July 2012 Archives

Feel like it's been a hot summer?  Looking to cool off? How about spending the afternoon in an ice arena and learning about how they keep it cool - while curbing their energy bills?
 
Northwest Clean Energy Resource Team (NW CERT), Minnesota Ice Arena Managers Association (MIAMA), and Minnesota Association of Small Cities (MAOSC) are co-hosting a free event for local units of government August 15th 1pm - 4pm in East Grand Forks. This free event will focus on financing tools and opportunities that are currently available to assist local governments and public school districts in funding clean energy projects in northwestern Minnesota.  We'll hear from folks at East Grand Forks Ice Arena and other ice arenas to learn how they have saved energy and money, and how your community can do the same!
 
This free event is relevant for counties, cities, municipalities, school districts, townships, municipal utilities, and other local units of government in northwestern Minnesota. 
 
We'll discuss: What funding is available? How do you do it? How have other local governments approached and accomplished such projects? 
 
Learn more, see the agenda, and register online at http://nwlocalgovt.eventbrite.com
or call 612-626-0555.

The Clean Energy Resource Teams--or CERTs--are a non-partisan, non-advocacy group that works with citizens across the state to strengthen their communities by supporting money-saving energy efficiency projects and building entrepreneurship around Minnesota's growing renewable energy industries. 

Contact: Margaret A. Kozak, Clean Energy Resource Teams (CERTs) Event Programming Coordinator, 612-626-0555.

Alumna Lauren Stai '12 keeps her Passion for Agronomy

Written by communications assistant and junior Ruth Navarro, a communication major from Crookston, Minn. 

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Graduating with a major in agronomy was a farfetched idea for recent graduate Lauren Stai '12. She wasn't raised on a farm and didn't know anything about crops. But after taking up an internship as a crop scout, she was hooked.  Recognizing she really enjoyed being out in the field combined with the passion and patience to persevere she decided to major in agronomy at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Originally from Bemidji, Minn., Stai had considered other universities, but when she toured the U of M, Crookston campus, she knew this was the school for her. 

Being a woman in this male-dominated profession might have intimidated some, but for Stai it was a challenge that motivated her even more. And it would prove beneficial because when she interviewed for five jobs just before graduating this past spring, she received call backs from all five locations. 

Knowing she wanted to stay close to home, Stai decided to choose the Williams, Minn., 
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location. Stai works for two integrated companies, Northern Farmers Co-op Exchange and Northern Excellence Seed. As an agronomist she's been able to do what she loves and hopes that she can continue to learn everything she can about crops and soil. 

"I want to be as knowledgeable as I can about my job and get to the point where I can be helpful to farmers," Stai said. 

Stai's days are filled with riding her four wheeler checking fields for pests, collecting soil samples, and conducting research. She wants to keep the passion for the field and by being more experienced, she believes, she will be the go-to-girl in the future. 

Stai recounts her days at UMC and credits her success to all the help she got from faculty and staff. She enjoyed the fact that professors were always willing to help and the hands-on aspect made learning interesting.  Feeling welcomed made it easy for Stai to fit it. She soon joined the Agronomy Club and was also part of the crop and soils team for North American Colleges of Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA) . Being involved gave Stai vital networking skills that have helped her learn more and stay connected. 

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UMC gave Stai the skills and tools for her job, but having an optimistic character is something important in this line of work. Stai understands that things change day-by-day and learning to make the best of it is important.   

"Being optimistic is an important characteristic in this field because weather plays a big role in my job and nothing is guaranteed," Stai said. 




Listen to Lauren Stai talk about agronomy and choosing her major:



In the photos, top, left: Lauren Stai checks beans as part of her work as an agronomist.

Middle, right: Stai loves working outdoors, and even though she was not raised on a farm, she is passionate about agronomy. 

Bottom, left: Stai works for two integrated companies, Northern Farmers Co-op Exchange and Northern Excellence Seed. 

