November 2012 Archives

Flutist Galen Abdur Razzaq of Flutejuice Productions will perform on Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at 7 p.m. in the Kiehle Auditorium at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The event, "An Evening of Jazz and Kwanzaa" will include several jazz selections as well as a presentation of the Kwanza ceremony. 

Galen Abdur-Razzaq, a talented and extraordinary flutist from Montclair, N.J., has performed both domestically and internationally for more than thirty years. A former student of the Berklee College of Music, Boston, Mass., and a graduate of Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J., Galen holds a master's degree in fine arts and education. He is an arranger, composer, director, educator, and writer.

Kwanzaa is a week-long celebration honoring African heritage and based on seven core principles known as Nguzo Saba, including unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith. It was first celebrated in 1966-67 and was created as the first specifically African-American holiday to reconnect African Americans with their African culture and historical heritage.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lorna Hollowell, director, diversity programming, 218-281-8580 (lhollowe@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Celebrate the holiday season with a concert of the holiday's best music performed by the University of Minnesota, Crookston choir under the direction of Associate Professor George French. The concert will be held on Saturday, December 8, 2012, at 7 p.m. in the Hafslo Chapel located on the grounds of the Polk County Museum. The concert is free and all are welcome. 

The Hafslo chapel, once a Norwegian country church, was built in 1888 and closed in 1978. It was moved in 1983 to the Crookston campus where it was located for almost twenty years before it was moved to the Polk County Museum grounds located at 719 East Robert St., Crookston, Minn. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: George French, associate professor, Music and Theater, 218-218-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A retirement reception honoring Carol Windels, Ph.D., professor/faculty member at the 
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Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) and in the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul is slated for Wednesday, December 5, 2012. The reception will be held from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Windels (at right) is retiring on December 31 following 28 years at the NWROC. Coffee and cake will be served and everyone is invited to attend the reception in her honor.

Windels is a world renowned expert in sugar beet root diseases and has made major contributions to the understanding of sugar beet root diseases and their control or management in the sugar beet industry of Minnesota and North Dakota.  Previous to that, she made significant contributions to the understanding of Fusarium Head Blight (scab disease in small grains) and the organism that causes it.  

Her professional career began with the University of Minnesota as a junior scientist rising through the rank of scientist.  In 1984, she came to Crookston and the Northwest Experiment Station as an assistant professor.  In 1998, she was promoted to full professor and has been a valued member of the faculty at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center. She is also an adjunct professor at North Dakota State University's Department of Plant Pathology.

Windels has been teacher and mentor to several graduate students as well as numerous undergraduate students who have worked in her lab and on her projects these many years.  She has co-edited two books and authored/co-authored over 200 publications and 16 book chapters along with serving on the editorial boards of three journals. 

A member of several professional societies, Windels has served as an officer in various capacities, including president, of the American Phytopathological Society.  She has earned several awards and honors including the Sugarbeet Distinguished Service Award by the Sugarbeet Industry of Minnesota and North Dakota, the Meritorious Service Award by the American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists, and is a Fellow in both the American Phytopathological Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

In 2011, Windels was recognized for her work with the Torch & Shield Award, the highest honor given by the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The award honors contributions of significance to higher education, the Crookston campus, and the region; recognizes champions of the U of M, Crookston, NWROC and Extension for their impact on the region through teaching, research, and outreach; and distinguishes both high profile individuals and those who have been "quiet" contributors to the success of the Crookston campus. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Maureen Aubol, Northwest Research and Outreach Center, 218-281-8602 (aubo0002@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Minnesota College Application Week has been proclaimed a success with the help of the 
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Achieve More Initiative. Janessa DeBoer, who works in the Center for Adult Learning, led the effort and reports that 39 students in the Crookston High School completed college applications and some 40 parents attended parents Night on Thursday, November 15.

The goal was to have more students applying to college in their senior year. Students could apply to any two-year or four-year college/university or training program in which they were interested. Parents Night helped answer questions surrounding the financial, social, and academic aspects of attending a post-secondary institution. More than 50 institutions of higher education waived their application fees during the week to encourage students to complete an application. 

During the week's events, prizes were given away to students including a 32-inch television, two printers, and a number of gift cards.

A competition designed around the theme "I want to go to college because..." was won by Ms. Swanson's and Ms. Darco's classroom. The students won based on a poster, participation in College Application Week, and by wearing college apparel. They were awarded a Happy Joe's pizza party. 

Background
Last year, as part of a national initiative through the American Council on Education, Governor Mark Dayton proclaimed the second week of November Minnesota College Application Week.  This week will provide a framework for high schools and postsecondary institutions to collaborate in a concentrated effort to engage and inform underrepresented students (first generation college students, students of color, and low-income students) about the college exploration and application process. While much of the focus of College Application Week is geared toward first-generation, low-income students, all students are encouraged to participate in events to help them explore and prepare for postsecondary education.

Achieve More emerged from the regional IMPACT 20/20 Education Task Force's priority initiative to increase high school graduation rates and encourage more students to consider attending college.   Launched in fall 2012, the project is a collaborative effort among the Center for Adult Learning (CAL), the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), and the Crookston Area Chamber of Commerce.  Achieve More consists of two major components, UMC's current College and Career Preparation 101, aimed at grades 8‐12, and Junior Achievement, which returns to the Crookston School District for grades 3‐7.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Amber Schultz, director of admissions, stops to assist a student with the application process in the lab at the Crookston High School. 

