August 2013 Archives

The Wildlife Society's North Central Section recently selected the Student Chapter of the 
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Year award to the University of Minnesota Crookston Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society (TWS). The Student Chapter is advised by John Loegering, associate professor in natural resources in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at the U of M Crookston. A travel grant of up to $1,000 is awarded to the Section's Student Chapter of the Year.  The award will be presented at the Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference in Kansas City, Missouri.

The North Central Section presents the Student Chapter of the Year award to an outstanding student chapter each year for its exemplary contributions to the Society's mission and goals.  The goal of the award is to encourage and recognize exceptional achievements by Section student chapters.  "It is truly a great accomplishment and a testament to the dedication of your members and the organization and leadership of your officers" said Rochelle Renken, president of the North Central Section.  "The selection committee was impressed with your activities and the level of organizational achievement.  In particular I was impressed by your service activities and public outreach efforts.  Keep doing good work to prepare your members for professional roles and to engage the public in conservation education."

Emily Trappe, Student Chapter president, was pleased with the recognition. "This award recognizes the activity and work of our club and their passion for natural resources and wildlife," she said.
John Loegering echoed Trappe's sentiment, "I am extremely proud of the engagement of the students in the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society on the Crookston campus. They are leaders in their own right and this achievement reflects their dedication and effort. It is an honor to be recognized out of more than 25 chapters of the organization in the North Central Section and gratifying to work with students who are as committed as these students are." 

Student chapters strengthen the Society's membership recruitment and retention efforts by providing opportunities for member involvement in Society activities.  The Student Chapter of the Year award pays tribute to this important unit of The Wildlife Society. (For more, visit http://wildlife.org/ncs/awards)

Background
The Wildlife Society is an international, non-profit scientific and educational organization serving and representing wildlife professionals in all areas of wildlife conservation and resource management. The goal of the student chapter on the Crookston campus is to promote excellence in wildlife stewardship through science and education. 

Students in the organization are involved in a number of projects including duck banding at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge, Wood Duck Box Monitoring at Rydell National Wildlife Refuge, American Woodcock monitoring at Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge, black bear den monitoring, several environmental education programs at local schools, Prairie Chicken booming ground surveys, prairie seed cleaning, and youth deer hunts at Rydell National Wildlife Refuge as part of their community service.  They also hosted speakers on deer management and stream and ditch restoration that were educational for students and well attended by the public.  This past year the group also won wildlife quiz bowls at both the Minnesota and Midwest conclaves, competing against other universities through the Midwest.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo is Senior Jenny DuBay during a duck banding trip with the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society. 

Contact: : John Loegering, associate professor, Ag and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Crookston Community Band is being revived and Band Director TJ Chapman (in photo) is 
encouraging anyone interested in playing with the band to join. Rehearsals will take place on Monday evenings beginning September 9, 2013. The rehearsals will run from 7 to 8:30 in Kiehle 236, the music rehearsal room (located directly behind the stage of Kiehle Auditorium) at the University of Minnesota Crookston. All are welcome.

A concert is tentatively planned by the Crookston Community Band to take place later in the 
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semester, perhaps early December, so dust off your instrument and join them. Chapman, who teaches mathematics at the U of M Crookston, is taking over directing the band from Associate Professor George French, who will focus on a theater production this fall along with his other responsibilities. 

The principle tubist with the Bemidji Symphony Orchestra who is celebrating their 75th concert season, Chapman is also the acting principle tubist for the Greater Grand Forks Symphony Orchestra. He performs regularly with the North Dakota Trombone Choir.

Chapman holds master of science in mathematics and a master of music with a major in performance from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. He earned a bachelor of science in mathematics and a bachelor of arts in music both from Bemidji [Minn.] State University. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: TJ Chapman, band director and instructor of mathematics, 218-281-8384 (tchapman@umn.edu) ;Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota Crookston was recently informed that the website 
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StateUniversity.com has ranked University of Minnesota Crookston number 4 in Minnesota for campus safety. The scores of the top four schools ranked in the category were identical in a listing that includes 50 colleges and universities in the state. 

