August 2012 Archives

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Members of Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) at the University of Minnesota, Crookston are excited about the success of their project to provide access to clean water to locations in Nigeria and Nepal. Two bore holes were recently completed in Nigeria near Amai College with a second at the Amai Nursery and Primary school in  Ajangbadi, Ojo, local government of Nigeria. 

Placing the bore holes at a school allows them to be consistently monitored and creates a venue to allow the surrounding community members to gain access to clean water. 
The two bore holes in Nigeria were made possible in great part to the leadership of U of M, Crookston Senior Wemimo Samson Abbey, a business major from Lagos, Nigeria. After the earthquake in Haiti in 2010, Abbey taught UMC SIFE about the lack of access to clean water seen around the world. The Clean Water for Everyone initiative was established to help provide access to clean water in third world countries in response to this critical need. 

The clean water projects have been supported by members of the campus and community. Last February, SIFE hosted a Clean Water for Everyone benefit dinner which raised over $3,000. The proceeds from the dinner helped fund the two bore holes in Nigeria. 
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Others who have been involved in leading SIFE's clean water effort include Anthony Taylor, a senior majoring in management from Sheridan, Wyo.; Tashi Gurung, a senior majoring in environmental sciences from Mustang, Nepal; and Alex Buscher, a senior majoring in business from Brainerd, Minn. 

The organization is advised by business instructors Kenneth Johnson, Courtney Bergman and Rachel Lundbohm. 

Taylor, who is the president of UMC SIFE is excited about the way the project has come to fruition. "As a team, we are ever so grateful to Crookston and the surrounding community for their financial contributions and to the campus that has so graciously supported us," Taylor said. "If it weren't for the help of community members and departments like UMC Sodexo Dining Services the benefit dinner fundraiser would not have been so successful." Taylor also commented that the SIFE team was grateful that Abbey was willing to spend a part of his summer at work on the project in Nigeria as "he was the final push needed to make this dream a reality." 

The project in Nigeria is SIFE's second clean water project designed to help supply a community with water. In Nepal, SIFE is funding a water filtration system for a boarding school. The system pumps water out of a river, filters it, and then supplies the clean water to the school.  Both projects are the result of connections by students from Nigeria and Nepal who attend the U of M, Crookston.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: : Anthony Taylor, UMC SIFE president, 218-275-3287 (tayl0787@crk.umn.edu); Kenneth Johnson, instructor, Business Department, 218-281-8178 (joh02053@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Announces Summer 2012 Graduates

The Office of the Registrar at the University of Minnesota, Crookston recently announced its list of summer 2012 graduates. Students completed their degree requirements during summer 2012. Graduates are listed below with their degree(s) earned. 

The University of Minnesota, Crookston enrolls approximately 1,600 full-time students and is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The U of M, Crookston is a four-year baccalaureate degree granting institution, dedicated to learning, discovery and engagement in northwest Minnesota.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."   To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


NameMajorEmphasisMinorHonors
Blasingame, Tanya AnnAccounting B S   
Bullo, Aman AmanoApplied Studies B SRespiratory Care  

 Hlth Infor Priv Sec Hlth Care  
Carlson, Cassie Marie Grace Applied Studies B S   
Clark, Robert AManufacturing Management BMM   
Cole, Rick AllanHlth Infor Sftware Eng/IT Prof   
Curtis, Hannah JoyBusiness Management B S   
Dahlstrom, Jesse RoyBusiness Management B S   
Fiege, Eric MichaelSport &Recreation Mgmt B S   
French, Sarah LynnBusiness Management B S  Distinction
Halland, Trista ElaineBusiness Management B SEntrepreneurship/Sm Bus Mgmt  
Haubursin, Chase ClaySport &Recreation Mgmt B S   
Hoefs, Stephanie MBusiness Management B S   
Holmquist, Kathryn AnnCommunication B S   
Johnson, Marshall EugeneBusiness Management B SManagement  
Johnston, TreyCommunication B S   
Kessler, Lauren BrittneyEarly Childhood Education B SPrimary Education  
Liu, ChunhuiBusiness Management B SManagement  
Paczkowski, Damian JohnAccounting B S   
Paulson, Shanda MarieBusiness Management B S   
Ratzlaff, Bobbielee MareeApplied Studies B S   
Rodriguez, Melanie CAnimal Science B SPre-Vet Medicine High Distinction
Rueter, Danielle RaeSport &Recreation Mgmt B S Marketing 
Simpson, Mark ANatural Resources B SNatural Resources Law Enforce  
Steuck, Scott JCommunication B S   
Templin, AprilNatural Resources B SNatural Resources Law Enforce  
Tschida, Calvin MartinApplied Studies B S   
Wagner, Amanda BethCommunication B S Music 
Wimmer, MichaelNatural Resources B SNatural Resource Management  
Wright, Staci LynnAccounting B S   
Health Management B S  
Zins, KatelynCommunication B S  

