November 2011 Archives

Early registration deadline for Soybean College Monday, December 12.

Soybean producers and agriculture professionals interested in practical and in-depth management information to help maximize profits in soybean production are encouraged to participate in the Soybean College at the University of Minnesota, Soybean Logo Long1 copy.jpgCrookston. The interactive combination of hands-on lab experiences and lectures will be held on Tuesday, December 20, 2011, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:10 p.m. Registration is $40 before December 12 or $50 at the door the day of the event. Lunch will be provided for participants.

The Soybean College is a joint collaboration between University of Minnesota Extension, College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences; Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council; University of Minnesota Crookston; and the Northwest Research and Outreach Center. Payment must accompany registration $40 registration before December 12. Checks should be made payable to University of Minnesota Extension. Registration with payment can be mailed to UMN Extension RO - Moorhead, Amanda LeGare, 715 11th Street No., Ste. 107C Moorhead, Minn., 56560-2083.

Registration begins at 8 a.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center, with a welcome at 8:30 followed by a general session on the Soybean Trade Mission to China and MSGA: Facing Policy Issues Together with Kurt Krueger, farmer and President of Minnesota Soybean Growers Association.

The opening session will be followed by a series of lectures and laboratories to be repeated during the day at least once. The concurrent sessions begin at 10:05 a.m. and run until 3:10 p.m. with a break for lunch at noon.

Lecture session topics include: Soybean Fertility Program for Northwest Minnesota with Dan Kaiser from the University of Minnesota; Soybean Agronomics with Seth Naeve, University of Minnesota; Addressing Soil Compaction with Jodi DeJong-Hughes, University of Minnesota; Developing Weed Management Plans with Jeff Gunsolus, University of Minnesota; and Soybean Cost of Production and Market Considerations for 2012 with Bill Craig and Bret Oelke, both from the University of Minnesota.

Laboratory sessions are designed to provide participants with hands on experiences and exposure to a variety of current production issues. Topics of the labs include: Soybean Disease Recognition and Challenges with Dean Malvick, University of Minnesota; Insect Issues in Soybeans with Phil Glogoza, University of Minnesota; Matching Soybean Growth Stages with Crop Management with Doug Holen, University of Minnesota; Beyond the Soil Survey Book with Kristina Walker, University of Minnesota; and Soybean Cyst Nematode Lab: How to Determine Egg Counts from Soil Tests with Kasia Kinzer, North Dakota State University

The brochure and registration form can be downloaded. Sponsors of the 2011 Soybean College are Pioneer Hi-Bred, Farm Business Management - Northland Community and Technical College, REA Hybrids, Hyland Seeds, Triangle Ag. LLC, AgCountry Farm Credit Services, SunOpta Grains and Foods Group, Thunder Seeds Inc., Dairyland Seeds / Heartland Seeds.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Deb Zak, director, Extension Regional Office, Crookston, 218-281-8684 (dzak@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Kick off the the holiday season with a concert of the holiday's best music performed by the University of Minnesota, Crookston choir under the direction of Associate Professor George French. The concert will be held on Sunday, December 4, 2011, at 3 p.m. in the Hafslo Chapel located on the grounds of the Polk County Museum. The concert is free and all are welcome.

The Hafslo chapel, once a Norwegian country church built in 1888, closed in 1978. It was moved in 1983 to the Crookston campus where it was located for almost twenty years before it was moved to the Polk County Museum grounds located at 719 East Robert St., Crookston, Minn.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: George French, associate professor, Music and Theater, 218-218-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Collegiate Crops Judging Team from the University of Minnesota, Crookston 2011 Crops Team.jpgcompeted in the national crops contests recently finishing second in both the Kansas City and Chicago contests. Members of the 2011 team include seniors Chase Boen, Karlstad, Minn., double majoring in agronomy and agricultural business; Matthew Green, Greenbush, Minn., triple majoring in agricultural systems management, agronomy, and agricultural business; and Ethan Hulst, Crookston, Minn., majoring in agronomy. The U of M, Crookston Collegiate Crops Team is coached for the second year by Rob Proulx, a lecturer in agronomy in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department.