Contact: Janessa DeBoer, student personnel coordinator, Center for Adult Learning, 218-281-8673 (deboe053@umn.edu); Eric Morgan, student personnel coordinator, Center for Adult Learning, 218-2818685 (morga365@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, co

Adam Switzer (at right), a senior at the University of Minnesota, Crookston from Apple Valley, Minn., 
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majoring in sport and recreation management, successfully passed the Microsoft® Office 2010 Master Certification. He is the first student to earn the certification at the master level from the Crookston campus. The U of M, Crookston is Microsoft Testing Site for such certification.

The Microsoft Office Master certification denotes fluency in several important Microsoft Office applications. To achieve this highest designation, a candidate must pass three required exams and one elective exam. The required exams are Word 2010 Expert, Excel® 2010 Expert and PowerPoint® 2010.

The benefits of the certification as a Microsoft Office Master are to build credibility through proof of skills, to set yourself apart as a desktop computing expert, to differentiate yourself from your peers, to possess a professional recognition accepted around the world, and to demonstrate computing efficiency in the workplace. 

The Microsoft Office certification program within the university helps provide graduates tangible proof they possess skills that make them ideal hires. This certification gives students a leg up in a difficult job market.

"When our students are competing against other students from other business schools, if all things are equal, this is a differentiator for our students," explains Twyla Treanor, assistant professor in the Math, Science, and Technology Department. "We know students need to look at every angle possible to stand out and get ahead."

Microsoft Certified Application Specialist certifications are primarily for those who use Microsoft Office programs as a vital part of their job functions. To learn more about the Microsoft Certification available at the U of M, Crookston, visit http://www3.crk.umn.edu/academics/mst/itm/certification.htm. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Twyla Treanor, assistant professor, Math, Science, and Technology Dept., 218-281-8181 (ttreanor@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Whether interested in wildlife management as a career or in learning more about the specifics of managing a deer population, everyone is invited to a presentation by Lou Cornicelli, Ph.D., who works with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) as a wildlife research manager. Cornicelli will present on Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at 7 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. Topics will include Minnesota deer management history, estimating population sizes and management, along with a look at future wildlife research in the state. The event is free and open to the public. 

Prior to becoming the DNR's wildlife research manager, Cornicelli was the big game program leader, a position he held for ten years. He is an expert in deer population management, and as the big game program leader, he was responsible for managing deer, elk, and moose seasons and populations. 

Cornicelli's presentation is sponsored by the U of M, Crookston Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society. For more information on majoring in natural resources on the Crookston campus, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

December at the University of Minnesota, Crookston brings the excitement and challenge of Agriculture and Natural Resources Activities Day. Students from almost 50 high schools will be on campus on Friday, December 7, 2012, to compete in more than 20 contests. The Ag and Natural Resources Day competition has been held for more than 30 years on the Crookston campus.

The day begins early with registration for the equine contests beginning at 7:15 a.m. With contests ranging from horticulture and forestry to ag mechanics, livestock and sales, the day brings out the competitive spirit of students culminating in an awards ceremony. The contests are overseen by U of M, Crookston Agriculture and Natural Resources Department faculty.  All activities conclude with the awards ceremony at 1:15 p.m.in Lysaker Gymnasium. 

The awards ceremony recognizes the day's winning individuals and teams. Scholarships, plaques and certificates are awarded to school teams and individuals for each contest. Last year, $750 UMC scholarships were awarded for the high individual in each contest, $600 UMC scholarships were awarded for the second place individual, and $450 UMC scholarships were awarded for the third place individual. In all, more than $32,000 in scholarships is awarded during the competition. 

More information regarding Ag and Natural Resources Activities Day is available by contacting Leah Stroot at 218-281-8101 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/agnatrday. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Leah Stroot, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8101(stro0525@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Crookston Student Association in partnership with several student clubs and organizations at the University of Minnesota, Crookston are hosting Santa Land in celebration of the holiday season. The event will take place in the Sargeant Student Center at the U of M, Crookston on Saturday, December 8, 2012, from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Visit with Santa, enjoy free cider and cookies, crafts, activities, and meet some of Santa's helpers. Santa Land is free for all.
 
Lisa Samuelson, director of student activities, says U of M, Crookston students enjoy hosting Santa Land as a way to thank the community for support. "Santa Land has become one of the students' all time favorite activities as it allows them to revisit their own childhood memories while giving back to the community that supports them throughout the year," Samuelson says.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director of Student Activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Several new articulation agreements have been implemented by the Business Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Agreements were signed with Hibbing Community College (HCC) in Hibbing, Minn.; Inver Hills Community College in Inver Grove Heights, Minn.; and Pine Technical College in Pine City, Minn. 

Graduates with an associate of science degree in business administration from Hibbing Community College could consider pursuing a bachelor of science degree in business management from the U of M, Crookston. Associate of applied science graduates in industrial systems technology from HCC could pursue their bachelor of manufacturing management. Both degrees are offered online and on-campus.

