December 2013 Archives

UM Crookston Students Attend CFFA National ATA And FFA Convention 2013

Eleven students from the University of Minnesota Crookston Collegiate FFA (UMC CFFA) 

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attended the National Alpha Tau Alpha (ATA) Conclave and the National FFA Convention in late October and early November 2013.  The conferences were held in Louisville, Kentucky.  In additional to attending the conventions, most students also competed in various competitions.  

The A.W. Nolan Memorial Leadership Award was awarded to the UMC CFFA at the Awards Banquet held on November 1.  The U of M Crookston was one of five colleges who received the "platinum" level, which is the highest level that can be achieved.  The award also came with a $100 dollar honorarium presented to the UMC CFFA.  UMC CFFA members competing in a wide variety of competitions plus student authorship of magazine or journal articles were key factors in receiving this award.  Senior Addie O'Neil, an agricultural education major from Redwood Falls, Minn., authored several articles for the Horse Digest during this past year.

Rebekah Landmark, a sophomore double majoring in animal science and agronomy from Montevideo, Minn., brought home a second place plaque in the ATA Essay contest.  Her award also included a $50 dollar honorarium.  This is only the second time that UMC has placed in the Essay competition.  Her essay topic was "With the changes in traditional agriculture and the innovative technologies of the present and future, describe the potential of SAE in school-based Agricultural Education. Use current agricultural research to support your position."

A Program of Excellence presentation was given to the entire body of ATA participants by CFFA President Amy Lee, a senior majoring in agricultural education from Mercer, N.D., and O'Neil.  They discussed the highlights of the 2012-2013 year for the U of M Crookston Collegiate FFA chapter.  Areas of professional development, fundraising, community service, and fellowship were the focal points.

Debate team members included Emil Waskow, a junior majoring in agricultural systems management from Hugo, Minn., and Landmark.   They debated "Should the FDA begin recognition of the difference between GMO and non-GMO foods and require labels to inform the consumer."

The Quiz Bowl team was made up of Lee, O'Neil, Senior Kayla Erickson, a double major in agricultural business and agricultural education from Scandia, Minn., and Justin Goodroad, a senior double majoring in agricultural business and agricultural education from Lindstrom, Minn.  Questions came from three areas including technical agriculture: plant science, professional education, and agricultural education organizations: National Young Farmer Educational Association and the National Association of Agricultural Educators

Other CFFA members attending the conferences, working the UMC booth, but not competing in contests included Aaron Bengtson, a freshman animal science major from Battle Lake, Minn., Marissa Roden, a freshman animal science major from Battle Lake, Minn., Betsy Johannsen, a sophomore animal science and natural resources double major from Hartland, Minn., Tiffany Muellner, a junior majoring in natural resources from Sauk Centre, Minn., and Ellen Dauphinais, a sophomore animal science major from Parkers Prairie, Minn.

Background

The U of M, Crookston is home to the only Collegiate FFA chapter in the state of Minnesota and Professor Lyle Westrom serves as the group's advisor. The Collegiate FFA is part of the National FFA Organization, which also held its 2013 National Convention concurrently with the ATA Conclave in Louisville, Kentucky. A new record of over 62,998 FFA members attended the National FFA Convention. 

The A.W. Nolan Memorial Leadership award, named in the memory of Aretas W. Nolan, former professor and head of agricultural education at the University of Illinois, recognizes agricultural education organizations for their pursuit of leadership, ensures professionalism, and improves communication between collegiate agricultural organizations. Nolan and his students conceptualized and started Alpha Tau Alpha (ATA), the National Professional Honorary Agricultural Education Fraternity, in 1921.

About National FFA Organization
The National FFA Organization is a national youth organization of 579,678 student members as part of 7,570 local FFA chapters in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. The National FFA Organization operates under a federal charter granted by the 81st United States Congress and it is an integral part of public instruction in agriculture. The U.S. Department of Education provides leadership and helps set direction for FFA as a service to state and local agricultural education programs. For more, visit the National FFA Organization online at www.FFA.org, on Facebook, Twitter and the official National FFA Organization blog.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photo: front row, left to right, are Emil Waskow, Tiffany Muellner, Betsy Johannsen, Kayla Erickson, Addie O'Neil, Amy Lee, and Marissa Roden. Back row:  Ellen Dauphinais, Lyle Westrom, Justin Goodroad, Rebekah Landmark, and Aaron Bengtson

Contact: Lyle Westrom, professor, Agricultural and Natural Resources, 218-281-8110 (lwestrom@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communication, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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The public is invited to an area-wide Martin Luther King, Jr., celebration taking place in Grand Forks, N.D., on Monday, January 20, 2014, and is the result of a collaboration between the University of North Dakota and the University of Minnesota Crookston. The Red River Valley Celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is designed around the theme: "The Faces of Civil Rights: It isn't just a Black Thing." 
 
