October 2011 Archives

IMG_1958.jpgDerek Cox, an aviation major at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his student solo flight at the Crookston Municipal Airport. The Walker, Minn., native is a freshman and completed his solo flight on Wednesday, October 26, 2011. His advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus.

The significance of the first student solo flight cannot be overemphasized.Landing an aircraft involves very difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest.

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student IMG_1952.jpghaving him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Songs of Temperance and Temptation is the theme of a concert to be performed on Rose Ensemble 2011_formalindoor.jpgTuesday, November 1, 2011, in the Kiehle Auditorium at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The Rose Ensemble will bring the flavor and the music of the prohibition period to life beginning at 7 p.m. Tickets for the concert are $12 for adults and $9 for students with an ID. With the purchase of two or more regular priced tickets an additional ticket is free.

Prohibition leaps onto the musical stage in this delightful look at the history and humor behind Minnesota's long-standing love/hate relationship with the saloon. Semi-staged and fully costumed, this research-rich yet light-hearted performance features the songs and stories of Carrie Nation and 19th-century Temperance Union meetings, balanced by a full cup of good ol' anti-Prohibition songs. Projections of historical photos and narration from F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby complement the show, as the performers skip and prance to Victorian waltzes, croon 1920s jazz, launch into Irish reels, ragtime, and gospel, and belt out some of Irving Berlin's best show-stoppers!

Founded in 1996 by Artistic Director Jordan Sramek, The Rose Ensemble reawakens the ancient with vocal music that stirs the emotions, challenges the mind, and lifts the spirit. The Saint Paul, Minnesota group tours internationally with repertoire spanning 1,000 years and 25 languages, including new research in Middle Eastern, European and American vocal traditions. The Ensemble has released 9 recordings. For more information, visit www.roseensemble.org.

LegacyLogo.jpgThe concert is sponsored in part by a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board through appropriation by the Minnesota State Legislature and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: George French, director of music and theater, 218-281-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Staying Out of the Neutral Zone

Call it a drive to excel, her competitive nature, or an intense form of stress relief, it doesn't matter to Sophomore Karen Celmer because she takes her ice hockey seriously. The equine science major finds herself on the ice in Minnesota after growing up on hockey in North Liberty, Ind., a small town located along the northern border of the state near South Bend.

celmer_k_3_years_hockey.jpgShe started skating when she was two years old graduating to hockey skates by the time she was three or four. "When I was learning to skate, you could not find small enough hockey skates," Celmer explains. "Now you can, but I had no choice but to start skating on figure skates."

Playing hockey meant regular trips to South Bend where she would play with and against players from Michigan and as far away as Valparaiso, Ind. She grew up playing in a wide variety of venues from an old munitions warehouse to the Joyce Center at Notre Dame, but most important, Celmer grew up playing on teams with rosters that were primarily boys.

As she made her way through hockey programs, celmer_k_high_school_hockey.jpgCelmer played for the Irish Youth Hockey League, Riley High School, and John Adams High School, all located in South Bend. She was one of three girls playing hockey until around her sophomore year of high school when the other girls left the team, and she was advised against continuing. In fact, she was told she could be a "liability to the team."

 "I switched teams at that point," Celmer says. "I wanted to play hockey, and I wanted to play for a team that believed in me enough to give me a chance."

When she was a high school senior, she helped to start a traveling girls' hockey team known as the Indianapolis Racers. She is proud of what the young team has accomplished in such a short while. Last March, the U19 team won the Mid-American District Championship to earn a berth in the national tournament in only their second year of existence.
As a college student, Celmer continues to play hockey with the Hockey Club at the U of M, Crookston. It took special permission from the league's commissioner, but she takes to the ice with the rest of the guys three nights a week for practice and twice during the weekend for games.

DSC_2107.jpgWhat she loves most about playing is when she knows she is playing well and outskates a competitor or manages to take the puck from them. "When I find myself playing well, I have a very deep sense of gratification," she smiles. "It makes it all worthwhile."

Outside of classes and hockey, Celmer represents the Hockey Club at full board meetings of the Crookston Student Association and plans to coach mites as part of the Crookston Youth Hockey Program this winter. She is also a member of the Collegiate FFA at the U of M, Crookston.

Celmer loves hockey; that goes without saying, but it isn't her only passion. Her horse, Bleu, is the other. She has been involved with horses since she was in grade school, and they are the reason this one time nursing major transferred to Crookston to earn her degree in equine science.

"I grew up in a small town, and I wanted to go to smaller college," she reflects. "Finding a place that had the degree program I wanted along with the chance to play hockey helped me decide."

While Celmer isn't certain of what is next in her future, she is considering her options. "I know I want to work in the equine industry or maybe go to veterinary school," she states. "I will have to see."

Right now though, it really doesn't matter, Celmer is too busy with hockey and horses to contemplate very far into her future. Whatever tomorrow holds, she will bring to it all the intensity she can muster because that's who she is.

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Filled with more than 200 guests, Bede Ballroom was the site of the annual Torch & 2011_10-26_Torch & Shield group 2530.jpgShield Recognition held at the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Wednesday, October 27, 2011.  The highest honor given by the campus, the Torch & Shield Award, celebrated the leadership of four individuals who have aided in the development of the Crookston campus, the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) and Extension. The evening, hosted by Charles H. Casey, chancellor at the U of M, Crookston and Albert Sims, director of operations at the NWROC, also was an opportunity to recognize and thank donors.