Colleges and universities ranked for campus safety on a scale that accounts for severity of a crime as well as frequency of crime. Data is compiled from reports submitted by college and university law enforcement between January 1 and December 31, 2012. 

The website StateUnivesity.com provides information about state universities and colleges across the United States including financial aid, academics, athletics and more gathered from a variety of sources. 

To view the rankings for the top ranked universities in Minnesota on safety, visit www.stateuniversity.com/rank_by_state/safety_score_rank/MN.html.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Andrew Svec, director of communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Comma Removed from Official Name of the University of Minnesota Crookston

It's official. The comma which has been part of the official name of the University of Minnesota's Crookston campus has been removed. The change follows University policy for all campuses in the system to remove the comma, or the pipe ( I ), which appeared between Minnesota and the name of the specific campus. The University of Minnesota Crookston is the official title and the comma will no longer appear on the Web site or in any other reference to the Crookston campus. The official word mark and graphics are in development and will follow in a subsequent notice. 

In the future, refer to the University of Minnesota Crookston as U of M Crookston or UM Crookston when using the abbreviated form. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Andrew Svec, director of communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Jake Sanders (in photo), a 2012 graduate of the University of Minnesota Crookston and former Golden 
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Eagle athlete, will facilitate a pilot project in three local school districts as part of Achieve More. Sanders will coordinate and manage Junior Achievement and College and Career Preparation 101 in three local school districts including Fisher, Fertile-Beltrami and Win-E-Mac. Achieve More.

Funded through a recent grant from the Northwest Minnesota Foundation in collaboration with the Center for Adult Learning at the U of M Crookston and Impact 20/20, Achieve More was a successful pilot in the Crookston School District in 2012-13. 

Achieve More focuses on helping high school graduates prepare for career and post-secondary success by helping students navigate the challenges and opportunities they encounter; increasing opportunities for students to pursue post-secondary credit while in high school; and strengthening assessments and support students and help them stay on track and identify those needing additional help. Along with these, the program will align state academic standards and teacher preparation with real-world learning and encourage schools and districts to take innovative, comprehensive approaches to preparing students for post-secondary success.

Christopherson, director of the Center for Adult Learning looks forward to what Sanders can bring to his new role. "Jake has many years of coaching and mentoring experience," Christopherson says. "He is a native of Crookston and has much to share with students, parents, and staff at Fertile-Beltrami, Fisher, and Win-E-Mac. He will bring his ability to lead and influence to this role in a way that will benefit high school students in these communities and beyond." 

Through this innovative partnership, the Center for Adult Learning, the Northwest Minnesota Foundation, and IMPACT 20/20, together with educators and volunteers, will engage young people to connect with relevant occupations, both regional and local, while raising awareness of the importance of staying in school and thinking beyond the twelfth grade. 

For more information, contact Sanders at 218-281-8599. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Michelle Christopherson, director, Center for Adult Learning, 218-281-8679Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota Crookston will host Bernard Franklin, Ph.D., (in photo) assistant to the vice 
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president at Kansas State University, on Thursday, September 5, 2013. Franklin, who is also the current president of Junior Achievement in Middle America, will be speaking during the campus Thursday Commons at noon in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center, on "Reengineering the Future." He will also give his presentation "Imagineering the Future" at 7 p.m. in the Kiehle Auditorium that same evening. Both events are free and the public is invited to attend either or both sessions. 

Franklin is known for his passion and vision along with his ability to motivate and inspire young people to succeed in today's world. He takes on such relevant topics as leadership, innovation, empowering the leader inside, as well as encouraging students to consider the important question: "do your skills, talents, and abilities meet the expectation of employers?" Of interest to educators will be Franklin's expertise on strategic planning, changing demographics, and the future of higher education.  And, community leaders and members will benefit from his knowledge of leadership, innovation, and education. 

For more information, contact Lorna Hollowell, director of diversity and multicultural programs at 218-281-8580 (lhollowe@umn.edu). Sponsors for the event include the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Programs, Crookston Student Association, Center for Adult Learning, and the Career and Counseling Center. 