For graduates earning an applied science degree from Inver Hills Community College, pursuing a bachelor of science in accounting at the U of M, Crookston would be an option. Those interested in pursuing a bachelor of science in business management could do so by earning their applied science degree from Inver Hills in either contemporary business or international business.

Pine Technical College graduates with an associate of applied science degree in accounting would also be able to pursue a bachelor of science in accounting at the U of M, Crookston.

Articulation agreements are formal arrangements transferring a defined set of academic credits between an academic program of one institution, usually a two-year post-secondary institution, to a program within a college or campus of the University of Minnesota system in order to fulfill general education or program requirements. Benefits of an articulation agreement include a reduced chance of retaking the same coursework; and the opportunity to move from an associate degree to a bachelor's degree at the U of M, Crookston. 

 For more information on the degree programs available in the Business Department at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/bus or call 218-281-8176 (800-UMC-MINN).

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Sue Brorson, head, Business Department, 218-281-8186 (sbrorson@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Freshman Douglas Potts Completes First Student Solo Flight

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Douglas Potts, Williams, Minn., a freshman at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his student solo flight.  An agricultural aviation major, Pott's advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus. His flight instructor is Chase Enghauser, a 2012 graduate of the U of M, Crookston with a business management aviation degree. The milestone flight was completed at the Thief River Falls [Minn.] Regional Airport due to runway construction activity at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The first student solo flight is a significant accomplishment and cannot be overemphasized.  Landing an aircraft involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  
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As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest. 

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student having him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. It stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios were not a part of early aviation making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this 
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tradition, aviation students at the U of M, Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. Students have the option to choose tracks in agricultural aviation, business aviation, law enforcement aviation, or natural resources aviation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A $100,000 grant from the U.S. Department of State will fund a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota, Crookston and Zhejiang Economic and Trade Polytechnic (ZJETP) to establish an American Cultural Center in China. The purpose of the cultural center, to be located on the campus of ZJETP in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, is to cultivate greater understanding between the United States and China. One of the unique aspects of the American Cultural Center at ZJETP is the construction of a 3-D immersive lab similar to the one located on the Crookston campus. 

Students in China will be able to use the lab to demonstrate American historical scenes and visit sites in the U.S. including universities, national landmarks, and other places of interest. The lab combines the most recent computer technology, sensor technology, and visual technology to allow users to "immerse" themselves in a virtual environment and interact with that environment. Along with the 3-D immersive lab, the American Cultural Center at ZJETP will include a multimedia conference room and theater, a reading room, and an e-reading room.

To be eligible for the grant, an applicant had to demonstrate expertise in one or more of the following subject areas: people-to-people exchanges, cultural and academic programming, international cooperation, institution-to-institution partnerships, and the ability to develop and implement programs in China. The one-time grant funding, which runs from September 20, 2012, through September 20, 2013, will promote a greater understanding of and appreciation for American culture. 

Jingpeng Tang, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Math, Science, and Technology Department on the Crookston campus is the grant's principal investigator. Kim Gillette, Ph.D., director of the Office of International Programs will join Tang to serve as the cultural center's deputy directors. Serving as their counterpart as deputy director in China is Mingdi Gu, who is the director of the international office at ZJETP. 

According to Tang, the American Cultural Center is the natural outgrowth of a long-term relationship between the U of M, Crookston and ZJETP. "We have been partners with Zhejiang Economic and Trade Polytechnic since 2005," Tang says. "This American Cultural Center will help foster mutual understanding between both countries, assist with student recruitment, and further our campus mission of outreach. We are excited about the opportunity and proud to be included among the campuses that have this kind of collaboration." The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities is home to the only other center of this kind in the U of M system.

One of the long term goals for the American Cultural Center at ZJETP is to use it as a bridge to universities, businesses, industries, governmental and non-governmental agencies in the United States and Zhejiang province and the Yangtze River Delta of China, including Shanghai, Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces. The Center also opens doors for potential research opportunities across both campuses.

Background
Over their history, the U of M, Crookston and ZJETP have collaborated on student exchange, faculty exchange, curriculum construction, and joint programs. More than 50 students from ZJETP have attended the U of M, Crookston in the software engineering, business management, and agricultural business programs. These programs allow ZJETP students to transfer to the U of M, Crookston to complete a bachelor's degree. The Crookston campus also established an English as Second Language (ESL) Center on the ZJETP campus. Study abroad opportunities for both faculty and students at the U of M, Crookston have been enhanced by the relationship with ZJETP and many have taken advantage of the opportunity to visit the campus in China. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Jingpeng Tang, associate professor, Math, Science, and Technology Dept., 218-281-8182 (jptang@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

In celebration of a rich culture and heritage, the month of November is recognized as Native American Heritage Month at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. A number of events are taking place beginning on Friday, November 16 and running through Tuesday, November 20, 2012. As part of the recognition, a display will be featured in the Library and Bookstore windows for viewing from November 17-30. 

The events are sponsored by the Office of Diversity & Multicultural Programs, in collaboration with the Circle of Nations Indigenous Association (CNIA), University of Minnesota Extension, the Early Childhood Education Club, the Multicultural International Club, and Sodexo Dining Services. 

The public is invited to attend all of the events taking place on campus:

On Friday, November 16, from 5-7 p.m., as part of International Education Week, students in CNIA and the Multicultural International Club will be sponsoring an International Carnival for Kids with games in Bede Ballroom led by students from CNIA. The evening is geared toward families with children ages 10 and under and is free for everyone. 

