October 2013 Archives

A week of events is slated at the University of Minnesota Crookston during International Education Week, Sunday, November 10 through Friday, November 15, 2013. From culinary creations to an international market, International Education Week will include adventures from around the world. 

The community is invited to attend several events on campus during the week in celebration of International Week: 

On Sunday, November 10, at 7 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, special guest speaker, Katy Westrom, daughter of Professor Lyle Westom, will speak about her journey traveling around the world. She will talk about her experience with The World Race, a mission trip spanning 11 countries in 11 months. The presentation is co-sponsored by Campus Ministries in conjunction with the Study Abroad Club.  Katy is a graduate of the University of Minnesota and currently teaches music at Wadena Public School.

On Monday, November 11, in Brown Dining Room enjoy international cuisine during a lunch from the four corners of the world. Featured countries are Africa, Germany, Brazil, and Japan. The public is welcome to join the campus for lunch at a cost of 7.65 + tax per person served from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. From 2-3 p.m. in the Bede Ballroom A & B students from the English as a Second Language (ESL) class and students from the intercultural communication course will present on various topics. Teaching Specialist, Carol Simmons and Associate Professor, Rachel McCoppin paired students together in order to give students an applied intercultural communication experience. Using the skills and knowledge they have learned students are required to speak one sentence in their partners' native language and prepare a 5 minute presentation. Presentations will also be held on Friday, November 15. The community is encouraged to attend. 

On Tuesday, November 12, an international art & photography contest will be held in the Prairie Room, Sargeant Student Center from 10-2p.m. Everyone is invited to view artwork and photograph exhibits by students as well as vote for their personal favorite. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to wear traditional clothing celebrating their heritage during the day.  From 1-5p.m. the Multicultural and International Club will host an event called "A Day without Shoes" in the International Lounge, Sargeant Student Center. The collection drive will receive shoe donations of all sizes. Everyone is encouraged to bring shoes they don't wear anymore. These donations are sent to people around the world. 

An International Market will be held on Wednesday, November 13 in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. There will be items for sale from 2 - 7 p.m. including handcrafts, art, food, and more. Everyone is encouraged to visit the market and shop. The event is sponsored by the Study Abroad Club and Multicultural and International Club (MIC). These events are all open to the public. 

On Thursday, November 14, there will be student presentations from those who have experienced traveling abroad.  Presentations will take place in the Prairie Lounge. Featured counties are, New Zealand from 12-1 p.m; China from 1-2 p.m. and Spain from 3:30 -4:30 p.m. students will talk about their experiences traveling abroad and what they learned from it.  Special appetizers will be served during each session. This event is free and open to the public. 
 
On Friday, November 15, things really heat up on campus with the "How Hot is Hot? Hot Sauce Contest" which will be held at 12 p.m. in the Northern Lights Lounge.  From 2-3 p.m. in Bede Ballroom students form the English as a Second Language (ESL) class and the Intercultural Communication course will conclude their presentations. The community is encouraged to attend. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree. "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Rae French, coordinator, learning abroad/international student programming, 218-281-8339 (rfrench@umn.edu); Ruth Navarro, communications assistant, 218-281-8446 (nava0085@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director of communications, 218-281-8432 (l

Looking for inspiration, laughter, and tips on how to improve yourself?  A Women's Health Expo will be held at the University of Minnesota Crookston on Thursday, November 7, 2013, from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Heritage Hall Classroom. The event is free and the public is invited to hear guest speakers Annabelle Narlock share her story of survival and success; Sue Thompson, a certified trainer in Laughter Yoga, will facilitate a session; and Megan Scott, an acupuncturist will share nutrition tips and tricks.

Appetizers and refreshments will be served following the expo.  Door prizes will be given away and you will have the opportunity to network with members of the campus and community. For information on the expo, contact Alysa Tulibaski at 218-281-8570.

The event is sponsored by the UMC Women's Commission. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Alysa Tulibaski, Student and Family Experience coordinator, 218-281-8570 (hauge450@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Grant Criger, a sophomore at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Eagan, Minn., 
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majoring in law enforcement aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Nic Huber and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology. With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree. "Small Campus. Big Degree." To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Flight instructor Nic Huber (left) congratulates Grant Criger on the completion of his solo flight. 