In their second place finish in the Kansas City, Mo., the team placed 192 points behind Kansas State University and 875 points ahead of South Dakota State University.  The contest, held on Tuesday, November 15, 2011, at the Kansas City Board of Trade, saw the team take first in grain grading, second in plant and seed identification, and second in seed analysis. A scholarship award of $500 from the Kansas City Board of Trade was awarded to the team for their second place finish.
Individually, Hulst finished third overall with a first in seed analysis and earning honors as an All-American in grain grading and seed analysis (scores of 95% or better); Green finished sixth overall; and Boen finished seventh overall and earned honors as an All-American in grain grading (score of 95% or better).

With their second place in the Chicago Collegiate Crops Contest, held Saturday, November 19, at the Hilton Garden Inn, Oakbrook Terrace, Ill., the team finished 215 points behind Kansas State University and 162 points ahead of South Dakota State University. The team was second in grain grading, second in plant and seed identification, and third in seed analysis.

Individually, Green finished fifth overall earning a scholarship award of $500 from the CME Group/Chicago Board of Trade; Hulst finished sixth overall and took honors as an All-American in plant and seed identification (score of 95% or better); and Boen finished in eighth place overall.

The crops contests integrate a student's knowledge of agronomy into three categories: seed analysis, grain grading and crop and weed identification. The Kansas City and Chicago contest represent the national finals of collegiate crops competition for the year. Preparation for crops contests teaches evaluation of crops for quality relative to certification, viability, and marketing.

The first Collegiate Crops Contest was held in 1923 and in Kansas City in 1929. Collectively in the 88 years of competition, 161 crops contests have taken place. Teams from the U of M, Crookston have competed in the crops contests for 40 years. They have finished in the top four 30 times and four times when the team fell out of the top four, the teams consisted of only two members rather than the usual three-member team. Both times those teams placed sixth overall. To learn more about the contests, visit www.crops.org/students/contests.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right: Coach Rob Proulx, Matthew Green, Ethan Hulst, and Chase Boen.

Contact: Rob Proulx, instructor, agronomy, 218-281-8136 (prou0041@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

She keeps students dancing, in fact, Senior Allison Noll has been keeping the campus noll_a_with_cast.jpgdancing for three years. An agricultural business and agricultural education double major, Noll's passion for dance began as a high school student growing up in Mahnomen, Minn., dancing for her high school dance line, the Sparklers.

To date, Noll has choreographed three musicals at the U of M, Crookston including "Leader of the Pack" in 2010, "Dracula, the Musical?" in spring 2011, and now, "Zombie Prom." Her work begins by listening to the music and lyrics and putting together ideas. She may check other sources, but as Noll explains, "I like to try and keep the dances my own so I don't rely on outside sources much at all."

She is given the score for the musical from George French, who heads up the music and theater department on the campus. She writes down the steps on the score as the dance moves develop. "I try not to repeat dance steps to keep the choreography from getting boring," Noll says. "I keep the cast busy learning almost until they are ready to perform in order to refine the steps as they memorize each move."

Working with the students is something Noll enjoys particularly the freshman who are excited to be performing for the first time. Dance is not offered as part of the curriculum at the U of M, Crookston so Noll treasures the opportunities she has had to choreograph. "I find it a wonderful way to be involved in a hobby I have loved since high school," she says. "And, I have the privilege of working with so many people."

Noll has choreographed two of the Mr. UMC pageants along with her work on the musicals. She is gratified by the experience particularly when she is part the audience watching the stage, but also, listening and looking for a reaction from the rest of the audience. "I really like to see the them enjoy the performance and watch it all come together," she reflects. "I am nervous before the curtain goes up because I have spent a lot of time with the cast, and I really want it to go well."

For one season, Noll was the coach of the Crookston High School Treasurettes dance line. She also is involved in Collegiate FFA and has worked for four years in the Office of Development and Alumni Relations. When the opportunity became available, Noll studied abroad in Australia and will be back for one final year at the U of M, Crookston to finish up her double major. Her advisor is Associate Professor Lyle Westrom, who teaches in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department. Noll is the daughter of Dale and Linda Noll of Mahnomen.
 
