October 2012 Archives

Veterans and their families are invited to a unique opportunity to learn more about starting and operating a small business. A Veteran Entrepreneur and Business Networking event will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2012, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center, at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The event is free and lunch is included, but registration is requested by contacting the Northwest Minnesota Small Business Development Center (NW MN SBDC) at 218-299-3037 (sbdc@cord.edu).

The event, sponsored by the NW MN SBDC and the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies 
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(CRES) at the U of M, Crookston, will cover a wide range of topics including starting and 
financing a business. Information will also be available to those interested in strengthening a current business. Attendees will meet key partners who offer resources at no or low cost in their local communities. 

Background
The mission of CRES is to encourage entrepreneurship through educational leadership, applied research, and insightful consulting.  CRES engages the students, faculty, and research facilities of the University of Minnesota, Crookston in order to stimulate the entrepreneurial culture and strengthen the economic vitality of northwest Minnesota. CRES is located in Dowell Hall 117 on the Crookston campus. For more information, contact Lundbohm at 218-281-8190 (rlundboh@.umn.edu) or visit the CRES Web site at www.umccres.org.   

Minnesota SBDC applies higher education, private sector and government resources to assist businesses and foster entrepreneurship. Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, Small Business Administration, Concordia College and regional partners fund this nonprofit organization. The NW MN SBDC is located at 1103 Roosevelt Road SE Bemidji, Minn. To schedule an appointment, please contact the SBDC at (218) 299-3037 or email sbdc@cord.edu.  Additional information about services, workshops and trainings, and our partners can be found at www.offuttschoolofbusiness.org/sbdc. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Jaimee Meyer, associate director, NW MN Small Business Development Center (SBDC) (218) 755-4255; Rachel Lundbohm, associate director, Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES), 218-281-8190 (rlundboh@umn.edu)

Alumni from the University of Minnesota, Crookston are invited to attend an alumni social on 
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Thursday, November 15, 2012. The social will take place from 5 -7 p.m. at the Ramada Plaza Suites located at 1635 42nd Street South in Fargo, N.D. Refreshments will be served.

This marks the third time the University of Minnesota, Crookston Alumni Association has hosted an alumni social in Fargo, and all alumni are encouraged to attend. For more information, contact Rose Ulseth in the alumni office at 218-281-8439.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Rose Ulseth, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8439 (rulseth@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Often the celebration of Halloween conjures up tales of suspense and for many the spooky 
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stories of the famous author Edgar Allan Poe. A book published recently on Poe includes an essay by Associate Professor Rachel McCoppin, at right, who teaches in the Liberal Arts and Education Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The book entitled Adapting Poe: Re-Imaginings in Popular Culture published by Palgrave Macmillan includes the essay "Horrific Obsessions: Poe's Legacy of the Unreliable Narrator" authored by McCoppin.

The book, edited by Dennis R. Perry and Carl H. Sederholm, is a collection of essays examining a wide range of genres and media all centered on Poe and his works. The compilation looks closely at Poe's influence on popular culture and his relevance today. 

"Poe is known for his psychological horror; his narrators terrify readers because their afflictions come from within their own minds," McCoppin says. "Poe narrators are famous for repressing their true selves, until the horrific culmination of the story shows the narrator as a slave of his own demanding psyche, usually forcing him to commit murder. 
 
"My article focuses on Poe's narrators in some of his most famous stories, like "The Tell-Tale Heart" and "The Black Cat" and connects them to leading characters in the popular films, Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo and M. Night Shyamalan's Sixth Sense, to show how failing to know oneself may lead, given the right circumstances, to terror," she continues. 