Background
Franklin brings incredible knowledge and insightful personal experience as a role model to each audience he touches. His presentations are always moving experiences that inspire participants.

As an undergraduate at Kansas State University, he became the first black student ever elected president of the Student Government Association. At the age of 24, Franklin made Kansas history by becoming the youngest person ever appointed to the Kansas State Board of Regents and the youngest Chair of the Board at age 28. Franklin has been a Fellow for the Study of the United States Presidency and has served on an advisory commission to President Carter's Administration with Martin Luther King III and other prominent African Americans.

Franklin received his masters in Counseling and Behavioral Studies from the University of South Alabama and a Ph.D. in Counseling and Higher Education Administration, with an outside emphasis in Family Studies from Kansas State University. He received his bachelor's degree in Political Science from Kansas State University. In 1984, he began his higher education career at the University of South Alabama as Director of Student Activities and Minority Student Affairs and followed with a similar position at Rollins College in Winter Park, FL. He served as Assistant Dean of Student Life and Director of Leadership Development Programs at his alma mater, Kansas State University. He was formerly the President of Metropolitan Community College - Penn Valley in Kansas City, MO.

He was recently named president of Junior Achievement of Middle America, an organization dedicated to inspiring and preparing young people to succeed in a global economy.
For more than 20 years Franklin has advised and worked with undergraduate men's fraternities and other male organizations. He is currently on the board of directors as president of Delta Upsilon International Fraternity.

Franklin has been honored as one of the 100 Most Influential African Americans in Kansas City. His work and contributions to urban boys was recognized in the opening chapter of Bill Cosby's book, "Come On People" (2008). The Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce honored him with their distinguished Leadership Award for contributions to urban education. Franklin is also a past recipient of the Urban Hero award presented by the Downtown Kansas City Council.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lorna Hollowell, director of diversity and multicultural programs, 218-281-8580 (lhollowe@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)


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The Princeton Review, an education services company widely known for its test prep programs and college and graduate school guides, named the University of Minnesota Crookston to its "Best in the Midwest" section of its website feature, "2014 Best Colleges: Region by Region." The information is posted on the Company's website at www.princetonreview.com/best-regional-colleges.aspx

U of M Crookston Chancellor Fred Wood says the campus is proud to offer degrees from the University of Minnesota, the state's land grant institution dedicated to promoting access to higher education along with learning, discovery, and engagement for the common good.

"We are certainly pleased to again receive this recognition by The Princeton Review because it serves as a reminder and affirmation for the work of our dedicated faculty and staff," Wood says. "We put students first at the University of Minnesota Crookston, and we strive to offer the highest quality academic experience possible.  This honor recognizes our efforts to offer a University of Minnesota degree in a small campus environment that provides our students a truly remarkable experience."

The 155 colleges chosen for its "Best in the Midwest" list are located in twelve states: Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. The Princeton Review also designated 226 colleges in the Northeast, 124 in the West, and 138 in the Southeast as best in their locales on the company's "2014 Best Colleges: Region by Region" lists. Collectively, the 643 colleges named "regional best(s)" constitute about 25% of the nation's 2,500 four-year colleges

For this project, The Princeton Review asks students attending the schools to rate their own schools on several issues -- from the accessibility of their professors to quality of their science lab facilities -- and answer questions about themselves, their fellow students, and their campus life.  

The schools in The Princeton Review's "2014 Best Colleges: Region by Region" website section are also rated in six categories by The Princeton Review. The ratings, which appear on the school profiles, are scores on a scale of 60 to 99. The Princeton Review tallied these scores based on institutional data it obtained from the colleges in 2012-13 and/or student survey data. The rating score categories include: Academics, Admissions Selectivity, Financial Aid, Fire Safety, Quality of Life, and Green. The Princeton Review explains the criteria for each rating score on its site at www.princetonreview.com/college/college-ratings.aspx. The Princeton Review does not rank the 643 colleges in its "2014 Best Colleges: Region by Region" list hierarchically or by region or in various categories. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Andrew Svec, director, communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Fall Semester 2013 Brings Changes, Excitement to U of M Crookston

A new residence hall, new programs, and the latest in technology greets students at the 
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University of Minnesota Crookston this fall. Classes begin on Tuesday, August 27, 2013, following a weekend of orientation activities and the annual "Meet Crookston Through Service," a service event that introduces new students to the community. 