Noll doesn't tire of dance and her enjoyment of choreography is unwavering even when she considers the countless hours she has invested in each of the performances. "I get a deep sense of gratification from it," Noll says.

And, it's a good thing she doesn't tire of designing dance steps because Noll is responsible for keeping the campus dancing, and her work makes us all feel good.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Joe Harren (Jonny), Eagle Bend, Minn., a senior majoring in agronomy; Melissa Graf (Toffee), Hokah, Minn., a sophomore majoring in animal science; Brooke Hamilton (Miss Delilah Strict), Adams, Minn., a junior majoring in business; Allison Noll, (choreographer) Mahnomen, Minn., a senior double majoring in agricultural business and agricultural Education; and Austin Czichotzki (Eddie), Barnesville, Minn., a senior majoring in communication. 

Contact: George French, director of music and theater, 218-281-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Rotaract, a Rotary-sponsored service club at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, announces a fundraiser to fight polio. This effort will raise money for and create awareness of the need for children to be immunized against polio. The club will sponsor "Pinky for Polio" on Monday through Wednesday, November 28-30, 2011, in the Sahlstrom Conference Center near the entrance to the Eagle's Nest.

A $1 donation is equivalent to one vaccination for a child, and participants will be recognized by the purple dye on their little finger. The fundraiser is driven by a desire to end polio by protecting children through the vaccine, and the "Pinky for Polio" campaign is named for the purple dye painted on a child's little finger to signify immunization against polio. The campaign has been going on for more than two decades.

To learn more about the effort to eradicate polio, visit www.rotaract.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Campus Preview Day Scheduled for Saturday, December 3, 2011

New and prospective students are invited to visit the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Saturday, December 3, 2011, to learn more about the campus during Preview Day.  Students are encouraged to bring their families along for the in depth look at campus.  

Students may go online to register for the Preview Day on Saturday, December 3 by visiting  www.umcrookston.edu/admissions or by contacting the Admissions Office at 218-281-8569. The welcome and admissions presentations begin at 10 a.m.

During Preview Days, students have the opportunity to interact with current students, faculty, and staff as they learn about the U of M, Crookston. Throughout the day the students will be able to receive detailed information about the various opportunities available on the Crookston campus, participate in a question and answer session, tour the beautiful campus, and enjoy lunch in Brown Dining Hall.   Preview Day is designed to help students and their families as they make decisions about college.

For more information, visit www.umcrookston.edu/admissions.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Amber Schultz, director, admissions, 218-281-8568, (evan0331@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The documentary "Invisible Children" will be shown at the University of Minnesota, invisible_children_logo.jpgCrookston on Wednesday, November 30, 2011. The documentary on plight of child soldiers of Central Africa will begin at 8 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. The presentation is free and the public is invited.

This powerful film documents a trip to Uganda in 2003 by Jason Russell, Bobby Bailey, and Laren Poole, and the story of young, innocent children desperate for help.  As child after child related their heartbreaking stories, the men--only college students at the time--recorded everything turning it into the haunting documentary "Invisible Children." For more information, visit www.invisiblechildren.com.

The event is sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Programs at the U of M, Crookston.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Kristie Jacobsen-Jerde, program associate, residential life, 218-281-8533 (jacobsen@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Gurung_Yangchen 9523.jpgA junior business management major at the University of Minnesota, Crookston has been awarded the Scholarly Excellence in Equity and Diversity (SEED) award. Yangchen Gurung, Mustang, Nepal, received the President's SEED Award for Outstanding Scholar- Activism. Gurung will be recognized on Wednesday, November 16, 2011, at the University of Minnesota Equity and Diversity Breakfast held at the McNamara Alumni Center on the Minneapolis campus.

The Office for Equity and Diversity's SEED awards program honors and acknowledges diverse students who are doing outstanding work at the University of Minnesota, both in and out of the classroom. When she graduates from the U of M, Crookston, Gurung will be the second woman from her remote village high in the Himalayan Mountains to do so.  She hopes to return to her village and work to improve the lives of the villagers, especially the women and girls who continue to grow up in the shadow of inequality and oppression.  