McCoppin earned her doctorate from the University in Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pa., her master or arts from Northern Michigan University, Marquette, Mich., and her bachelor of arts from the University of Michigan, Flint, in English. Her research interests include American transcendentalism, modernism, existentialism, and the pedagogy of literature and ethics. She has been teaching in the area of literature, oral interpretation, and communication ethics at the U of M, Crookston since 2003. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Rachel McCoppin, associate professor, Liberal Arts and Education, 218-281-8273 (mccoppin@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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Michael McMahon, St. Paul, Minn., a sophomore at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his student solo flight.  A natural resources aviation major,  McMahon's advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus. His flight instructor is Chase Enghauser, a 2012 graduate of the U of M, Crookston with a business management aviation degree. The milestone flight was completed at the Thief River Falls [Minn.] Regional Airport due to runway construction activity at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The first student solo flight is a significant accomplishment and cannot be overemphasized.  

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Landing an aircraft involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest.

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student having him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

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Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. It stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios were not a part of early aviation making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at the U of M, Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

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The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. Students have the option to choose tracks in agricultural aviation, business aviation, law enforcement aviation, or natural resources aviation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:

Top, left: Michael McMahon

Top, right: Chase Enghauser (left) shakes the hand of his first solo flight student Michael McMahon after his successful completion of the important milestone flight.

Center, left: Enghauser cuts the shirttail of McMahon according to American aviation tradition.

Bottom, left: McMahon's signed shirttail is ready to go on display at the airport. 

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Student clubs and organizations will host a Halloween Carnival for Kids on Saturday, October 27, from Noon to 4 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center.  The event is free and intended for area children ages 2 to 12 years old. 

Food donations for the North Country Food Bank will be accepted.  Children can take part in many different games, coloring, and face painting. There will also be door prizes.  Delta Theta Sigma will host the event with assistance from the Animal Science Association, Black Student Association, Pre-Vet Club, Peer Connections, and Ag-Arama.

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Students interested in advancing as a tax professional will now have the opportunity to earn a Certificate of Taxation at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The certificate, offered through the Business Department, is available to students both on campus and online.
 
The certificate is designed to prepare the student for a career in tax preparation, including individual, farm, business, trusts, estates, payroll, estate taxes, etc. In addition, it prepares the student to pass the registered tax return preparer competency test. 

The certificate also would appeal to non-licensed paid preparers and to individuals interested in a new career as a tax preparer. In order to complete the certificate, students will take classes in income tax, tax preparation, and accounting systems. 

Background
Effective January 1, 2011, all paid preparers of 1040 income tax returns are required to obtain a Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN) from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) before preparing and filing tax returns. Current preparers will be issued a provisional PTIN, and have until the end of 2013 to pass the Registered Tax Return Preparer competency test administered by the IRS. 

The Crookston campus offers a bachelor of science degree in accounting designed to provide students with both the theoretical and the analytical framework required to work effectively in public, private or governmental accounting. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Ken Bulie, lecturer, Business Dept., 218-2818194 (bulie001@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Students and staff at the University of Minnesota, Crookston will do their best to frighten 
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those who attend the "Haunted Red River Cemetery," a walk-through spooky cemetery scare event on Halloween, Wednesday, October 31, 2012, from 6 to 10 p.m. The cost to attend is $2 for students who have an I.D. and $4 for all others. Bring a non-perishable food item and admission will be reduced by half. 

The event, open to the public and suitable for kids ages 8 and older, will take place on campus on the grounds just north of Centennial Hall, directly east of the main entrance to the campus.  "Scare actors" will be located throughout the trail, but they will be directed not to touch anyone.

Event parking will be in Parking Lot G near Kiehle Building.  

All monetary proceeds will go to support the Crookston Humane Society. The event is sponsored and staffed by the Office of Residential Life and Security Services.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Jen Schoenecker, residential life, 218-281-8536 (schoe315@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

It was another successful year for the University of Minnesota, Crookston at the annual 
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conference of the Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) held recently in Brookings, S.D. Placing second overall, the team from Crookston consisted of four juniors all majoring in horticulture. Ashlynn Hartung, Lindstrom, Minn., placed first in woody plant identification, first in herbaceous plant identification, and earned first place overall individual honors. Tim Staudahar, Hibbing, Minn., walked away with first place in woody plant identification, as well as herbaceous plant identification, and finished as the third place overall individual. Other members of the winning team were Catlin Kersting, Cloquet, Minn., and Mitch Sledge, St. Louis Park, Minn.

