September 2012 Archives

If you are interested in aviation or history, learn more about the Wright Brothers and the 
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history of the first flight at Kitty Hawk with renowned aviation historian Darrell Collins at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. His presentation, which takes place at 7 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium, will be followed by a question and answer period. The presentation is free and open to the public and refreshments will follow.

Background
Collins is a native of the North Carolina's Outer Banks and resides in Manteo, on Roanoke Island, N.C.  He is a graduate of Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina and holds a B. S. degree in geology with a minor in history.

He has worked with the National Park Service in the division of interpretation and education for 33 years, spending the majority of his time at the Wright Brothers National Memorial, where he serves as the historian. He served with NASA is a series of educational programs promoting aviation and the Wright brothers to young children. 

In 1990, he was nominated as the National Park Service top interpretative ranger for the Freeman Tilden award.  He was nominated by the Department of the Interior in 1999 to represent the National Park Service for the "Park Ranger Tour Program", an outreach program for children in major U. S. cities. In 2003 the centennial year of the world's first flight at Kitty Hawk, he presented the National Park Service national and international promoting the 100th Anniversary of that great milestone in human history. 

For the past twenty-four years he has been on the aviation/ aerospace lecture circuit.  Pervious speaking engagements include the Aero Club of Washington's Wright Memorial Dinner, National Air Transportation, Aerospace Industries of America, Aircraft Owners and Pilot Association, 40th Ralph Barnaby Lecture, National Business Aviation Association.   

He is a regular speaker at the Speakers' Showcase Series at the Oshkosh Fly-In Convention. Australian International Airshow DownUnder and many other aviation/ aerospace oriented groups and events.  Collins ranks in the top 5 historians in the world on early aviation and the Wright brothers. He is the author on numerous articles and consulting editor for play writes and authors on early aviation and the Wright brothers. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A day of discussion and presentations on creating nature-based community play spaces will be held at the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Wednesday, October 17, 2012, in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. A $15 registration fee includes lunch and participants may complete their registration online at http://z.umn.edu/NaturalPlaySpace. The workshop runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The morning offers presentations by staff from the U of M, Crookston and local partners covering planning, installation, and the programming aspects of nature-based play spaces. In the afternoon, break-out discussions will address specific areas of interest to help move projects forward no matter what stage they are in currently. 

For more information, contact Marlne LeBlanc at the Extension Regional Center at 218-281-8696 or mleblanc@umn.edu. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Marlene LeBlanc, Extension Regional Center, 218-281-8696 (mleblanc@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Homecoming weekend at the University of Minnesota, Crookston focused on the achievements of four exceptional alumni. The Outstanding Alumni and induction into the Athletic Hall of Fame was held on Friday evening, September 21, 2012, on the campus. The Outstanding 
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Alumni award was presented to  Kirk Schultz '79, Doreen (Johnson) Roy '81, and Gerald Landby '82 and Ryan Driedger '97 from Golden Eagle Hockey was inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame. 

The recognition took place in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center with a social followed by a banquet and presentation of the honorees. Hosting the evening were Corby Kemmer, director of development and alumni relations and Stephanie Helgeson, director of athletics and Chancellor Fred Wood brought greetings from the campus. The choir, under the direction of George French, sang several numbers including Hail! Minnesota and the Minnesota Rouser. 

A few highlights of these four accomplished alumni include the following: 

Kirk Schultz '79 graduated with a degree in hotel, restaurant and institutional management and has more than 30 years of experience in the hotel and restaurant industry. He is currently the vice president at Madison Hospitality Group. 

His responsibilities include hotel and restaurant operations, new hotel development, renovation, management contracts, acquisitions and strategic planning as well as a partner in the Culvers Restaurant in Alexandria, Minn.

Schultz has been responsible for operating several hotels and restaurants in addition to multi-unit management. His leadership experience includes a wide array of properties and leading brands: full service, limited service, water parks, extended stay, independent and economy hotels along with casual theme and family dining restaurants. 

His experiences prior to joining the Madison Hospitality Group include 14 years with Torgerson Properties, Inc., a leading franchisee in Minnesota and Florida. Most recently, he served as their senior vice president and was a member of the board of directors. New hotel openings, repositioning properties, renovation programs and implementation of comprehensive, property-specific business and marketing plans are also part of his background. He is past-president of the Minnesota Lodging Association and active in his community and in civic organizations. 