"My lifelong dream is to help lift the poor out of poverty by giving them education and skills necessary to sustain themselves, their families, and their communities," Gurung states.

Her involvement on campus includes tutoring students in mathematics and economics. Coordinator of Disability Services Laurie Wilson is quick to tout Gurung's skills. "Her gentleness and respectful, nurturing demeanor are hallmarks of her presence in every environment," explains Wilson.  "During the past summer, she was able to return home to her village and she used that opportunity to bring enrichment materials from her business program at the University to the children in her village. She plants 'seeds' of hope wherever she goes." Gurung is noted for her academic work as well as her service. Her grade point average is a stellar 3.94.

Gurung is in her second year of working as a community advisor in Residential Life on Gurung_Yangchen 9517.jpgthe Crookston campus, where she is charged with creating a positive living and learning environment for her residents and for upholding the expectations of the University for those environments. She also is involved with Students in Free Enterprise and a part of the highly successful SIFE Presentation Team. She has been involved with the Multicultural and International Club on the Crookston campus since she was a freshman.

Kenneth Johnson, instructor in the Business Department and an advisor for SIFE recognizes Gurung for her work in the classroom. "Yangchen is extremely bright," Johnson says. "Although this may be reflected in her grade point average, it is better reflected in her ability to think critically, see multiple sides of an issue, and learn new concepts with ease."
She follows in the footsteps of her cousin Lhakpa Gurung, a 2010 graduate and a recipient of last year's SEED award.

Undergraduate SEED Award recipients are diverse students who demonstrate outstanding achievement and leadership in the area(s) of academic performance and/or community outreach/activism. In addition, SEED Award recipients must demonstrate a deep understanding of and commitment to issues of equity, diversity, and social justice through their academic work and/or service to the community. For more information, visit http://academic.umn.edu/equity/awards/seed_awards.html.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: : Laurie Wilson, coordinator, disability services, 218-281-8587 (lwilson2@umn.edu); Kenneth Johnson, instructor, Business Department, 218-281-8178 (joh02053@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

CNIA hosts Native American Games Night on Tuesday, November 22, 2011

The Circle of Nations Indigenous Association (CNIA) at the University of Minnesota, Crookston is hosting a Native American Game Night on Tuesday, November 22, 2011 in recognition of Native American Heritage Month (November). The activities begin at 6 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. There will be activities for all ages and the event is free and all are welcome.

The evening of games will include arts and crafts, traditional Ojibwe games, healthy snacks and refreshments, music and more. For more information on the evening's activities, contact Dana Trickey, advisor to the CNIA, at 218-281-8677.
The CNIA is a club dedicated to enhancing the knowledge and understanding of Native people in our region and Native students attending our campus; to increasing enrollment of Native students at the U of m, Crookston; and promote a culturally connected environment for Native students on the campus.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Dana Trickey, Center for Adult Learning, 218-281-8677 (tric0014@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Agriculture and Natural Resources Activities Day brings high school students from some 40 high schools to the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Friday, December 2, 2011. The annual event, which involves the students competing in more than 20 contests, has been held on the campus since 1969.

Ranging from horticulture and forestry to ag mechanics, livestock and sales, the day is fraught with excitement and culminates in an awards ceremony. The contests are overseen by U of M, Crookston Agriculture and Natural Resources Department faculty. The day begins early with registration for the equine contests beginning at 7:15 a.m. All activities conclude with the awards ceremony at 1:15 p.m.in Lysaker Gymnasium.

Scholarships, plaques and certificates are awarded to school teams and individuals for each contest. Over $32,000 in scholarships are available to award-winning students.  Last year, $750 UMC scholarships were awarded for the high individual in each contest, $600 UMC scholarships were awarded for the second place individual, and $450 UMC scholarships were awarded for the third place individual.