This year's Torch & Shield honorees included  Robert Nelson, registrar and director of institutional research, U of M, Crookston;  Kathleen O'Brien, vice president for university services, University of Minnesota; Li Shuming, president of Zhejiang Economic and Trade Polytechnic, Hangzhou, China; and Carol Windels, professor of plant pathology, Northwest Research and Outreach Center.

President Li addressed the crowd via Skype from Hangzhou, China. The U of M, 2011_10-26_Torch & Shield Li Shuming 2600.jpgCrookston collaborates with ZJETP and a number of students from that institution currently attend the Crookston campus, where they are working to complete their bachelor's degrees.

Greetings from the University of Minnesota Foundation were brought by Frank Robertson, director of planned giving. Robertson was joined by Corby Kemmer, director of development and alumni relations at the U of M, Crookston, to recognize members of the Presidents Club.

2011_10-26_Torch & Shield students 2582.jpgThe evening included a second focus showcasing student achievement. Brooke Hamilton, a junior from Adams, Minn., majoring in business management, opened the evening with the solo Silent Noon from "House of Life" accompanied by George French, director of music and theater on the Crookston campus. Ben Williams, a junior from Excelsior, Minn., majoring in natural resources, spoke to the audience about the importance of student academic scholarships. The evening was captured on video by Tony Taylor, a junior majoring in marketing from Sheridan, Wyo., who works as a student assistant in Media Services.

Concluding the evening was a research presentation by Katy Smith, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Math, Science, and Technology Department. Joining her were two students, Tyler Brazier, a senior from Greenbush, Minn., majoring in software engineering; and Beth Walters, a senior from Crosslake, Minn., majoring in environmental science. Together with Smith they presented their work on the impact of wetland plants on the restoration of contaminated soil sediments and the construction and design of a greenhouse gas collection chamber.

Allison Noll, a senior double majoring in agricultural business and agricultural education from Mahnomen, Minn., works as a student assistant in the Office of Development & Alumni Relations and was an integral part of the evening's activities. The string trio playing during the social included two student musicians, and a number of students attended the event as representatives on advisory committees. Students in the Horticulture Club were responsible for the floral arrangements and Student Ambassadors assisted during the evening. A number of students also were involved in serving the banquet following the program.

For more information on Torch & Shield, visit www.umcrookston.edu/torchandshield.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top right photo: (left to right):Carol Windels, professor of plant pathology, Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC);  UMC Chancellor Charles Casey; Robert Nelson, registrar and director of institutional research, UMC; Albert Sims, director of operations, NWROC;  Kathleen O'Brien, vice president for university services, University of Minnesota.


Center right photo: President Li addresses the audience at Torch & Shield via Skype.

Bottom left photo:
Students featured at the Torch & Shield Recognition were (left to right): Ben Williams, Beth Walters, Brooke Hamilton, Tyler Brazier, and Tony Taylor.


Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer @umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

American_Degree_FFA.jpgNine University of Minnesota, Crookston students received the FFA American Degree in Indianapolis, Ind., at the National FFA Convention on Saturday, October 22, 2011.  The degree is the highest degree that can be attained by active FFA members.  It is based on the member's Supervised Agricultural Experience Program and their leadership experiences.  Less than 2% of FFA member nationwide achieve this degree level.

FFA American Degree recipients pictured include: Maria Funk,  a junior agricultural education major from Sebeka; Whitney Lian a sophomore agricultural education major from Thief River Falls; Haley Koubsky  a sophomore double major in animal science and agricultural education from Starbuck/Glenwood; Whitney Jacobson, a sophomore double major in animal science and agricultural education from Thief River Falls; Justin Goodroad, a freshman double major in agricultural education and animal science from Chisago Lakes; Kasey Okke, a sophomore agricultural education major from Hawley; Kaitlyn Tollefsrud a senior equine science and agricultural education double major from Hawley; and Dustin Smith  a sophomore triple major in agricultural business, business management, and agronomy from Staples-Motley. Not pictured, but also receiving his degree was Andrew Gorentz, a senior agronomy major from Perham.

Former Minnesota FFA President Jason Troendle was elected national secretary at the same convention.  Troendle is originally from St. Charles, Minn., and attends college at Bethel in Roseville, Minn.  It has been over twenty years since Minnesota has had a national officer.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, front row (l to r):  Maria Funk, Whitney Lian, Haley Koubsky, and Whitney Jacobson. Back row:  Justin Goodroad, Kasey Okke, Kaitlyn Tollefsrud, and Dustin Smith.  Not pictured but also receiving his degree was Andrew Gorentz.


Contact: Lyle Westrom, professor, Agricultural and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8110 (lwestrom@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Jacob Pastoors, a junior at the University of Minnesota, Crookston from Olivia, Minn., pastoors_j.jpgcompleted his first student solo flight on Saturday, October 22, 2011, at the Crookston Municipal Airport.  

Pastoors is an agricultural aviation major and following his first solo flight, he will continue to expand his flight skills toward achieving his private pilot certificate. His advisor is U of M, Crookston Chief Pilot Mike Vivion.

pastoors_j2.jpgThe University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Mixed Blood Theatre of Minneapolis, Minn., will present the play "According to Coyote," an energetic collection of lightning-paced legends, on Monday evening, October 24, 2011, at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The performance begins at 7 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium and is free and open to the public.  

This collection of legends gives life to Coyote, the trickster, teacher, magician, and hero in American Indian traditions.  Playwright John Kauffman employs age-old techniques of music, dance, magic and narrative to bring to life this character in all his guises: Coyote the Creator, the namer of animals and bringer of fire; Coyote the Trickster, conniving for an advantage that usually backfires on him; and Coyote the Teacher, from whom lessons of humility, wisdom, and humanity are learned.  