Doreen (Johnson) Roy '81 completed associate degrees in business management and fashion merchandising, which laid the foundation for her future as an entrepreneur. Following her graduation, she went on to earn a bachelor of science degree in textiles from North Dakota State University, Fargo, N.D., in 1983. 

She began producing natural goats' milk soaps for her family in 1999, and through the encouragement of family and friends, her online store "The Wholesome Basket" was born. The product line is also available at her store in downtown Burlington, Iowa, known as "Gypsi."  Today, her company makes and markets 30 variations of body and skin care products as well as an extensive line of accessories.

Johnson has been active in the Burlington Riverfront Farmers Market, which she helped organize, for the past ten years. She is a dedicated volunteer in her community including organizing activities for children; organizing a nutrition and recipe program; working with local organizations such as Area Aging, Women, Infants, and Children (WIC); Extension; and as an organizer of the Riverfront Market Basket drawings. She is a member of the Downtown Partners through the Chamber of Commerce and a speaker for women's groups, seniors, and community colleges on the topics of nutrition and healthy living. 

Gerald Landby is a 1982 graduate with an associate degree in landscape, turf, and grounds. He went on to Montana State University, Bozeman, to earn his bachelor of science degree in landscape management. He is currently director of grounds at Carroll College, Helena, Mont., where he has been since 1998. 

He is responsible for supervision of grounds staff, planning for and providing leadership for campus landscape, infrastructure planning, and capital projects at Carroll College. His work on grounds has led to several awards including the 2008 Grand Award in the athletic field category from the Professional Grounds Management Society, a "Field of Excellence" award from Pioneer Athletics for Nelson Stadium on the campus in 2009, and in 2011, the college received Tree Campus USA recognition from the National Arbor Day Foundation, the first college in Montana to earn the honor. 

Prior to his current role, he was municipal arborist for the city of Great Falls, Mont. Landby is a member of the Montana State University of Agriculture Academic Advisory committee, and he has attended Professional Land Care Network Day (PLANET) on the Hill Legislative Day in Washington, D.C., five times, where he volunteered his time for grounds maintenance at "Renewal and Remembrance" at Arlington National Cemetery in conjunction with the event. Landby also volunteers as an athletic field consultant for the public schools in Montana. 

He is the member of a number of professional organizations in the turf and landscape field, has been featured in articles in professional magazines, and a guest speaker at numerous conferences in his area of expertise. 

Ryan Driedger '97 graduated with a degree in agronomy and left a legacy in hockey. He came to the U of M, Crookston in 1993 after playing hockey at Dakota College at Bottineau, N.D., on a championship team. He transferred to play Golden Eagle hockey and scored the winning goal in the championship game in 1993 when he was named to the All-Tournament Team and earned First Team All-American honors.

He has been referred to as one of the most naturally gifted hockey players in U of M, Crookston campus history. His talent in hockey led him to play junior hockey where he was part of the Winkler Flyers Junior Hockey Club championship team in 1992-93 and a team with a 42-5-1 record and a member of the 2012 Flyers Hall of Fame. He went on to play for a National College Hockey Association championship team at Bemidji State University in 1993-94.

He returned to the Crookston campus to finish his degree in 1994-95, when he was the captain of the hockey team that went 30-2 on the season. 

Driedger is the owner of Abode Building & Renovations where he is responsible for building new homes and major renovations, arranging sub-contractors and interacting with homeowners in Carman, Manitoba, Canada.

For more information on homecoming at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/alumni/homecoming.htm

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Kirk Schultz, Doreen (Johnson) Roy, Gerald Landby, and Ryan Driedger

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, Development & Alumni Relations, 218-281-8432 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Ads focus on U's value to Minnesota and how investing in the university 'illuminates' the state and world

MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (9/24/2012) - The University of Minnesota is taking a unique approach to higher education marketing when it launches its new "Driven to Discover" campaign today.

For the first time, the university's branding and marketing will directly tie the value the university provides to the state with the importance of public and private investment in higher education.

This year's ads focus on the university's mission of teaching, research and discovery and public outreach and engagement, and illustrate how that mission prepares future generations and illuminates the state and world. They are an evolution of previous years' Driven to Discover campaigns and were created around the theme of "Illumination." This year's iteration of the campaign, "Keeping our lights on illuminates everyone," emphasizes how the impact of the University of Minnesota benefits everyone.