More information regarding Ag and Natural Resources Activities Day is available by contacting Leah Stroot at 218-281-8101 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/agnatrday.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: : Leah Stroot, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8101 (stro0525@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Alysia Osowski, Grafton, N.D., a senior double majoring in agricultural business and osowski_a.jpgagronomy at the University of Minnesota, Crookston  recently completed her student solo flight at the Crookston Municipal Airport. She completed the flight on November 10, 2011. Her advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus.

The significance of the first student solo flight cannot be overemphasized.  Landing an aircraft involves very difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest.

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student having him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. It stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios were not a part of early aviation making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at the U of M, Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

dubay_jenny.jpgStudents from the University of Minnesota, Crookston assisted staff at the Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) banding ducks as part of the nationwide effort to assess he survival and migration patterns of waterfowl in North America.

The ANWR is charged by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) with banding 1200 Mallards in four groups including adults vs. the young of the year and males vs. females for a total of 300 in each group. The banding effort in northern Minnesota permits the USFWS to document the migration patterns and timing of the banded birds as well as estimate survival for each of the banded age/gender groups.  

Banding data is important to understanding bird ecology and gathering feedback for determining management actions by wildlife professionals. It also is significant in monitoring the status of bird populations particularly for those populations that might be threatened. Bands on ducks taken by hunters are typically recovered and reported assisting the USFWS efforts in tracking.  The public is encouraged to report any bands found to the Bird Banding Laboratory at 1-800-327-BAND (2263) and include the bird species, date, and location.

Associate Professor John Loegering serves as an advisor to the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society on the Crookston campus as well as teaching a fall semester course in wildlife ecology and management. Most of the students participating are either members of the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society or Loegering's wildlife ecology class.

Loegering attests to the benefit this opportunity provides students in natural resources. "The duck banding trip is intended to teach students about a small part of a huge monitoring system, offer them practical hands-on banding experience, and give them an opportunity to interact with staff from the federal agency that employs many of our graduates.  Other than departing the Owen Hall parking lot at 4:15 a.m., it is a fabulous experience."

Kupferschmid_brett.jpgThe captured ducks are nearly all mallards, but they do catch an occasional Northern Pintail or Wood Duck. Most ducks are all in their 'eclipse' phase akin to other birds winter plumage - their coloring is drab, rather than the colorful plumage one would expect.  For mallards, this period lasts a few weeks to a few months.

To learn more about the natural resources degree program, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/agri.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:

Top, left: Jenny DuBay, a junior majoring in wildlife management from Apple Valley, Minn., holds a male mallard at the Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge where the duck banding took place.

Bottom, right: Brett Kupferschmid, a junior majoring in natural resources from Perham, Minn., holds a female mallard in preparation for release after banding.


Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281- 8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Veterans Club will be hosting a Color Guard and Ceremony at the University of Minnesota, Crookston flag pole November 11, 2011, in commemoration of the men and Veterans Day 7866.jpgwomen who died serving our country. The event will begin at 11:11 a.m. on the Campus Mall and everyone is welcome to attend.

The Veterans Club chose the time 11:11 a.m. because it ties into the origin of Veterans Day.  Veterans Day was originally called "Armistice Day" and mainly recognized WWI veterans. Armistice Day celebrated the armistice which ended WWI. That armistice was signed at 11:11 a.m. on the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918. After WWII, Armistice Day was changed to Veterans Day to honor all war veterans.

soldiers_sailors_memorial_1966_stromstad_bruce.jpgThe commemoration of Veterans Day is a long standing tradition on the Crookston campus dating back to the earliest days of the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial. The memorial was constructed in 1920 in honor of the young men and women who attended the Northwest School of Agriculture, predecessor of the U of M, Crookston, who died serving our country. Since then, more plates have been added commemorating not only those in the military who attended Northwest School of Agriculture but the University of Minnesota Technical Institute in Crookston and the University of Minnesota, Crookston as well.