Additional horticulture students who competing individually included Ethan Kojetin, a junior from Atwater, Minn.; Sarah Lanners, a sophomore from Nashwauk, Minn.; Ashley Radke, a sophomore from Grand Forks, N.D.; and Amanda Thompson, a junior from Pine River, Minn. The MACHS team from the U of M, Crookston is coached by Theresa Helgeson, lab services coordinator and Sue Jacobson, instructor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department. 

The teams compete in the areas of plant judging, plant identification, and a general knowledge examination. This year's competition, which took place Oct 11-14, at South Dakota State University included teams from the University of Minnesota, Crookston, University of Wisconsin-River Falls, Iowa State University, North Dakota State University, Northwest Missouri State, and Western Illinois University. The theme for this year's event was Local Treasures and celebrated the organization's 40th anniversary. 

The keynote speaker for the conference, Karl Schmidt, owner and founder of Glacial Lakes Permaculture, spoke on the topic of "Permaculture? That's nice, but how do I make a living doing it?" Conference attendees also had an opportunity to tour the Prairie Coteau Garlic Farm, Volga, S.D.; Shade Vineyard, Volga, S.D.; Linda's Gardens in Chester, S.D.; and North American Wholesale Florist and the Falls Park in Sioux Falls, S.D. The three day event concluded on Sunday, October 14 with the annual business meeting and awards ceremony at the McCrory Gardens Visitor Center.

The MACHS competition will be held at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls in 2013 followed by North Dakota State University in Fargo in 2014. 

The MACHS organization and contest provide a means of communication between horticulture clubs of participating schools. Sharing knowledge and ideas is an important part of the gathering. The MACHS competition includes collegiate horticulture clubs from 12 Mid-American states. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Back row, left to right, Tim Staudahar and Mitch Sledge and in the front row Catlin Kersting and Ashlynn Hartung.

Contact: Theresa Helgeson, lab services coordinator, 218281-8120 (helg0145@umn.edu; Sue Jacobson, instructor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept. 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@u

University of Minnesota Extension Dean Bev Durgan honored Dan Dolan, president of the Washington County Agricultural Society, on Oct. 9 at Extension's annual conference. She also honored several Extension faculty members for exemplary work that helped Minnesotans improve their lives through Extension research and education.

The following is a list of recipients and awards:

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Deb Zak, Regional Director, Distinguished Outstanding Leadership
Deb Zak (left), regional director in Northwest Minnesota, began her career as a county Extension educator in Pennington County before moving into regional leadership positions. Some of her administrative accomplishments include serving on the State Coordinating Committee for the Regional Sustainable Development Partnership; completing a nine-year term on the State Tourism Advisory Council; and serving on the University of Minnesota Crookston Executive Committee. Zak co-chairs the Extension American Indian Task Force, and works with University faculty and various tribal and community organizations to design and deliver a science and math summer program for students in grades 8-12 on the White Earth Reservation. The program improves students' academic achievement using a natural resources-based curriculum that incorporates Ojibwe culture and traditions.

Dan Dolan, Distinguished Friend of Extension
As a strong Washington County 4-H supporter and volunteer, Dolan led the core group of 4-H volunteers that advocated for restoring county funding for Extension programming. Today, as Washington County Extension Committee chairperson, Dolan continues to lead the effort to ensure county support and raise private funds that leverage county and state investments.

As president of the Washington County Agricultural Society, as well as horse program leader, Dolan ensures that the Washington County Fair provides a rich environment for 4-H'ers to demonstrate their learning and leadership.