The day's events will kick off at 11 a.m. with a Unity Walk beginning at Central High School in Grand Forks. At 11:30, a celebration program will be held at the Empire Arts Center located at  415 Demers Ave, Grand Forks, N.D. Featured in the program will be the Northstar Council, Red River High School Building Bridges, Central High School art display, Spoken Word, the Diversity Award presentation, the UM Crookston Choir and UM Crookston Black Student Association. UM Crookston Chancellor Fred wood will be speaking. Following the program there will be a social.

At 1:30 p.m., the UND Student Senate and North Dakota Student Association service project at the Empire Arts Center. Students, faculty, and staff from the UM Crookston will be engaged in a service project at 2:30 p.m. at the North Country Food Bank in Crookston. 

Background

This event is an opportunity for everyone to honor legacy of Dr. King. As the spokesperson for the nonviolent civil rights movement, King worked tirelessly. He was assassinated in 1968, and a day commemorating his legacy is held the third Monday of January each year. The observance was first held in January 1986, after being signed into law by President Ronald Reagan in 1983, but it wasn't until 2006 that the holiday became official in all 50 states.
 
Sponsors for the event include Marcos Pizza; Caribou Coffee; Pizza Ranch; Olive Garden; Ground Round; Sam's Club, US Foods, O' for Heaven's Cakes N' More, Super-One Foods; Deeks Pizza, Maurices; Bonzers, and Buffalo Wild Wings, all of Grand Forks; Jimmy John's of North Dakota; Community Foundation of Grand Forks, East Grand Forks and Region; UND Dining Services; UND Multicultural Services; and UMC Diversity and Multicultural Services. 

Evening Event

Later in the evening, the U of M Crookston is hosting Pulitzer Prize winning author and historian Taylor Branch in the Kiehle Auditorium at the University of Minnesota Crookston at 7 p.m. The event is free and all are welcome. This activity is funded, in part, by a grant from the Northwest Minnesota Arts Council and the Minnesota arts and cultural heritage fund appropriated by the Minnesota Legislature with money from the vote of the people of Minnesota on November 4, 2008. Other sponsors include the Northwest Minnesota Foundation, the Lake Agassiz Regional Library, Crookston High School, and Academic Affairs, Campus Ministry, Concerts & Lectures, Honors Program, and Career and Counseling at the U of M Crookston. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lorna Hollowell, director, Diversity and Multicultural Services, 218-281-8580 (lhollowe@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Pulitzer Prize winning author and historian Taylor Branch will present "Civil Rights Then and 
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Now: Reflections on the King Years" in the Kiehle Auditorium at the University of Minnesota Crookston on Monday, January 20, 2014, at 7 p.m. The event is free and all are welcome.  A book signing will be held in Kiehle 124 following the presentation and books by Branch will be available for purchase on site. Branch also will speak on Tuesday, January 21 at 10 a.m. at the Lake Agassiz Regional Library in Crookston as part of his visit.

About Taylor Branch

Taylor Branch is an American author and public speaker best known for his landmark narrative history of the civil rights era, America in the King Years. The trilogy's first book, Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63, won the Pulitzer Prize and numerous other awards in 1989. Two successive volumes also gained critical and popular success: Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963-65, and At Canaan's Edge: America in the King Years, 1965-1968. Decades later, all three books remain in demand. 

In the October 2011 issue of The Atlantic, Branch published an influential cover story entitled "The Shame of College Sports," which author and NPR commentator Frank Deford said "may well be the most important article ever written about college sports."  The article touched off continuing national debate.  

Aside from writing, Branch speaks before a variety of audiences--colleges, high schools, churches, synagogues, mosques, political and professional groups. He has discussed doctrines of nonviolence with prisoners at San Quentin as well as officers at the National War College. He has presented seminars on civil rights at Oxford University and in sixth-grade classrooms. His 2008 address at the National Cathedral marked the 40th anniversary of Dr. King's last Sunday sermon from that pulpit. In 2009, he gave the Theodore H. White Lecture on the Press and Politics at Harvard. 

Branch began his career in 1970 as a staff journalist for The Washington Monthly, Harper's, and Esquire. He holds honorary doctoral degrees from ten colleges and universities. Other citations include the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008 and the National Humanities Medal in 1999. More information is available at taylorbranch.com. 