On Monday, November 19, a traditional Native meal will be served in Brown Dining Room from 10:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Sponsored by CNIA and co-sponsored by Dining Services, Diversity & Multicultural Services, and U of M Extension. The public is invited to attend and cost for the meal is $7.65 per person. 

On Monday, November 19, at 7 p.m. a presentation of the "The Circle of Life, Sacred Medicines and a Celebration of Animals" will be conducted by JT Shining Oneside from the Turtle Mountain Community College/YouthBuild in Turtle Mountain, N.D. Her family-orientated presentation will be of interest for school-aged children.  

On Tuesday, November 20, Bill Paulson will be on campus to present "Thanksgiving: A Native's Perspective...History, Hope, and Healing." Attendees are encouraged to bring their own brown bag lunch or purchase a traditional Thanksgiving meal Brown Dining Room for $7.65. His presentation will take place in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center at noon.

Concluding the events on Tuesday, November 20, at 7 pm, will be "Rivers Edge: An Evening 
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of Native Song, Dance and Music", in Kiehle Auditorium. Highlights include a parade of native regalia, the significance of Native designs/patterns, and story-telling. 

Rachel Quale, vice president of the CNIA at the U of M, Crookston, says that this is a month for both education and creating awareness. "The CNIA started on campus four years ago, but in the past two years, we have become increasingly active," Quale says. "We are using November to create a greater awareness of the club, which is open to all students, and even more importantly, to heighten everyone's consciousness of the great legacy of the Native people." Quale, a senior from St. Cloud, Minn., is an equine science major on the Crookston campus.  

Background
CNIA is a club dedicated to enhancing the knowledge and understanding of Native people in our region and Native students attending the University of Minnesota, Crookston; to increasing enrollment of Native students; and to promote a culturally connected environment for Native students. They welcome all students to join them. 

The month of November is American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month. It is a time to celebrate the rich and diverse cultures, traditions, and histories and to acknowledge the important contributions of Native people. To learn more, visit http://www.ncai.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Lorna Hollowell, center, is joined by members of Rivers Edge, the group will perform on campus on Tuesday, November 20 . 

Contact: Lorna Hollowell, director, Diversity and Multicultural Services, 218-281-8580 (lhollowe@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Veterans Support Group at the University of Minnesota, Crookston is marking Veterans Day on Monday, November 12, 2012, with several commemorative events. The public is invited to attend all activities. 

At 11 a.m. there will be a Veterans Day ceremony with a flag raising at 11:11 a.m. This specific time was chosen because it ties into the origin of Veterans Day.  The day was set aside and originally called "Armistice Day" and mainly recognized WWI veterans. Armistice Day celebrated the armistice which ended WWI. That armistice was signed at 11:11 a.m. on the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918. After WWII, Armistice Day was changed to Veterans Day to honor all war veterans. 

Following the flag ceremony, everyone will move to the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial on campus for a wreath ceremony.

Concluding the day, Retired Colonel Martin Breaker (photo at right) will speak at 4:15 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. Breaker, who is an instructor in the Business Department at the U of M, Crookston retired in 2003 from the Army Reserve after 32 years in active duty and National Guard and Reserve duty in Minnesota. Following the scandal of Abu Ghraib, Breaker volunteered to return to duty and served nearly three years in Iraq from 2005 to 2008.

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The Veterans Support Group mission is to raise awareness of veterans and their service to country along with currently serving. The group is open to everyone. The president of the group is Calvin Meyer, a senior majoring in aviation from Albertville, Minn. Breaker and Mike Vivion, chief pilot at the U of M, Crookston, serve as the group's advisor. 

The commemoration of Veterans Day is a long standing tradition on the Crookston campus dating back to the earliest days of the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial. The memorial was constructed in 1920 in honor of the young men and women who attended the Northwest School of Agriculture, predecessor of the U of M, Crookston, who died serving our country. 

Since then, more plates have been added commemorating not only those in the military who attended Northwest School of Agriculture but the University of Minnesota Technical Institute in Crookston and the University of Minnesota, Crookston as well. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Travis Anderson, Prinsburg, Minn., a freshman at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, 
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recently completed his student solo flight.  An  agricultural aviation major,  Anderson's advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus. His flight instructor is Chase Enghauser, a 2012 graduate of the U of M, Crookston with a business management aviation degree. The milestone flight was completed at the Thief River Falls [Minn.] Regional Airport due to runway construction activity at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The first student solo flight is a significant accomplishment and cannot be overemphasized.  Landing an aircraft involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of 
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the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest. 

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student having him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

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Following American aviation tradition, removing new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. It stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios were not a part of early aviation making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at the U of M, Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. Students have the option to choose tracks in agricultural aviation, business aviation, law enforcement aviation, or natural resources aviation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Billed as the "Academy Awards for high tech," rural Minnesota communities and partners 
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received a Tekne Award in Minneapolis on November 1, 2012, from the Minnesota High Tech Association for their work on broadband access and adoption. Representatives of the Minnesota Intelligent Rural Communities (MIRC) initiative collected the "Innovative Collaboration Award" in front of a crowd of nearly 1,000 at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

Through the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program grant, the MIRC coalition, which included as one of its partners the Economic Development Administration University Center (EDA Center)  located at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, brought together a network of resources and support to rural Minnesota individuals and communities--especially those unemployed and seeking employment, small businesses, coalitions of government entities, and local leaders. 
 