Larry Jacobson, Extension engineer, Distinguished Campus-based Faculty
As an Extension agricultural engineer, Jacobson is a national expert in the area of agricultural housing, livestock air quality and odor abatement. Jacobson and colleagues developed a national air quality and odor control, monitoring and prediction model called OFFSET (Odor from Feedlots -Setback Estimation Tool). He was also a key member in developing the National Air Quality Assessment Tool used by Extension educators, farmers and government agency professionals across the U.S.

Suzanne Driessen, Extension Educator, Distinguished Field-based Faculty
Suzanne Driessen teaches foundational programs in food safety and food preservation while constantly working to identify and meet emerging food safety educational needs. Her teaching has reached consumers and food service staff across the state, resulting in behavior changes that protect the health of Minnesotans from foodborne illness. Driessen's work addresses many aspects of food safety in consumer, institutional and food service settings.

Private Applicator Recertification Team, Distinguished Team
The Pesticide Safety and Environmental Education - Private Applicator Recertification program team reaches farmers who have not historically been involved with Extension's Integrated Pest Management training. In partnership with the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, the team helps farmers learn to make better decisions about managing pesticides and pesticide-resistant insects, weeds and diseases. This program supports the need for up-to-date information that benefits the safety and security of their families, their communities and the environment. 
U of M Team Members: Dean Herzfeld, Tana Haugen, Mary Kay Ferguson, Fritz Breitenbach, Lisa Behnken, Diane DeWitte, Michael Donnelly, Phil Glogoza, Dan Martens, Ryan Miller, Dave Nicolai, Brenda Postels, Liz Stahl, Jerry Tesmer, and Nathan Winter. 
MDA Team Member: Kay Sargent

Community Mentorship Program Team, Distinguished Diversity and Inclusion
The Community Mentorship Program helps Minnesota's diverse and underserved populations "live a little better" through financial literacy education. This program is implemented through a unique partnership between Extension and Minnesota Council on Economic Education (MCEE), along with other University faculty members. A primary goal is to build the capacity of grassroots organizations to conduct their own culturally sensitive financial literacy training, especially in the language of the participants. The program has increased the capacity of participating agencies. 
Team Members: Antonio Alba Meraz, Sara Croymans, Jennifer Garbow, Rosemary Heins, Lori Hendrickson, Rebecca Hagen Jokela, Cindy Petersen, Suzanne Sheridan, Patricia Olson, Claudia Parliament, and Jane Stockman

Contact: Catherine Dehdashti, U of M Extension, (612) 625-0237, ced@umn.edu

cres_logos_final_wgreen.jpgThe Bremer Foundation has awarded a grant for $50,000 to the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES) at the University of Minnesota, Crookston.  The grant, which provides $25,000 each year for two years, offers operational support to extend the unique entrepreneurial assistance services and programming of CRES to northwestern Minnesota. It will also focus on developing entrepreneurial awareness among area high school and U of M, Crookston students.  Susan Brorson, head of the Business Department serves as the principal investigator for the grant which was written by Kevin Cooper, who serves as director of CRES, and Rachel Lundbohm, the Center's assistant director. 

"We want to engage students and assist businesses by providing technical assistance to area entrepreneurs and conducting valuable research related to entrepreneurship," explains Lundbohm. "Encouraging students interested in entrepreneurship while getting them involved in the region is also a priority. We appreciate this award from Bremer to support our passion for entrepreneurship and to help us provide assistance to entrepreneurs and businesses in the region."

Goals of CRES for the next two years include entrepreneurial and small business consulting, community education and outreach that facilitates entrepreneurial networking, and the dissemination of rural entrepreneurship research. 
The work of CRES positively impacts entrepreneurs and small businesses in northwest Minnesota by providing no-cost technical assistance to these individuals.  Entrepreneurs, companies, and non-profit organizations receiving the assistance of CRES have provided positive feedback regarding their experience with the program. Students who have worked on CRES-initiated projects have also received valuable experience, further contributing to their education and professional understanding.

