullivan.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Land Management Field School Held at U of M, Crookston in June

The University of Minnesota, Crookston and the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) recently co-hosted a land management field school for new employees of resource management agencies, particularly the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Agriculture and land use was a primary focus of the 4-day field school which was held from June 21- 24 on the Crookston campus with field excursions to various sites within the county.

Dan Svedarsky, Director of the Center for Sustainability at the U of M, Crookston and Sims and ag research.jpgresearch biologist with the NWROC and Glen Kajewski, Assistant State Conservationist with NRCS organized the session along with U of M, Crookston Associate Professor David Demuth, who served as field camp coordinator.  

"Fewer graduates have farm backgrounds these days," according to Svedarsky, "and as they go to work for natural resource agencies and interact with agriculture, it is imperative that they have a familiarity with the process and the culture of folks who make their living on the land."

Eighteen participants from the NRCS, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Soil and Water Conservation Districts learned from technical personnel through lecture and lab sessions; most speakers were from the U of M, NWROC, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, and Extension. Equally important, field school participants learned from practitioners on trips to working farms. These ranged from the highly specialized operation of the Wagner Farms located in the heart of the Red River Valley where precision agriculture has been pioneered, to a 5-generation, conventional dairy farm, to a fruit and vegetable farm, to a diverse Amish farm in the eastern part of Polk County. Emphasis was placed on the natural resource base of soil and water and how farmers use these resources in agriculture, management considerations, and relationships with various agencies.

Wagner and precision ag.jpgThe intensive session provided an exposure to practical land use in Northwest Minnesota and was structured for participants to learn from each other as well as from more formal instruction. Participants came from all over the state and represented a broad spectrum of experiences and cultural diversity. According to one participant, "The skills and information I attained by participating in the school were absolutely invaluable and very applicable to my job and will make me a better employee for my agency."

Polk County and the Crookston campus were ideally suited for the field school due to the diversity of agricultural land uses within walking or commuting distance of the modern instructional and residential facilities on campus. The Red River Valley in the western part of the county has large intensive farms located on deep, rich prairie soils which transition to lighter soils developed under deciduous forests to the east with smaller, more diversified farms.  

Mary Lien and local foods.jpgParticipants were able to tour the Glacial Ridge Project, located 10 miles east of campus, where the NRCS has played in key role in investing Wetland Reserve Program resources to create the largest wetland and prairie restoration project in North America. This project is transitioning to the Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  A system of prescribed burning to increase forage quality for livestock is being implemented on Glacial Ridge, and is being evaluated as a wildlife management technique as well. Water table effects also are being evaluated in concert with shallow wetland restoration

Additional sponsors of the session included; U of M Extension; Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Wagner Farms; Truax Company, and the Minnesota Corn Growers. This was essentially the first field school of this sort to be hosted in Minnesota and plans are underway to make it an annual occurrence.

"There is an incredible transition of personnel within all agencies due to retirement of baby boomers." says Svedarsky, "That, plus the need for new hires to know more about the practical considerations of land use and the need to collaborate with other agencies really puts a high priority on these kind of sessions."

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top, right: Albert Sims, Ph.D., director of Operations at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center explaining the nature of agricultural research as applied to soils and agronomy at the University of Minnesota.


Center, left: Alumnus Gary Wagner '75 an area farmer explains the fundamentals of precision agriculture. Glen Kajewski, NRCS Assistant State Conservationist is to the right of Wagner.


Bottom, left: Mary Lien from Gonvick, Minn., describing a local foods meal catered to field school participants at the headquarters of the Rydell National Wildlife Refuge.

 


Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu) ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Support University of Minnesota, Crookston athletics while practicing your golf swing this summer at the Highway 2 Classic Golf Tournament on Thursday, July 21, 2011, at the Fosston Golf Course in Fosston, Minn., and the Oak Lake Golf Course in Erskine, Minn.  

The five person scramble will consist of 18 teams and will consist of nine holes at goldeneagle_logo copy.jpgthe Fosston Golf Course beginning at 10 a.m. and nine holes at the Oak Lake Golf Course teeing off at 2 p.m. There will be a $40 entry fee per person which will cover green fees, a pre-tournament meal, and drawings. All net proceeds of the tournament will go to Golden Eagle Athletic Scholarships. Please join us in this scholarship fund-raising event and enjoy the company of UMC alumni, staff, and friends.

