April 2013 Archives

The University of Minnesota Crookston was named to the 2013 President's Higher Education 
03 honorroll_LOGO.jpg
Community Service Honor Roll. This designation is the highest honor a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement. The Crookston campus was one of 690 institutions of higher education to receive this honor. The 2013 Honor Roll recipients were announced at the American Council on Education's 95th Annual Meeting Leading Change on March 4, 2013, in Washington, D.C. 

According to the definition of community service defined for recognition on the honor roll, the U of M Crookston engaged in 39,481 services hours. Community service includes activities designed to improve the quality of life of off-campus community residents, particularly those deemed low-income, and includes both direct service to citizens and indirect service.

Applications for the recognition are evaluated on the university's three exemplary projects based on the scope of the project, evidence of project effectiveness, and impact on the community.  For each project, Lisa Loegering, assistant director of community engagement, is required to provide the number of students and staff who participated in the project, the total number of service hours, the number of individuals served, and the effectiveness of the project.

Background
Inspired by the thousands of college students who traveled across the country to support relief efforts along the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina, CNCS has administered the award since 2006 and manages the program in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, as well as the American Council on Education and Campus Compact. 

More information about the U of M Crookston's community service efforts can be found at www1.crk.umn.edu/services/ce. More information on eligibility and the full list of Honor Roll awardees can be found at nationalservice.gov.  

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, Community Engagement, 218-281- 8526, (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

This event has been CANCELED. 

The University of Minnesota Crookston Music and Theater Department will perform the farcical black comedy "Arsenic and Old Lace" on Thursday and Friday, May 2 and 3, 2013. The performances, which begin at 7:30 p.m., will take place in Kiehle Auditorium. Tickets, available at the door, are $5 for adults and $3 for students and children. 

The comedy is directed by Junior Beth Motley, an equine science major from Vadnais Heights, Minn., and is an undergraduate research project for Motley. "Arsenic and Old Lace," by playwright Joseph Kesselring, is the story of a drama critic named Mortimer Brewster who discovers his eccentric, elderly aunts are actually homicidal maniacs. The play was written in 1939 and made into a film in starring Cary Grant.  

Members of the cast include Martha Brewster played by Liz Massie, a junior from Eagan, Minn., majoring in communication; Abby Brewster played by Joanie Melichar, a sophomore from Richfield, Minn., majoring in early childhood; Teddy Brewster played by Justin Burogz, Crookston, Minn.; Elaine Harper played by Sarah Lanners, a sophomore from Nashwauk, Minn., majoring in horticulture; Mortimer Brewster played by Nathan Anderson, a sophomore from Appleton, Minn., majoring in agricultural education; Jonathan Brewster played by Dylunn Frazee, Crookston, Minn.; Dr. Einstein played by Sam Haugen, a sophomore from Fertile, Minn., majoring in agronomy; Officer Brophy played by Bomi Jang, a sophomore from Yangpyeong, South Korea, majoring in marketing; Officer O'Hara played by Johnnie Pauly, a junior from Wrenshall, Minn., majoring in equine science; Mr. Witherspoon/The Rev. Dr. Harper played by Emily Steenhout, a senior from Backus, Minn., majoring in equine science; Lieutenant Rooney played by Hyeseung Ko, a sophomore from Seoul, South Korea, majoring in marketing; Mr. Gibbs played by Cholong Sung, an ESL student from , Seongnam South Korea

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: George French, associate professor, 218-281-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society team took top honors in the wildlife quiz bowl 
Quiz Bowl Team.jpeg
competition at the Midwest Student Conclave in Twin Lakes, Mich.  This is the first time University of Minnesota Crookston students attended the conclave and competed in the quiz bowl.    Members of the team were natural resources majors Senior Jennifer DuBay, Apple Valley, Minn.; Junior Michael McMahon, St. Paul, Minn.; Sophomore Alisha Mosloff, Thief River Falls, Minn.; and Senior Matt Toenies, Randall, Minn.

"We totally rocked!" said senior wildlife management student  Jennifer DuBay.  "It was great fun.  This was without a doubt a great victory for us and a great example of the education a student can receive in the Natural Resources Department at the University of Minnesota Crookston."

"I heard someone in the crowd say 'Is that kid a genius?'"aid Jim Schneider, advisor to the host chapter at Michigan State University.

"This is an incredible achievement," said John Loegering, U of M Crookston professor and student chapter advisor.  "To compete so well against the powerhouse programs of the Midwest at the team's first appearance at this level is a real testament to the commitment and dedication of these students to their studies, their academic performance, and their profession.  I am very proud of their performance." 