Recent Work

In Branch's latest book, The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement (Simon & Schuster), Branch has identified eighteen essential moments from the Civil Rights Movement, and providing selections from his trilogy, has placed each moment in historical context with a newly written introduction.  The captivating result is a slender but comprehensive view of America in the turbulent, transformative 1960s, by our nation's foremost authoritative voice on the subject.

Background

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This activity is funded, in part, by a grant from the Northwest Minnesota Arts Council and the Minnesota arts and cultural heritage fund appropriated by the Minnesota Legislature with money from the vote of the people of Minnesota on November 4, 2008. Other sponsors include the Northwest Minnesota Foundation, the Lake Agassiz Regional Library, Crookston High School, and Academic Affairs, Campus Ministry, Concerts & Lectures, Honors Program, and Career and Counseling at the U of M Crookston. 

Earlier in the day activities in memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., designed around the theme "Faces of Civil Rights: It isnt' just a Black Thing" will be taking place. The day marks a Red River Valley Celebration of Dr. King with events at the University of North Dakota and the University of Minnesota Crookston throughout the day. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Kenneth Mendez, office support assistant, Post Office, 218-281-8329 (mende089@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A campus legacy continues with hosting of the 39th annual Ag Arama at the University of 
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Minnesota Crookston. The weekend of events, scheduled for Friday and Saturday, January 24-25, 2014, is hosted by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and includes activities for the entire family. The theme for this year's event is "Down on the Farm." 

Dedication of Ag Arama

Ag Arama 2014 is dedicated to long time faculty member and alumna Susan Jacobson '87 and '96 (In photo below at right). She first graduated with her associate degree in floriculture/greenhouse management and later earned her bachelor of science degree in plant industries management both from the University of Minnesota Crookston. She has worked at the U of M Crookston for
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 the past twenty years and has enjoyed teaching the very classes that stimulated her own interests as a student. 

Jacobson is heavily involved in the community she lives in and is part of many professional affiliations including the Minnesota Nursery Landscaping Association. Jacobson was recognized with the Outstanding Alumni Award during homecoming last fall.

Ag Arama Activities

Most of the Ag Arama activities take place on Saturday, Jan. 25, in the University Teaching and Outreach Center (UTOC) located on the north edge of the campus.  

Contests in agronomy, animal science, horticulture, agricultural business, and natural resources highlight Ag Arama weekend. They serve as an opportunity for students to showcase their knowledge and skills and have a chance to interact with alumni and faculty members. Ag Arama is planned and operated by a committee of students advised by Terrill Bradford and Brenda Miller, who both teach in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department.

On Friday evening, the Animal Science Association sponsors a chili feed from 5 to 8 p.m. in UTOC for $5 per person. 

On Saturday morning from 8:30 a.m. until 1 p.m., the animal showmanship contests begin and the public is welcome to watch the competition as it unfolds in both novice and experienced categories. Students compete in western and English horse showmanship, lamb lead, and dairy, beef, sheep, and swine showing.  The novices are paired with experienced students prior to the contests to prepare for the day. Alumni showmanship will take place at 2 p.m.

From 9 a.m. to noon, an agricultural industries show features some of the latest in agricultural equipment. At 1:30 p.m., the Round Robin Showmanship will begin. Coronation of the Ag Arama royalty takes place at 2:30 p.m. followed by the presentation of specialty awards and the sweepstakes presentation. Emcees for this year's Ag Arama are alumni Matt Green '13 and Matthew Krueger '12.

In the evening, a social will be held at the Crookston American Legion from 5:30 to 7 p.m., with appetizers served from 6 to 7 p.m. Capping off the weekend will be dancing to "Eagle Creek" from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Legion. Admission is $10. 

Ag Arama Royalty candidates

For Ag Arama King the candidates are Donovan Rupprecht, a junior from Fertile, Minn., majoring in animal science; Dustin Smith, a senior from Browerville, Minn., double majoring in agricultural business and agronomy; Timothy Staudahar, a senior from Hibbing, Minn., majoring in horticulture; Sam Haugen, a junior from Fertile, Minn., majoring in agronomy; and Kevin Bunde, a junior from Parkers Prairie, Minn., majoring in agricultural systems management. 

Queen candidates include Rochelle Herzog, a junior from Randall, Minn., majoring in animal science; Sarah Morris, a senior from Ramsey, Minn., majoring in animal science; Emily Krull, a senior from Two Harbors, Minn., majoring in equine science; Chelsey Hettver, a senior from Brainerd, Minn., majoring in animal science; and Katie Nenn, a senior from Wyoming, Minn., majoring in animal science.