If you are interested in participating in the tournament, contact Bill Tyrrell at 701-740-5278 or btyrrell@umn.edu.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and nearly 40 concentrations, including seven online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Bill Tyrrell, director, athletic fundraising, 218-281-8436 (btyrrell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director of communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

New and prospective students are invited to visit the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Saturday, July 16, 2011,  to learn more about the campus during Preview Day.  Students are encouraged to bring their families along to visit the campus.

Students may go online to register for the Preview Day on Saturday, July 16 by visiting  www.UMCrookston.edu/admissions or by contacting the Admissions Office at 218-281-8569. The welcome and admissions presentation begin at 10 a.m.

During Preview Days, students have the opportunity to interact with current students, faculty, and staff as they learn about the U of M, Crookston. Throughout the day the students will be able to receive detailed information about the various opportunities available on the Crookston campus, enjoy lunch in Brown Dining Hall, participate in a question and answer session, and tour the beautiful campus.   Preview Day is designed to help students and their families as they make decisions about college.

For more information, visit www.umcrookston.edu/admissions.

 Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Amber Evans, director, admissions, 218-281-8568, (evan0331@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Students interested in earning a degree online have three additional degrees to choose from at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The U of M Board of Regents approved the online delivery of Information Technology Management and Health Management degree programs during the May 2011 meeting and an online Communication degree was approved during the Board's June meeting held last week.

This has in effect grown the online offerings at the University of Minnesota, Crookston to MUMlgC_online_color.jpg10 degree programs in addition to three certificate programs.

The new online degrees join the existing degree programs in accounting, applied health, applied studies, business management, marketing, manufacturing management, and quality management.

Adel Ali, Ph.D., head of the Math, Science, and Technology Department is confident that the online delivery of the degree in information technology management will both enhance and strengthen what his department has to offer. "For students interested in the field of information technology, this is a great opportunity to complete a degree in an online environment," Ali says. "Our faculty will engage students online just as they do in the classroom by allowing them to explore some of the latest technologies while giving them the chance to interact with other students who share a similar passion for computer technology."

The Information Technology Management (ITM) degree is designed for students interested in working as an information technology specialist, application developer, network administrator or webmaster. Graduates are prepared to work integrating new and advanced computer technology into an organization's infrastructure and managing daily operations. Working on technology-based projects also helps students gain valuable work experience.

The Health Management degree offers students interested in healthcare the opportunity to earn a degree or further their professional career. It prepares graduates for management positions in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, human service organizations, government, and other health related organizations. The Health Management program meets the requirements and is approved by the state of Minnesota's Board of Examiner's for long-term care administration licensure. Upon completion of the B.S. degree, graduates are qualified to write the state and national Long-Term Care Administrator Licensure Examination.

Ali believes that students who seek the new online Health Management degree will find it greatly beneficial to their careers if they would combine that with the currently available online certificate for Health Informatics' Privacy and Security for Health Care Providers.   Similarly, the currently online offered certificate of Health Informatics for Software Engineers and Information Technology Professionals will be a great complement to the ITM degree. "The number of jobs available in health information technology is growing very fast now," Ali says, "And all indicators point to an even faster rate in the future to keep up with the computerization of medical records."
    
For those interested in the Communication degree, the Crookston campus can prepare students for a career in advertising, public relations, corporate communications, or as an editor, event planner, public affairs officer, political campaign leader or speech writer. Students can earn a degree with a concentration in an area of interest and one that will fit their career goals. Skills learned in communication will transfer to business, government, and public service.

Jack Geller, professor and head of the Liberal Arts and Education Department likes what the online degree in communication means for students. "Offering communication online will allow students to develop their writing, presentation and interpersonal skills and help them effectively translate those skills to the workplace," Geller says. "It augments the opportunities in the Liberal Arts and Education Department for students, and our faculty members are excited to engage students in the study of communication online as well as in the classroom."