Contact: Ruth Navarro, communications intern, 218-281-8446 (nava0085@crk.umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communication, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

marcum_bleachers.jpgThis summer Stacey Marcum, a senior at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, is completing an internship that fits perfectly into her chosen major--communication with a concentration in sports and marketing--as she works with the athletic department on campus. Marcum is a 2009 graduate of Merrill High School in Merrill, Wis.

In her position Marcum is experiencing the wide spectrum of activities taking place in a college athletic department, from working with compliance to events and marketing. The variety of the job is one of Marcum's favorite things. "I get to do so many different things here. One day I will be working with Club Kid doing athletic activities with the kids, the next I will be in a meeting to get advertising at the baseball field," she explains, "I have also been the communicator between UMC and the company that is printing pocket schedules to be handed out to people at games so they know when the fall athletic events are, and I am making posters to promote athletics. I love it all."

Marcum is one of many students who based their decision on what college to attend on the marcum_murakami.jpgathletics they are involved in. She came to the U of M, Crookston on a softball scholarship as a freshman and undecided about her major. "I really liked the campus and the softball program, I figured I would take some general classes and figure out my major from there," she explains.

With some classes behind her and some friendships formed, Marcum began talking to students in different majors trying to decide what path to follow. She really liked her communication classes, such as speech and writing, and she loved sports.  In her conversations with some students in the communication major she realized a career path with this major was one she was interested in. With an emphasis in communication studies she also saw she could tailor the major to her interests in sports and marketing by choosing 21 credits of classes in this concentration area.

marcum_poster.jpgMarcum believes her internship with UMC athletics has been very valuable. It has helped her realize this is the field she loves and where she would like to continue to work. Having been on the softball team for her past three years at UMC, Marcum knew quite a bit about athletics going into the position but has been surprised at how much she has learned, especially in terms of her future career. "In this role I have discovered that working in the college setting is a place I could see myself in the future," she says. "I would love to be an athletic director at a university one day or work in compliance. If I didn't do that, marketing for a professional sports team would also be a dream job." Softball is still and always will be a passion for Marcum, "I would love to coach a softball team at the college level as I work my way up to being athletic director."

For now Marcum is content doing all she can to help UMC athletics grow in the coming years, including working on posters and promotions to help the community become more aware of the athletic events that take place on campus and when they are happening.  "As an athlete, and now working with the athletic department, I know how important support from the campus and the community is, so come watch us!" she laughs.

A communication degree from the U of M, Crookston offers students the opportunity to develop a concentration area to fit individual interests and career goals. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/communication. To learn more about U of M, Crookston Golden Eagle athletics, visit http://www.goldeneaglesports.com.

Listen to Marcum talk about her major in her own words:

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos, top, left: Stacey Marcum, a senior communication major is spending her summer working with the UMC athletic department.

Middle, right: Marcum (right) reviews one of the pocket schedules she has been working to get created with assistant athletic trainer Takashi Murakami

Bottom, left: Marcum hanging posters for athletics around campus."I didn't expect everyone to have as much trust in me. I'm not used to that but it has been a great experience," she says
.

Contact: Austin Czichozki, communications assistant, 218-281-8446 (czich003@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Entrepreneurs and small business owners can receive valuable help through an opportunity offered by the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES) at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. CRES is seeking regional entrepreneurs and small business owners interested in forming a unique relationship that would include valuable consulting services by U of M, Crookston students under the guidance of qualified faculty at no cost.cres_logos_final_wgold.jpg

Each semester, both spring and fall, CRES integrates projects into three courses offered on campus. These projects become an integral part of the course curriculum and are designed to benefit small business owners and entrepreneurs while providing students with real-world business experiences.

Applications for the program are accepted anytime; however, priority is given to applications received prior to the due dates. The 2012 fall semester application deadline is Friday, August 10 and the spring semester application deadline is Friday, November 30, 2012. Applicants will be notified about their participation in the program no later than August 20 for fall semester and December 10 for spring semester.

All applications are screened by CRES and the projects that best fit the mission of CRES and enhance the learner outcomes for the course will be contacted for a follow-up meeting to determine guidelines, client expectations, and to review other relevant information regarding participation.