The event is sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Programs. Learn more at http://www.mixedblood.com/regional-tour.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A legend has passed. On September 25, 2011, Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and sustainable development activist died in Nairobi, Kenya, after a prolonged battle with cancer. In her memory and as a tribute to her legacy, the University of Minnesota, Crookston will plant a memorial apple tree on campus. In coordination with the hosting of the Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) conference, a Honeycrisp apple tree will be planted at 4 p.m. on Friday, October 21, 2011, in the Nature Nook, near the west entrance to Bergland Laboratory on the campus. The public is invited to attend.

The family of Maathai and the Green Belt Movement asks well-wishers to plant a tree to provide a living symbol of Wangari and her tireless work to make the world a better and more peaceful place. U of M, Crookston Chancellor Charles H. Casey will make comments during the tree planting along with Harouna Maiga, Ph.D., associate professor of animal science and a native of Mali, Africa.

The recipient of numerous awards commemorating her activities with sustainability, international conservation, women's rights, health, Maathai is perhaps best known for wangari.jpgfounding the Green Belt Movement in 1977. The movement was launched in Kenya primarily to inspire women to improve their livelihoods by planting trees for firewood, clean water, and soil protection. It has become a world-wide movement, particularly in third-world countries.

Dan Svedarsky, director of the Center for Sustainability had the pleasure of meeting Maathai at the U.N. Conference on Global Climate Change held in Copenhagen in December of 2009. "A group of us met with her at the Danish Film Institute to view the premier showing of, 'Taking Root,' a film featuring her life story. That film and discussions with her which followed, were an incredibly moving experience," according to Svedarsky.

Background

Wangari Maathai was born in Nyeri, Kenya (Africa) in 1940. The first woman in East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate degree, Professor Maathai obtained a degree in Biological Sciences from Mount St. Scholastica College in Atchison, Kansas (1964).(Her studies in American were supported by a Kennedy Foundation scholarship for Kenyans which also included President Obama's father.)  She subsequently earned a Master of Science degree from the University of Pittsburgh (1966). Professor Maathai pursued doctoral studies in Germany and later obtained a Ph.D. (1971) from the University of Nairobi where she also taught veterinary anatomy. She became chair of the Department of Veterinary Anatomy in 1976.

Professor Maathai is internationally recognized for her persistent struggle for democracy, human rights and environmental conservation. She has addressed the UN on several occasions and spoke on behalf of women at special sessions of the General Assembly during the five-year review of the Earth Summit. She and the Green Belt Movement have received numerous awards, most notably the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize. In 2005, Professor Maathai was honored by Time Magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world, and by Forbes Magazine as one of 100 most powerful women in the world.

Apple experts at the University of Minnesota were responsible for the development of the Honeycrisp apple making it an apt tribute to Maathai on the Crookston campus. The event is sponsored by the Crookston Students for Sustainable Development (CSSD) and the Center for Sustainability. It commences an initiative to develop an "Edible Campus Landscape" where fruit-producing trees and shrubs will be planted along with possibly campus gardening. "Wangari would have liked that," according to Svedarsky.

To learn more, visit www.greenbeltmovement.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and sustainable development activist, from www.greenbeltmovement.org.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, communications, University Relations, 218-281-8342 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

University of Minnesota, Crookston Freshman John Niemczyk, an aviation major from John Niemczyk.jpgHugo, Minn., completed his first solo flight on October 12, 2011.  Niemczyk is the first member of this fall's private pilot class at the University of Minnesota, Crookston to complete the important milestone of flying an airplane without an instructor aboard.

 In keeping with an age-old tradition, Niemczyk's shirt-tail was "trimmed" and his name and the date of first solo was inked onto the cloth, which is now posted prominently at the Crookston Airport.

The John Niemczyk2.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. His advisor is U of M, Crookston Chief Pilot Mike Vivion. Niemczyk's flight instructor is Carolyn Clark from UND. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of more than 1,500 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu)

The number of degree-seeking students enrolled at the University of Minnesota, Crookston fall semester 2011 has surpassed previous record levels, continuing a five-year trend of increasing enrollment and a fourth year of record high enrollment.  Official enrollment figures for all University of Minnesota campuses were announced at the Board of Regents meeting this afternoon.  

Enrollment data puts the number of degree-seeking students attending the Crookston campus at 1,600 for fall semester 2011. That number bests 2010's all-time record of 1,462 undergraduates and signifies an increase of 9.4% since last fall.  When comparing fall 2011 enrollment to fall 2006, the percentage is even more remarkable, reflecting an increase of 52% in degree-seeking students over that five-year period.

The number of undergrads pursuing their degrees online is also up, bringing the total of online-only students to 464.  The U of M, Crookston now offers ten degree programs entirely online, adding its on-campus programs in communication, information technology management, and health management to its online offerings this fall.

Not surprisingly, the growth in enrollment resulted from an increase in applications, but the Crookston campus also has made strides in retention and graduation rates.  It continues to attract quality students, indicated by the rise in the average ACT score for incoming students, which rose from 21.6 last year to 21.8 for fall semester 2011.

While the reputation of the Crookston campus has continued to advance--enhanced most recently by receiving recognition and "Best College" designations from both U.S. News and World Report and The Princeton Review again this fall--the enrollment growth is attributed to additional factors.  "Students are definitely attracted to the University of Minnesota brand, the educational options and degrees we provide, and the personal attention they receive here," says Charles Casey, chancellor of the U of M, Crookston.  