The most recent residential facility, Heritage Hall, will be open for only the second semester since it was first occupied last January. Of the three residence halls built on campus since 2006, each one has included a classroom: Centennial Hall (2006), Evergreen Hall (2009), and Heritage Hall (2013). The Harris A. Peterson Classroom located in Heritage Hall holds up to 118 and can be reconfigured from a classroom to a large space for hosting campus events. The inclusion of classrooms in the residence halls is designed to encourage a living and learning environment. 

The Undergraduate Collaborative Learning and Experiential Applied Research Lab (UCLEAR) allows students across disciplines to explore information in a whole new way. For example, students in the health sciences can "slice" into an MRI, which displays data in 3-D using BodyViz. Tissues can be isolated and examined. The data can be shared with the five Microsoft PixelSense tables in the room where the students can investigate the case while determining the history of the patient. The PixelSense tables and immersive visualization provide a technologically advanced interface for students to experience course or research material. A team could work on up to 9 different components of the same project or 9 projects can be investigated simultaneously.

New programs in elementary education and finance, which is also offered online, provide students more majors to choose from this fall. An update to Brown Dining room makes the space even more inviting and gives it a contemporary look. 

The campus also welcomes Barbara Keinath, the new vice chancellor of academic affairs, and Carola Thorson, the new director of admissions and enrollment management. Chancellor Fred Wood welcomed faculty and staff during a Welcome Week luncheon on Monday, August 19, and this fall, the campus is preparing to celebrate its 20th year as a four-year institution and its anniversary as the first-ever laptop university in the country.  Special recognition for the 20-year anniversary will kick off at homecoming on October 4, 5, and 6.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Landscaping continues around Heritage Hall in preparation for the arrival of students and the beginning of fall semester. 

Contact: Andrew Svec, director, communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu);Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Dan Svedarsky was an invited speaker and conference co-summarizer at a recent conference 
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on, America's Grasslands: The Future of Grasslands in a Changing Landscape. Svedarsky is a research biologist at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center and director of the University of Minnesota, Crookston's Center for Sustainability. The meeting brought together researchers, natural resources professionals, farmers and ranchers, representatives of Native American tribes, and policy experts and conservationists from California to Washington, D.C. to discuss the outlook and opportunities to conserve North America's grasslands. 

The biennial conference was held in Manhattan, Kan., and was focused on working collaboratively with ranchers to conserve grasslands but also included presentations on prairie ecology, interpretation, and restoration techniques. 

Primary sponsors of the conference were the National Wildlife Federation and Kansas State University along with the World Wildlife Fund, Environmental Defense Fund, The Nature Conservancy, Ducks Unlimited, Sharp Brothers Seed Company, Grassland Heritage Foundation, and the Consortium for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability. 
In his paper entitled, Prairie restoration - up close and personal - on a University Campus, Svedarsky reported on his long-time work with restoring prairie at the Red River Valley Natural History Area of the Northwest Research and Outreach Center in Crookston and the use of prairie plants in interpretative demonstrations on the Crookston campus. 

He and other faculty, staff, and students have installed prairie plants in the Nature Nook, Youngquist Prairie Garden, and currently in a raingarden in front of Heritage Hall; the newest resident hall on the Crookston campus. "Prairie plants have the advantage of being adapted to local growing conditions, are readily available, low maintenance, and are the "architects" of the rich fertile soils of the Red River Valley," notes Svedarsky. A number of UMC natural resource graduates are currently employed in land management capacities where they use prairie plants in their work. Svedarsky has also worked closely with The Nature Conservancy in northwest Minnesota in projects such as the Pankratz Prairie, Pembina Trail Preserve, and the Glacial Ridge Project. He received the President's Stewardship Award from The Nature Conservancy in 1981.