Background
The mission of the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies is to encourage entrepreneurship through educational leadership, applied research, and insightful consulting.  CRES engages the students, faculty, and research facilities of the University of Minnesota, Crookston in order to stimulate the entrepreneurial culture and strengthen the economic vitality of northwest Minnesota.  

The U.S. Department of Education awarded a $550,000 congressionally-directed grant to the University of Minnesota, Crookston to establish the CRES in 2010. Congressman Collin Peterson played an integral leadership role in this entrepreneurial initiative and was supported by both Senators Al Franken and Amy Klobuchar. CRES serves the eleven county region of northwest Minnesota, including Beltrami, Clearwater, Kittson, Lake of the Woods, Mahnomen, Marshall, Norman, Pennington, Polk, Red Lake, and Roseau counties, and is located in Dowell Hall 117on the Crookston campus.

For more information, contact Lundbohm at 218-281-8190 (rlundboh@.umn.edu) or visit the CRES Web site at www.umccres.org.   

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Rachel Lundbohm, associate director, CRES, 218-281-8190 (rlundboh@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Minnesota EDA Center, based at the U of M, Crookston, recently published its latest report, Second_Stage_Business_Report_9-2012_Page_01.jpg"Successful Businesses in Rural Minnesota: Lessons Learned" by faculty members Eyad Youssef, Ph.D., Jack Geller, Ph.D., Ken Myers, and Denis Maier, Ph.D. 

The report details common traits and characteristics related to new business success across rural Minnesota in order to identify successful "second-stage" businesses and to understand the factors leading to their success. The report is available online

Contact: Jack Geller, professor and head, Liberal Arts and Education Dept. and director, EDA Center

A solo piano recital featuring guest artist John McKay, D.M.A., will be held at the grand piano
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in Evergreen Hall on the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Tuesday, October 23, 2012. McKay, who's career as a recitalist, collaborative musician, and soloist with the orchestra spans more than five decades, will be in concert beginning at 7 p.m. The recital is free and the public is welcome to attend. Evergreen Hall is located on the south side of the Crookston campus. 

The program will feature music by Mozart (including the brilliant Sonata in D major, K. 311), Chopin (including the Ballade No. 3 in A flat major, op. 47), and Ravel (three movements from "Miroirs").

McKay is an American pianist and music educator of Canadian birth who has performed in concerts, recitals and on radio and television broadcasts throughout North America and Europe. Born and raised in Montreal, Canada, he graduated from McGill University. He earned graduate degrees at the Eastman School of Music where he studied with Eugene List and David Burge. McKay spent most of the sixties in Europe studying and concertizing widely. 

He taught at the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minn., where he taught piano and the history of music for 28 years. For 17 of those years, he also directed Minnesota Valley Sommarfest, a festival of chamber music held every July at Gustavus. He continues to be in demand as a recitalist. 

McKay is married to Sara Hayden McKay, who directs the St. Peter Choral Society and the couple was honored in 2000 by the Minnesota State Arts Board for their contributions to the arts. 

For more information on the concert, contact George French, director of music and theater, at 218-281-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu). 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: George French, associate professor, music, 218-281-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Six Students from U of M, Crookston Attend World Dairy Expo, Madison, Wis.

Six students from the University of Minnesota, Crookston Dairy Club and their two coaches attended the World Dairy Expo in Madison, Wis., recently. The Expo is an event designed for all aspects of the dairy industry. All of the students competed in the International Post-Secondary Dairy Cattle Competition held September 30 through October 1, 2012. 

dairy expo1.jpgCompeting were Rachel Grant, a freshman from Westminster, Md., majoring in animal science; Rochelle Herzog, a sophomore from Randall, Minn., majoring in animal science; Marilyn Lewis, a freshman from Bemidji, Minn., majoring in animal science; Whitney Lian, a senior from Thief River Falls, Minn., majoring in agricultural education; Andrea Ramponi, a senior from Mountain Iron, Minn., majoring in animal science; and Corissa Robinson, a freshman from Monticello, Minn., majoring in equine science. They were joined by coaches Lyle Westrom and Harouna Maiga, both professors in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department on the Crookston campus. 