For more information about the opportunity, contact Rachel Lundbohm, Associate Director of CRES at 218-281-8595 (cres@tc.umn.edu) or visit the CRES Web site at www.umccres.org. The CRES office is located in Dowell Hall 117 on the Crookston campus.

Background

The Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies, funded through a grant from the Department of Education, assists entrepreneurs in Northwestern Minnesota with the development and creation of their entrepreneurial enterprise. CRES, located on the Crookston campus, serves eleven counties including Beltrami, Clearwater, Kittson, Lake of the Woods, Mahnomen, Marshall, Norman, Pennington, Polk, Red Lake and Roseau. The services offered are based on the client's needs.

The mission of CRES is to encourage entrepreneurship through educational leadership, applied research, and insightful consulting.  It engages the students, faculty, and research facilities of the University of Minnesota, Crookston in order to stimulate the entrepreneurial culture and strengthen the economic vitality of northwest Minnesota.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Rachel Lundbohm, associate director, CRES, 218-281-8190 (rlundboh@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Alex Buscher, a junior majoring in business management at the University of Minnesota wemimo_a and_buscher_a.jpgCrookston, recently acquired an internship working in part with the University in the Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP). Arriving at UMC as a freshman, Alex sought the field of business after considering other options. With a strong feeling that a business degree would offer greater career flexibility, she has continued her exploration as both a student and future professional.  

During her experience thus far at the U of M, Crookston, Buscher has been involved in many clubs and activities such as Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE), where she has held positions as vice president, president, and currently treasurer.

"I like exploring and that's what I'm doing in my major at UMC" said Buscher. "At the same time I intend to do the same in my clubs and activities as well."

Buscher, a 2010 Brainerd High School graduate, started applying for internships in the fall of 2011 to just about anywhere that offered an internship position relative to the business field.  She learned about the NWRSDP internship via e-mail sent by Jack Geller, head of the Liberal Arts and Education Department on the Crookston campus, which notified Alex and corresponding business students of an opening in the NWRSDP. At that point, Buscher wasted no time in responding to the e-mail request and was interviewed and later accepted for the internship.

"I really wanted this on-campus internship. I was excited about it and do love the idea of sustainability since it's highly relevant in our world today," Buscher said.

Working inside the NWRSDP office, Buscher is joined by fellow U of M, Crookston students Abbey Wemimo, Tashi Gurung, and Kate Holmquist. While each of the students has his or her own job description, Buscher finds herself exploring her career field while assisting with technology-oriented tasks on a daily basis. Helping the office extend their projects to the Web allows Buscher to utilize, learn, and apply new methods of technology she aquired over the course of her education and internship.

buscher_wemimo_with_rozell.JPGCurrently, Buscher is video editing a series of Interactive Televison (ITV) lectures broadcast this spring on more than eight campuses entitled "Local Food College." The goal of the lectures was to educate the surrounding communities on practices in gardening, agriculture, backyard poultry, and vegetable production to name a few. However, while the videos served an educational purpose, a need arose for compilation and editing of the videos to extend beyond the intended lectures. Recognizing the need, Buscher was given the video files and asked to compile them using the knowledge she attained thus far. These kinds of opportunities make her internship a relevant, real-world experience for her and one that benefits her employer as well.

To learn more about the Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership and how sustainability is applied across the Northwest region visit www.rsdp.umn.edu/northwest. To learn more about the business major at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/business.

Abbey Wemimo and Alex Buscher talk about their internships with NWRSDP:

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos, at top: NWRSDP summer interns Abbey Wemimo (left) and Alex Buscher (right) are shown here in their respective offices at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus

Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership summer interns Abbey Wemimo (left) and Alex Buscher (middle) sit down for an interview with e-communications and public relations assistant Sean Rozell (right) to discuss their current internship positions and personal backgrounds.