"Prospective students and their families who visit the campus instantly understand our marketing theme, 'Small Campus. Big Degree.'  They often comment on the friendly, personal feeling and compare it to that of a small private school," says Casey. "When I visit with our graduates and their families at commencement in spring, they express how important the attention and mentorship from faculty and staff have been to them," he adds.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston now delivers 26 undergraduate degree programs--ten of which are also available entirely online--and welcomes students from more than 25 countries and 40 states.  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Andrew Svec, director of communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu) Robert Nelson, registrar, 218-281-8560 (nelson@umn.edu) Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director of communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

To celebrate the 200th anniversary of pianist and composer Franz Liszt's birth, the SteveCarlson copy-1.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston will host a concert by Stephen Carlson, professor of piano at Bemidji State University. The concert will be held on Tuesday, October 25, 2011, at 7:30 p.m. The concert will be performed on the new grand piano located in the Evergreen Residence Hall lobby.  Evergreen Hall is located directly north of the UMC athletic fields on the south side of the campus. The performance, sponsored by Concerts & Lectures, is free and the public is invited.

The evening will begin with Liszt's St. Francis of Paola Walking on the Water followed by Sonata No. 32 in C minor, Op. 111 by Ludwig van Beethoven. Following a program intermission will be Ballade No. 4 in Fminor, Op. 52 by Frederic Chopin and conclude with Three Movements from Petrushka by Igor Stravinsky.

A member of the Bemidji State University Music Department since 2006, Stephen Carlson is a versatile soloist and chamber musician who has performed at many colleges, universities, and festivals throughout much of the U.S. and Eastern Canada.  
In 2005, Dr. Carlson made his New York debut as a solo recitalist in Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall with a program that included Schumann's Symphonic Etudes, Stravinsky's Three Movements from Petrushka, and various works by Beethoven, Debussy and Scriabin.  From 1995 to 2003, he appeared at Minnesota Valley Sommarfest in St. Peter, Minn., where he performed an array of solo and collaborative works.  Appointed to the Performing Artist Roster of the South Carolina Arts Commission, he has also performed chamber music with members of the South Carolina Philharmonic as well as the Charleston and Greenville [S.C.] Symphonies.  He has appeared with the Bemidji Symphony Orchestra three times: last season in which he played Beethoven's Emperor Concerto, in 2009 when he played Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 and in 2007 when he played Beethoven's Triple Concerto along with Michelle Laliberte and Patrick Riley.  He also performed the Tchaikovsky with the Bismarck-Mandan Symphony, Mozart's Concerto in A major, K. 414 with the Gustavus Adolphus Chamber Orchestra, and Saint-Saëns's Carnival of the Animals with the Mississippi Valley Chamber Orchestra.

He completed the doctor of musical arts degree in piano performance and pedagogy at the University of Iowa where he studied with Uriel Tsachor.  He is also a graduate of the University of Illinois and Gustavus Adolphus College where he studied with Ian Hobson and John McKay, respectively.

This season, Carlson has recitals scheduled in Arizona, Minnesota, North and South Carolina, North Dakota, and Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Also an innovative clinician with wide-ranging interests, he is frequently called upon to give master classes, piano teacher workshops, and to adjudicate contests. Most recently, he instituted "Piano Day" with the support of the Bemidji State University Foundation and Department of Music.  Prior to coming to Bemidji State where he is associate professor of music, Carlson was a tenured faculty member at Coker College in Hartsville, S.C.  He has also taught piano at the University of Arkansas Pine Bluff, Gustavus Adolphus College and St. Joseph's School of Music in St. Paul, Minn.

For more information, contact Associate Professor George French at 218-281-8266.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: George French, associate professor, Liberal Arts and Education, 218-281-8266 (fgrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Early Childhood Education Program at the University of Minnesota, Crookston recently hosted an institutional evaluation visit by an assessment team representing the Minnesota Board of Teaching. This site visit was a follow up to the Crookston campus earning initial institutional approval from the Minnesota Board of Teaching in 2007 to prepare students for state teacher licensure.

The evaluation team, chaired by Teacher Education Specialist JoAnn Van Aernum, was on campus for the three-day visit to review the data gathered since 2007 related to the 54 standards established by the Board. These standards are meant to ensure that teacher candidates have the opportunity to learn, develop, and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required for teacher licensure.

Meeting these standards, which are designed to maintain high quality in teacher licensure candidates, is part of the process as the U of M, Crookston seeks to gain full-continuing approval for its teacher preparation program. Full-continuing approval has a seven-year interval and is determined by the Board of Teaching.
 
Van Aernum indicated she felt the visit was a positive one and clarified its importance. "The purpose of the visit by our team is to evaluate according to the criteria and make a recommendation to the Board of Teaching," she said. "It is critical that institutions meet these established rules for teacher preparation in order to provide the high quality teachers we need in our schools."

A report from the team will be prepared and delivered to the campus in early December, at which time the campus may provide further documentation if needed. A recommendation by the team will be sent to the Board for a final decision, and an announcement of the decision is expected in the first quarter of 2012.

The Board of Teaching, created in 1973, provides leadership for improvements in teacher education programs in order to assure that the state has well-qualified, professional teachers. The Governor appoints eleven members to the Board of Teaching: six classroom teachers, one higher education faculty member, one school administrator, and three members of the public, two of whom must have spent some time on a local school board. The Board determines the standards and practices that will serve the state's teachers and teacher preparation institutions. For more information, visit http://education.state.mn.us/mde/index.html.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 16 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of more than 1,500 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Jack Geller, professor and head, Liberal Arts and Education Department, 218-281-8248 (gelle045@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Fall Convocation is scheduled for Thursday, October 20, 2011, at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The convocation will be held in Kiehle Auditorium at 12:30 p.m., and celebrates student accomplishment including recognizing those earning a perfect 4.0 grade point average during spring semester 2011 and the contributions of student-athletes and student leaders. The public is welcome to attend.