Contact: Andrew Svec, director, communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

MaryTyrrell.jpgThe second annual Mary Tyrrell Health Walk for Scholarships is about raising awareness of 
heart and women's health while raising support for student-athletes at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The walk will be held on Saturday, September 8, 2012, at Ed Widseth Field on the U of M, Crookston campus. Registration is $25 and all registrants giving $25 or more will receive a t-shirt designed especially for the walk. 

Registration begins at 9 a.m. with the walk at 10 a.m. From 9-11 a.m. there will be tables of information on heart health, women's health, and general wellness. At 11 a.m., a free "healthy tailgate" lunch will be served for walk participants and provided by Crookston National Bank. Door prizes will be awarded, and  all participants will receive two free tickets to the Golden Eagle Football game vs. Concordia St. Paul. 

For more information or to donate to the Mary Tyrrell Health Walk for Scholarships, contact Natasha at 218-281-8423.

Background
The inaugural Mary Tyrrell Health Walk for Scholarships was held in the fall of 2011 with 147 participants. The event is designed to raise awareness about heart health and women's health issues. It is named in memory of Mary Tyrrell, wife of Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising at the U of M, Crookston. Mary passed away unexpectedly from heart disease in December 2010. 

Her untimely death ended the life of a woman who was passionate about helping student-athletes and caring for patients as a nurse at Altru Clinic in Grand Forks, N.D., as well as the life of a devoted wife and mother. It also serves as a reminder of the threat posed by heart disease and how healthy diet and exercise, along with knowing the risk factors and symptoms of heart disease can help provide protection. 

After 18 years as an athletic trainer at the U of M, Crookston, Bill took over as director of athletic fundraising in 2005 and works closely with Teambackers, an athletic promotion and fundraising organization for Golden Eagle athletics.  In 2009, Mary and Bill established a scholarship to specifically support student-athletes through the Bill and Mary Tyrrell Endowment fund, and throughout the years, they have given both time and financial support to encourage student-athletes on the Crookston campus. 

The University of Minnesota, Crookston is an NCAA Division II Institution and a member of the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference (NSIC). The Golden Eagle Equestrian team is a member of the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA). For more information, visit the Golden Eagle Athletics website at www.goldeneaglesports.com.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Mary Tyrrell

Contact: Natasha Reierson, assistant director, athletics, 218-281-8423 (kuhle007@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

It's time for homecoming at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, and the Office of 
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Development & Alumni Relations is preparing to honor the 2012 Outstanding Alumni and Athletic Hall of Fame inductees on Friday, September 21. During the evening, Outstanding Alumni Kirk Schultz '79, Doreen (Johnson) Roy '81, and Gerald Landby '82 will be recognized for their achievements. Ryan Driedger '97 from Golden Eagle Hockey will be inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame. 

The recognition will take place in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center beginning at 6 p.m. with a social followed by a banquet and presentation of the honorees. Hosting the evening are Corby Kemmer, director of development and alumni relations and Stephanie Helgeson, director of athletics and greetings will be brought by Chancellor Fred Wood. To make reservations for the evening, contact Rose Ulseth in the Office of Development & Alumni Relations at 218-281-8439 by September 17. 