The student chapter won the state competition last February and will compete in the national competition next fall in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The quiz bowl is a one-on-one competition between teams and features questions on  wildlife biology, taxonomy, ecology, biogeography, biodiversity, population ecology, management techniques, conservation policies, and other topics relevant to wildlife management majors. Other wildlife programs competing included Michigan State University, Central Michigan University, Lake Superior State University, Iowa State, Purdue University, University of Missouri-Columbia, University of Central Missouri, Southern Illinois University, and University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point.  

Conclaves are hosted by student chapters and offer professional training on a variety of topics.  This year students gained experience in several techniques including amphibian sampling, mist netting birds, capturing and handling small mammals, capturing fish with electrofishing gear, and locating animals with radio-telemetry.  There also was a resume workshop and networking events.  The conclave was at Camp Pinewood, a 200-acre YMCA camp near Twin Lakes, Michigan.  

The U of M Crookston Chapter has 25 members and is part of the over 10,000 members of The Wildlife Society, which represents and serves the professional community of scientists, managers, educators, technicians, planners, and others who work actively to study, manage, and conserve wildlife and habitats worldwide.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Jenny DuBay, Matt Toenies, Alisha Mosloff, Michael McMahon. 


Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Jon Foley, Ph.D., director of the Institute on the Environment (IonE) at the University of the Minnesota, will speak at the University of Minnesota Crookston on Tuesday, April 30, 2013, at 7 p.m. His presentation "Can we feed the world without destroying it?" will take place in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. The event is free and the public is invited. 

Foley holds a McKnight Presidential Chair in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, and his work focuses on the behavior of complex global environmental systems and their interactions with human societies. In particular, Foley's research group uses state-of-the-art computer models and satellite measurements to analyze changes in land use, ecosystems, climate and freshwater resources across regional and global scales. 

He joined the University of Minnesota in 2008, after spending 15 years on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin. He has won numerous awards and honors, including the National Science Foundation's Faculty Early Career Development Award, the Samuel C. Johnson Distinguished Faculty Fellowship, the J.S. McDonnell Foundation's 21st Century Science Award, and the Sustainability Science Award from the Ecological Society of America. In 1997, President Bill Clinton awarded him the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. He has also been named an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow.

The visit by Foley is part of a series of events taking place in recognition of Earth Week and as a keynote in a Sustainability Summit taking place on April 30 and May 1. For more information about the Sustainability Summit and all related activities, visit www.umcrookston.edu/today. 

To learn more about the Institute on the Environment at the University of Minnesota, visit www.environment.umn.edu. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Listening is a big part of learning. For Rachel McCoppin, Ph.D., associate professor in the 
McCoppin_Rachel 0999.jpg
Liberal Arts and Education Department at the University of Minnesota Crookston, listening plays just as significant a role in teaching. McCoppin was recognized recently for her teaching when she was named a recipient of the prestigious Horace T. Morse U of M Alumni Association Award for Outstanding Contributions to Undergraduate Education.  

McCoppin has been teaching in the area of literature and humanities at the U of M Crookston since 2003. She will be recognized, along with six others, at a ceremony on Tuesday, April 30, 2013, at the Mc Namara Alumni Center in Minneapolis.  The annual award recognition honors the University's best teaching professors for their contributions to undergraduate, graduate, and professional education. The ceremony includes comments from recipients, presentations of the awards, and a reception. 

"The student voice is as important as any voice in my classroom," McCoppin says. "It is through listening that I grow as an instructor and I witness students in my classes develop." As a college student, McCoppin found she enjoyed classes most where students and the instructor interacted as equals in a discussion. While these kinds of classes are harder to prepare for, McCoppin feels they challenge her as well as build her confidence as an instructor. 

Diversity in the classroom is a deeply held value for McCoppin, and she sees teaching as transformative. She welcomes discussions in her classroom that include more than just western ideas, but rather, uses the topics as a path to uncover ideas and perspectives in ancient literature and incorporate them into the study. "It requires intense critical thinking and a search for evidence for my students and me," McCoppin says. "But, it has proven to be a way for me to bring the whole world to the study of humanities." 

McCoppin was promoted from assistant professor to associate professor with tenure in August 2009. She earned her doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pa., her master or arts from Northern Michigan University, Marquette, Mich., and her bachelor of arts from the University of Michigan, Flint, in English. Her research interests include mythology, world literature, and the pedagogy of literature and ethics. 

In 2010, students recognized her with the Outstanding Educator Award, and in 2005, McCoppin received the Outstanding Service Learning Faculty Award. She was also presented by students with the award for Most Creative Use of Technology in 2006.