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Lewis, Lian, Ramponi, and Robinson competed as a team in the Practical Judging Contest. The contest consisted of three parts including linear evaluation, identified heifer selection, and non-identified heifer selection.  Linear evaluation requires evaluating numerous traits of the animal using a 1 to 50 point grading scale. Identified heifers selection requires the team to use pedigrees and visual appraisal to rank the animals. Non-identified heifers selection requires students to rank the animal first to last using primarily visual appraisal. Lewis, Lian, Ramponi, and Robinson placed first in the linear category as a team. Robinson placed first individually while Lian placed third individually. The team took home a $250 monetary award, a plaque, and sweatshirts. Individuals earned a monetary award and ribbons. 

Grant, Herzog, Lewis, and Lian competed in the Post-Secondary Traditional Contest. The traditional contest consists of judging twelve classes of four dairy cows or heifers and ranking them on the desired traits. Students must defend their placing by giving four sets of oral reasons. Lian placed fifth overall in the contest and also took home several top ten scores including 7th high individual on milking shorthorns, 7th high individual on Brown Swiss, 9th high individual for Holsteins, and 10th high individual for Ayrshires. The team placed eighth overall. 

During their visit to Madison, the team toured numerous dairy farms including Hoard's Dairymen Farm and Sunshine Genetics. The team also visited the Dairy Shrine which contains records of dairy history and important historical and technological improvements.  Westrom stated, "The educational value of experiences offered at the Dairy Exposition and dairy tours in nearby Madison, Wisconsin, are difficult to duplicate in a classroom." 

"The World Dairy Expo offers the ideal platform for students to compete at the international level and provides the global dimension of education for our students." Maiga said. 

Currently, the World Dairy Expo serves as a forum for dairy producers, companies, students, faculty, professional organizations and other dairy enthusiasts to come together to compete, and to exchange ideas, knowledge, technology, and commerce. To learn more about the expo, visit www.worlddairyexpo.com. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Members of the Traditional Dairy Judging Team (at right) competing at the World Dairy Expo were, in front, Rochelle Herzog and Whitney Lian, and in back, Rachel Grant and Marilyn Lewis. 

Members of the Linear Team (at left) were Corissa Robinson, Andrea Ramponi, Whitney Lian, and Marilyn Lewis

Contact: Harouna Maiga, professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8107 (hmaiga@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Torch & Shield Award Recipients for 2012 Honored

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Honoring those who have aided in the development of the University of Minnesota, Crookston, the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC), and Extension is the purpose of the Torch & Shield award. This celebration of leadership is the highest honor presented by the Crookston campus and a special recognition event was held on Wednesday, November 7, 2012, on the campus.

The Torch & Shield award recipients for 2012 include Alan Cattanach, general agronomist at American Crystal Sugar Company in Moorhead, Minn.; Wayne Goeken, director of the International Water Institute's Center for Watershed Education; and Otter Tail Power Company, whose headquarters are located in Fergus Falls, Minn.

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Alan Cattanach (left) has worked in cooperative research efforts in the past with 8 scientists from Northwest Research and Outreach Center and 6 from the University of Minnesota, St. Paul. He has served on U of M search committees and Extension planning teams and committees. He has participated in numerous sugarbeet and soil fertility extension meetings with other U of M Extension specialists and county extension agents and served as liaison to NWROC and St. Paul campus scientists for Sugarbeet research programs of interest to American Crystal Sugar Company.

Working as part of the Sugarbeet Research and Education Board of Minnesota and North Dakota, Cattanach has helped to provide extensive funding of projects at the NWROC and to St Paul campus scientists, as well as involved in an EPA grant partnership with NWROC (Biological control of Cercospora Leafspot) and provided gift funds to NWROC in support of sugarbeet research projects.