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

UMCAA to Host Alumni Social on Thursday, November 14

The University of Minnesota Crookston Alumni Association (UMCAA) will host an alumni 
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social on Thursday, November 14, 2013, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Fargo Billiards & Gastropub, 3234 43rd St S, Fargo ND  58104. Refreshments will be served. 

This marks the fourth time the UMCAA has hosted an alumni social in Fargo, and all alumni are encouraged to attend. For more information, contact Rose Ulseth in the alumni office at 218-281-8439.
  
Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Brock Wood, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from  
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Alexandria, Minn., majoring in agricultural aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. Flight instructor was Brandon Curry and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. (In the photo are Curry, left, and Wood.)

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology. With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree. "Small Campus. Big Degree." To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M Crookston Torch & Shield Award Recipients for 2013 Honored

Honoring those who have aided in the development of the University of Minnesota Crookston, 
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the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC), and Extension is the purpose of the Torch & Shield award. This celebration of leadership is the highest honor presented by the Crookston campus and a special recognition event was held on Wednesday, November 6, 2013, on the campus.

The Torch & Shield award recipients for 2013 include Charles "Chuck" Habstritt, retired from teaching, but he still farms with his brother near Roseau, Minn.; Lynn Willhite, studio artist in Crookston, Minn. for the past 25 years. 

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Charles "Chuck" Habstritt a retired University of Minnesota Crookston Associate Professor is highlighted with achievement and a legacy of dedication to students during a 40-year teaching career. 

He graduated in 1967 with a bachelor of science in agronomy/soil science from the University of Minnesota.  Transferring to North Dakota State University in Fargo, N.D., Habstritt obtained his master of science in 1969 majoring in agronomy with an emphasis in soils, biochemistry, and plant physiology. 

Habstritt began his teaching career in 1969 at the U of M Crookston where he specialized in agronomy and soils. He was named outstanding educator by students three times and in 1999, he was selected to receive the Distinguished Teaching Award by his colleagues. In 2007-08, Habstritt was honored with the University of Minnesota's John Tate Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising. In the U of M system, the Tate Awards recognizes and rewards high-quality academic advising.

From 1970 to 2009, Habstritt served as a coach to the highly successful Collegiate Crops Judging Team on the Crookston campus. He was also responsible for compiling the rules and regulations book that has been used for national contests in both Chicago and Kansas City. He has coached his teams to top-three finishes more than 25 times. 

Habstritt has developed and taught 13 courses, advised some 40-50 students a year, trained teaching assistants, published, and solicited funding for scholarships to keep and attract top students for his program. He found time during his career to manage his grain, oil seed, and grass seed farm and was recognized with the Honorary State Farmer Degree. During his career, Habstritt also served as assistant coach for hockey, and in 1986, he received the University of Minnesota Regents Award for Excellence in Coaching. 

Together with collegiate hockey, Habstritt also found time to coach 32 hockey teams including squirts, peewees, and bantams. Today, Habstritt and his wife, Christine, reside in Casa Grande Ariz. in the winter and Rocky Point on the Lake of the Woods in the summer. Although retired from teaching, he still farms with his brother near Roseau, Minn.

Lynn Willhite has been a studio artist in Crookston, Minn. for the past 25 years. Primarily a 
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textile artist, she works with dye and fabric to create watercolors on fabrics. She sells and shows her work at regional and national art shows. She has generously donated several of her wearable art pieces to support scholarships at the University of Minnesota Crookston. 

Willhite's creativity and innate talent have benefitted students across the Crookston campus where she has devoted her countless hours to decorating the residence halls, including Centennial, Evergreen, and most recent--Heritage Hall. These halls attest to her great style and her dedication to making the residence halls beautiful places for students to live and study. 

She is a graduate of Minnesota State University Moorhead with a degree in elementary education.  Over the years, she taught at the Early Childhood Education Center at the University of Minnesota Crookston and served as an adjunct instructor, teaching drawing and design.  Sharing her talent has benefitted not only the campus but the Crookston community where she taught community education classes in watercolor for beginning students.
Willhite moved to Crookston in 1978, with her husband Gary, who is the director of Residential Life and Security. Together, they robustly worked on the very popular Community Stable Service, a live nativity showcased at the U of M Crookston in the arena in the University Teaching and Outreach Center. 