Background
Along with McCoppin, other recipients of the Morse-Alumni award include Jennifer Deane, Social Sciences from the U of M Morris; Christopher Dovolis, College of Science and Engineering; Carrie Earthman, College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences; Karen LaBat, College of Design; Susan Staats, College of Education and Human Development; and Susan Wick, College of Biological Sciences, all from the U of M, Twin Cities. 

Recipients of the award are chosen by student and faculty members of the Senate Committee on Educational Policy, previous award recipients, and a representative of the University of Minnesota Alumni Association. T he Distinguished Teaching Awards are sponsored by the Senate Committee on Educational Policy, the Office of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, and the University of Minnesota Alumni Association.

Since 1965, the University has recognized exceptional undergraduate faculty for their contributions to student learning through classroom teaching, research, and creative activities; advising; academic program development; and educational leadership. The award is named for the late Horace T. Morse, who served as the first dean of the University's General College from 1946-66 and who was a national leader in the field of undergraduate education. For more information, visit www.minnesotaalumni.org/DTA. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Rachel McCoppin, associate professor, Liberal Arts and Education Dept., 218-281-8273 (mccoppin@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

University-Community Forum in Warren, Minn., on Saturday, April 27, 2013

The annual Community Connect Forum, coordinated by the University of North Dakota Center for Community Engagement, will be hosted this year by Warren, Minn. on Saturday, April 27.  Community members, faculty, and students from around the region will gather for this year's theme of "Sustainable Communities".  

Registration for the forum is free, and can be found at http://communityengagement.und.edu.  The website also includes a schedule for the day of the forum. Dan Svedarsky, director of the U of M, Crookston Center for Sustainability, and Chris May, NW Clean Energy Resource Team coordinator, are panelists.  Deb Zak, Extnsion Regional Director, and Linda Kingery, executive director of the NW RSDP, will facilitate an afternoon session, as will Ben Anderson, Extension Regional director in the Moorhead office. 

The forum will focus on civic, economic, and environmental sustainability, addressing topics such as smart government, new business ownership models, and changes in agriculture and energy.  As hosts of the forum, Warren will have the opportunity to showcase its own town story and their efforts toward creating more sustainable practices in their community such as becoming a GreenStep City.  Warren will also highlight their unique assets with their downtown businesses and nearby Audubon wildlife preserve.  Participants will have the opportunity to network and view exhibits of different regional projects, agencies, and resources.  

The forum will be held in the Warren-Alvarado-Oslo School.  There will be free transportation available for UND participants on the day of the forum to travel to Warren; the bus will leave Memorial Union at 8 AM.  Warren is about 30 miles northeast of Grand Forks.  

About the Center:  The UND Center for Community Engagement links academic resources with community needs by connecting students and faculty to teaching and research projects off campus.  It was created by an act of the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education in 2004.  The Center serves as a catalyst for faculty and students to learn from and with nonprofit organizations, rural communities, tribal communities, and other public partners through local and regional initiatives.  

About Community Connect:  The Community Connect project provides opportunities for rural communities to work together with UND faculty and students on the challenges and opportunities in our region.  There are three components to the Community Connect project - a community-university forum, a print journal, and a website with an online academic journal.  

About our sponsors:  The Community Connect project is supported in part by a grant from the Otto Bremer Foundation and sponsorships from the United Valley Bank, the Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, the Farmers Union Insurance, and private donations. 

Contact: Lana Rakow; lana.rakow@und.edu; 701-777-2287

Amy Childers from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Division of Ecological and Water Resources will speak on Wednesday, April 17, 2013, at the University of Minnesota Crookston. Her presentation on the Impacts of Ditching on Streams and Restoration Alternatives will take place in Youngquist Auditorium at 3 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend and there is no admission charge.

Topics to be discussed include the fundamental concepts in fluvial geomorphology and ecology; including dynamic equilibrium, channel shape, stream flows; how our streams have been impacted by ditching and dams; and stream restoration designs and restoration projects with DNR cooperators.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources, 218-281-8132 (jlogeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Crookston Students for Sustainable Development (CSSD) are doing their part to reduce 
Hydration Station.jpg
disposable plastic water bottles use on campus. The University of Minnesota Crookston followed Bemidji State University's lead by installing a combination water fountain/bottle filler outside of the Center for Sustainability Office in Hill Hall. Today there are five of these "hydration stations"  and a 6th is on order. Rich Connell, director of the Office of Facilities Management on the Crookston campus and his staff coordinated purchase and installation of the hydration stations.