He earned his doctorate in soil science from the University of Minnesota, and master's of science, and bachelor's of science also in soil science from North Dakota State University (NDSU) and University of Wisconsin-Madison respectively. He has been general agronomist at American Crystal Sugar Company since July 1998 and prior to that worked for North Dakota State University and the U of M as Extension sugabeet specialist. 

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Over the years, Wayne Goeken (left) has worked with a number of personnel at the U of M, Crookston primarily with River Watch and watershed education and monitoring efforts. Recently he has worked with associate professors Katy Smith and Brian Dingmann on a river sediment research project involving high school and university students. 
Goeken has been involved in ongoing work with the Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership and Executive Director Linda Kingery in promoting the Red Lake River Enhancement Project, including leading a canoe/kayak trip of the entire 195-mile length of the Red Lake River to raise awareness of its cultural attributes and recreational potential. He continues to work with the NRSDP on development of initiatives to connect people to nature, especially children, including promoting nature-based interactive play spaces for children.

He coordinates the annual River Watch Forum on the U of M, Crookston campus during spring break, with high school River Watch teams coming from 25 schools throughout the Red River Basin to share their results and learn about current topics in watershed science. He also conducts annual training and certification workshops each spring for personnel from natural resource agencies who are involved in water quality monitoring, the only certification program of its type in Minnesota.

Goeken earned his bachelor of science in agribusiness and his master of science in economics from South Dakota State University in Brookings.
 
Named for the river that provided its first source of power, Otter Tail Power Company was 
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incorporated in 1907. The company began producing electricity in 1909 at Dayton Hollow Dam on the Otter Tail River near Fergus Falls, Minnesota, and home to the company's headquarters.

Today, Otter Tail Power Company is a subsidiary of Otter Tail Corporation. Its approximately 790 employees provide electricity and energy services to more than 129,000 customers in 422 communities and in rural areas in an un-crowded 70,000-square-mile service area in western Minnesota, eastern North Dakota, and northeastern South Dakota. The company has customer service centers in Crookston and ten other communities in its service area.

Otter Tail Power Company's mission is to produce and deliver electricity as reliably, economically, and environmentally responsibly as possible to the balanced benefit of customers, shareholders, and employees and to improve the quality of life in the area in which we do business. To learn more about Otter Tail Power Company visit www.otpco.com.

Otter Tail Power Company has supported the University of Minnesota, Crookston over the years through scholarships, the Campus Energy Challenge, and various sponsorships. 
Cris Oehler director of public relations for Otter Tail, accepted the award on behalf of Otter Tail Power Company. 

The Torch & Shield Award honors contributions of significance to higher education, the Crookston campus, and the region; recognizes champions of the U of M, Crookston, NWROC, and Extension for their impact on the region through teaching, research, and outreach; and distinguishes both high profile individuals and those who have been "quiet" contributors to the success of the Crookston campus. For more information, visit www.umcrookston.edu/torchandshield.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, at top, Fred Wood, chancellor of the U of M, Crookston, Goeken, Oehler, Cattanach, and Albert Sims, director of operations at the NWROC. 

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Josh Caplan (right) will be on the University of Minnesota, Crookston for a special 
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presentation entitled "Hate Speech is Lame", in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center, on Thursday, October 18, 2012, at 7 p.m. Caplan is a graduate student at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., working on a master of arts degree in public policy.  His presentation discusses how we use words and language that might be hurtful and discriminating. Sometimes hurtful language might be intentional, while other times, we may not even realize it or think about it. The program is free and public is invited to attend. 

Lorna Hollowell, director of diversity and multicultural programs on the Crookston campus is excited about hosting Caplan at the Crookston campus. "While serving as the director of cultural diversity at Owensboro Community & Technical College in Kentucky, I brought Josh to campus to speak," Hollowell says. "He is an excellent, engaging presenter, who interacts with students, faculty, and staff in a captivating manner. His presentation resulted in inclusive dialog that continued after his presentation had ended."