In addition to the color guard and flag ceremony on Friday, the Veterans Club at the U of M, Crookston will be hosting a Veterans Day presentation in Kiehle Auditorium at 1 p.m.. Featured guest speaker Stewart Bass, a naval aviator who flew in WWII and was awarded the Navy Cross for valor in action, will be discussing the carrier war, operations in the Pacific, and flying the TBM. The public is invited.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top, right: In 2007, members of the Vets Club placed a wreath at the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial located near entrance at the U of M, Crookston. It is a longstanding tradition on the campus.

Bottom, left: In 1966, Bruce Stromstad, student body president at the Northwest School of Agriculture laid a wreath at the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial.



Contact: Michael Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Katelyn Zins, communications assistant, 218-281-8446 (zinsx029@crk.umn.edu)

The musical-comedy "Zombie Prom" will be performed by music and theater students at the University of Minnesota, Crookston on November 16-20, 2011. Performed in the historic Kiehle Auditorium, the play is nightly at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, Nov. 16-19 with a special matinee performance on Sunday, November 20 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $6 for adults; $3 for students and children; and U of M, Crookston students are free with their U-Card. Anyone donating an non-perishable food item for the North Country Food Shelf in Crookston will receive a $1 discount on admission.

The musical is set in the atomic 1950s at Enrico Fermi High, where the law is laid down by a zany, tyrannical principal, Miss Delilah Strict, played by Brooke Hamilton. Pretty senior Toffee, played by Melissa Graf, has fallen for the class bad boy, played by Joe Harren. Family pressure forces her to end the romance, and he charges off on his motorcycle to the nuclear waste dump. He returns glowing and determined to reclaim Toffee's heart. A tuneful selection of original songs in the style of 50s keeps the action rocking across the stage. It is produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc.

Cast members of "Zombie Prom" are (cast names included in parentheses): Nathan Anderson (Jake), Appleton, Minn., a freshman majoring in agricultural education; Austin Czichotzki (Eddie), Barnesville, Minn., a senior majoring in communication; Mark Frenzel (Josh), Blackduck, Minn., a freshman majoring in agricultural systems management; Jessica Girgen (Candy), Madien Rock, Wis., a freshman majoring in health sciences; Melissa Graf (Toffee), Hokah, Minn., a sophomore majoring in animal science; Brooke Hamilton (Miss Delilah Strict), Adams, Minn., a junior majoring in animal science; Joe Harren (Jonny), Eagle Bend, Minn., a senior majoring in agronomy; Alissa Hermandez (Coco), Savage, Minn., a freshman majoring in equine science; Tyler Lowthian (Joey), Richfield, Minn., a freshman majoring in organizational psychology; Liz Massie (Ramona), Eagan, Minnesota, a freshman majoring in communication; Joanie Melichar (Sheila), Bloomington, Minn., a freshman majoring in animal science; Miah Smith (Ginger), Hutchinson, Minn., a freshman majoring n health sciences; and Amanda Wagner (Announcer), Fisher, Minn., a senior majoring in communication.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: George French, associate professor, Liberal Arts and Education, 218-281-8266 (fgrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A week of events is slated at the University of Minnesota, Crookston during International international market.jpgWeek, Monday, November 14 through Friday, November 18, 2011. From culinary creations to an international market, International Week will include adventures from around the world.

The community is invited to attend several events on campus during the week in celebration of International Week:
Enjoy international cuisine during a lunch from the four corners of the world on Monday, November 14 in Brown Dining Room. The public is welcome to join the campus for lunch at a cost of $8.15 per person served from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

On Tuesday, November 15 from 12 -2 p.m., everyone is invited to "Learn a Language" in the Northern Lights Lounge, Sargeant Student Center. There also will be an international photography contest in the Prairie Room, Sargeant Student Center. From 2-4 p.m., everyone is invited to view the artwork and photographs of students as well as vote for their personal favorites. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to wear traditional clothing celebrating their heritage during the day.

An International Market will be held on Wednesday, November 16 in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. There will be items for sale from 2 - 6 p.m. including handcrafts, art, food, and more. Everyone is encouraged to visit the market and shop. Earlier in the day, students will be participating in an English as a Second Language (ESL) Poster Board Contest in the Northern Lights Lounge, Sargeant Student Center. These events are all open to the public.
 