"As Minnesota's only comprehensive research and land-grant university, the University of Minnesota works to solve the toughest challenges across the state and world," said President Eric Kaler. "But we can't continue to tackle those critical problems without continued investment in our young people and the U. The new campaign truly illustrates how our mission comes to life in Minnesota and how continued investment in the University of Minnesota will fuel the economy and keep our state shining bright." 

The first television spots begin airing Sept. 24 and continue for two months. They will reach most of the state, focused on news and prime-time programming in the Minneapolis-St. Paul and Rochester television markets. The campaign's second flight will air from mid-January to mid-March.

"This is unlike anything most people have seen from higher education," said Ann Aronson, the university's assistant vice president for marketing. "It has a dramatic look and feel, but we're interested in much more than grabbing attention. We want to change the conversation about higher education in Minnesota and inspire people. This is about communicating the U's value to the state and how investments in the university benefit everyone."

The university's homepage, www.umn.edu, will provide multiple ways for others to "Be a light" and get involved with the campaign. Visitors can learn about university discoveries, advocate for the U and support students through scholarships. They will find an interactive illumination map that highlights discoveries and contributions made by U of M faculty, students and alumni by geographical area. Those inspired to tell their own stories about how the University of Minnesota has affected their lives, their families or their communities can submit them at www.umn.edu. Submitted stories may also be added to the interactive map.

A social media component encourages others to join the conversation about how discovery has illuminated them by using the hashtag #LightUMN in platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest, Instagram and Google+. For example, a competition on the photo-sharing social network Instagram will invite users to depict how the University of Minnesota illuminates their lives.

The TV ads feature the song, "There's So Much Energy in Us," by the critically acclaimed Minneapolis-based indie-rock band Cloud Cult. Lead singer Craig Minowa is a U alumnus. Many other university students and alumni star in the ads:
Lucia Randle, a student in the College of Education and Human Development.
Danielle Berg, a PhD candidate in astrophysics with the College of Science and Engineering.
Larea Carter, an alumna of the College of Liberal Arts.
Danice Cabanela, an actress and student in the College of Liberal Arts.
Branden Hickey, a student in the College of Biological Sciences.
Eamonn McLain, an alumnus of the College of Liberal Arts and Guthrie Bachelor of Fine Arts Program and cellist for the local band Lucy Michelle and the Velvet Lapels.

The campaign also will feature digital outdoor billboards along major commuter routes in the Twin Cities and downtown Minneapolis, and bus shelters wrapped with messaging in key locations throughout Minneapolis and St. Paul. Other tactics include online ads in key markets across Minnesota and scoreboard displays at the university's TCF Bank Stadium and Williams and Mariucci arenas.

Minneapolis-based OLSON, an independent agency, created the campaign for the U. OLSON has been the university's agency partner since the campaign was first launched in 2006. The two-year campaign will cost $2.5 million, with a majority of the funding from the University of Minnesota Foundation.

For more information about the Driven to Discover campaign, visit http://discover.umn.edu.

Contact: Julie Christensen, University News Service, jrchris@umn.edu, (612) 626-1720; Andrew Svec, director, communications at U of M, Crookston, 218-281-8432 (asvec@umn.edu)

Mary Tyrrell had a beautiful smile, and if she had been present on Saturday, September 8, 
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2012, to see all the participants in the 2nd Annual Mary Tyrrell Health Walk for Scholarships, she certainly would have been smiling. The walk, with its 112 participants, raised some $2,000 for scholarships for student-athletes.

Unfortunately Mary was not there, and the reason for the walk in her memory was not just to raise money but also to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms of heart disease and to encourage healthy eating and exercise. 

The inaugural walk in memory of Mary Tyrrell, wife of Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising, was held in the fall of 2011. The Tyrrells established a scholarship to support student-athletes through the Bill and Mary Tyrrell Endowment fund in 2009, and throughout the years, they have given both time and financial support to encourage student-athletes on the Crookston campus. 

Bill Tyrrell was deeply appreciative of the participation and this tribute to his wife. "I was touched by the generosity and kindness of those who walked and all those who gave financially to support our student-athletes," Tyrrell said. "I know Mary would have appreciated everyone, and it was great to see the turnout for the second year of this event. Thank you to all who made this walk possible and who supported this passion for student-athletes of Mary's and of mine." 