The fall convocation guest speaker will be Linda Kingery, at right, executive director of the Kingery_Linda 6757.jpgNorthwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP), where she has served since 2000. Under Kingery's leadership the NWRSDP functions with the University to further research, education, and outreach consistent with sustainable development principles. Kingery is a 2006 Torch & Shield Award recipient.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of more than 1,500 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Tom Baldwin, senior vice chancellor, academic and student affairs, 218-281-8340 (tbaldwin@umn.edu): Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

New and prospective students are invited to visit the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Saturday, October 22, 2011, to learn more about the campus during Preview Day.  Students are encouraged to bring their families along for the in depth look at campus.  

Students may go online to register for the Preview Day on Saturday, October 22 by visiting  www.umcrookston.edu/admissions or by contacting the Admissions Office at 218-281-8569. The welcome and admissions presentations begin at 10 a.m.

During Preview Days, students have the opportunity to interact with current students, faculty, and staff as they learn about the U of M, Crookston. Throughout the day the students will be able to receive detailed information about the various opportunities available on the Crookston campus, participate in a question and answer session, tour the beautiful campus, and enjoy lunch in Brown Dining Hall.   Preview Day is designed to help students and their families as they make decisions about college.

For more information, visit www.umcrookston.edu/admissions.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Amber Evans, director, admissions, 218-281-8568, (evan0331@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston Horticulture Club is hosting the Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) 39th annual conference. This event will be from Thursday, October 20 to Sunday, October 23, 2011, and the theme is "Little Campus on the Prairie." The MACHS conference is expected to bring more than 40 horticultural students from across the Midwest to the U of M, Crookston campus. This is the first time that the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club has hosted this event. 

machs2011.jpgMACHS is comprised of horticulture clubs from universities  and two-year colleges in the Midwest Region including Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. MACHS is a branch of the Association of Collegiate Branches (ACB) within the American Society for Horticultural Sciences (ASHS). ACB is a national forum comprised of undergraduate horticulture clubs within ASHS.

The objective of MACHS is to promote an awareness of the profession of horticulture, furnish a medium of communication for horticulture students, and exchange club and professional ideas. These objectives are met through a variety of activities taking place throughout the weekend conference.

 Thursday night students will gather in the U of M, Crookston greenhouse classroom for registration, refreshments, and a campus welcome by Ron DelVechio, U of M, Crookston professor and head of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department. Friday morning begins with a contest which includes a general knowledge exam, plant identification, and plant judging. Each school has a team of four students whose individual scores contribute to the team total. This contest is designed to challenge the horticulture students and allow them to see where they stand in relation to other universities.

Friday afternoon will include three guest speakers. Linda Kingery of the Northwest Regional and Sustainable Development Partnership will be talking to students about local foods. Kathleen Brokke, historian and horticulturalist, will be performing her interpretation of Fannie Manhood Heath, a pioneer horticulturalist in this region. Minnesota Nursery and Landscaping Association president Bert Swanson will also be sharing his industry perspective with the up and coming industry leaders. Friday evening will include a banquet meal with keynote speaker Rusty Schmidt, natural resource specialist with the Washing Conservation District. Schmidt is one of three authors of the Bluethumb Guide to Raingardens which has changed the way people think about using water in the Twin Cities area and beyond.

Saturday is a day of regional tours. Students will begin the day with naturalist Rhett Johnson leading the group through the Agassiz Dunes Scientific and Natural Area in Fertile, Minn. Traveling south to Detroit Lakes, Minn. the group will see the poinsettia growing operation of Bergen's Greenhouse, Inc. In Park Rapids, Minn. students will visit the wholesale perennial growing operation of Bergen's Nursery. The final stop for the group will be Itasca State Park where the group will take a tour of Minnesota's conifers. Students will also have an opportunity to cross the headwaters of the Mississippi River which will be a first-time experience for many students who come from much farther downriver.

Sunday marks the end of the weekend conference as the MACHS students hold their annual business meeting. Awards from Friday's team contest also will be presented. It will be a weekend of learning, networking, and growing as a horticulturalist for all students involved.

The entire event is being planned by the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club students with support from U of M, Crookston staff and faculty. The MACHS annual conference is the largest undertaking in the history of the Horticulture Club, and they are excited to showcase their program, the campus, and the community to many other universities and technical colleges.


U of M, Crookston senior Kristine Neu currently serves as the chair of MACHS, and she works with a team of four other officers from South Dakota State University; the University of Wisconsin, River Falls; and Iowa State University. For more information about MACHS visit, www.umcrookston.edu/machs.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 


Contact: Kristine Neu, communications assistant, (neuxx019@umn.ed) ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Alumni from the University of Minnesota, Crookston are invited to attend an alumni social on Thursday, November 10, 2011. The social will take place from 5 -7 p.m. at the Ramada Plaza Suites located at 1635 42nd Street South in Fargo, N.D. Refreshments will be served.

This marks the second time the University of Minnesota, Crookston Alumni Association has hosted an alumni social in Fargo, and all alumni are encouraged to attend. For more information, contact Rose Ulseth in the alumni office at 218-281-8439.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED.  The University of Minnesota, Crookston will host a horse owner education program on Saturday, November 12, 2011, from 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at the University Teaching and Outreach Center (UTOC) on the campus. The cooperative program between the U of M, Crookston and U of M, Saint Paul is designed to assist current horse owners as well as those interested in owning a horse in the future.
 