Over 250 participants attended the conference which included field trips to the Konza Prairie Biological Station of Kansas State and the National Tall Grass Prairie Preserve. The regional setting was the Flint Hills region of the North American Tallgrass Prairie where limestone geology lies close to the surface thus favoring grassland development on the thin soils and a ranching culture. Kansas State has been the center of numerous research studies on tallgrass prairie ecology including vegetation and animal interactions including the Greater Prairie Chicken.

"Native grasslands and the wildlife that depend on them are disappearing at alarming rates," said Aviva Glaser, agriculture policy specialist at the National Wildlife Federation and conference co-organizer. Recent surges in grain prices have prompted the extensive conversion of native grasslands and CRP grasslands in the Dakotas, many of which are erosion-prone due to steep slopes and droughty soils. "We want to do what we can to help the conservation and careful management of the American grassland," said Dr. John Briggs, Kansas State professor of biology and director of the Konza Prairie Biological Station who also helped organize the conference. "It's going to take all of these groups working together. We can't just work in a vacuum."

In his summary remarks, Svedarsky posed the question of why people should care about prairies in the first place, with their rich diversity of plants and animals; large and small. "I think often of the following words of Larry Kruckenberg, former North Dakota Game and Fish Commissioner:  for people to care about something, they must; feel it is of consequence, believe that it affects them, and believe they can do something about it. Does an unemployed single mom in the Bronx care about the conversion of South Dakota grassland to row crops? I doubt it, but before real consequential action is taken at the regional and national level, the base of caring constituency must be broadened."

Svedarsky believes in educational solutions and also quoted the Central African Conservationist, Baba Dioum. "For in the end we will conserve only what we love, we will love what we understand, and we will understand only what we are taught." Being a college natural resources conservation professor, Svedarsky adds to this his mantra for teaching, "So let us teach often, and well."

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Dan Svedarsky by a raingarden of mostly native prairie plants in front of the Flint Hills Discovery Center in Manhattan, Kansas. Svedarsky and assistants are installing a similar raingarden in front of Heritage Hall on the University of Minnesota Crookston campus.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, professor, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The installation of artificial turf on Ed Widseth Field at the University of Minnesota Crookston 

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received another boost with a second gift of $25,000 from the Eagles Club in Crookston. This donation, the second $25,000 designated for the project in the past few weeks, will be spread over a five year period. With Ed Widseth Field used by the Golden Eagle athletics and the Crookston High School, it is essential to install artificial turf to keep the surface ready for play. 

"I could not be happier that the membership of the Crookston Eagles Club has decided to donate $25,000 to UMC for the Turf Project," said Crookston Eagles Club general manager Jake Fee. "This project is not only great for UMC but will also be a great asset for the Crookston High School and for the entire community of Crookston. The Crookston Eagles Club is a proud supporter of UMC and we are pleased that we can play a small part in helping this project happen. 


"The Eagles Club motto is "People helping People", and I take great pride in supporting our community and our local charities and we couldn't think of a better project to get behind, and encourage everyone in the community to help in any way to this project." 

Almost all football fields in the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference (NSIC), the conference in which the U of M Crookston competes, have upgraded to artificial turf. Not only is the artificial surface easier to maintain, it reduces injury and can handle up to six times more traffic than grass fields. The estimated cost of the project is approximately $1 million including of the initial investment necessary to build the base for the turf.

Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising, is pleased to add this generous gift to those already given. "The installation of the turf is a big project and also a big priority for us," Tyrrell says. "It is incredible to have this kind of support coming from our community. It builds momentum, and makes a difference in the lives of all our students."

For questions regarding the project or to help support the effort, contact Tyrrell at 218-281-8436 (tyrrell@umn.edu). 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right are Corby Kemmer, director of development and alumni relations; Jake Fee, manager of the Eagles; Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising; and Stephanie Helgeson, director of athletics. 