She has been an ongoing volunteer in the Crookston community through her church, as well as the schools, working on fundraisers and several committees.  She has been a past president of the UMC Faculty Association and has proudly been the leader of 4-H and was responsible for starting the first Cloverbuds program, a pre-school program for siblings of 4-H members.

The Torch & Shield Award honors contributions of significance to higher education, the Crookston campus, and the region; recognizes champions of the U of M Crookston, NWROC, and Extension for their impact on the region through teaching, research, and outreach; and distinguishes both high profile individuals and those who have been "quiet" contributors to the success of the Crookston campus. For more information, visit www.umcrookston.edu/torchandshield.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree. "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo at top, right, in the back row are Corby Kemmer, director of Development & Alumni Relations, Chancellor Fred Wood, and Albert Sims, director of operations at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center. In the front row are Chuck Habstritt (left) and Lynn Willhite. 

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Ruth Navarro, communications assistant, 218-281-8446 (nava0085@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

It was down to the last few seconds when the answer to a question on herpetology led the 
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University of Minnesota Crookston to victory in the Wildlife Quiz Bowl held at the annual conference of The Wildlife Society. The conference contest, held in Milwaukee, Wis., was a big win for the UM Crookston over a team from Humboldt State University (HSU), Arcata, Calif., a perennial favorite. 

Coached by John Loegering and Vanessa Lane, the team of natural resources majors was led by captain Matt Toenies, a senior from Randall, Minn. Other members included Jennifer DuBay, a senior from Apple Valley, Minn.; Alisha Mosloff, a junior from Thief River Falls, Minn.; Emily Trappe, a senior from International Falls, Minn.; and Jacob Nelson, a senior from Lake Park, Minn. They competed through four rounds with sixteen other teams from across the country and finished against HSU with a final score of 105 to 100 and coming back after a 25 to 70 point deficit.

Loegering was proud of the team's professionalism and performance. "Our team won on a question in herpetology, taught by Vanessa Lane, and it's a class we just started offering this fall," Loegering says. "Our students were exemplary and Vanessa and I could not be more proud of the way they competed and represented the University of Minnesota Crookston." Students attending had an opportunity to visit the Leopold Shack and International Crane Foundation while at the conference along with valuable opportunities to network and meet professionals in the field.

Background
The Wildlife Society is an international, non-profit scientific and educational organization serving and representing wildlife professionals in all areas of wildlife conservation and resource management. The goal of the student chapter on the Crookston campus is to promote excellence in wildlife stewardship through science and education. For more information on natural resources at the U of M Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/natr.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Matt Toenies, Jennifer DuBay, Alisha Mosloff, Emily Trappe, and Jacob Nelson. 

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor and U of M Extension wildlife specialist, Ag and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

CANCELED: A Parent Night will be held at Win-E-Mac on October 22, 2013, at 7 p.m. in the Win-E-Mac Media Center. It will host all 10th - 12th grade parents and students. Parent Night is an opportunity for parents to learn more about the financial, social, and academic aspects of attending a post-secondary institution. Topics during the evening include financial aid, FAFSA, ACT tests/scores, college applications, college visits, residential life and housing, as well as answering any questions parents may have.

Background
Achieve More emerged from the regional IMPACT 20/20 Education Task Force's priority initiative to increase high school graduation rates and encourage more students, at an earlier age, to consider attending college. Launched in Fall 2012, the project is an effort among UMC's Center for Adult Learning (CAL). Achieve More consists of two major components, College and Career Preparation 101, aimed at grades 7‐12, and Junior Achievement, which targets grades 2-6. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Jake Sanders, Student Personnel Coordinator, Center for Adult Learning, 218-281- 8599 (sande404@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, Assistant Director, Communications, 218-281- 8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A Parent Night will be held at Fisher High School on October 28, 2013, at 7 p.m. in the Fisher High School Library. It will host all 10th - 12th grade parents and students. Parent Night is an opportunity for parents to learn more about the financial, social, and academic aspects of attending a post-secondary institution. Topics during the evening include financial aid, FAFSA, ACT tests/scores, college applications, college visits, residential life and housing, as well as answering any questions parents may have.