Jack Geller, director of the EDA Center served as the project's primary evaluator and was pleased to be a part of the award winning project. He also acknowledges the vital role played by the University of Minnesota Extension in the MIRC and their work in rural Minnesota.  

Selection of Tekne finalists and winners was made by an independent panel of judges. In choosing MIRC, an initiative convened by Blandin Foundation and involving 30 partners, judges noted that, "MIRC has benefited from a legacy of collaboration. MIRC partners are numerous and the impact the collaboration has had on broadband adoption is significant. In fact, the [broadband] adoption rate is 29.8 percent faster in MIRC partner communities when compared to the rest of rural Minnesota."

All rural regions of Minnesota have engaged in broadband projects as part of the MIRC Initiative. Individual communities initiated more than 70 locally designed and led demonstration projects, suchas Lac Qui Parle County's "Commuter Computer" (mobile learning lab) or Winona's "Project FINE" (language-specific computer literacy training in Hmong and Spanish).

Statewide MIRC partners provided training to more than 8,000 individuals, computers to more than 1,600 households and has resulted in more than 40,000 households in rural Minnesota subscribing to high-speed Internet. The two-year initiative was funded through a $4.3 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act grant administered by Blandin Foundation and will be completed at the close of 2012.

"Resilient, vibrant communities are connected communities," said Dr. Kathy Annette, Blandin
Foundation CEO. "And the quality and diversity of those connections is a hallmark of a community's leadership and sustainability. Through MIRC, engaged local leaders and statewide partners worked together to bring the promises of broadband to many of Minnesota's rural communities, including all residents in their progress. Blandin Foundation is thrilled that coalition's ambitious and innovative work has been honored through the Tekne Award."

Presented by the MHTA, the Tekne Awards honor those who play a significant role in discovering new technologies that educate, improve lifestyles, and impact the lives and futures of people living in Minnesota and all over the world. The program reinforces Minnesota's place as one of the most competitive and technologically advanced regions in the world. A full list of winners and finalists is available online at http://www.tekneawards.org/finalists

About the EDA Center at the U of M, Crookston
The mission of the EDA Center, located at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, is to engage university faculty, staff and students with local, county and regional economic development agencies in support of the rural economy. For more information, contact Jack Geller at 218-281-8248 or visit the EDA Center's Web site at www.edacenter.org.

About Blandin Foundation
Blandin Foundation stands with rural Minnesota communities as they imagine and claim ambitious, vibrant futures. It is one of only a handful of foundations in the U.S. focused exclusively on rural communities and the largest rural-based private foundation in Minnesota. Information on Blandin Foundation grant-making, leadership development programs and public policy initiatives are at www.blandinfoundation.org and broadband news at www.blandinonbroadband.org. On Twitter at http://twitter.com/BlandinFound. Media contact: Allison Ahcan, 218-326-0523.

About Minnesota High Tech Association (MHTA)
MHTA, or the Minnesota High Tech Association, is an innovation and technology association united in fueling Minnesota's prosperity. MHTA helps bring together the people of Minnesota's technology ecosystem and leads the charge in directing technology issues to Minnesota's state capitol. MHTA is the only membership organization that represents Minnesota's entire technology-based economy. Its members include organizations of every size − involved in virtually every aspect of technology creation, roduction, application and education in Minnesota. Find out more online at http://www.mhta.org or follow MHTA on Twitter at http://twitter.com/MHTA.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: MIRC was awarded the Tekne "Innovative Collaboration Award." Jack Geller, director of the EDA University Center is on the far left. 

Contact: Jack Geller, director, The EDA Center, 218-281-8248 or 507-381-0720; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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Three agricultural education majors at the University of Minnesota, Crookston were recently awarded the American FFA Degree. Nathan Anderson, a sophomore from Appleton, Minn.; Thomas Chute, a senior from Aitkin, Minn.;  and Amy Lee a sophomore from Mercer, N.D.; were presented their American FFA Degree on Saturday, October 27 at the 2012 National FFA Convention held in Indianapolis, Ind.  

The American FFA Degree is the highest degree that can be earned from the National FFA Organization.  Anderson, Chute, and Lee are all members of the U of M, Crookston Collegiate FFA Chapter as well as concurrently enrolled in their respective high school chapters.

Background
The Crookston campus has the only Collegiate FFA chapter in the state of Minnesota and Professor Lyle Westrom serves as the chapter's advisor.  The Collegiate FFA is part of the National FFA Organization which also held its 2012 National Convention concurrently with the ATA Conclave in Indianapolis, Indiana.  A new record of over 56,000 FFA members attended the National FFA Convention.  The convention returns to Louisville, Kentucky in 2013.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right: Nathan Anderson, Amy Lee and Thomas Chute.


Contact: Lyle Westrom, professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-2818110 (lwestrom@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota Crookston Collegiate FFA earned the platinum level A.W. Nolan Memorial Leadership Award at the National ATA Conclave held recently in Indianapolis, Ind.  The award was presented to sixteen U of M, Crookston Collegiate FFA members on Friday, October 26, 2012. 