Contact: Bill Tyrrell, director, athletic fundraising, 218-281-8436 (btyrrell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A birding open house is slated for Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013, and hosted by the University of Minnesota at the Red River Valley Natural History Area, located across from the Crookston campus on the west side of U.S. Highway 2. The open house runs from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Visitors will have the chance to see mist netting and bird banding demonstrations and tour a number of education stations including bird identification, bird feeding, bird beaks, and more. Representatives from the Purple Martin Association of the Dakotas and the Minnesota Master Naturalist Program will be available, and children will have the opportunity to make and take home birdfeeders and hike along the trails that wind through the 85-acre Natural History Area. 

Driving Directions:  From US 2 on the north side of Crookston, turn west on North Acres Drive (El Metate restaurant and Crookston Armory are at this corner), drive 0.25 miles, pass the residence, and follow the road as it turns right and heads north.  Cross the railroad tracks and continue along the road as it turns west and northwest to the History Area parking lot.  Directions:  http://z.umn.edu/urocmaps

For more information, contact Laura Bell at 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu). 
Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Laura Bell, lab services coordinator, Ag and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Written by Senior Alexmai Addo, communications assistant in University Relations.

College is all about self-discovery and finding a career path you will love.  For James Rogers, 

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a junior at the University of Minnesota Crookston (UMC), that is exactly what happened to him when he came to UMC.  Rogers is originally from Becker, Minnesota.  He chose to come to UMC because he thought it had one of the best criminal justice programs in the state. 

Rogers wanted to be a cop and came in as a criminal justice major with an emphasis in law enforcement.  However, as his college career went on, he realized that law enforcement wasn't the career field he wanted to pursue.  He liked math and science, so he decided to look for a major in the Math, Science and Technology Department.  After exploring different majors in that department, he found that he was fascinated with software engineering and wanted to pursue a major in that area of study. 

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Rogers is currently completing his internship in software engineering this summer.   All students must complete an internship to graduate from the University of Minnesota Crookston.  He is helping with programs for the board and surface tables in the Undergraduate Collaborative Learning and Experiential applied Research (UCLEAR) Lab.  The UCLEAR Lab features interactive computer surface touch tables with PixelSense technology.  It allows different groups to work collaboratively on different research or hands-on exercises.   Data or imagery can be distributed among the different systems in the lab, where teams of students or researchers can perform analysis in a large format, multi-touch display.  

Rogers and some of his classmates went in to see Adel Ali, former head of the Math, Science, and Technology Department, to acquire information on getting an internship in software engineering.  Ali told them to get in contact with Mark Gill, a lecturer at the University of Minnesota Crookston.  Gill was working on programs for the boards and could use some student interns.  With that, he got Rogers and some of his classmates a summer internship.   "I do a lot of coding, planning designing, and troubleshooting to figure out problems," said Rogers.  When Rogers started his internship he wished to gain experience and insight on what future jobs would be like, which is what he got.

his internship has added numerous attributes to Rogers's education at UMC.  He stated that it has improved his coding skills and helped him get an insight of what the industry will be like.  "It has helped me gain more experience in areas I lacked and improve my skills in areas I was already strong in."  Rogers was able to apply what he learned in his class to his internship, which is a wonderful thing for a student.  It helps the student see that what they are learning is practical to their future.  His classes, such as Programming one and two and Requirement Analysis Quality Assurance Test, were all helpful to him.  He is currently working on an aerial view of Crookston, where he is adding shapes of buildings and different points to the Crookston map. 


Aside from the internship, Rogers is highly involved in activities and academics at the University of Minnesota Crookston.  He plays on the club hockey team, which he is the vice president for.  Also, he is completing an undergraduate research study with Mehdi Mekni, an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota Crookston.  When he leaves UMC, he will most likely go into the workforce but he is not sure yet.  Rogers is a wonderful student and the University is proud he chose to come here. 

For more information on software engineering or other majors at the U of M Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos: James Rogers demonstrates one of the touch sensitive screens that is part of the UCLEAR lab. 