Background
Achieve More emerged from the regional IMPACT 20/20 Education Task Force's priority initiative to increase high school graduation rates and encourage more students, at an earlier age, to consider attending college. Launched in Fall 2012, the project is an effort among UMC's Center for Adult Learning (CAL). Achieve More consists of two major components, College and Career Preparation 101, aimed at grades 7‐12, and Junior Achievement, which targets grades 2-6. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Jake Sanders, Student Personnel Coordinator, Center for Adult Learning, 218-281- 8599 (sande404@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, Assistant Director, Communications, 218-281- 8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Four seniors from the University of Minnesota Crookston took home top honors over the 
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weekend at the Mid-American Horticultural Society (MACHS) competition at the University of Wisconsin River Falls. The horticulture majors making up the first place team included Catlin Kersting, Cloquet, Minn.; Ashlynn Hartung, Lindstrom, Minn.; Mitchell Sledge, Saint Louis Park, Minn.; and Tim Staudahar, Hibbing, Minn. The UM Crookston team finished in first place overall followed by Iowa State University in second and Colorado State University in third. The coach for the U of M Crookston is Theresa Helgeson. 

The teams competed in four categories with a total of 200 points each for a total of 800 points overall. The categories were General Knowledge; Judging in both fruit and vegetable classes and nursery and floriculture classes; Herbaceous Identification and Woody Identification. 
In the contest for herbaceous identification Staudahar tied for first place and Hartung tied for second. In Woody Identification Hartung took first and Staudahar took second and the two finished in first and second place respectively in Overall Individual. 

Juniors Ashley Radke, Grand Forks, N.D.; and Sarah Lanners, Nashwauk, Minn.; and Senior Amanda Thompson, Pine River, Minn., also competed as individuals. Lanners finished third in the Herbaceous Identification contest. 

The competition, which takes place during the MACHS annual conference, provides a means of communication between horticulture clubs of participating schools. This year marked the 41st annual conference of the organization. Sharing knowledge and ideas is an important part of the gathering. The MACHS competition includes collegiate horticulture clubs from 12 Mid-American states.

Keynote speaker at the conference was Mike Yanny, senior horticulturalist from Menomonee Falls, Wis. The conference offered students the opportunity to participate in educational tours of the Gertens Garden Center in Inver Grove Heights, Minn.; Bailey's Nursery in Newport, Minn.; St. Croix Valley Tree Farm in Sommerset, Wis.; A Future Farm and The Orchard in Baldwin, Wis.; and Wouterina de Raad's Garden Tour in Beldenville, Wis. 

For more information on horticulture at the U of M Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/hort.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, at top, left to right in the back row, are Sarah Lanners, Mitch Sledge, Tim Staudahar, Catlin Kersting, Ashley Radke, Ashlynn Hartung. In the front: Coach Theresa Helgeson and Amanda Thompson

Contact: Theresa Helgeson, coach, MACHS team, 218-281-8120 (helg0145@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota Crookston honored six remarkable individuals during 
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homecoming. Recognition for four Outstanding Alumni and three Athletic Hall of Fame inductees was held on Friday evening, October 4, 2013, in Bede Ballroom in the Sargeant Student Center. Hosting the evening were Corby Kemmer, director of development and alumni relations and Stephanie Helgeson, director of athletics and Chancellor Fred Wood brought greetings from the campus. The choir, under the direction of George French, sang several numbers including Hail! Minnesota and the Minnesota Rouser. 

Outstanding Alumni award was presented to Tyler Grove '94, Timothy Rhonemus '84, Susan Jacobson '86 & '96 and Gene Dufault '68 and inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame were Michele (Johnson) Allen ex.'88, and Craig Talberg ex. '91. 

A few highlights of these seven accomplished alumni include the following: 

Gene Dufault '68 graduated with a degree in business and has been involved in a number of professions since his graduation. His work experience includes working in food and beverage sales, both stand-alone restaurants and hotels, and operating his own business. 

During the past 19 years Dufault has dedicated his time and talent to working closely with township government. He serves as the district director for the association, which covers 5 counties. He also assists in lobbying efforts for the state legislature, sits on numerous boards, and helps train township officers for their elected positions.

He graduated from the Northwest School of Agriculture (NWSA) in 1963. He regards his time on campus as something very dear to him. Dufault remembers personally helping initiate both the Young Democrats and the Young Republicans along with participating in a number of other clubs and organizations. 