The University of Minnesota, Crookston is an NCAA Division II Institution and a member of the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference (NSIC). The Golden Eagle Equestrian team is a member of the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA). For more information, visit the Golden Eagle Athletics website at www.goldeneaglesports.com.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Several football from '90-'91 and '91-'92 joined Bill Tyrrell for the 2nd annual Mary Tyrrell Health Walk for Scholarships on Saturday, September 8. Left to right are Kenny Bond ex. '96, Jesse Maruska '93, Jon LaBine ex. '93, former head football coach Jim Sims, Chad Simons '94, Jimmy Miller ex. '93, Vance Johnson ex. '93, Bill Tyrrell.

Contact: : Natasha Reierson, assistant director, athletics, 218-281-8423 (kuhle007@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

USnewsbadge_midwest_2013.jpgThe University of Minnesota, Crookston is pleased to announce a move up to second in this year's U.S.News Best Colleges rankings in the category Midwest Top Public Regional Colleges. The rankings for 2013 mark the 15th consecutive year the Crookston campus has appeared in the top four and signals a move up from last year's placement at number three. The exclusive rankings, available at usnews.com on Wed., Sept. 12, will be published in the September issue of U.S.News & World Report, available on newsstands on Tuesday, September 18. 
 

Within the specific category, Top Public Regional Colleges, U.S. News compared 371 colleges by region. The University of Minnesota, Crookston's category, Midwest Top Public Regional Colleges, is comprised of both public and private institutions that focus on undergraduate education and offer a range of degree programs but grant less than half of their degrees in the liberal arts. 

Campus officials are pleased with the news and credit the improvement to a campus wide focus on excellence at every level. "The U.S. News rankings call out our adherence to high quality academic programs and student services by our dedicated faculty and staff," says Fred Wood, chancellor of the U of M, Crookston. "We offer the best academic and student experience in a small, closely-knit atmosphere where students earn a University of Minnesota degree. 

"In a year when we are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Morrill Act, which established land grant universities, we are proud to continue our commitment to students and our legacy as a land grant institution," Wood continues. "We strive now, as we have since our earliest years, to provide access to higher education, to encourage discovery, and to serve the public good." 

Over the past two decades, the U.S. News college rankings, which group schools based on categories created by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, have grown to be the most comprehensive tool for students and parents considering higher education opportunities. Among the many factors weighed in determining the rankings of regional colleges, the key measures of quality are:  peer assessment, graduation and retention rates, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, and alumni giving.  For details, visit www.usnews.com.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Andrew Svec, director, communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

In recognition of Hispanic Heritage Month, the University of Minnesota, Crookston is hosting a program that encompasses Hispanic history, storytelling, music, dancing, and refreshments on Sunday, September 16, 2012, the official Mexican Independence Day. The event, known as the "Celebration of Life, History, and Freedom" will take place in the Kiehle Auditorium, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. All activities are free and everyone is welcome. Refreshments will feature popular Mexican foods to sample. 

Highlights of the evening will include; vocal music by Bryan Sanchez, dancing by Las Rositas, presentations on Hispanic history, the Mexican Independence Day, and the flag by area elementary and middle school students. Special presentations by Alan Dragseth, president of the board of the Red River Valley Sugarbeet Museum and area sugar beet grower, and by Leticia Sanchez, Intervention Coordinator/Supervisor, for Migrant Health Services in Crookston, will bring to life the history of Hispanics and Latinos in the Red River Valley. 

Mary Farley, recipient of the prestigious 2012 Virginia McKnight Binger Awards in Human Service, will be recognized during the evening. She spent her life's work in humanitarian efforts including advocating for immigrants and children, ministering to convicts, reintegrating homeless adults into community life, and finding treatment for individuals with mental illness.   For more on the award, visit www.mcknight.org. 

Cristina Rodriguez, from Fresh Voices in Progress, will provide an audio visual presentation chronicling the lives and culture of Hispanics in the Red River Valley. The evening will also include information about the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act, known as the DREAM Act by the Office of Diversity & Multicultural Programs, and a featured reading by local high school student Justin Burgoz. The legislation, if passed, would affect individuals ages 15 to 31, who came to the country before they were 16 and have lived here continuously for at least the past five years. They must be free of serious criminal convictions, be enrolled in or have completed high school, or have served in the U.S. military. The presentation will provide information and help raise awareness. For more information on the DREAM Act, visit www.ed.gov. 

The evening will conclude with piñatas and Mexican Bingo for kids of all ages. 