Contact: Sean Rozell, communications assistant, 218-281-8446 (rozel010@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

New U of M, Crookston Chancellor Fred Wood Has Minnesota Ties

at work_day 2.jpgFred Wood, the new chancellor of the University of Minnesota, Crookston, spent most of his life in California, but he has family ties to Crookston, Minnesota, and the Red River Valley.

Wood comes to the University of Minnesota after a 26-year career at the University of California, Davis, a public, land-grant research university within the University of California system. There, he served as vice chancellor of student affairs from 2007 to 2012, in addition to holding other leadership positions such as interim vice provost for undergraduate studies and associate dean of the UC Davis College of Letters and Science in addition to concurrently serving as a tenured chemistry faculty member there.

His first Minnesota tie comes through his mother, Jean Turner, who was born in Crookston in 1917. Her parents, Earl and Ada (Cameron) Turner, were both born in St. Vincent, Minn., near the Canadian border, and were farmers. During the Great Depression when she was 12 years old, Jean moved with her family to Libby, Montana, where her family found work in the lumber mills. As the Depression gave way to World War II, Jean and her sister, Lucille, moved to California where they found work in the oil refineries. Jean met and married Jack Winfred Wood, who later became a carpenter, and while living and working in Martinez, California, their son Fred was born along with his two sisters.

Although his father stopped his formal education at high school and his mother did not Mary+FredWood.jpgcomplete high school, both of Fred Wood's parents valued education, and they keenly encouraged him to attend college. "I'm a true first-generation college student," says Wood, "and as I look back, I can see just how important that single decision was to the story of my life. It really opened the world to me, and I appreciate my parents' encouragement and support of that decision."

Wood started out at a local community college and then earned a B.S. in chemistry and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry--both from UC Davis. He spent two years as a tenured faculty member at a small community college in northern Idaho before returning to UC Davis to serve as a tenured faculty member and vice chair of the chemistry department.

While attending community college in Pleasant Hill, California, he met Mary Williams, appropriately enough, in his first chemistry class. She accompanied him to UC Davis where she completed her undergraduate degree in entomology. Fred continued his doctoral work in chemistry there, and Mary earned her Master of Library Science degree at UC Berkeley, 50 miles away. The two were married in 1982, and subsequently had three children, Kiel, Meghan, and Moira.

WoodChildren.jpgThe value of education remains a strong force within the Wood family, and this is where another tie to Minnesota comes into play.   Kiel, Fred and Mary's oldest, is an environmental studies graduate from Willamette University and works as a wild land firefighter and rappeller for the U.S. Forest Service; he is also studying to complete a BS degree in nursing.  Meghan, their second child, attended and graduated from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, and she is currently studying to obtain her doctorate in veterinary medicine at UC Davis. And Moira will be a senior at St. Olaf College in Northfield, where she is studying biomedical anthropology with career goals in international public health.

Wood admires the great regard the citizens of Minnesota have for higher education and considers the University of Minnesota system a gem among all of public education in the United States. "The size of the Crookston campus is one of the things that drew me to this opportunity--it allows for a strongly student-centered environment and provides a stellar educational experience for students. The size and mission also allow it to be nimble and move relatively quickly to deal with our changing environment," says Wood. "The faculty and staff here have a unique ability to adapt, as they have with the transformation over its history from a boarding school to a two-year college to a baccalaureate-level university several years ago." He also cites the focus on experiential learning and the integration of technology across the board with the laptop computer initiative as two other very important aspects of the UMC experience. "Since they have the opportunity to work with it every day I'm not sure the faculty and staff realize just how distinctive their use of technology is and just how well they are preparing graduates for their lives after college. It's really quite remarkable," he adds.

"Mary and I are extremely excited to be a part of the University of Minnesota, Crookston, and the Crookston community," says Wood. He will reside in the guest suite on campus in Evergreen Hall until his apartment in town is ready in August. Mary will join him after she ties up some loose ends with her work and family matters, but she will visit regularly until then.