Timothy Rhonemus '84 graduated with a degree in dietetics. He first came to the university as a transfer student seeking to obtain his bachelor of science degree in restaurant management but all that changed when he found that the health care profession was just as rewarding. 

After graduating from U of M Crookston, he attended St. Cloud State University and received his bachelor of science degree in political science. In 1994 Rhonemus received his third degree this time in nursing. He currently works as a healthcare surveyor for the Minnesota Department of Health and Human Services. He assists in surveying nursing homes, out-patient surgical centers, dialysis units, rehab centers, out-patient physical therapy rehab clinics, and care facilities for the intellectually disabled. 

Rhonemus is grateful for his educational experiences at the U of M Crookston and knows that those experiences prepared him for his career in healthcare.  

Susan Jacobson '87 & '96 first graduated with her associate degree in floriculture/greenhouse management and later received her bachelor of science degree in plant industries management from the University of Minnesota Crookston. 

After relocating and being forced to change her career Jacobson found the perfect fit for her interests at the U of M Crookston. Jacobson is proud of the education that opened her eyes to the endless possibilities in the field of horticulture. Jacobson went on to work in the industry for a couple of years and also owned her own flower shop. 

She has worked at the U of M Crookston for the past twenty years and is excited to be teaching the very classes that stimulated her own interests in the beginning. Jacobson is heavily involved in the community she lives in and is part of many professional affiliations including the Minnesota Nursery Landscaping Association. She and her husband, David, make their home in Fertile, Minn.

Michele (Johnson) Allen ex. '88 was a multi-sport athlete at the University of Minnesota Crookston between 1986 and 1988. During that time she played Trojan volleyball, basketball, and softball. 

Allen's athletic skills helped the U of M Crookston place fifth in the 1986 State Junior College Tournament. She was the top passer in 1986 and 1987 and top server in 1988. Allen was named to the All-State Tournament Team, All-Region Tournament Team, and All-Northwest Division Honorable Mention Team in 1986. In 1987 she was named to the All-State Tournament Team and 1st Team All-Northwest Division.

Allen currently works as the laboratory director at Kittson Memorial Hospital where she's in charge of laboratory operations for critical access and oversees two rural health clinic laboratories.  She is also the director of ancillary services for the United States Army Reserve for laboratory, pharmacy, and radiology operations for a 146 bed combat support hospital. Allen received her master's degree from the University of North Dakota and currently resides in Kennedy, Minn., with her three children.

Craig Talberg ex. '91 had twelve interceptions in eight games in one season to lead the nation for the Trojan football team when the campus was part of the National Junior College Athletic Association. He was a First Team All-American in 1990 as well as section player of the year. Talberg was named All-Conference, All-Region, and Defensive Player of the Year in 1990. He went on to Minnesota State University Moorhead (MSUM) where he holds the interception record with six and was named Second Team All-American.

He has a bachelor of science degree from MSUM in teaching and coaching and went on for his developmental and adapted physical education (DAPE) licensure at St. Cloud State University. He also holds a master's degree from Bethel University. 

Talberg teaches physical education at Milaca Public Schools in Milaca, Minn., where he is the head coach for baseball and the eighth grade football coach. He and his wife, Lana, are the parents of three.

Tyler Grove '94 was one of the first to earn a four-year degree from the University of Minnesota Crookston. His major was in plant industries management with an agronomy emphasis. 

While at the U of M Crookston, he participated in the Crops Team and in NACTA (North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture) competition. In 2007 he earned his master's degree in agronomy from Iowa State University. 

In 1995, he was employed with American Crystal Sugar Company as an agriculturist for the East Grand Forks district, and in February, 2013, he accepted a position as the ag strategy development manager at the corporate office in Moorhead, Minn. 

In 2008, he was selected to attend MARL (Minnesota Ag and Rural Leadership) Program.  He and his wife, Rhea, have two children, Ryan and Madison. Grove looks back on his years at the University of Minnesota Crookston and is thankful for the support and encouragement he received from faculty. 

For more information on homecoming at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/alumni/homecoming.htm.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Back row, left to right: Chancellor Wood, Craig Talberg, Tyler Grove, Stephanie Helgeson, and Corby Kemmer. Front row: Gene Dufault, Sue Jacobson,Michele Allen and Timothy Rhonemus.