The program is recommended for ages 13 and up but is open for everyone. Registration is required for this program and the deadline is Wednesday, November 9 at 11:59 p.m. The program registration fee is $25. In case of cancellation due to inclement weather, an e-mail will be sent to all participants. Mail registration(s) and check(s) made out to the U of M to: Registration Coordinator, University of Minnesota, 405 Coffey Hall, 1420 Eckles Avenue, St Paul. Minn., 55108. Online registration is also available at www.regonline.com/FallRegionalHorse. Registration questions can be directed to 1-800-876-8636.

The doors will open at 8:30 a.m. and light refreshments will be served throughout the day. There will be three sets of hour-long sessions. Participants are invited to select the program of their choice.

Programs running concurrently at 9 a.m. include Winter Care led by Marcia Hathaway, Ph.D., from the U of M; and Equine First Aid Away from Home led by Gemma Drees, D.V.M., from the Red Lake Falls Vet Clinic. 

At 10 a.m. the concurrent programs are Selecting and Extending Your Hay Supply led by Krishona  Martinson, Ph.D., from the U of M; and Body Condition Scoring and Weight Estimation with Jennifer Earing, Ph.D., and Beth Allen, both from the U of M.

The last two sessions for the day begin at 11 a.m. and include Feeding the Problem Horse led by Hathway, and Conformation: Form to Function led by ADawn Melbye instructor  from the U of M, Crookston. The day concludes with an optional question and answer session with program speakers from noon to 12:30 p.m.

For more information about this event, visit www.extension.umn.edu/horse.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of more than 1,500 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: ADawn Melbye, instructor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8125 (amelbye@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A scholarship assisting "non-traditional" women in completing their education at the University of Minnesota has been awarded to three students from the Crookston campus. Recipients of the Carol E. Macpherson Memorial Scholarship include: Senior Beth Debeltz, a health management major from Embarrass, Minn.; Junior Donna Malarkey, a quality management major from Crookston, Minn.; and Sophomore Nan Wright, an organizational psychology major also from Crookston.

"It is an honor for our campus to have three women awarded the Carol E. Macpherson Memorial Scholarship," says Melissa Dingmann, director of financial aid at Crookston. "We know that sometimes students can feel daunted by the thought of re-entering the academic world, but help exists in the form of scholarships designed to assist them in the transition. These three award recipients are most deserving, and they are dedicated, hard-working students who are committed to their educational goals."

"I hope to develop and capitalize on my experience at UMC," says Malarkey.  "My mother was a 1945 graduate of the Northwest School of Agriculture, and I hope to be able to follow her example and call myself a U of M, Crookston alumni in 2012. As a non-traditional student, self-supporting, with limited resources, the scholarship assistance is deeply appreciated."

Recipients of the scholarship are chosen by a selection committee including University staff and faculty with particular interest and expertise in assisting non-traditional women students. In order to be considered for the scholarship, a student must be 28 years or older, been out of school for at least five years, be in good academic standing with the U of M, and meet half-time enrollment status. A weighted list of selection criteria includes the strength of the student's written personal statement, reference letters, and other special circumstances.  

Wright appreciates her scholarship. "I am grateful to the foundation and family for their belief in and support of me, and I assure you, I will do all I can to be worthy of the honor," she says.

It is much the same for Debeltz, an online student, "First of all I would like to say thank you to the family of Carol E. Macpherson. It is an honor to be selected and I am very grateful. I also would like to thank the staff and faculty at the University who selected me as well. This scholarship will help me attain my career goals as a wife and a mother, and I look forward to paying it forward to others in the future."

The scholarship was created in the late 1970s and is sustained through the generosity of Macpherson's family. To learn more about the scholarship, visit www.umn.edu/women/macphersonHistory.html.

The three recipients have been invited to attend an awards and recognition event on October 21, 2011, in Memorial Hall in the McNamara Alumni Center on the Twin Cities campus. The Celebrating University Women Awards & Recognition event, which takes place from 3 -5 p.m., is designed to honor outstanding U of M women students, staff, and faculty. It is free and the public is welcome. RSVP online at z.umn.edu/2011wmcawards.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Melissa Dingmann, director, financial aid, 218-281-8576 (Dingmann@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Minnesota Rural Health Association (MRHA) will join the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health (NOSORH) and other state/national rural stakeholders in celebrating the first-ever National Rural Health Day on Thursday, November 17, 2011. Events recognizing National Rural Health Day and "Celebrating the Power of Rural" are being planned throughout the nation. 

MRHA_logo.jpgThe MRHA is planning to mark the occasion by offering at no charge a cyber conference titled the "Status of Rural Health in Minnesota" presented by Paul Jansen, program manager for Trauma System and the Rural Health Advisory Committee, MN Dept of Health Office of Rural Health and Primary Care.  The conference begins at noon. Those interested in registering should visit the association's website at www.mnruralhealth.org to register. 

NOSORH created National Rural Health Day as a way to showcase rural America; increase awareness of rural health-related issues; and promote the efforts of NOSORH, State Offices of Rural Health and others in addressing those issues.  Plans call for National Rural Health Day to become an annual celebration on the third Thursday of each November.

Approximately 62 million people - nearly one in five Americans - live in rural and frontier communities throughout the United States. "These small towns, farming communities and frontier areas are wonderful places to live and work; they are places where neighbors know each other and work together," notes Teryl Eisinger, NOSORH director. "The hospitals and providers serving these rural communities not only provide quality patient care, but they also help keep good jobs in rural America."