On Thursday, November 17, there will be a special interactive display on human trafficking entitled "The Dark Truth" in the Northern Lights Lounge from 2 - 6 p.m. Recycled cards, known as "Card-Again," will be for sale and money collected will be used for shelters for trafficked victims in the region.

On Friday, November 18, things really heat up on campus with the "How Hot is Hot? Hot Sauce Contest" which will be held at noon in the Northern Lights Lounge.  Later that afternoon, Student Programming and Activities for Campus Entertainment (SPACE) and International Programs will team up to host the popular International Kids Carnival from 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. in Bede Ballroom and International Lounge, Sargeant Student Center. There will be barnyard animals, button making, origami, face painting, games, tattoos, and items for sale all designed for children and families. The International Kids Carnival is free and children and families are especially invited to participate.

International Education Week, scheduled November 12-16, 2011, is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. This joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education is part of our efforts to promote programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn, and exchange experiences in the United States. To learn more, visit http://iew.state.gov.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Rae French, coordinator, learning abroad/international student programming, 218-281-8339 (rfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston Horticulture Club hosted the Mid-America MACHS_2.jpgCollegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) 39th annual conference from Thursday, October 20 to Sunday, October 23, 2011. The theme was "Little Campus on the Prairie." This was the first time the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club hosted the event. There were 33 students and 3 advisors from 6 universities in attendance including: Iowa State University, North Dakota State University, Northwest Missouri State University, South Dakota State University, the University of Wisconsin- River Falls, and Western Illinois University.

Thursday evening students gathered in the U of M, Crookston greenhouse classroom for registration, refreshments, and a campus welcome by Ron DelVecchio, U of M, Crookston professor and head of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department. Friday morning began with the general knowledge exam, plant identification, and plant judging. Each school had a team of 4 students whose individual scores contribute to the team total. This contest was designed to challenge the horticulture students and allow them to see where they stand in relation to other universities.

Friday afternoon included three guest speakers. Linda Kingery of the Northwest Regional and Sustainable Development Partnership talked to the students about the dynamic local foods in this region. Kathleen Brokke, historian and horticulturalist, performed her interpretation of Fannie Manhood Heath, a pioneer horticulturalist in the region. Minnesota Nursery and Landscaping Association President Bert Swanson shared his industry perspective with the up and coming industry leaders. Also taking place Friday afternoon was the planting of an apple tree in the U of M, Crookston Nature Nook to honor Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai. Friday evening included a banquet meal with keynote speaker Rusty Schmidt, natural resource specialist with the Washing Conservation District. Schmidt is one of three authors of the Blue Thumb Guide to Raingardens which has changed the way people think about using water in the Twin Cities area and beyond.

MACHS_1.jpgSaturday was a day of regional tours highlighting the diversity of Minnesota. Students began the day with naturalist Rhett Johnson leading the group through the Agassiz Dunes Scientific and Natural Area in Fertile, Minn. Traveling south to Detroit Lakes, Minn., the group saw the poinsettia growing operation of Bergen's Greenhouse, Inc. In Park Rapids, Minn., students visited the wholesale perennial growing operation of Bergen's Nursery. The final stop for the group was Itasca State Park where they took a tour of Minnesota's conifers. All of the students had an opportunity to cross the headwaters of the Mississippi River which was a first-time experience for many students.

Sunday marked the end of the weekend conference as the MACHS students held their annual business meeting, elected the 2011-2012 officer team, and selected a host school for 2013. Awards from Friday's team contest were presented.  The top overall individual was Winston Beck from Iowa State University. The first place team was South Dakota State University. Iowa State University was the second place team with the team from Northwest Missouri State University placing third. The U of M, Crookston observed the MACHS tradition that the host school is allowed to compete but not receive awards.