"The University of Minnesota system, much like the University of California system, continues to be integral to its home state, and the fact that a large number of students attending the Crookston campus are first generation students is not lost on me," Wood says. "Those first steps into higher education can be intimidating, but they can also be wonderful and inspiring. And with the supportive, friendly environment I see here, it's not surprising to me to see the growth and success that has occurred on this campus.

"My predecessor Chancellor Chuck Casey set the stage for continued growth and success," adds Wood, "and I'm honored and humbled to be able to follow him as the leader of U of M, Crookston campus."

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos, at top: Fred Wood at his desk during his second day as chancellor.

Middle, right: Mary and Fred Wood

Bottom, left: Moira, Meghan, and Kiel


Contact: Andrew Svec, director, communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Junior Catlin Kersting, Cloquet, Minn., Enjoys Summer in the Greenhouse

kersting_56.jpgThis past spring Catlin Kersting, a junior horticulture major at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, found herself in a unique position. While most of her fellow classmates were trying to find summer employment, she was being offered a job -- a job she didn't even apply for.  This summer Kersting, a 2010 graduate of Cloquet High School, is working at Wagner's Landscaping Inc., in Fisher, Minn., near Crookston. She attributes her current position with Wagner's to the hands-on approach in her classes at the U of M, Crookston.

Kersting is often found out in the campus greenhouses, whether participating in classes or labs, working with the Horticulture Club, which she was the president of this last semester, or just enjoying the company of the plants or the faculty and staff that work there.  Theresa Helgeson, lab coordinator in the greenhouses, mentioned to Kersting that Roger Wagner, a former instructor on the Crookston campus for a little over 30 years and the owner of Wagner's Landscaping Inc., was looking for a hard worker for the summer at his landscaping business. Helgeson encouraged Kersting to consider it. One day in the greenhouses Kersting and Wagner crossed paths and began to chat about her summer plans.

Originally, she was planning to go home and work at The Green House in Carlton, Minn., Kersting_58.jpgwhere she has worked for the past five years. Wagner instead offered her a job in his greenhouses, he had seen her at UMC and knew she had a passion for horticulture and thought she would be a great addition to his staff. After some support and encouragement from Helgeson, Kersting took a trip out to the nursery and loved it. She took the job offer after the visit, excited about the chance to try something different and gain new experiences.

At Wagner's Kersting has been able to put a lot of what she has learned in the classroom into real world, practical use. She has also had the opportunity to broaden her knowledge base, "I have learned a lot about trees, from grafting and planting to what trees pollinate with one another. I now know which trees need pollinators and which crab apple trees drop their fruit and which keep their fruit. I could not have told you that before," she says.

This job has really showed Kersting that she is on the right path in her college career. "I hope to one day manage my own greenhouse or work in a nursery, and I have really been able to get those experiences here, starting with the planting of the seedlings this winter and selling those same plants to the customers now, as well as all the day-to-day functions."  At Wagner's Kersting can usually be found in one of the greenhouses watering the plants or helping out customers--her favorite part of the job.

kersting_64.jpg"Sometimes the customers will bring out cookies and want to sit down and chit-chat with you! It is really family-like out here which is really nice." The friendly atmosphere at Wagner's is what also drew her to the U of M, Crookston. In both places she is able to work directly with the plants and in both places she feels like a part of a family. "At a big campus you might get lost in the crowd, but at UMC, you are one of the family," Kersting explains. "Everyone really wants you to succeed and will do anything to help you out."

At UMC Kersting has grown into a leader, something she never thought she would be. In addition to being the Horticulture Club president last semester, this fall she will be leading a group of freshmen and transfer students as they become accustomed to campus and each other as well as leading a team of about 20 fellow UMC students as one of the student team leaders for the new student orientation program. These are experiences she feels will be valuable when it comes time to start a career. "If I am going to be running a greenhouse I will be managing employees. These experiences will help me know how to do that effectively."

Kersting views her summer job as more than just watering plants to help them grow. It's a great learning opportunity that is helping her to grow both personally and professionally.