Hispanic Heritage Month begins September 15, the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries--Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua, and ends Oct. 15. In addition, Mexico declared its independence on September 16 and Chile on September 18. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: : Lorna Hollowell, director, diversity and multicultural programs, 218-281-8580 (lhollowe@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Managing land to enhance wildlife, specifically birds, will be the topic of the "Bird-friendly Forest Management" workshop slated for Thursday, September 20, 2012, at the Forest 
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History Center near Grand Rapids, Minn. The workshop, which runs from 7 a.m.to 1 p.m., will include an optional birding walk. The cost is $10 and includes workshop materials, breakfast treats, and lunch. Pre-registration by September 18 is required and registration fees will be collected on the day of the workshop.  Participants should register online at http://z.umn.edu/BFFM (preferred) or call the University of Minnesota Extension-Itasca County at 218-327-7486.  

The workshop is open to the general public as well as natural resource professionals and is under the coordination of John Loegering, University of Minnesota Extension. Woodland Advisor Credit (WAC7) also is available (http://woodlandadvisor.org/classes).  Highlights include habitat management for wildlife; strategies for ruffled grouse, American woodcock, and other brushland species; financial assistance and incentives, property tax programs, invasive species; and a panel discussion of the implications for forests and wildlife in the future.  Workshop content questions may be directed to Loegering at jloegeri@umn.edu or 218-281-8132.

"This workshop will be a great opportunity for woodland landowners with an interest in managing their forest for birds," Loegering says.  "We will have several great presentations by resource professionals from three different agencies with a mission to offer technical assistance to landowners."

Background
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Public interest in birds and birding has increased in the past decade.  Private forest landowners have an opportunity to manage their land to produce forest products as well as enhancing wildlife values, especially for birds.  The workshop will review the basics of private forest management as well as strategies to enhance forests for migratory songbirds, ruffed and sharp-tailed grouse, American woodcock, and cavity-nesting species. This workshop is supported by the Renewable Resources Extension Act Program, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and University of Minnesota Extension. To learn more, visit 
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http://z.umn.edu/BFFMinfo.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos: 
Top, right: workshop brochure
Middle, left: yellow warbler, courtesy of US Fish and Wildlife Service
Bottom, right: woodcock, courtesy of US Fish and Wildlife Service

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Business Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston has implemented two new articulation agreements with Vermilion Community College (VCC). The agreement allows eligible students with an associate degree in business from VCC an option to transfer to the Crookston campus to complete a baccalaureate degree in business management either online or on site Students with an associate degree in sports management from VCC would have the option of a bachelor of science in sport and recreation management at the U of M, Crookston.  Vermilion Community College, a two-year residential college, is located in Ely, Minn.

Articulation agreements are formal arrangements transferring a defined set of academic credits between an academic program of one institution, usually a two-year post-secondary institution, to a program within a college or campus of the University of Minnesota system in order to fulfill general education or program requirements. The biggest benefits of an articulation agreement include reduced chances of retaking the same coursework and the opportunity to move from an associate degree to a bachelor's degree at the U of M, Crookston. 

For more information on the degree programs available in the Business Department at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/bus or call 218-281-8176 (800-UMC-MINN).

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Sue Brorson, head, Business Department, 218-281-8186 (sbrorson@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

For students in public speaking at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, the new course 
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textbook will have some very familiar names on the cover. The work is the result of years of teaching experience and research by Associate Professor Mark Huglen, who has been at the Crookston campus since 1996. In this most recent textbook Public Speaking: Strategies for Effective Public Speaking, Huglen was assisted by his colleague in the Liberal Arts and Education Department, Associate Professor Kevin Thompson. 

The textbook is not Huglen's first foray into publishing, but rather, it is the fourth book he has authored or co-authored since 2004. He has also authored a number of journal articles and presentations for regional and national conferences. 

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Learning to be an effective public speaker is an important aspect of communication in all academic majors making the class a valuable experience and a requirement at the university. Huglen's textbook is used in all public speaking classes on campus and covers such areas of study as topic selection, research, organization, rehearsal, and extemporaneous delivery of both informative and persuasive speeches. 

Huglen holds a doctorate in communication from Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich. He earned his master of arts degree in communication from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, N.D., where he also earned his bachelor of science in speech education. Thompson earned his doctorate in adult and post-secondary education from the University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyo.; his master of arts from Ball State University, Muncie Ind., in organizational communication and training; and his bachelor of arts from the University of North Dakota in communication. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, top, right: Associate professors Kevin Thompson (left) and Mark Huglen hold a copy of the textbook. 