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Ruth Navarro, communications assistant, 218-281-8446, (nava0085@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Current Version of GED Test to Expire at the End of 2013

GED testing centers in Minnesota encourage adults to finish and pass before test deadlines


The University of Minnesota Crookston Counseling Services announced that the current version of the GED test will expire at the end of 2013. The current version, known as the 2002 Series GED test, will be replaced with the new 2014 GED test on January 2, 2014. 

Those who have taken the 2002 Series GED test, but not passed all five parts, have until the end of 2013 to pass or they will need to start over again in 2014 with the new GED test in order to receive their high school credential.   This includes paying additional fees to take the new GED test.  The fee will increase from $60 at the Crookston Testing Center to a nation-wide rate of $120.

"The GED test opens doors to college, better jobs, the respect adults deserve, and the satisfaction of earning a high school credential," said Meloni Rasmussen, GED Examiner of the University of Minnesota Crookston Counseling Services. "So we want to be sure that everyone is aware of this deadline. GED test-takers must act now to finish and pass before the current test expires." 

"Support is available, right here in Crookston," said Laurie Burkeholder, ABE Instructor for Crookston Adult Basic Education. "We can help adult learners get prepared to take the parts of the GED test they still need to pass. We want you to succeed!"  Laurie can be reached at (218) 281-4743.  The Crookston ABE is located at the Family Service Center at 1407 Erskine Street in Crookston, MN.

Interested GED test-takers can find more information at finishtheGED.com.

A few important tips you should know about testing at the University of Minnesota Crookston Counseling Service's Testing Center before the end of 2013:
- Registration deadline for repeat GED® test-takers is December 13, 2013
- Registration deadline for new GED® test-takers is November 29, 2013
- Last day to take the current version of the GED® test is December 18, 2103
- To schedule an appointment for testing call the testing center at (218) 281-8586

"To anyone who has already started the GED test, your future is calling. By passing the GED test, you can answer that call," said Randy Trask, president and CEO of GED Testing Service. "You owe it to yourself. Don't miss the chance to turn one small step into your next big opportunity in life." 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Meloni Rasmussen, principle administrative specialist, Career and Counseling Services, 218-281-8586 (melonir@umn.edu)

Prairie grouse conservationists from across the U.S. and Canada will gather at the University of Minnesota Crookston on October 10-12, 2013, to share knowledge and appreciation of prairie grouse populations throughout their range. The 30th meeting of the Prairie Grouse Technical Council Conference will commence with registration and a reception on Thursday, October 10, starting at 5:30 p.m. in the Prairie Room of Sargeant Student Center on the campus of the U of M Crookston. Registration for the full conference is $150 per attendee. For more information contact Dan Svedarsky, conference organizer, at 218-281-8129 or dsvedars@crk.um.edu.

 

The prairie grouse family includes the sage grouse, the lesser and greater prairie chicken, Attwater's prairie chicken, and the sharp-tailed grouse. Participants of the conference will hear of the impact of changing land use, energy development, and Farm Bill programs, such as the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), on prairie grouse populations across the range. Professional biologists and graduate students will present technical papers on research and conservation programs in efforts to reduce factors which are limiting to populations. In addition to various prairie grouse reports, the event will include a business meeting and a field trip to local prairie grouse habitat.

 

The meeting will include presentation of the Hamerstrom Award, which recognizes individuals and organizations for ongoing efforts in prairie grouse conservation. The award is named in honor of Fred and Francis Hamerstrom who were both students of the famed Aldo Leopold, the father of wildlife management. The Hamerstroms conducted research on prairie grouse in Wisconsin for decades and are credited with generating information that was critical to saving the prairie chicken in Wisconsin and other states as well.

 

"The biennial conference rotates to different parts of the grassland biome in North America to allow participants to experience the broad range of conditions where these magnificent birds live," notes Dan Svedarsky, Ph.D., conference organizer. The conference most recently was hosted in Hays, Kansas, in 2011 and last hosted in Crookston in 1987.