Megan Luxford, a student sustainability assistant, has been leading the effort within the Center for Sustainability. "We've been looking for a product to give back to students who pay the Green Fee as well as promoting sustainability," according to Luxford. "After discussing this within the CSSD, we thought refillable water bottles would be the perfect complement to the hydration stations. After researching a variety of products we found a model with nice messages, made of recycled materials in the U.S.A., and with the option of being personalized for our campus." 

CSSD purchased a supply of the attractive water bottles made from 100% recycled aluminum from Liberty Bottle Works and are making them available for free distribution to U of M Crookston students. 

The campus hydration stations allow for a quick fill activated by a motion sensor that is faster than the traditional drinking fountains and provides a touchless, sanitary option. Although the campus fountain water is high quality well water, the stations are also equipped with a filter and a counter to measure how many disposable plastic waste we've eliminated. Thus far, we've reduced over 20,000  bottles. 
Green water bottles.jpg
Bottles are available for pickup from the Center for Sustainability office in 109 Hill Hall. A limited number will be available for purchase by faculty and staff on the Crookston campus.  

For further information, contact Megan Luxford by e-mail at luxfo003@crk.umn.edu or by  phone at 712-310-0638.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, top, right: Chancellor Fred Wood fills the very first "Go Green" refillable water bottle sponsored by the Crookston Students for Sustainable Development (CSSD) and the UMC student green fee. Pictured in front of a hydration station is Laura Gabrielson, Chancellor Wood, Ben Williams, and Megan Luxford. The students are all sustainability assistants supported by the green fee to promote sustainability activities on campus.

In photo, left: Students pick up their "Go Green" refillable water bottles in the Center for Sustainability in Hill Hall. 

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Ceremonies for the inauguration of Fred E. Wood, Ph.D., as the fifth chancellor for the 
wood_f.jpg
University of Minnesota Crookston are scheduled for Thursday, April 18, 2013, in Kiehle Auditorium. The ceremony will begin at 12:30 p.m. and a reception will follow at 2 p.m. in the Northern Lights Lounge in the Sargeant Student Center. All faculty, staff, students, alumni, along with the public are invited to attend the inauguration and reception as guests of the campus in celebration of this historic event.

At 10 a.m. that morning, everyone is invited to attend the dedication of Heritage Hall, the newest residence hall on campus. Heritage Hall is located west of Centennial Hall and provides students with a new style of suite living. Designed primarily for freshman and sophomores, the two bedroom suites, with study room and private bathroom will provide a spacious living environment for four students. The 43,043 square foot, two-story building can house up to145 students in 35 two-bedroom suites furnished with a study room and bathroom facilities--approximately 700 square feet per suite. 

Special guests on campus for the dedication and inauguration will include University of Minnesota President Eric Kaler, Karen Kaler, and several members of the Board of Regents. 

An online guest book is available along with inauguration details at www1.crk.umn.edu/events/inauguration. 

Background
Wood comes to the University of Minnesota after a 26-year career at the University of California, Davis, a public, land-grant, research university within the University of California system. There, he served as vice chancellor of student affairs from 2007 to 2012, in addition to holding other leadership positions such as interim vice provost for undergraduate studies and associate dean of the UC Davis College of Letters and Science in addition to concurrently serving as a tenured chemistry faculty member there. He began his work as chancellor for the Crookston campus on July 2, 2012.

A first-generation college student, Chancellor Wood earned a B.S. in chemistry in 1980 and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry in 1984, both from UC Davis. As chancellor, Wood will be the chief academic and executive officer for the Crookston campus, responsible for leveraging its unique strengths in undergraduate education, applied research and public engagement within the broader mission of the University of Minnesota. 

He has early ties to Minnesota and the Red River Valley. His mother was born in Crookston, and her family farmed in St. Vincent, Minn. during her youth, so although he grew up in California, he says he felt connected to Crookston and Minnesota right from the start. His wife, Mary, joins his excitement and enthusiasm for the Crookston campus and shares his connection to the campus, community, and region. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Andrew Svec, director, communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Despite strong crosswinds and turbulent weather conditions, Douglas Peterson Potts (in photo), 
douglas potts.jpg
Williams, Minn., recently completed his private pilot training. Potts, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston majoring in agricultural aviation, completed all necessary flight training for the Private Pilot certificate.  Anderson was trained by Chase Enghauser, a graduate of the U of M Crookston business management aviation program.
 
The private pilot certificate is typically the first pilot license that an aspiring pilot seeks on his or her way to becoming a professional pilot.  The Private Pilot certificate enables the aviator to carry passengers and travel cross country in many types of aircraft.  To complete that certification, the budding aviator must complete a series of lessons of increasing complexity, including planning and flying a solo flight of more than 150 miles, and many, many practice landings and takeoffs under the careful supervision of their flight instructor.  The Private Pilot certification process requires that the student pass a comprehensive knowledge exam, and the Stage 28 lesson includes both an oral and flight test. 