On Saturday, Sept. 22, everyone is invited to attend the annual homecoming parade at 10:30 a.m. on the Campus Mall. Jim Sims will serve as the parade's grand marshal. Sims was head football coach at the U of M, Crookston from 1976-1995. During his tenure, the U of M, Crookston Technical College won three division team championships, and he was named division coach of the year twice.

Following the parade, Golden Eagle Soccer will take on the Augustana Vikings at 11 a.m. Teambackers will host a tailgate with live music by the band Four Wheel Drive in Parking Lot E also beginning at 11 a.m. The Golden Eagle Football game will kick off at 1 p.m. against Southwest Minnesota State Mustangs.

Following the football game, alumni are invited to a post-game social at I.C. Muggs, and at 5 p.m., the Golden Eagle Volleyball team will take on the Augustana Vikings. The weekend's events will conclude with an alumni/student dance at the Crookston Eagles. For all the events taking place during homecoming, visit www.umcrookston.edu/today. 

Students will celebrate homecoming week with events planned around the theme "Life's a Beach." Highlights for students include a homecoming photo booth, the 2nd Annual Alpha Sigma Pi Powderpuff Football game, and the coronation of homecoming royalty, along with a number of other homecoming related activities. 

A Campus Preview Day for prospective students is also slated for Saturday, Sept. 22 and includes admissions presentations, campus tours, and academic sessions. For more information on the day's schedule or to register for Campus Preview Day, visit www1.crk.umn.edu/admissions/visit. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 9ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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The area is invited to a special presentation by former NBA player Chris Herren on Wed., Oct. 17, 2012, at 7 p.m. in the Kiehle Auditorium at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Herren, who played for the Denver Nuggets and the Boston Celtics, shares the story of his struggle with substance abuse that lasted most of his basketball career. He will be available to answer questions and sign autographs following the program. The event is free and refreshments will follow the program.

The presentation by Herren will highlight Alcohol Awareness Week on the Crookston campus. Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising is excited about the opportunity to highlight Herren and his story. "We are so fortunate to host someone like Chris Herren on our campus," Tyrrell says. "This program is one no one should miss as it carries a powerful message by someone who has experienced it firsthand. There is a message for everyone in Chris's presentation."
Herren is also the subject of the Emmy Award-nominated ESPN Films documentary "Unguarded," directed by Jonathan Hock.

Anyone interested in more information about the program should contact Tyrrell at 218-281-8436 (btyrrell@umn.edu). 

Background
Chris Herren, a 6'2" guard from Fall River, Massachusetts, scored 2,073 career points while at 
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Durfee High School. A Boston Globe and Gatorade player of the year, Herren received numerous awards and honors during his high school career, including being named to the McDonald's All-American Team in 1994.

Recruited by the top Division I programs in the country, Herren chose Boston College only to break his wrist during his first collegiate game. Sidelined by his injury, Herren failed several drug tests and left Boston College. Picked up by Fresno State and legendary coach Jerry Tarkanian, Herren went on to lead the WAC and nation in assists and steals, and was named to the all-WAC first team in 1996 and 1997.

Herren was drafted in the 2nd round (4th pick, 33rd overall) of the 1999 NBA Draft by the Denver Nuggets. He played one year with the Nuggets seeing action in 45 games prior to being traded to the Boston Celtics in 2000. As a Celtic Herren had a career-high 18 points against Dallas, only to suffer a season-ending injury. After being released from the Celtics, he played basketball overseas in five countries, Italy, Poland, Turkey, China, and Iran.

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Herren struggled with substance abuse for much of his basketball career. Alcohol- and drug-free since August 1, 2008, he has refocused his life to put his sobriety and family above all else.

In June of 2009, Herren launched Hoop Dreams with Chris Herren, a basketball player development company that offers basketball training, camps, and clinics to top basketball prospects in New England.

Chris Herren's memoir, Basketball Junkie, written with Providence Journal columnist Bill Reynolds, was released in May of 2011. It chronicles his struggles with addiction and his journey on and off the basketball court.

Herren is also the subject of the Emmy Award-nominated ESPN Films documentary "Unguarded," directed by Jonathan Hock. The documentary--which is narrated by Herren and those closest to him--follows him as he realizes his dream to play in the NBA for the Boston Celtics, only to lose it all to addiction before rising again with a new dream.