While earning his master of arts in political science at Purdue University, Caplan coached the nationally recognized Purdue Speech and Debate team.  His current studies focus on how individuals identify themselves and the effects of political context in public policy creation. He is an executive editor of the Georgetown Public Policy Review and was recently the policy fellow for the Democratic Senatorial
Campaign Committee. 

Caplan earned his master of arts in political science and his bachelor of arts in political science from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., and will graduate with his degree in public policy from Georgetown in 2013.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lorna Hollowell, director, diversity programming, 218-281-8580 (lhollowe@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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One of the highlights of homecoming week at the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Friday, September 21, 2012, was the coronation of the homecoming royalty. The evening was designed around the theme for this year's homecoming festivities "Life's a Beach." 

The homecoming court included King Jeff Pryor, a junior sport and recreation management major from Havanna, Ill.; Queen Laurie Tyson, a junior sport and recreation management major from Rosemount, Minn.; Anthony Taylor, a senior business management major from Sheridan, Wyo.; Sabra Amundson, a junior, animal science major from Sioux Falls, S.D.; Michelle Boateng, a senior information technology management major from Bloomington, Minn.; Matthew Green, asenior, double major in agronomy and agricultural business from Greenbush, Minn.; Stephen Henderson, a junior sport and recreation management major from Chatsworth, Calif.; Walter Lunsford, a senior criminal justice major from Upatoi, Ga; Brooke Novak, a senior, communication major from Dahlen, N.D. and Sara Wiedmaier, a junior sport and recreation management major from Marengo, Ill. 

Candidates were chosen by a vote by the student body. Activities and events taking place throughout the week included a powder puff football game, a spirit banner contest, photo booth culminating with a weekend of athletic competition and an alumni-student dance. For a complete listing of events, visit www.umcrookston.edu/alumni/homecoming.htm.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: 
Top, left, Jeff Pryor and Laurie Tyson
Top, right, Walter Lunsford and Brooke Novak
Center, right, Anthony Tahlor and Sara Wiedmaier
Bottom, right, Jeff Pryor and Michelle Boateng
Bottom, center, Stephen Henderson and Laurie Tyson
Bottom, left, Matthew Green and Sabra Amundson


Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston SIFE Announces Name Change for Organization to Enactus

Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE), including the University of Minnesota, Crookston SIFE 
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team, are excited to announce a new name for the organization. While the guiding tenets of the organization remain the same, SIFE will be known moving forward as Enactus. The new name was revealed on September 30, 2012, by SIFE International at the start of the SIFE World Cup in Washington D.C., and notification of rebranding intentions was emailed to all registered SIFE members last year.  The name change typifies the work of the organization and they hope it will better reflect the organization as "entrepreneurs in action" for the greater good.

The organization still stands by the same principles of volunteerism and teamwork as well as the criteria of social, economic, and environmental progress. SIFE on the Crookston campus will take on a new identity as UMC Enactus. Students on the UMC Enactus team have been highly successful representing the chapter at the U of M, Crookston earning the title Regional Champions for 13 consecutive years. 

The team is advised by Sam Walton Fellow Kenneth Johnson, instructor in the Business Department and assisted by Courtney Bergman, a lecturer in the Business Department who is working on becoming a Sam Walton Fellow.  

Along with the new name have come a few technical changes, including adjustments of competition presentation rules, which can be found in the 2012-2013 Competitions, Awards, and Scholarships Guide located.

The mission of UMC Enactus remains to educate, inspire, and reinvest in our community while expanding our minds in the ever changing global business world. The global non-profit organization active in more than 40 countries, encourages students to work in partnership with business and higher education where they are challenged to develop community outreach projects including: free market economics, personal success skills, entrepreneurship, financial literacy, business ethics, sustainability, and environmental sustainability.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Anthony Taylor, president, (tayl0787@umn.edu), James Kriegh, vice president, (krie0198@umn.edu), or Alex Buscher, treasurer, (busch206@umn.edu); Kenneth Johnson, instructor, Business Department, 218-281-8178 (joh02053@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assis

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