At three points during the aspiring pilot's training, he or she flies with an evaluator or check airman, who is typically more experienced than the flight instructor.  These evaluations are called stage checks, and at the successful conclusion of the Stage 28 (lesson number 28), students at the University of Minnesota Crookston receive their private pilot certificate.

The University of Minnesota Crookston partners with the University of North Dakota to provide students with flight training and academic coursework in Agricultural Aviation, Business Management Aviation, Law Enforcement Aviation and Natural Resources Aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M Crookston NACTA Team Wins Sweepstakes at 2013 Judging Conference

Students from the University of Minnesota Crookston headed for Texas ready for completion 
NACTA_team.jpg
at the annual National Association of Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA) Judging Conference in early April and their preparation paid off. The NACTA Team won sweepstakes in the four-year college division and that win included a number of first place finishes.

Twenty-nine students went to the competition held this year at Texas Tech, Lubbock, Texas, ready to compete in eleven contests in ag business, ag communication, ag computers, crops, dairy judging, horse judging, meat judging, knowledge bowl, livestock judging, livestock management, and soils.  

ag business.jpg
First place finishes included the following teams:

Ag Business Team, coached by Margot Rudstrom and Chuck Lariviere, included Katie Hagen, junior, ag business major from Epping, N.D., Kayla Erickson, senior, ag education and ag business double major from Scandia, Minn.; Matt Green, senior, agronomy, ag business, and ag systems management triple major from Greenbush, Minn.; and Dustin Smith, who took second place individual honors is a senior, ag business and agronomy double major from Browerville, Minn.;

computers.jpg
Ag Computers Team, coached by Christo Robberts, Amanda Crook, senior, agronomy and ag business major from Brandon, Manitoba, Canada, took first-place individual; Brian Oachs, junior, ag business and agronomy double major from Herman, Minn.; Cedric Citrowske, second-place individual, freshman, ag systems management major from Canby, Minn.; and Drew Underdahl, senior, ag business major from Zumbro Falls, Minn.

Meat Judging Team, coached by Jeremy Breiland, 
Derek Suhonen, sophomore, ag systems management and animal science double major from Wright, Minn.; Justin Goodroad, first-place individual, a sophomore, animal science and ag education double major from Lindstrom, Minn.; Dustin Wiese, second-place individual, a senior, animal science major from Pequot Lakes, Minn.; and Katie Hagen, junior, ag business major from Epping, N.D.

Teams in livestock management and dairy judging finished in second-place; teams in ag 
meat judging.jpg
communication and knowledge bowl finished in third; and the team in crops judging finished in fourth place.
 
Members of the NACTA Team include Missy Geiszler, junior, agronomy major from Mayer, Minn.; Haley Weleski, junior, communication major from Lancaster, Minn.; Katie Hagen, junior, ag business major from Epping, N.D.; Dustin Smith, senior, ag business and agronomy double major from Browerville, Minn.; Rebekah Landmark, freshman, animal science major from Montevideo, Minn.; Matt Green, senior, agronomy, ag business, and ag systems management triple major from Greenbush, Minn.; Sarah Morris, senior, animal science major from Ramsey, Minn.; Kayla Erickson, senior, ag education and ag business double major from Scandia, Minn.; Rochelle Herzog, sophomore, animal science major from Randall, Minn.; Marilyn Lewis, freshman, animal science and ag systems management double major from Bemidji, Minn.; Amanda Guimont, freshman, ag business major from Anoka, Minn.; Rachel Grant, freshman, animal science major from Westminster, Md.; Brian Oachs, junior, ag business and agronomy double major from Herman, Minn.; Austin Moffett, senior, agronomy major from Manvel, N.D.; Cedric Citrowske, freshman, ag systems management major from Canby, Minn.; Travis Lund, senior, agronomy major from Brandon, Minn.; Lucas Kelley, senior, agronomy major from Minto, N.D.; Krista Dale, senior, equine science major from Sartell, Minn.; Amberly Pesall, freshman, ag business and equine science double major from New Brighton, Minn.; Justin Goodroad, sophomore, animal science and ag education double major from Lindstrom, Minn.; Nathan Renard, senior, agronomy major from Page, N.D.; Lindsey Homelvig, senior, agronomy major from Devils Lake, N.D.; Ben Wuebkers, senior, animal science major from Freeport, Minn.; Brandon Reierson, junior, agronomy major from Climax, Minn.; Amanda Crook, senior, agronomy and ag business major from Brandon, Manitoba, Canada; Bryce Gillie, senior, agronomy major from Hallock, Minn.; Drew Underdahl, senior, ag business major from Zumbro Falls, Minn.; Derek Suhonen, sophomore, ag systems management and animal science double major from Wright, Minn.; and Dustin Wiese, senior, animal science major from Pequot Lakes, Minn.