Contact: Mark Gill, lecturer, Math, Science, and Technology Department, 218-281-8258 (mgill@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Mary Tyrrell, a devoted wife, mother, and nurse, gave tirelessly in support of student- 
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athletes at the University of Minnesota Crookston. The campus invites everyone to remember Mary, support scholarships, and help raise awareness of heart disease during the third annual Mary Tyrrell Health Walk for Scholarships. The walk will be held Wednesday, August 28, 2013, and begins with registration at 5 p.m. in Parking Lot E near Ed Widseth Field on the campus. Registration is $25 for adults and $10 for students 18 and under. All registrants will receive a t-shirt designed especially for the walk. To register or for more information about the walk, contact Tricia Sanders at 218-281-8326. 

A free "healthy tailgate" will be served for walk participants. Door prizes will be awarded, and all participants are encouraged to stay for the Student-Athlete Meet and Greet at 6 p.m. and the Golden Eagle Maroon and Gold football game at 6:30 pm.

Background
The inaugural Mary Tyrrell Health Walk for Scholarships was held in the fall of 2011. The event is designed to raise awareness about heart health and women's health issues. It is named in memory of Mary Tyrrell, wife of Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising at the U of M, Crookston. Mary passed away unexpectedly from heart disease in December 2010. 

Her untimely death ended the life of a woman who was passionate about helping student-athletes and caring for patients as a nurse at Altru Clinic in Grand Forks, N.D., as well as the life of a devoted wife and mother. It also serves as a reminder of the threat posed by heart disease and how healthy diet and exercise, along with knowing the risk factors and symptoms of heart disease can help provide protection. 

After 18 years as an athletic trainer at the U of M Crookston, Bill took over as director of athletic fundraising in 2005 and works closely with Teambackers, an athletic promotion and fundraising organization for Golden Eagle athletics.  In 2009, Mary and Bill established a scholarship to specifically support student-athletes through the Bill and Mary Tyrrell Endowment fund, and throughout the years, they have given both time and financial support to encourage student-athletes on the Crookston campus. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Mary Tyrrell's smile brightened every thing around her.  

Contact: Tricia Sanders, director, finance, 218-281-8326 (sand0803@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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The installation of artificial turf on Ed Widseth Field at the University of Minnesota Crookston gained some yardage recently with a gift of $25,000 from KROX AM. With Ed Widseth Field used by the Golden Eagle athletics and the Crookston High School, it is essential to install artificial turf to keep the surface ready for play. 

"I feel this is a very important project for UMC, Crookston High School, and the city of Crookston," says Chris Fee, owner/general manager of KROX.  "My wife Tiffany and I have two sons who play football and will be playing on the field turf in the future as Crookston Pirates, and, who knows, maybe even as Golden Eagles." 

Almost all football fields in the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference (NSIC), the conference in which the U of M Crookston competes, have upgraded to artificial turf. Not only is the artificial surface easier to maintain, it reduces injury and can handle up to six times more traffic than grass fields. The estimated cost of the project is approximately $1 million including of the initial investment necessary to build the base for the turf.
"KROX is always willing to support the kids in town, and we can't wait to see the smiles of all the athletes when the project is complete," Fee continues. "We encourage Crookston Pirate and UMC Golden Eagle Football fans to donate what they can, from $100 to $100,000 to make sure the project happens and the teams won't have to move home games out of Crookston again!"

Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising, is grateful for the leadership demonstrated by KROX. "This generous contribution helped us surpass the $100,000 mark in the effort," says Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising. "We are grateful for and excited by this show of support for the project and for our student-athletes. Thank you to Chris Fee and KROX for their generosity and for seeing the importance of the turf project to the Crookston campus and the community."

For questions regarding the project or to help support the effort, contact Tyrrell at 218-281-8436 (tyrrell@umn.edu). 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Chris Fee; Bill Tyrrell, director of athletic fundraising; and Stephanie Helgeson, director of athletics

Contact: Bill Tyrrell, director, athletic fundraising, 218-281-8436 (btyrrell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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