The University of Minnesota, Crookston is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) and is a member of the North Central Association (NCA). For more information about the online degrees, visit www.umcrookston.edu/online  or call 218-281-8680 (cronline@umn.edu).
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Michelle Christopherson, director, Center for Adult Learning, 218-281-8679 (mchristo@umn.edu); Adel Ali, head, Math, Science, and Technology, 218-281-8268 (adelali@umn.edu); Jack Geller, head, Liberal Arts and Education, 218-281-8248 (gelle045@umn.edu); E

University of Minnesota, Crookston Chancellor Charles H. Casey joined other college and university presidents who belong to Minnesota Campus Compact in nominating recipients of three statewide awards.  Recipients were honored June 14, 2011, at St. Catherine's University in St. Paul, Minn. Minnesota Campus Compact award recipients included Rae French and Nana Boaten from the U of M, Crookston and North Country Food Bank, a community partner of the Crookston campus.

The Presidents' Student Leadership Award recognized an individual student or a student organization that modeled a deep commitment to civic responsibility and leadership, evidenced by initiative, innovative and collaborative approaches to addressing public issues, effective community building, and integration of civic engagement into the college experience.

Boaten_Nana 9933.jpgNana Boaten (at left), a senior majoring in marketing, earned the Student Leadership Award.  Originally from Ghana, Boaten served as senator of international relations for the Crookston Student Association, president of the Soccer Club, treasurer for the National Society of Leadership and Success, and secretary of the Study Abroad Club this past year.  Additionally, he has been a member of Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE), UMC Rotary Club, Students Today Leaders Forever, and the Residential Housing Jury Board for Student Conduct.  He also served on six campus committees.  When asked to represent his country, Boaten steps up by giving presentations and cooking ethnic food for special events.  His service is not restricted to the Crookston campus community though.  He has delivered meals, coached Crookston Youth Soccer Association, assisted on the Habitat for Humanity house, served Thanksgiving meals at Villa St. Vincent, hosted high school students overnight for the Multicultural Excellence Program, raised funds for the Salvation Army, helped organize "Winter Wonderland," and helped sandbag the city of Crookston.  

The Presidents' Civic Engagement Steward Award recognized the faculty, administration, or staff or a group that has significantly advanced their campus' distinctive civic mission by forming strong partnerships, supporting others' civic engagement, and working to institutionalize a culture and practice of engagement.

Rae French (at right) was the recipient of the Steward Award.  French coordinates the Learning French_Rae 1724.jpgAbroad Program and works closely with international students to provide opportunities that are mutually beneficial to them and to our domestic students and local community.  In an effort to nurture relationships between new Chinese students and community, provide teaching opportunities for Chinese students, and provide enrichment opportunities for Crookston youth, French initiated a highly successful Chinese Language and Culture program this fall for students of all ages.  Additionally, she coordinates and brings groups of students to local classrooms to give presentations about their countries.  She also organizes the International Dinner Series, International Week, and passport drives for the campus and community.  She facilitates host families and does an amazing job making sure we all have many opportunities to learn a bit more about each other's culture.

The Presidents' Community Partner Award recognized a community-based organization that has enhanced the quality of life in the community in meaningful and measurable ways and has developed a sustained, reciprocal partnership with the college or university, thus enriching educational as well as community outcomes.

The North Country Food Bank (NCFB) received this award based on its ongoing partnership with the U of M, Crookston.  In August, NCFB hosted two orientation groups during Meet Crookston Through Service, UMC's service day during New Student Orientation.  Student excitement from that event spurred additional collaborations by a variety of student groups.  In September NCFB agreed to host an AmeriCorps member through UMC, who completed 300 hours and helped organize additional volunteers.  In addition to supervising her, they provided her with a life-changing education on the extent of the services and the need.  The Crookston campus and NCFB collaborated on a Mobile Food Drop in December, where over 27,000 pounds of food was distributed within two hours.  Students returned with a new perspective on hunger.  NCFB has accommodated the students' schedules and opened the warehouse during evening hours so that student clubs could pack boxes and backpacks.  Additionally, they have assisted with awareness events such as a Hunger Banquet and an Empty Bowls Project by providing local hunger statistics.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, service learning, 218-281-8526 (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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