Four colleges earned the platinum award, the highest level attainable, and it is the first time 
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for the U of M, Crookston to garner the honor.  The Crookston students participated in all contest areas including parliamentary procedure, debate, quiz bowl, program of excellence and the essay competition.  

In addition, Addie O'Neil, a senior majoring in agricultural education from Redwood Falls, Minn., wrote two journal articles in the Horse Digest entitled "Ground Tying" and "Opening and Closing the Gate" for renowned horse trainer Dennis Auslam. 

Jennifer Spahn, a freshman majoring in early childhood education from St. Paul, Minn., won second place in the essay contest with her essay entitled "The American role in providing agricultural extension support in developing countries". Her placing in the contest marks the highest level ever attained by a U of M, Crookston student. 

The parliamentary procedure team consisted of two seniors, a junior and two sophomores: Whitney Lian, a senior majoring in agricultural education; Whitney Jacobson, a junior double majoring in animal science and agricultural education, both from Thief River Falls, Minn.; along with Thomas Chute, a senior majoring in agricultural education from Aitkin, Minn.; Justin Goodroad, a sophomore double majoring in animal science and agricultural education from Lindstrom, Minn.; and Katie Myhre, a sophomore majoring in animal science from Whapeton, N.D. Lian served as team's president and Myhre as its secretary.

Chute and O'Neil were joined by Maria Funk, a senior majoring in agricultural education from Sebeka, Minn., and Amy Lee, a sophomore majoring in agricultural education from Mercer, N.D., to make up the quiz bowl team.  

Emil Waskow, a sophomore double majoring in animal science and ag systems management from Hugo, Minn., and Emily Campbell, a freshman majoring in animal science from Aitkin, Minn., competed in the debate contest.   Contestants debated the statement "Should agricultural education teacher preparation programs continue the traditional teacher preparation curriculum as opposed to adopting more forms of alternative certification?"

The program of excellence presentation was given by Betsy Johannsen, a freshman from Hartland, Minn., and Sam Haugen, a sophomore majoring in agronomy from Fertile, Minn.  They discussed the highlights of the 2011-2012 year for the U of M, Crookston Collegiate FFA chapter.  Areas of professional development, fundraising, community service, and fellowship were the focal points. 

Background
The U of M, Crookston is home to the only Collegiate FFA chapter in the state of Minnesota and Professor Lyle Westrom serves as the group's advisor.  The Collegiate FFA is part of the National FFA Organization which also held its 2012 National Convention concurrently with the ATA Conclave in Indianapolis, Indiana.  A new record of over 56,000 FFA members attended the National FFA Convention.  The convention returns to Louisville, Kentucky in 2013.

The A.W. Nolan Memorial Leadership award, named in the memory of Aretas W. Nolan, former professor and head of agricultural education at the University of Illinois, recognizes agricultural education organizations for their pursuit of leadership, ensures professionalism, and improves communication between collegiate agricultural organizations. Nolan and his students conceptualized and started Alpha Tau Alpha (ATA), the National Professional Honorary Agricultural Education Fraternity, in 1921. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: 
CFFA Members in attendance at ATA Conclave and National FFA Convention (left to rght): Maria Funk, Lyle Westrom (Advisor), Amy Lee, Sam Haugen, Jenna Cardinal, Emily Campbell, Justin Goodroad, Jennifer Spahn, Betsy Johannsen, Thomas Chute, Addie O'Neil, Whitney Jacobson, Katie Myhre, Whitney Lian, Emil Waskow

Contact: Lyle Westrom, professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-2818110 (lwestrom@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Two seniors at the University of Minnesota, Crookston are the recipients of the prestigious Scholarly Excellence in Equity and Diversity (SEED) award. Wemimo Samson Abbey and Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee were recipients of the Sue W. Hancock Undergraduate SEEDs of Change Award. The two will be recognized on Wednesday, November 14, 2012, at the University of Minnesota Equity and Diversity Breakfast held at the McNamara Alumni Center on the Minneapolis campus. 

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Wemimo Samson Abbey (left), a senior from Lagos, Nigeria, has a passion for leadership, research, family, and country. He is majoring in business management and organizational psychology and has taken on leadership roles both on campus and outside campus organizations that have led to exciting opportunities for him in the areas of research and the creation of a non-profit. Inspired after attending the 22nd Annual Diversity Recruitment Program at Harvard University, Abbey established the non-profit organization "Change Africa," dedicated to fighting poverty with education and sustainable free enterprise endeavors. With a grade point average (GPA) of 3.7, he credits experiences at the University of Minnesota, Crookston with empowering him to devote his life to fight for the powerless, stand up for women, and never give-up on the hopeless. 

His advisor Kenneth Johnson, instructor in the Business Department admires Abbey's dedication. "It is safe to say, I cannot imagine any other student who could accomplish what he has while simultaneously excelling in classes, research, and a plethora of other activities," Johnson says. 

Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee (right), a senior accounting major from Seoul, Korea, is dedicated to issues of equity and diversity. A 4.0 GPA student, he has been a critical part of the 
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Crookston campus recently being named a tax preparation site, and as an IRS certified tax volunteer, he has helped many of the community's elderly complete their tax forms. When Lee first came to campus, he saw the need for increased awareness of diversity and worked with members of the Multicultural International Club to host an international market, game night, language lessons, and a celebration of holidays around the world, among others. Lee believes that empowering people and using what he has learned in his classes will change lives and continues to work to build a better world which respects diversity and strives for equity and social justice. 
  