Students began preparing for the contests in November, and they are allowed to compete only one time per contest with the exception of soils which allows a student to compete twice. The contests are hands-on and the judging contests, like those in crops, dairy, and livestock, require the student to both rank and provide reasons for their decisions. The NACTA Team raises its own funding in order to participate in the competition.
 
As part of the trip to the judging conference, students take advantage of learning opportunities afforded by the location. This year students visited Bayer FiberMax, a cotton and genetics research facility; a custom feedlot operation; the National Ranching Heritage Center; and a tour of a local vineyard and winery.
 

Background

Included in some of the competition were teams from Kansas State University, Cal Poly, Iowa State University, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Texas A&M, Oregon State University, Purdue University, and many others.  The last time the NACTA Team from the U of M Crookston took sweepstakes was in 2010. The next NACTA Judging Conference will take place in Maryville, Missouri, in spring 2014.

NACTA is dedicated to advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning in the agricultural, environmental, natural, and life sciences. NACTA competitions have been held since 1957 and involve knowledge and skills contests covering various agricultural topics. The competition is rigorous, including college and university students from all across the nation. To learn more, visit www.nactateachers.org.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photos:

At top, right, NACTA Team, left to right starting at the bottom: Missy Geiszler, Haley Weleski, Katie Hagen, Dustin Smith, Brenda Miller, Terrill Bradford, Rebekah Landmark, Matt Green, Sarah Morris, Kayla Erickson, Rochelle Herzog, Marilyn Lewis, Amanda Guimont, Margot Rudstrom, Rachel Grant, Brian Oachs, Austin Moffett, Cedric Citrowske, Travis Lund, Lucas Kelley, Krista Dale, Amberly Pesall, Justin Goodroad, Nathan Renard, Lindsey Homelvig, Ben Wuebkers, Brandon Reierson, Amanda Crook, Bryce Gillie, Drew Underdahl, Derek Suhonen, Dustin Wiese, and Kristie Walker.

Top, left, Ag Business Team, bottom to top - Katie Hagen, Matt Green, Kayla Erickson,and  Dustin Smith

Middle, left, Ag Computers Team, front row - Drew Underdahl, Amanda Crook. Back row, Cedric Citrowske, and Brian Oachs.

Bottom, right, Meat Judging Team, bottom to Top - Katie Hagen, Dustin Wiese, Derek Suhonen, and Justin Goodroad.

Contact: Terrill Bradford, instructor, animal science, 218-281-8108 (tbradfor@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Michael McMahon, St. Paul, Minn., (pictured at right) a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston 
McMahon2.jpg
majoring in agricultural aviation, recently completed flight training for the Private Pilot certificate.  McMahon was trained by Chase Enghauser, a graduate of the UMC Business Management Aviation program.

The private pilot certificate is typically the first pilot license that an aspiring pilot seeks on his or her way to becoming a professional pilot.  The Private Pilot certificate enables the aviator to carry passengers and travel cross country in many types of aircraft.  To complete that certification, the budding aviator must complete a series of lessons of increasing complexity, including planning and flying a solo flight of more than 150 miles, and many, many practice landings and takeoffs under the careful supervision of their flight instructor.  The Private Pilot certification process requires that the student pass a comprehensive knowledge exam, and the Stage 28 lesson includes both an oral and flight test. 

At three points during the aspiring pilot's training, he or she flies with an evaluator or check airman, who is typically more experienced than the flight instructor.  These evaluations are called stage checks, and at the successful conclusion of the Stage 28 (lesson number 28), students at the University of Minnesota Crookston receive their private pilot certificate.

The University of Minnesota Crookston partners with the University of North Dakota to provide students with flight training and academic coursework in Agricultural Aviation, Business Management Aviation, Law Enforcement Aviation and Natural Resources Aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Travis Anderson, Prinsburg, Minn., (pictured at right) a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston 
anderson_travis1.jpg
majoring in agricultural aviation, recently completed flight training for the Private Pilot certificate.  Anderson was trained by Chase Enghauser, a graduate of the U of M Crookston Business Management Aviation program.

The private pilot certificate is typically the first pilot license that an aspiring pilot seeks on his or her way to becoming a professional pilot.  The Private Pilot certificate enables the aviator to carry passengers and travel cross country in many types of aircraft. To complete that certification, the budding aviator must complete a series of lessons of increasing complexity, including planning and flying a solo flight of more than 150 miles, and many, many practice landings and takeoffs under the careful supervision of their flight instructor.  The Private Pilot certification process requires that the student pass a comprehensive knowledge exam, and the Stage 28 lesson includes both an oral and flight test. 