Off the court, Chris Herren continues to share his story with audiences in the hopes of reaching just one person and making a difference in his or her life. To support this vision, he founded The Herren Project, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing assistance to families affected by addiction. In 2012 The Herren Project launched a national anti-substance abuse campaign, Project Purple, to encourage people of all ages to stand up to substance abuse.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Bill Tyrrell, director, athletic fundraising, 218-281-8436 (btyrrell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston is one of the best colleges in the Midwest according 
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to the nationally known education services company, The Princeton Review.  It is one of 153 institutions The Princeton Review recommends in its "Best in the Midwest" section of its website feature, "2013 Best Colleges: Region by Region," that posted August 20, 2012, on PrincetonReview.com.    

"As a campus of the great University of Minnesota system, our place in the market calls us to pay close attention to quality and offer the best educational experience to our students," said Fred Wood, chancellor of the U of M, Crookston.  "It's rewarding to have outside agencies such as The Princeton Review recognize the efforts of our faculty and staff and include the U of M, Crookston on its list of best colleges in the Midwest.  

"It's especially timely given that we are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Morrill Act, which established land grant universities for the public good," Wood says.  "On that note, we are and always will be committed to service to the public in terms of offering excellent programs and in terms of maintaining access and affordability for our students."

For this project, The Princeton Review asks students attending the schools to rate their own schools on several issues -- from the accessibility of their professors to quality of the campus food -- and answer questions about themselves, their fellow students, and their campus life.

The 153 colleges that The Princeton Review chose for its "Best in the Midwest" list are located in twelve states: Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. The Princeton Review also designated 222 colleges in the Northeast, 122 in the West, and 136 in the Southeast as best in their locales on the company's "2013 Best Colleges: Region by Region" lists.  Collectively, the 633 colleges named "regional best(s)" constitute about 25% of the nation's 2,500 four-year colleges. For a full listing of the 2013 Best Colleges go to www.princetonreview.com/best-regional-colleges.aspx

The schools in The Princeton Review's "2013 Best Colleges: Region by Region" website section are also rated in six categories by The Princeton Review. The ratings, which appear on the school profiles, are scores on a scale of 60 to 99.  The Princeton Review tallied these scores based on institutional data it obtained from the colleges in 2011-12 and/or student survey data. Review explains the criteria for each rating score on its site at www.princetonreview.com/college/college-ratings.aspx

The Princeton Review (www.PrincetonReview.com) is an education services company known for its test-prep courses, tutoring, books, and other student resources. Headquartered in Framingham, MA, with editorial offices in New York and locations across the U.S.A. and abroad, the Princeton Review, which is a privately held company, is not affiliated with Princeton University.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Andrew Svec, director, communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A new articulation agreement has been implemented by the Business Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston with Mesabi Range Community and Technical College. The articulation agreement allows eligible students with an associate degree in business from Mesabi Range and Community and Technical College an option to transfer to the Crookston campus to complete a baccalaureate degree in business management either online or on site.  The two-year community and technical college has campuses located in both Eveleth and Virginia, Minn.

Articulation agreements are formal arrangements transferring a defined set of academic credits between an academic program of one institution, usually a two-year post-secondary institution, to a program within a college or campus of the University of Minnesota system in order to fulfill general education or program requirements. Benefits of an articulation agreement include Cost savings on tuition, fees, room and board; reduced chances of retaking the same coursework; and the opportunity to move from an associate degree to a bachelor's degree at the U of M, Crookston. 

For more information on the degree programs available in the Business Department at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/bus or call 218-281-8176 (800-UMC-MINN).

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Sue Brorson, head, Business Department, 218-281-8186 (sbrorson@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Lorna Hollowell (right) has been hired as director of diversity and multicultural programs at the 
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University of Minnesota, Crookston.  She comes to the campus from Owensboro Community and Technical College in Owensboro, Ky, where she served as director of cultural diversity, and she previously worked as an educational talent search advisor for Madisonville Community College, also in Kentucky.  She began her responsibilities on campus on Monday, July 23, 2012.  