Advisor to Lee, accounting instructor Ken Bulie, J.D., says Lee stands out. "I have had several very good students over the years, but probably none that have the unique combination of personality, determination, intelligence, and commitment to valuing diversity through service that Danny has," Bulie says. 

Background
The Office for Equity and Diversity's SEED awards program honors and acknowledges diverse students who are doing outstanding work at the University of Minnesota, both in and out of the classroom. Undergraduate SEED Award recipients are diverse students who demonstrate impressive achievement and leadership in the area(s) of academic performance and/or community outreach/activism.  

In addition, SEED Award recipients must demonstrate a deep understanding of and commitment to issues of equity, diversity, and social justice through their academic work and/or service to the community. Six to ten undergraduates are honored with the SEED Award each year.  For more information, visit www.academic.umn.edu/equity/awards/seed_awards.html

Past recipients of the SEED award from the U of M, Crookston include Lhakpa Gurung in 2010 and Yangchen Gurung in 2011. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Laurie Wilson, coordinator, disability services, 218-281-8587 (lwilson2@umn.edu); Kenneth Johnson, instructor, Business Department, 218-281-8178 (joh02053@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A celebration of International Education Week will be held November 12-16, 2012, and 
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includes a week packed with events and activities. Highlighting the week is a presentation by Fun wi Tita (at right), director of Making a Difference International (MADI) on Wednesday, November 15, at 7 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. 

MADI specializes in poverty-alleviation activities including the provision of basic personal needs such as clothing and shoes, in tangent with the monetary support of child health, microfinance, agricultural and educational initiatives in Uganda. Tita's presentation will include photographs during an engaging session about the vital work of the MADI organization. 

If you are interested in international cuisine, you are invited to dine on Monday, November 12 on food from the four corners of the world. Featured countries include France, Mali, Vietnam, and Korea.  The public is welcome to eat lunch at a cost of $7.65 per person being served from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Brown Dining Room. Everyone is encouraged to wear traditional clothing representing your heritage and at 3 p.m. that afternoon there will be pictures and prizes awarded.

Tuesday, November 13, is an opportunity to experience a day without shoes and everyone is encouraged to bring a pair of shoes for donation. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the International Lounge, there will be a variety of surfaces available to walk on as a way of experiencing the terrain of other countries in the world. 

From 12 to 1 p.m. in Brown Dining Room D, Sargeant Student Center, Senior Timothy Baker, a natural resources major from Copperas Cove, Texas, will share information about his three study abroad experiences in Thailand, New Zealand, and the Galapagos and the secrets to making these trips work. Bring your own lunch and join this discussion of learning abroad. 

From 12 to 2 p.m., English as Second Language (ESL) students will host a poster session in the International Lounge, Sargeant Student Center. The public is invited to ask questions and visit with these students and vote on the best poster. Prizes will be awarded to the "judges" as well as to the students. 

Students who spent spring break 2012 in Spain will be sharing their digital storytelling project from 4-5 p.m. during a reception for them in the Northern Lights Lounge, Sargeant Student Center and refreshments will be served. 

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Wednesday, November 14 from 2-6 p.m. is the International Market (pictured in 2011, at left) in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. This year's market will feature items from Nepal, local community artists, along with many items from around the world.

From 7-8 p.m., Fun wi Tita will present his own childhood challenges and talk about the work of Making a Difference Internationally, Inc., in the Kiehle Auditorium. Admission to the presentation is a donated item of shoes or clothing or a canned good. Everyone is encouraged to come and hear about this important work in Africa. Refreshments will be served. To learn more about Making a Difference at www.madinc.org. 

On Thursday, November 15 is the International Photo and Art Contest held in the Prairie Room, Sargeant Student Center. Winners will be featured in a calendar produced by the Office of International programs. 

A program and reception will be held from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center for Abbey and Dae Yuel "Danny" Lee who are 2012 recipients of the Scholarly Excellence in Equity and Diversity (SEED) award. The program begins at 3 p.m. with the reception following. 

From 12 to 1 p.m. on Friday, November 16, Wemimo Samson Abbey, a senior from Lagos, Nigeria, majoring in business will share the story of Change Africa, an international cause dedicated to fighting poverty with education and sustainable free enterprise endeavors in developing Africa. The presentation will take place in Bede Ballroom A and B, Sargeant Student Center. To learn more about Change Africa, visit http://changeafrica.org. 

From 3 to 5 p.m. everyone is invited to a martial arts how-to session in Prairie Room, Sargeant Student Center. Learn some unique moves from a wide variety of martial arts styles.

Concluding the week from 5 to 7 p.m. is the International Kids Carnival held in the International Lounge with games in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center sponsored by Circle of Nations Indigenous Association (CNIA) and the Multicultural International Club (MIC). Families with children 10 and under are especially invited to attend. 

Background
International Education Week, scheduled November 12-16, 2012, is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. This joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education is part of efforts to promote programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn, and exchange experiences in the United States. First held in 2000, today it is celebrated in more than 100 countries worldwide. To learn more, visit http://iew.state.gov. 