 

Svedarsky, a research biologist at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center and wildlife professor at the University of Minnesota Crookston, says, "We're fortunate in northwest Minnesota to have both sharp-tailed grouse and the greater prairie chicken living side by side and enjoyed by students, researchers, sportsmen, and nature lovers." The birds are especially notable for their spectacular courtship displays in the spring. Both species are classified as game birds in Minnesota and notably occur on the Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge east of Crookston and on other wildlife areas in northwest Minnesota.

 

In addition to primary sponsorship by the University of Minnesota, other sponsors include the Crookston Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Minnesota Prairie Chicken Society, Truax Company, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Nature Conservancy.


Contact: Dan Svedarsky, professor, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M Crookston Continues Trend Surpassing Enrollment Records

Total number of degree-seeking students at 1,813 for fall semester

UofMCrookston-M+wrdmk-mid.pngBased on official data, enrollment at the University of Minnesota Crookston for fall semester 2013 has, again, surpassed previous record levels.  Official, confirmed data reports place enrollment at 1,813 degree-seeking undergraduates--the highest enrollment in the history of the campus.  That number exceeds fall 2012's all-time record of 1,802 and continues a seven-year growth trend.

The official enrollment number includes all full- and part-time degree-seeking undergraduate students--those attending courses on campus as well as those pursuing their degrees entirely online.
  Over the past several years, a major contributing factor to UMC's enrollment growth has been the increase in "online only" students, a designation which means all of their courses are taken online.  The U of M Crookston currently offers eleven of its twenty-eight degree programs entirely online as well as on-campus. This year more than 800 students are considered online only students, up from about 700 last fall.

This fall the number of students attending classes "on site" on the Crookston campus has dipped to just under 1,000, down roughly 100 students from last year's all-time high. Fred Wood, chancellor for the U of M Crookston, views this as a natural fluctuation involving variables such as UMC's large graduating class of 2013, a slight dip in the number of international students, the improving economy, and overall declining trends in the number of recent high school graduates in the Upper Midwest.  He says, "Our on-campus enrollment is still healthy, if somewhat down, and we have plans to grow that number."

"We are committed to offering an excellent on-campus experience for residential and commuter students," Wood states.
  "Our traditional college students, who are typically 18 to 22 years old, along with many of our older students want to interact face-to-face with faculty, staff, and other students. That said, we also have an important obligation to serve a growing segment of students, the vast majority of whom are in their 30s and 40s and choose to pursue their studies online due to career, family, or living situation. I see this obligation as an extension of our long-held commitment to access that truly supports our mission as a modern, land-grant university.  As technology changes, we will likely continue to see increased interest in our online programs, and we're very pleased to be able to offer a top quality online education to meet those needs."

Barbara Keinath, vice chancellor for academic affairs adds, "By offering some of our programs online, UMC makes it possible for online students to earn a valuable University of Minnesota degree, continue to work, and manage their family obligations."

Chancellor Wood says the campus has plans to grow enrollment strategically, both online and on-campus.  A recent planning retreat of campus leaders resulted in three major priorities:  1) growing both on-campus and online enrollment; 2) retaining and graduating more students, with a strong focus on enhancing student advising and support; and 3) examining the breadth of academic majors and program offerings.
 According to Keinath, new program options will be assessed according to how well they help achieve the UMC mission, address student interest, complement and build on strengths of the faculty and staff, and meet employment needs. She adds, "Any new programs, like our current programs, will have to demonstrate that they are worthy of carrying the University of Minnesota name."

"Our aspirations for growth are a continuation of our evolution," says Wood. "As we evolve, we must strive for quality and excellence in everything we do.
  We also must keep an eye on costs for our students and their families and focus on assessment as, increasingly, the public wants real value returned on their educational investments. Finally, placement--in jobs or graduate and professional school--must also remain a priority."

"The University of Minnesota Crookston has shown an amazing resilience and the ability to change," he concludes. "We have evolved to stay current and to find our place in the marketplace. Just as this has been so critical in the past, it will continue to be so in the future. We need to maintain our experimental spirit with technology as well as our innovative approach to our academic programs."