In the role of director of diversity and multicultural programs on the Crookston campus, Hollowell believes institutions of higher education should be flagships of diversity and multiculturalism.

"Forming bridges and collaborative relationships with community organizations, secondary partners, and other post-secondary institutions is vital to creating and maintaining a diverse, inclusive and welcoming community", she says. "I want to do my best to insure that all students, domestic and international, feel welcomed and included in coordinating and participating in community-wide events to explore and showcase various cultures."

She describes her philosophy on diversity "as the exploration, appreciation, and celebration of all the ways we differ", noting that "As we explore our differences, we realize how much we are alike." She is excited to be on campus. "I am impressed with the diversity I see on campus and in the community of Crookston," Hollowell says. "It is very refreshing and provides fertile ground for all that UMC desires to do to promote diversity throughout the campus and community. 

Since her arrival on campus, Hollowell has been busy meeting with student groups, staff, and administration. The first event she is coordinating is a celebration of Hispanic and Latino History Month and the Mexican Independence Day, which will be held on Sunday, Sept. 16, from 5 to 6:30 p.m.  The evening will include history, storytelling, music, dancing, and refreshments. 

The event will conclude with an informational presentation on the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act, known as the DREAM Act. The legislation is open to individuals ages 15 to 31, who came to the country before they were 16 and have lived here continuously for at least the past five years. They must be free of serious criminal convictions, be enrolled in or have completed high school, or have served in the U.S. military. The presentation will provide information and help raise awareness. For more information on the DREAM Act, visit www.ed.gov. 

Her work is already focusing on the future including events in observance of Native American History Month, Black History Month, European History Month, Religious History, Asian/Pacific Islander History Month, Disability Awareness Month and more.  Hollowell encourages everyone to watch for details about upcoming events on the campus Web site at www.umcrookston.edu/today. 

Hollowell earned her bachelor of science in organizational management from Oakland City University in Indiana, and has completed coursework for certification in international student services at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Ky.  She is currently pursuing an executive master of science in organizational communication through Murray State University, Murray, Ky.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  and is celebrating 150 years as an U.S. land grant university.  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lorna Hollowell, director, diversity and multicultural programs, 218-281-8580 (lhollowe@umn.edu) Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Twenty Years for UMC Teambackers

It began in 1993 when the University of Minnesota, Crookston transitioned from a two-year 
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technical college to a four-year baccalaureate degree granting institution. Then director of athletics Marv Bachmeier and director of external relations Al Larson recognized the need for an organization to help raise money for athletic scholarships. The two brainstormed a number of times before a committee was formed, including members of both the campus and community, and through that committee, UMC Teambackers was born.

As a two-year institution, scholarships were not offered to student-athletes as determined by a decision of the conference, but that all changed when the four-year transition took place. This change made fundraising for scholarships both an opportunity and a challenge for the campus, and Bachmeier and Larson felt the importance for both the student-athletes and the athletic program. 

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"We had a lot of obligations with our own roles on campus, but we also knew we had to find a way to provide scholarships for our athletes," Bachmeier said. "Al and I understood the significance, and we looked at what others were doing and engaged people on campus and in the community who could help provide leadership."

After 18 years as an athletic trainer, Bill Tyrrell took over as director of athletic fundraising in 2005 and works closely with Teambackers. "For a number of students, excelling in sport is the door to a college education," Tyrrell said. "It is our goal to help those students continue to compete in the sport they love and to succeed academically. We appreciate every Teambacker member for their support and the difference they make in the lives of our student-athletes."

Over the years, Teambackers has investigated and held a number of fundraising events, but the two that have been around the longest are the Teambacker golf tournaments and Fun Nite, an evening of food, games, and auctions held annually in April. Since its humble beginnings, the organization has raised some $2 million dollars. 

"The role of Teambackers is vital to our campus," Tyrrell continues. "Our athletic programs need the financial contributions of individuals and organizations to help our student-athletes be successful in their sport as well as in the classroom. Anyone interested in Teambackers should contact me."

To mark their 20th year Teambackers is planning a number of anniversary events. They will kick off the start of their 20-year celebration on Thursday, August 23, when members and their guests will have an opportunity to meet Chancellor Fred Wood and Golden Eagle student-athletes during a special event designed to honor the history of UMC Teambackers. 