Listen to Catlin Kersting share her experience as a horticulture major: 

For more information about the horticulture program at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/hort.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos, top, left, Catlin Kersting surrounded by plants in front of Wagner's Landscaping, Inc.

Middle, right: Kersting, a junior horticulture major at UMC in one of the greenhouses at Wagner's Landscaping, Inc. where she has been working this summer.

Bottom, right: Putting her green thumb to work, Kersting waters the plants in the greenhouse at Wagner's Landscaping Inc.

Contact: Austin Czichozki, communications assistant, 218-281-8446 (czich003@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Northwest School of Agriculture (NWSA) Alumni Association welcomed alumni back to 2012_6-30_NWSA Top Aggies.jpgthe University of Minnesota, Crookston campus on Saturday, June 30, 2012, for their annual reunion. Three outstanding alumni were honored with the Top Aggie award, the highest honor awarded by Northwest School of Agriculture Alumni Association.

The award recognizes alumni who have displayed exemplary commitment and service to community, church, education, family, or in their occupational field. The Top Aggies for 2012 are Helen (Rasmussen) Tangen '41, Bemidji, Minn; Mark Chisholm '52, Gary, Minn; and Richard Olson '62, Grand Forks, N.D.

Charles "Chuck" Holmquist '52 was honored at the reunion with the Distinguished Service Award. The award is given for exemplary service by the NWSA Alumni Association Board. Holmquist was only the 14th recipient of the Distinguished Service Award since it was established in 1991.

Holmquist was a member of the alumni board several times over the years and served as its president. He is passionate about the Crookston campus and the legacy of the Northwest School. He was instrumental in bringing the Alseth NWSA Boardroom to fruition.

Helen (Rasmussen) Tangen '41 enjoyed a busy life at the Northwest School of Agriculture learning valuable lessons that would influence her both personally and professionally. Her love of music blossomed as accompanist for the choir, percussionist in the band and orchestra, and as a singer in the Glee Club and Mixed Chorus.

Growing up as an only child, Tangen says she learned to share at the Northwest School while living in a crowded dormitory and sleeping on a pull-out trundle bed. She formed lifelong friendships and attests to the rewards gained from setting and working toward academic goals. Following graduation she earned degrees from Bemidji State Teachers College and the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks,  in elementary education.

For 31 years, Tangen taught school in Roseau, Thief River Falls, and Duluth, in Minnesota, and for many years, in Grand Forks, N.D. She worked with college students while teaching at the lab school at the University of Wisconsin, Superior and assisted fellow teachers in the Grand Forks Public Schools as a reading specialist.

Active in the church no matter where she was living, Tangen is currently engaged in activities with the First Lutheran Church in Bemidji, Minn. Her love for the arts has also led her to become an avid supporter of the Paul Bunyan Playhouse, a non-profit professional summer stock theater located in Bemidji. Her love of both education and the arts led her to encourage her children, grandchildren, and now, great grandchildren to develop their own educational and musical interests.

Mark Chisholm '52 gained a wealth of knowledge at the Northwest School of Agriculture to prepare him for his lifelong career in agriculture. Classes in crops, welding, and motors provided him with the expertise he needed to farm and to take on leadership roles in his community.

Chisholm's life has revolved around agriculture except for the two years he spent in the U.S. Army. He has grown certified seed for the Minnesota Crop Association for 45 years. A member of the original Red River Coop Sugar beet processing plant in Hillsboro, N.D., he was one of the first to raise sugar beets in the Gary, Minn., area.

For 46 years, Chisholm has served on the Strand Township Board in Norman County and is currently the chairman. He has been a member of the Knights of Columbus for 50 years. He has proven a dedicated leader in agriculture and in the Gary, Minn., area.

Richard Olson '62 was involved as a student at the Northwest School of Agriculture in a wide variety of activities. The opportunities in athletics, music, theater, participation and work as the co-editor of the yearbook, membership in the National Honor Society and on the Student Council, and others kept him busy and helped him develop life skills and leadership.