To find out more about what is happening during International Education Week at the U of M, Crookston, visit the Today page at www.umcrookston.edu/today.   

Contact: Rae French, coordinator, study abroad, 218-281-8339 (rfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

It will be all "Smoke and Mirrors" at the University of Minnesota, Crookston when the 
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comedy/murder mystery is performed on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, Nov. 29, 30, and Dec. 1, 2012, in Kiehle Auditorium. The theatrical production by Will Osborne and Anthony Herrera will begin each evening at 7:30 p.m. Cost is $5 for adults and $3 for children and $1 for U of M, Crookston students with their ID. Refreshments will be provided at the intermission.

The cast includes Alan Frank, a sophomore majoring in hotel, restaurant, and tourism management from St. Michael, Minn.; John Habeck, a senior majoring in marketing from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Tyler Lowthian, a freshman majoring in business management from Richfield, Minn.; Ross Sigler, a sophomore majoring in accounting from Graceville, Minn.; and Anthonette Sims, a junior majoring in communication from Robbinsdale, Minn. Liz Massie, a sophomore majoring in communication from Eagan, Minn., is the student director and is assisted by Travis Jones, a junior majoring in applied studies from Milwaukee, Wis.The production is under the direction of George French, associate professor in the Liberal Arts and Education Department.

Plot
This riveting mystery comedy will keep audiences guessing as they go on location to an isolated island off the Gulf coast to watch power hungry producer director Hamilton Orr lure his timid screenwriter Clark into a scheme to get rid of the insufferable star of their multimillion dollar film. The plot hinges on the rehearsal of a suicide scene and the only witness to the murder is Hamilton's wife Barbara, the film's quirky publicist and Clark's former lover. The wily eccentric sheriff unearths one surprise after another until the final stunning revelation. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, back row, left to right: Liz Massie and Anthonette Sims.
Front row: Alan Frank, Ross Sigler, Travis Jones, and Tyler Lowthian.
Not pictured: John Habeck. 


Contact: George French, associate professor, Liberal Arts and Education Dept. 218-281-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A Parent Night will be held at Crookston High School on November 15, 2012, at 7 p.m. in the High School Auditorium. It will host all sophomore, junior and senior parents and students. Parent Night is an opportunity for parents to learn more about the financial, social, and academic aspects of attending a post-secondary institution. Topics during the evening include financial aid, FAFSA, ACT tests/scores, college applications, college visits, residential life and housing, as well as answering any questions parents might have. 

Parent Night is sponsored through the Achieve More initiative. For more information on the Parent Night activities, contact Janessa DeBoer at 218‐281‐8673.

Background
Achieve More emerged from the regional IMPACT 20/20 Education Task Force's priority initiative to increase high school graduation rates and encourage more students to consider attending college.   Launched in fall 2012, the project is a collaborative effort among UMC's Center for Adult Learning (CAL), the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), and the Crookston Area Chamber of Commerce.  Achieve More consists of two major components, College and Career Preparation 101, aimed at grades 7‐12, and Junior Achievement, which returns to the Crookston School District for grades 2-6.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Janessa DeBoer, student personnel coordinator, Center for Adult Learning, 218-281-8673 (deboe053@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

College representatives will visit the Crookston High School on November 13-15 during Minnesota College Application Week, which runs November 12-16, 2012. Thanks to Achieve More, an initiative designed to encourage students to consider attending and planning for college, students will have the opportunity to learn about and apply to regional Minnesota colleges for free.

Crookston High School Seniors will fill out applications from 10-11am each day. There will be representatives from local colleges to help fill out applications to regional colleges and answer questions. The visit schedule includes Northland Community and Technical College on November 13; University of Minnesota, Crookston on November 14; and Bemidji State University and North Dakota State College of Science on November 15. There will be prizes drawn throughout the week, so all seniors are encouraged to attend.

Sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Education, students will learn about opportunities at each of the visiting institutions and have help filling out application forms. The goal of the program is to get more students applying to college earlier. During this event, students may apply to any two-year or four-year college/university or training program in which they are interested.

For more information on Minnesota College Application Week activities, contact Janessa DeBoer at 218‐281‐8673.

Background
Last year, as part of a national initiative through the American Council on Education, Governor Mark Dayton proclaimed the second week of November Minnesota College Application Week.  This week will provide a framework for high schools and postsecondary institutions to collaborate in a concentrated effort to engage and inform underrepresented students (first generation college students, students of color, and low-income students) about the college exploration and application process. While much of the focus of College Application Week is geared toward first-generation, low-income students, all students are encouraged to participate in events to help them explore and prepare for postsecondary education.

Achieve More emerged from the regional IMPACT 20/20 Education Task Force's priority initiative to increase high school graduation rates and encourage more students to consider attending college.   Launched in fall 2012, the project is a collaborative effort among UMC's Center for Adult Learning (CAL), the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), and the Crookston Area Chamber of Commerce.  Achieve More consists of two major components, College and Career Preparation 101, aimed at grades 7‐12, and Junior Achievement, which returns to the Crookston School District for grades 2-6.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Janessa DeBoer, student personnel coordinator, Center for Adult Learning, 218-281-8673 (deboe053@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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