Contact: Mark Huglen, associate professor, Liberal Arts and Education, 218-281-8275 (mhuglen@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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It's a sweet story. University of Minnesota, Crookston Freshman Emily Campbell, Aitkin, Minn., just arrived on campus after 12 days at the Minnesota State Fair representing the beekeeping industry as Minnesota Honey Queen. An animal science major from Aitkin, Minn., she will compete for the national title in January 2013 when she travels to Hershey, Pa. 

To become Minnesota Honey Queen, Campbell first won the title of North Central Minnesota Honey Queen. "Winning this title is not like competing in a traditional pageant," she explains. "It is more like a job interview process and winning the North Central title qualified me for the state competition which was held in Duluth in mid-July at the state convention." 

She gave several speeches during the state convention, wrote an essay on propolis, a product produced by bees and used in the health industry, and went through an intense final interview where she had to demonstrate both strong communication skills and an in depth knowledge of bees.

Campbell knows her stuff. Her interest began in 4-H when she had a project in entomology focused on two diseases that plague honey bees. She won a grand champion ribbon on the project at the Minnesota State Fair and her projects on bees would eventually earn her a total of seven grand champion ribbons. For the past two years, she has owned her own hives, and she says her parents were very supportive of her interest in beekeeping.

"Bees are some of the most intelligent creatures on the planet," Campbell says. "Everything 
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they do has a specific purpose." She says that while it might appear that honey bees just buzz around all day, "they do not do anything without a reason." 

"We lose 30 percent of the honey bee population every year," she explains. "It is important for us to keep bees around, and even if you can't have bees in your yard, you can grow plants that are bee friendly. Every third bite of food you take off your plate, bees had something directly to do with it." 

A passion for agriculture and a desire to attend a campus of the University of Minnesota brought Campbell to the U of M, Crookston. What made the Crookston campus the perfect fit for her was the size. "I wanted a small campus, but I still wanted a University of Minnesota degree," Campbell says. 

Her dream would be to bring honey bees to campus because of the important role they play in pollination 
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and to create awareness of how very important they are to humans. Right now though, she is busy with classes and with preparation for the national competition but that won't deter this honey queen from generating buzz about her passion for bees. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Continues Trend Surpassing Enrollment Records

Number of degree-seeking students nears 1800

While the final numbers will not be available for some time, enrollment at the University of Minnesota, Crookston appears to have surpassed previous record levels, continuing a six-year trend.  Preliminary, unofficial reports put enrollment at 1,773 degree-seeking undergraduates--the highest enrollment in the history of the campus.  That number beats 2011's all-time record of 1,600. 

A major contributing factor to the growth is the number of undergrads pursuing their degrees online.  Approximately 700 students enrolled for fall 2012 are considered "online-only" students, which means all of their courses are taken online.  The U of M, Crookston currently offers ten of its twenty-six degree programs entirely online in addition to on-campus. 

"There is no question we are serving two very distinctive groups of students," said Fred Wood, chancellor of the U of M, Crookston.  "We remain strongly committed to those students who are pursuing their degrees in the traditional sense of living on or commuting to campus and interacting with our faculty and staff in person.  We've proudly served as a residential campus all the way back to our first days as the Northwest School of Agriculture in the early 1900s, and this will continue to be a great strength of the campus," said Wood, "but there is also clearly a need for non-traditional students to access high quality online degree programs. By meeting this need we also are helping our online students achieve their educational goals consistent with the mission of a modern land-grant campus."

The number of students pursuing the more traditional on-campus experience remains near 1,100, and campus residence halls are at maximum capacity.  Lounges and other areas in the halls have been converted to student rooms for fall semester, and beyond that, as of Wednesday, August 29, more than 30 students are being housed at the America's Best Value Inn just south of campus in Crookston.  A new residence hall is currently under construction for planned occupancy in January 2013 when the U of M, Crookston begins its spring semester.

"We provide a nationally-recognized residential living and learning atmosphere that focuses on experiential learning for those students who choose the residential college experience, and we plan to build on that," said Wood.  "We have a campus strategic plan to pursue enrollment growth both on-campus and online, and we now plan to finalize our strategic plan for online programs," he added.  "Growth in online enrollment has been phenomenal--more than 45% compared to fall 2011--and we want to ensure a high quality experience online to match the high quality residential experience we offer."

Final official enrollment statistics for the Crookston campus, as well as the other campuses of the University of Minnesota system, will be available in mid-October after they are reported to the U of M Board of Regents.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Andrew Svec, director of communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu), Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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