At three points during the aspiring pilot's training, he or she flies with an evaluator or check airman, who is typically more experienced than the flight instructor.  These evaluations are called stage checks, and at the successful conclusion of the Stage 28 (lesson number 28), students at the University of Minnesota Crookston receive their private pilot certificate.

The University of Minnesota Crookston partners with the University of North Dakota to provide students with flight training and academic coursework in Agricultural Aviation, Business Management Aviation, Law Enforcement Aviation and Natural Resources Aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual spring Fly-In/Drive-In Pancake Breakfast, will take place on Sunday, April 28, 2013, at the Crookston Municipal Airport. The breakfast, scheduled from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., is sponsored by and hosted by Alpha Eta Rho, the aviation fraternity at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, and Crookston Aviation. Tickets for the breakfast for adults are $6 in advance and $8 at the door; children 4 to 12 are $3 and children 3 and under are free. Tickets may be purchased from Alpha Eta Rho members or by contacting John Niemczyk 651-829-1731.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218- 281-8141 (mvivion@un.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Katie Schneider, a 2012 graduate of the University of Minnesota, Crookston from Delano, 
Schneider_Katie 2339.jpg
Minnesota, and former community adviser, has begun a one-year AmeriCorps VISTA appointment in the Office of Community Engagement, following training in Albuquerque, N.M., February 26 - 28, 2013. Schneider will assist with community service and service-learning efforts.  She will coordinate service days such as Meet Crookston through Service, National Youth Service Day, and MLK Day of Service. 

Her degrees are in equine science and agricultural business, but her passion has always been to work with a non-profit organization. Growing up on a hobby farm with sheep and horses along with her 14-year history as a member of 4-H, Schneider found herself donating time to help youth interested in horses and riding. The first time she received a thank you note from someone following an equine clinic she hosted, Schneider knew that working for a non-profit was her goal. "When the opportunity to work as an AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer on the campus opened, I was interested immediately," she says. "It is the chance to get students involved in service and make a difference and for me to do the kind of work I love." 

Lisa Loegering, assistant director for Community Engagement is looking forward to having Schneider on board. "We run community service and service learning out of the same office, and having Katie here is an opportunity to develop new programs, new projects, and to really move this office forward," Loegering says. The AmeriCorps VISTA appointment is for one year with an option for a second year. Schneider lives on campus and will be working with community service in the residence halls as well. 

schneider_loegering2.jpg
Loegering and Schneider will work as a team, but Loegering hopes to have people see Schneider as the face of community service on the campus. That idea sounds good to Schneider, "I am excited to get students involved in volunteering," she says. I know the campus and it is exciting to be back in this capacity. I am looking forward to working with Lisa and building on what is going on here."

Background
The U of M, Crookston has a history of community engagement that began long before the office by that name was established.  Faculty realized early on that many of the courses taught on the Crookston campus were best taught beyond the doors of the classrooms. In 1996, the Office of Service-Learning was established and housed under student activities. In addition to coordinating the service-learning program, this office also coordinated community service projects and America Reads. In 2011, the name was changed to the Office of Community Engagement to better describe the goals and more accurately define the activities. They work directly with local agencies, organizations, and individuals to address community needs.

The mission of the Office of Community Engagement is to serve as a resource for faculty for the integration of service-learning, support students in their development as engaged citizens and scholars, and foster mutually beneficial campus-community partnerships to address community needs. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/services/ServiceLearning. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, right, Katie Schneider, and at left, Katie Schneider (left) visits with Lisa Loegering about her new role as a AmeriCorps VISTA Volunteer.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, Community Engagement, 218-281- 8526, (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual University of Minnesota Crookston Teambackers Fun Nite promises to be the biggest one yet in the event's 18-year history. It all takes place on Friday, April 26, 2013, at the Crookston Eagles Club, and all proceeds are used to support athletic scholarships at the University of Minnesota Crookston. Tickets are $40 per person through Friday, April 5. Following that date, tickets will increase to $50 per person. To purchase tickets, contact Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising at 218-281-8436. 

The evening begins with a social at 5:30 p.m. featuring hors d'oeuvres along with two drink tickets per person. Following the social at 7 p.m. are games, drawings for prizes, raffles, and both live and silent auctions with the final drawing for $1,000 taking place at 10:30 p.m. A framed Minnesota Wild jersey autographed by Zach Parise and donated by Invest Forward in Crookston will be one of the timed auction items. Dancing with Tommy Helgeson will follow the games. 