These communities also face unique healthcare needs. "Today more than ever, rural communities must tackle accessibility issues, a lack of healthcare providers, the needs of an aging population suffering from a greater number of chronic conditions, and larger percentages of un- and underinsured citizens," Eisinger says. "Meanwhile, rural hospitals are threatened with declining reimbursement rates and disproportionate funding levels that makes it challenging to serve their residents."

State Offices of Rural Health play a key role in addressing those needs. All 50 states maintain a State Office of Rural Health, each of which shares a similar mission: to foster relationships, disseminate information and provide technical assistance that improves access to and the quality of, health care for its rural citizens. In the past year alone, State Offices of Rural Health collectively provided technical assistance to more than 28,000 rural communities.

In Minnesota, for example, the Minnesota Rural Health Association supports rural citizens by executing their mission which is to bring together diverse interests to address rural health issues and advocate for and with rural Minnesotans.  Their vision is to strengthen the rural voice on health care issues through dialogue, education and advocacy, with a focus on enhancing the accessibility, affordability, and quality of healthcare in rural Minnesota.

Additional information about National Rural Health Day can be found on the Web at www.celebratepowerofrural.org.  To learn more about NOSORH, visit www.nosorh.org; to learn more about the MN Rural Health Association, visit www.mnuralhealth.org

The MRHA contact is Judith Neppel, executive director, Minnesota Rural Health Association, at the University of Minnesota Crookston, 2900 University Ave., Selvig Hall 217, Crookston, Minn.  56716 or send an email to jneppel@umn.edu

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Judith Neppel, executive director, MRHA, 218-281-8323 (jneppel@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston honored six exceptional individuals during homecoming. Recognition for three Outstanding Alumni and three Athletic Hall of Fame inductees was held on Friday evening, September 30, 2011, in Bede Ballroom in the Sargeant Student Center.

AHOF_OA_2011.jpgNamed Outstanding Alumni for 2011 were Ann Bailey '79, Larimore, N.D.; Kevin Fee '80, Grand Forks, N.D.; and Eric Klindt ex. '99, Campbell, Minn.  Athletic Hall of Fame inductees included: Nathan Pitt '97, Morden, Manitoba, Canada; Luther Huggins ex. '84, Frisco, Texas; and Ed Odland, Crookston, Minn. Odland was honored for his long time support of Golden Eagle Athletics and his leadership to the Teambacker organization, the athletic promotion and fundraising organization on the Crookston campus.

The evening began with a social, followed by a banquet and program. U of M, Crookston Chancellor Charles H. Casey brought greetings from the campus. The choir, under the direction of George French, performed a musical number and led the singing of "Hail! Minnesota" and the "Minnesota Rouser."   A presenter, selected by the honoree, introduced each award recipient. Outstanding Alumni received their "Alummy," the award designed specifically for outstanding alumni recipients, and a commemorative plaque was presented to the Athletic Hall of Fame inductees. An additional plaque with the inductee's photograph will be placed in the Sports Center on the Hall of Fame wall outside of Lysaker Gymnasium.

The Outstanding Alumni Award is the highest honor bestowed on alumni by thehomecoming logo.jpg University of Minnesota, Crookston Alumni Association. The award recognizes alumni who have displayed exemplary commitment and service to community, church, education, family or in their occupational field. More than 125 alumni have been honored with the Outstanding Alumni Award since its inception in 1980.

The Athletic Hall of Fame recognizes achievement by a former athlete or team, or extraordinary support of student-athletes by an individual or organization.  There have been seven teams and more than 40 individuals inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame since 1999 when the award was presented for the first time in campus history.

The Crookston campus opened its doors in 1906 as the Northwest School of Agriculture educating high-school students for 60 years until 1968. During its last two years of operation, the campus transitioned to a two-year technical college, known as the University of Minnesota Crookston Technical Institute. In 1993, the campus transitioned again to offer baccalaureate degrees and became the first-ever laptop university in the nation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, seated, left to right: Ann Bailey, Ed Odland, and Kevin Fee. Standing: Chancellor Casey, Eric Klindt, Luther Huggins, Nathan Pitt, Athletic Director Steph Helgeson, and Director of Development & Alumni Relations Corby Kemmer.

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The highest honor given by the University of Minnesota, Crookston, the Torch & Shield Award, will celebrate the leadership of four individuals who have aided in the development of the Crookston campus, the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) and Extension.

Honorees for 2011 include: Robert Nelson, registrar and institutional research director at the U of M, Crookston; Carol Windels, professor of plant pathology at the NWROC; Li Shuming, president of Zhejiang Economic & Trade Polytechnic in Zhejiang, China; and Kathleen O'Brien, vice president of University Services at the U of M, Twin Cities. The evening is also designed to honor donors and will highlight the achievements of several students as part of the program.

Nelson_Robert 1010.jpgRobert Nelson, Ph.D., came to the University of Minnesota, Crookston in 1987 as the vice chancellor for student affairs and director of financial aid. In 1996, he became registrar along with his duties as vice chancellor, a combined role he held until 2005, when he added the director of institutional research to his role as registrar.

Over the years, Nelson has held significant roles in the transition of the campus to a baccalaureate institution from a two-year technical college and the conversion from quarters to semesters. He led efforts on the Crookston campus for web-based student self-registration, the University (U) Card, Academic Progress Audit System (APAS) for academic advising, the campus institutional research program, the student center design and construction project, and the "one-stop" student service center among others.