The mission of Teambackers today remains essentially unchanged from those early years. It continues to promote athletics and to raise money for scholarships and works in conjunction with the UMC Development Office, the Athletic Department, and the University of Minnesota Foundation. UMC is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II and a member of the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference. To learn more, visit www.goldeneaglesports.com/teambackers. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: : Bill Tyrrell, director, athletic fundraising, 218-281-8436 (btyrrell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

New articulation agreements have been implemented by the Business Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Agreements were signed recently with Hennepin Technical College, located in Brooklyn Park, Minn., and Pine Technical College, located in Pine City, Minn. The articulation agreements allow eligible students with specific associate degrees in business an option to transfer to the Crookston campus to complete a baccalaureate degree.  

Graduates earning an associate of science degree in business administration at Pine Technical College could consider a bachelor of science degree in business management from the U of M, Crookston. Those earning the associate in applied science in computer controlled precision manufacturing degree could pursue a bachelor of manufacturing management degree. Both of these options are available online or on-campus. 

Hennepin Technical College graduates with associate of applied science degrees in automation robotics engineering technology, electronics technology, or manufacturing engineering technology would have the option to pursue a bachelor of manufacturing management degree either online or on-campus at the U of M, Crookston.

For those earning a management or business analyst associate of applied science degree from Hennepin Technical College could consider the U of M, Crookston's bachelor of science degree in business management either online or on-campus. 

Articulation agreements are formal arrangements transferring a defined set of academic credits between an academic program of one institution, usually a two-year post-secondary institution, to a program within a college or campus of the University of Minnesota system in order to fulfill general education or program requirements. Benefits of an articulation agreement include Cost savings on tuition, fees, room and board; reduced chances of retaking the same coursework; and the opportunity to move from an associate degree to a bachelor's degree at the U of M, Crookston. 
 
For more information on the degree programs available in the Business Department at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/bus or call 218-281-8176 (800-UMC-MINN).

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Sue Brorson, head, Business Department, 218-281-8186 (sbrorson@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Announces Three New Emphasis Areas to Communication Program

A degree in communication from the University of Minnesota, Crookston offers students many career options. The bachelor of science in communication prepares students to be effective communicators in many professional settings. The U of M, Crookston has offered a communication degree since 2004, but after reviewing the current program, it was decided that three emphasis areas would be added. Essentially these emphases serve to clearly define the communication program of study for potential students.  

The three areas of emphasis are communication studies, organizational communication/public relations, and writing. 

The communication studies emphasis allows students to craft a personalized set of courses to suit their communication interests. Students will work closely with faculty to select 21 credits within the communication program or outside the communication program curriculum for a combined approach. A popular choice for students has been combining communication with a concentration of courses in marketing.  

The organizational communication/public relations emphasis allows students to study communication within organizations and communication with public systems. Students will learn about the internal organizational power and politics as well as making effective connections with the public. Students will take a wide range of courses preparing them for strategic external communication that allows them to connect with the public.

The writing emphasis allows students to focus on writing. This area addresses the theory and practice of writing in a wide range of settings.  Core writing courses will prepare students to be effective writers in both the corporate and public forum and to meet the marketplace realities of contemporary society.  

 "These new emphases help clarify the communication program for prospective students," says Mark Huglen, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Liberal Arts and Education Department. Huglen has been teaching communication courses for the past 17 years.  

The Crookston campus also offers a minor in communication which serves as a complement to any major. The communication minor prepares students to be effective communicators in any profession. The minor also allows students to select courses that strengthen their professional career objectives. 

The communication degree is also entirely available online, giving professionals working rotating shifts and place-bound students a chance to complete their degree. 

Learn more about the communication program from Mark Huglen, Ph.D.:

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Jack Geller, head, Liberal Arts and Education Department, 218-281-8248 (gelle045@umn.edu); Ruth Navarro, communications assistant, 218-281-8446 (nava0085@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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Abbey Wemimo II, a junior majoring in business management and organizational psychology at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, is motivated through many principles he learned from his mother and a passion for research. Wemimo is working this summer on an internship with the University in the Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP). An international student from Legos, Nigeria, Wemimo has been fascinated with the area of business since high school. 