The University of Minnesota, Crookston now delivers 28 undergraduate degree programs--eleven of which are also available entirely online--and welcomes students from more than 20 countries and 40 states.
 To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Andrew Svec, director of communications, public relations, and marketing, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director of communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Chuck Runyon, CEO and co-founder of Anytime Fitness will speak at the University of 
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Minnesota Crookston on Tuesday, October 22, 2014. The event, which takes place in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center at noon, is free and the public is invited. The first 300 people in attendance will receive a complimentary copy of Chuck Runyon's book, Working Out Sucks! (And why it doesn't have to).Runyon will be available following the presentation to sign copies of his book. 

The event is part of the speaker series sponsored by the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES), based on the Crookston campus. For information on Runyon's visit, contact Rachel Lundbohm, director of CRES at 218-281-8190 or call the CRES office at 218-281-8595. 

Runyon will focus on the four phases of being an entrepreneur, Level 5 leadership, and Return on Emotional Investment (ROEI). Anytime Fitness is the fastest-growing fitness club franchise in the world. In just 11 years, the Minnesota-based chain has grown to more than 2,000 clubs in all 50 U.S. states and 14 countries and serves more than 1.5 million members. 

About Runyon
With more than 20 years experience managing, consulting, and owning health clubs, Chuck Runyon has distinguished himself as a leading authority in the field of fitness. He revolutionized the fitness industry when he and Dave Mortensen co-founded Anytime Fitness. 

Runyon and Mortensen designed smaller, neighborhood clubs with features members wanted most: convenience, affordability, quality equipment and a friendly, non-intimidating atmosphere. From the initiation of Anytime Fitness, Runyon has been involved in virtually every facet of the business -- including strategic planning, operations, training, franchise development, and marketing. 

For his "unprecedented and unique contributions to the fitness industry," Runyon was honored as the John McCarthy Industry Visionary of the Year (2009) by the International Health, Racquet, and Sportsclub Association (IHRSA). Runyon currently serves on the board of directors for IHRSA.

In January 2012, Runyon challenged the national discourse on obesity with a bold new message conveyed in the title of his first book Working Out Sucks! His "get real" approach to getting healthy struck a nerve with his industry peers and the public at large. Recognized as an expert on eliminating the barriers to healthy lifestyles, Runyon is frequently asked to speak or comment on issues related to why people claim that their health is a top priority, while typically spending less than 1% of their time exercising. 

About CRES
The mission of the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies (CRES) is to encourage entrepreneurship through educational leadership, applied research, and insightful consulting.  The CRES engages the students, faculty, and research facilities of the University of Minnesota in Crookston in order to stimulate the entrepreneurial culture and strengthen the economic vitality of northwest Minnesota.

The CRES is housed in Dowell Hall 117. For information, call 218-281-8595 (cres@tc.umn.edu), or visitwww.umccres.org.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Rachel Lundbohm, director, CRES, 218-281-8190 (rlundboh@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M Crookston Crowns 2013 Homecoming Royalty

On Wednesday, October 2, 2013, the University of Minnesota Crookston crowned 
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homecoming royalty in an evening that celebrated the 20-year anniversary of four-year degrees. Crowned homecoming queen was Kayla Bellrichard, a junior double majoring in management and marketing from Elk River, Minn. The homecoming king honors went to Brant Moore, a senior majoring in management from St. Paul, Minn.

Attendants included Ashley Hoffman, a senior doule majoring in ag business and agronomy from Debs, Minn., Katelyn Johnson, a senior majoring in animal science pre-vet from Monticello, Minn., Ashley Manusos, a junior majoring in sport and recreation management from McHenry, Ill., and Haley Weleski, a senior majoring in communication from Lancaster, Minn. Joining them were Ben Genereux, a senior majoring 
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in agronomy with a minor in ag business from Crookston, Minn., Justin Goodroad, a junior majoring in agricultural education from Lindstrom, Minn., Jesse Jennings, a senior majoring in criminal justice from Robbinsdale, Minn., and Tyler Lowthian, a junior majoring in management from Richfield, Minn.

In the photo at top right are (left to right, in the bottom row) are Ashley Manusos, Ashley Hoffman, and Haley Weleski. Middle row: Jesse Jennings, Katelyn Johnson, Ben Genereux, Queen Kayla Bellrichard and King Brant Moore. In the back are Tyler Lowthian and Justin Goodroad.

In the photo, left, are Homecoming Queen Kayla Bellrichard and Homecoming King Brant Moore. 


Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director of Student Activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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