The entire event was planned by the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club students with MACHS_3.jpgsupport from U of M, Crookston staff and faculty. U of M, Crookston senior Kristine Neu served as the chair of MACHS 2011. The MACHS annual conference is the largest undertaking in the history of the Horticulture Club, and they were excited to showcase their program, the campus, and the community to the visiting universities. The host school for the 2012 MACHS conference will be South Dakota State University chaired by Sarah Custer. The host school for the 2013 MACHS conference will be the University of Wisconsin- River Falls chaired by Joel Sehloff. For more information about MACHS and to see more event photos visit the group's Facebook page: Mid America Collegiate Horticulture Society 2011.  

MACHS is comprised of horticulture clubs from universities  and two-year colleges in the Midwest Region including Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. MACHS is a branch of the Association of Collegiate Branches (ACB) within the American Society for Horticultural Sciences (ASHS). ACB is a national forum comprised of undergraduate horticulture clubs within ASHS.

The objective of MACHS is to promote an awareness of the profession of horticulture, furnish a medium of communication for horticulture students, and exchange club and professional ideas. These objectives are met through a variety of activities taking place throughout the weekend conference.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top right:

U of M, Crookston horticulture students with Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor (in purple): Standing left to right: Michael Laurich, Alisha Aasness, Catlin Kersting, Chad Harrer, Mitch Sledge, Kristine Neu and Chancellor Charles H. Casey. In the front (left to right): Ashlynn Hartung and Amanda Thompson.

Middle, left: The entire Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society crossing the headwaters of the Mississippi River on Saturday, October 22, 2011.

Bottom right: Four generations of MACHS chairpersons (l to r): Joel Sehloff, 2013 chair, University of Wisconsin- River Falls; Sarah Custer, 2012 chair, South Dakota State University; Kristine Neu, 2011 chair, U of M, Crookston; Winston Beck, 2010 chair, Iowa State University



Contact: Kristine Neu, communications assistant, (neuxx019@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Campus Preview Day Scheduled for Saturday, November 19, 2011

New and prospective students are invited to visit the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Saturday, November 19, 2011, to learn more about the campus during Preview Day.  Students are encouraged to bring their families along for the in depth look at campus.  

Students may go online to register for the Preview Day on Saturday, November 19 by visiting  www.umcrookston.edu/admissions or by contacting the Admissions Office at 218-281-8569. The welcome and admissions presentations begin at 10 a.m.

During Preview Days, students have the opportunity to interact with current students, faculty, and staff as they learn about the U of M, Crookston. Throughout the day the students will be able to receive detailed information about the various opportunities available on the Crookston campus, participate in a question and answer session, tour the beautiful campus, and enjoy lunch in Brown Dining Hall.   Preview Day is designed to help students and their families as they make decisions about college.

For more information, visit www.umcrookston.edu/admissions.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Amber Schultz, director, admissions, 218-281-8568, (evan0331@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

furry_m.jpgMichael Furry, Omaha, Neb., a freshman at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his student solo flight at the Crookston Municipal Airport. He is pursuing a bachelor's degree in natural resources and completed the flight on Sunday, October 30, 2011. His advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus, and his flight instructor is Carolyn Clark.

The significance of the first student solo flight cannot be overemphasized.  Landing an aircraft involves very difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest.

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student furry_m2.jpghaving him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Veterans Club at the University of Minnesota, Crookston will host a special presentation on Friday, November 11, 2011, at 1 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. Stewart Bass will be the featured guest speaker during a program commemorating Veterans Day on the campus.

Bass, a naval aviator who flew a TBM Avenger torpedo bomber in World War II, fought in the Pacific and was awarded the Navy Cross for valor in action.  The honor is the second highest combat decoration our nation awards. Bass will discuss the carrier war, operations in the Pacific, and flying the TBM.

After the war, Bass returned to his home near Missoula, Montana, and attended the University of Montana.  He worked for American Crystal Sugar Company for many years, and from 1974 until his retirement in 1986, he was vice president for the company.

In 1919, President Wilson first proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day. In 1938, November 11 was set aside as a legal holiday--a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as "Armistice Day." Armistice Day primarily recognized veterans of World War I, but in 1954, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting in its place the word "Veterans." It continues as a day of celebration to honor America's veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good. To learn more, visit www.va.gov/opa/vetsday.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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