Selling candy bars for fundraising initiatives in Nigeria, business was engrained into Wemimo at an early age. He highlights his time at the U of M, Crookston as a privilege and an opportunity to continue one of his many passions. During his experience thus far at UMC, Wemimo has been involved in many clubs and organizations such as the Crookston Student Association (CSA), Students' in Free Enterprise (SIFE), National Society of Leadership and Success, and the Lion's Club. 

"I'm an ardent believer that servant leadership should be a strong core of a businessman", Wemimo says. Quoting a practice of leadership from Robert K. Greenleaf, Wemimo prioritizes his efforts to give back to the community and country back home.

 Being an international student he still remembers difficulties in sourcing water, food, and even shelter; all the necessities that our society today often takes for granted. Recognizing an obligation to give back, Wemimo engages in his greatest core competency, research. 

During his attendance at UMC, Wemimo has been granted opportunities that span far beyond his imagination. In collaborative research with the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) and Undergraduate Research Opportunities, Crookston (UROC), Wemimo has received two grants to conduct research projects regarding various topics of his choice. Following completion of the first research project, Wemimo was graciously selected as one of two students in the entire University of Minnesota system to travel to Edmonton, Canada, to present their projects for the country to see. 

"UMC has offered me a lot and research is just one of them and the privileges to work on campus and conduct research has been beyond my imagination and just wonderful", Wemimo says. 
 
Wemimo heard about an internship on campus through UMC e-mail highlighting the importance of research. Of course, without hesitating, Wemimo jumped on the opportunity and applied. Following a series of formal interviews, Wemimo was granted the internship and began work inside the NWRSDP office with fellow UMC students Tashi Gurung, Alex Buscher, and Kate Holmquist. While Wemimo's internship position is research focused, work efforts have included qualitative data comparisons and research papers highlighting residential communities, food availabilities, and energy consumption through data sets ranging from 1992 to 2010.

The University of Minnesota Crookston offers on-campus internships for students of all majors and minors. To learn more about the Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership and how sustainability is applied across the Northwest region visit: http://www.rsdp.umn.edu/northwest/index.htm. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu. 

In the photo: Business instructor Kenneth Johnson (left) joins Abbey Wemimo during the University of Minnesota Undergraduate Symposium held on April 18, 2012. 

Contact: Sean Rozell, communications intern, 218-281-8446; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

 Clue for the Ox Cart Days Medallion Hunt will be announced at 4 p.m. 

The University of Minnesota, Crookston will host its annual Ice Cream Social on Wednesday, August 15 to kick off the 2012 Ox Cart Days celebration. The social will take place from 2 to 4:30 p.m. on the Campus Mall and will provide free ice cream and musical performances by the Valley Fiddlers under the direction of Val Buchmeier. The event will also feature a reading and book signing by author Brenda Child at 3 p.m. and the Ox Cart Days Medallion Hunt clue will be announced at 4 p.m. KROX AM 1260 will be broadcasting live from 2 to 4 p.m. during the social. 

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Child will share about her most recent work Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community, which explores the remarkable role of women in holding together Native American communities through the hardest years of the last two centuries. The UMC Bookstore will have the books available for purchase and will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. State Fair admission tickets will also be available at the UMC Bookstore for $9.00 each. 

A member of the Red Lake Ojibwe tribe herself, Child is a leading scholar in this area, and she brings readers a fascinating new angle on Native Americans. The subject of women is vastly underexplored in literature on American Indians, even though much about Indian religion is matriarchal, and women themselves often held significant power within Indian communities from their importance in the fur trade, harvesting, farming and keeping the community together. 

She is the chair of American Indian Studies and 
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associate professor of American Studies and American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota. She is consulting editor for the Penguin Library of American Indian History. Her other work includes the book Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Experiences, 1879-2000.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, bottom, right: Author Brenda Child by Richard G. Anderson. 

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director of communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu); Ruth Navarro, communications assistant, 218-281-8446 (nava0085@umn.edu)

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