To see learn more about Fun Nite activities, visit www.goldeneaglesports.com/funnite

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Bill Tyrrell, director, athletic fundraising, 218-281-8436 (btyrrell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

All proceeds to benefit the Carnegie Library Restoration Project Fund

Alpha Lambda Delta at the University of Minnesota Crookston is hosting the third annual Pi 

DSC_5972.jpg

Run on Saturday, April 20, 2013. The run will include a new route along with a new distance for runners. A 10K has been added to the traditional children's Fun Run and the Pi Run, a race of 5 km (3.1 miles), a distance roughly equal to Pi. Registration is $20 for adults and $5 for students.  For a registration form, visit www.theirrationalrace.com or call 218-281-8432 with questions. All runners and walkers are encouraged to participate.

The schedule for the morning begins at 8:30 a.m. with registration in the Carnegie building at Ash Street and 2nd Avenue in Crookston followed by the Fun Run at 9:30 and the Pi Run and 10K at 10 a.m. Awards will be presented to the top three overall female and male finishers. All children participating in the Fun Run will receive a finisher's medal. Early registration guarantees 5K and 10K runners a shirt. 

The race route will follow a similar one to the 2012 Ox Cart Run hosted by the Crookston Running Club starting and ending at the Carnegie building. 

All proceeds from the race will benefit the Polk County Historical Society Carnegie Library Restoration Project Fund.  The goal of the Polk County Historical Society's library renovation is to possibly turn the Carnegie building into an arts and cultural center for the community and region. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in June 1984 and the Lake Agassiz Regional Library of Crookston, built that same year, stands adjacent to it. 

Major sponsors for the Pi Run include Herc-u-lift Inc. and HB Sound & Light. Anyone interested in contributing to the project should contact Brian Dingmann at 218-281-8249. 

Background

Alpha Lambda Delta (ALD) is an honor society at the University of Minnesota, Crookston for students who have maintained a 3.5 or higher grade point average and are in the top 20% of their class during their first year or term of higher education.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photo: Chancellor Fred Wood hands in his registration forms for the 3rd Annual Pi Run to Alpha Lambda Delta President Alexandra Skeeter. 


Contact: Brian Dingmann, assistant professor, Math, Science and Technology Dept. 218-281-8249 dingm021@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED.

The Crookston Student Association at the University of Minnesota Crookston will host the first-ever Crookston Community Ball on Saturday, April 13, 2013, in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. The evening which begins at 7 p.m. with appetizers will be followed by a dinner at 8 p.m.and a dance with music from the 60s and 70s. A cash bar will also be available. Formal attire is preferred and tickets are $25 per person/$50 per couple. All proceeds will support student scholarships at the U of M Crookston.  Tickets are limited and may be purchased by contacting Chris at 218-281-8144. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Christo Robberts, advisor, Crookston Student Association, 218-281-8144 (crobbert@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Chunhui Wang, Ph.D., at right,has been appointed the assistant director of the University of Minnesota's Confucius Institute satellite office on the campus of the University of Minnesota Crookston. The Confucius Institute at the U of M was created to promote the study of Chinese language and culture throughout Minnesota. It is a collaborative initiative between the University of Minnesota, the Hanban/Confucius Institute Headquarters, and Capital Normal University in Beijing. Chunhui Wang's office is located in 4A Hill Hall. 
Wang_Chunhui 2374.jpg

The organization's namesake is the Chinese philosopher known for encouraging deep independent thought and the study of the outside world. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Chunhui Wang, assistant director, international programs, 218-281-8551 (wang4854@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Children ages 3 and up can explore the world of agriculture and farm animals during the University of Minnesota Crookston Tours for Tots program to be held Wednesday, April 17 through Friday, April 26, 2013. The tours, recommended for children ages 4 -7 years old, will take children to visit the beef and sheep barn, horse stable and arena, and the greenhouse. Groups of 5 or more with adult supervision are best suited to the tours. To ensure a tour time, contact Leah Stroot in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at 218-281-8101 (stro0525@umn.edu) by Wednesday, April 10. 

Tours run Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and on weekends by appointment. Students in the Introduction to Animal Science class will be providing hands-on learning activities at each stop in the beef and sheep barns, horse stable and arena, and the greenhouse. 

Children will have the chance to see and interact with animals and hear about projects and activities from students on the Crookston campus. In the greenhouse, children will see the wide variety of plants that are grown and view research areas along the way. Tours for Tots is sponsored by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at the U of M Crookston.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu

Contact: Leah Stroot, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8101 (stro0525@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Pages