He earned a bachelor of science degree in math education from North Dakota State University in Fargo; a masters degree in educational administration from Montana State University in Bozeman, and his law degree from the University of North Dakota (UND) in Grand Forks.
Olson taught math at Barnesville, Minn., high school and after the military, taught at UND as an adjunct professor in the School of Law, the College of Business and Professional Administration, and the Center for Teaching and Learning. The confidence and preparation so critical to successful teaching he credits to the many opportunities that shaped his life while a student at the Northwest School.

Practicing law in North Dakota and Minnesota over the past 38 years has allowed him to serve as a city and state prosecutor, public defender, interim judge, and defense attorney while involved in many facets of criminal justice, domestic affairs matters, and business and corporate work. Olson has also provided his services pro bono to organizations including Special Olympics and the North Dakota Association for the Disabled.

In the community, Olson has served as a deacon at his church and on its board of directors. Passionate about youth and adult recreation, he was instrumental in organizing and incorporating groups for amateur softball, youth basketball, and youth baseball.  He is particularly proud to have represented the Grand Forks Park District in the developing and supervising the development of an Arnold Palmer 18-hole golf course following the Grand Forks flood in 1997. Olson is currently working as the Park District's attorney in the construction and financing of the new Choice Health and Fitness Center in Grand Forks.

The NWSA was a residential high school located on the Crookston campus from 1906-68. The reunion weekend is planned by the Office of Development & Alumni Relations in cooperation with the NWSA Alumni Association board and is always held the last weekend in June.

The NWSA alumni reunion, first held in 1918, brings back alumni from the Northwest School of Agriculture, a residential high school located on what is now the University of Minnesota, Crookston campus. The NWSA graduated its first class of 8 students in 1909.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, back row: Corby Kemmer, director of Development & Alumni Relations; Charles H. Casey, chancellor at the U of M, Crookston; and Richard Olson. Front row: Mark Chisholm; Charles "Chuck" Holmquist; and Helen (Rasmussen) Tangen.


Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434, (ckemmer@umn.edu ); Ruth Navarro, communications assistant, 218-281-8446, (nava0085@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

extension.jpgAs of July 2, 2012, the Regional Extension Office of Crookston, which includes the Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, has moved to the Valley Technology Park just north of University of Minnesota, Crookston campus. The Valley Technology Park's newest tenants began the move late last month and have officially vacated their prior occupancy at the U of M, Crookston in favor of the new location.

Though they have moved, all staff phone numbers and e-mails remain the same. The increasing growth at the U of M, Crookston campus and the need for more office facilities created the opportunity for the change.

The new location will allow easier access to regional Extension staff. When asked about the move from the U of M, Crookston to the Valley Technology Park, Deb Zak, Northwest Regional Extension director, is nothing but smiles, "the chance to relocate presented itself as an opportunity for our office to improve in many ways. We have almost doubled our work space and are now much more accessible to the public." Visitors can pull into the parking lot at the Valley Technology Park and enter the Extension office through the east entrance of the building.

In addition to easier access for the community, Zak has other reasons for being a fan of the move, "I love the new offices. It is the first time in my career I have been able to design new offices and order new furniture."  Working with the CHEDA, the U of M, Crookston and Extension made it possible to complete the move without missing a day of operation.  

The new address for the Regional Extension Office of Crookston is 510 Country Road 71, Crookston, Minn., 56716. Their phone number is 888-241-0781.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right: Deb Zak, director, Crookston Regional Office, U of M Extension; Marlene LeBlanc, executive administrative specialist; Bill Craig, Extension educator/instructor; Linda Kingery, executive director, Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership; Karen Myszkowski, community program specialist; DeeAnn Leines, Extension educator/assistant professor; UMC student workers/summer interns Alex Busher, Brooke Novak, and Abbey Wemimo.



Contact: Deborah Zak, Regional Director, Northwest, Extension Regional Office, Crookston. Phone: 218-281-8684 or 1-888-241-0781. E-mail: dzak@umn.edu; Austin Czichotzki, communicatons assistant, 218-281-8446 (czich003@crk.umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assista

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