He has been very active in the community serving from 2003 to 2008 on the RiverView Health board of directors, a member of Crookston Rotary Club and serving as president in 1997-98, president of the Crookston Chamber of Commerce in 1992, and a member of the Crookston 2000 Community Design Team. Nelson was awarded the Linda Schrempp Alberg Outstanding Contribution to Minnesota Higher Education award by the Minnesota College Personnel Association in 1995 and was named the Northwest Minnesota Counselors Association Administrator of the Year for 1990-91.

Kathleen O'Brien has served as vice president for University Services since October obrien_k.jpg2002. Under her leadership, University Services has been transformed into a campus leader in accountability, efficiency and outstanding service. University Services, with a $394 million annual operating budget and more than 3,000 employees includes Facilities Management, Capital Planning and Project Management, Auxiliary Services (Bookstores, Dining Services, Housing and Residential Life, Parking and Transportation, Printing Services, and University Stores), Public Safety (University Police Department, Central Security , and Emergency Management), and Environmental Health and Safety, and Building Codes.

Vice President O'Brien has system-wide leadership responsibilities on issues related to emergency preparedness, facilities, sustainability, campus master planning and environmental health and safety. Vice President O'Brien directs the University's efforts on the Central Corridor Light Rail Transit line which will travel though the heart of campus on Washington Avenue. From 2003 to 2009, she and Athletics Director Joel Maturi led the construction of TCF Bank Stadium, the first Big Ten football stadium built in more than a generation.

President Li.jpgLi Shuming has served as president of Zhejiang Economic and Trade Polytechnic (ZJETP) since 2000. ZJETP in Hangzhou, China, is a partner university with University of Minnesota, Crookston. For the past ten years, President Li has paid special attention to building ZJETP's relationships with institutions overseas. He successfully strengthened ties with international education partners when he signed a cooperative agreement with the University of Minnesota, Crookston. This agreement established a ZJETP-UMC joint English as Second Language (ESL) program as well as two joint programs in agriculture business and computer software technology and allows ZJETP students to transfer to the U of M, Crookston to earn their bachelor's degrees.

President Li has been awarded Outstanding President by the National Marketing and Supply Group. Under his leadership, ZJETP has grown to offer four international cooperation programs, two language centers, and is now in collaboration with more than 10 institutions overseas.

Carol Windels, Ph.D., is a world renowned expert in sugar beet root diseases and has windels_carol.jpgmade major contributions to the understanding of sugar beet root diseases and their control or management in the sugar beet industry of Minnesota and North Dakota.  Previous to that, she made significant contributions to the understanding of Fusarium Head Blight (scab disease in small grains) and the organism that causes it. 

Her professional career started with the University of Minnesota as a junior scientist rising through the rank of Scientist.  In 1984, she came to Crookston and the Northwest Experiment Station as an assistant professor.  In 1998, she was promoted to full professor and is a valued member of the faculty at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center. She is also an adjunct professor at North Dakota State University's Department of Plant Pathology.

Windels has been teacher and mentor to several graduate students as well as numerous under graduate students who have worked in her lab and on her projects these many years.  She is a member of several professional societies and has served as an officer in various capacities, including president, of the American Phytopathological Society.  She has earned several awards and honors including the Sugarbeet Distinguished Service Award by the Sugarbeet Industry of Minnesota and North Dakota, the Meritorious Service Award by the American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists, and is a Fellow in both the American Phytopathological Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The Torch & Shield Award honors contributions of significance to higher education, the Crookston campus, and the region; recognizes champions of the U of M, Crookston, NWROC and Extension for their impact on the region through teaching, research, and outreach; and distinguishes both high profile individuals and those who have been "quiet" contributors to the success of the Crookston campus. For more information, visit www.umcrookston.edu/torchandshield.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of more than 1,500 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, alumni and development, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Five students will be a part of the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES) at the CRES Interns.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston fall semester. These undergraduate interns will be working in areas of strength related to their majors to help CRES provide services and technical assistance to regional entrepreneurs and small businesses and to assist them in starting or growing their business.

The new student interns include Abbey Wemimo, sophomore majoring in business management from Lagos, Nigeria; Julie Trotter, a senior majoring in hotel, restaurant, and tourism management from Eagan Minn.; Stephanie Thomas, a senior double majoring in business management and marketing from  St. Albert, Alberta, Canada; Yulia Wieland, a junior majoring in quality management from Crookston, Minn.; and Alvin Tong, a senior double majoring in business management and natural resources from Singapore. 

Background
The Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES), funded through a grant from the funded through the Department of Education, assists entrepreneurs in Northwestern Minnesota with the development and creation of their entrepreneurial enterprise. CRES, located on the Crookston campus, serves eleven counties including Beltrami, Clearwater, Kittson, Lake of the Woods, Mahnomen, Marshall, Norman, Pennington, Polk, Red Lake and Roseau. The services offered are based on the client's needs.

The mission of CRES is to encourage entrepreneurship through educational leadership, applied research, and insightful consulting.  It engages the students, faculty, and research facilities of the University of Minnesota, Crookston in order to stimulate the entrepreneurial culture and strengthen the economic vitality of northwest Minnesota.

The CRES is housed in Dowell Hall 117. For information, call 218-281-8595 (cres@tc.umn.edu), or visit www.umccres.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right:  Abbey Wemimo, Julie Trotter, Stephanie Thomas, Yulia Wieland, and Alvin Tong.



Contact: Rachel Lundbohm, associate director, CRES, 218-2818190 (rlundboh@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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