Candidates for Ag Arama Prince are Luke Lundeby, a sophomore from Osnabrock, N.D., majoring in agricultural systems management; Keith Yorek, a freshman from Little Falls, Minn., majoring in animal science; John DeBuhr, a sophomore from Chokio, Minn., majoring in aviation; Aaron Bengtson, a freshman from Battle Lake, Minn., majoring in agronomy; and Karson Dahl, a sophomore from Drayton, N.D., majoring in agronomy.

Princess candidates include Amberly Pesall, a sophomore from New Brighton, Minn., double majoring in agricultural business and equine science; Caitlin Wirth, a junior from Frazee, Minn., majoring in animal science; Kaylin Beatty, a sophomore from Andover, Minn., majoring in equine science; Rebekah Landmark, a freshman from Montevideo, Minn., double majoring in animal science and agronomy;  and Marilyn Lewis,a freshman from Bemidji, Minn., majoring in animal science.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Terrill Bradford, instructor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8108 (tbradfor@umn.edu); Brenda Miller, lecturer, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8140 (mill3707@umn.edu)

Students from more than 50 high schools, chapters and clubs were on campus Friday, December 6, 2013, to compete in more than 20 agriculture and natural resources related contests. The annual Agriculture and Natural Resources Day competition has been held for more than 30 years on the Crookston campus. 

With contests ranging from horticulture and forestry to ag mechanics, livestock and sales, the day brings out the competitive spirit of students culminating in an awards ceremony. The contests are overseen by U of M Crookston Agriculture and Natural Resources Department faculty.  The awards ceremony recognizes the top individuals and teams. 

Results of the day's competition are posted at www3.crk.umn.edu/ag/AAD/results.htm and all photographs of individuals and teams are available at www3.crk.umn.edu/photogallery/agnatrday/2013/index.html by selecting the photo and right clicking it to download.

Scholarships and plaques are awarded to school teams and individuals for each contest. Last year, $750 UMC scholarships were awarded for the high individual in each contest, $600 UMC scholarships were awarded for the second place individual, and $450 UMC scholarships were awarded for the third place individual. In all, more than $32,000 in scholarships is awarded during the competition. 

More information regarding Agriculture and Natural Resources Activities Day is available by contacting Leah Stroot at 218-281-8101 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/agnatrday

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Leah Stroot, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8101 (stro0525@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

They are looking for ideas from you. The University of Minnesota's Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership (NW RSDP) seeks innovative ideas in two areas: Those with the potential to improve food access and availability, and/or strengthen community food systems or that connect people and nature or sustains natural resources on working lands in Northwest Minnesota. Seed funding is available to support projects that leverage active citizenship and create a robust partnership with the University. 

The Idea Brief is the first step; selected projects will be asked to submit a proposal.  The briefs for each of the two areas are due January 23, 2014, and will be reviewed by work groups in February. Recommendations will be forwarded to the NW RSDP board for its March meeting. 

Learn more about the work in Natural Resources, Sustainable Agriculture and Local Food Systems along with information about each of the focus areas at http://blog.lib.umn.edu/rsdp/northwest.  

Contact Linda Kingery for more information at 218-281-8697 (kinge0002@umn.edu).

Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships facilitate the social, environmental, and economic sustainability of their region by encouraging citizen-driven ideas through coordinating and leveraging the resources of the University of Minnesota and other partners.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Linda Kingery, executive director, U of M Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, 218-281-8697 (kinge002@umn.edu)

Michael Angelo Caruso, international author, consultant, and speaker on Campus

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Michael Angelo Caruso, an international author, consultant, and speaker on the subjects of leadership, communication, and marketing, presented at the University of Minnesota Crookston on Monday, December 9, 2013. His topic was "Everything Is a Presentation" when he addressed an audience in the Kiehle Auditorium. The following day, he spoke to several classes on the same topics. 

About the presentation:  Every day we present ourselves to the world. Your simple actions (how you interact, shake hands, greet others, dress, etc.) are continually evaluated by others and influence their decisions about you. Don't miss out on opportunities for success by sending the wrong messages.  During this high-energy presentation, you'll learn simple techniques to create and manage your professional image in the workplace.  

Caruso's visit was sponsored by the Career Development and Counseling Department and the communication program in the Liberal Arts and Education Department

Learn more at www.michaelangelocaruso.com

In the photo, left to right, is Caruso with Don Cavalier, director of the Career Development and Counseling Department. 

Contact: Don Cavalier, director, Career Development and Counseling Department, 218-281-8585 (cavalier@umn.edu)

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The presentation, Civil Rights Then and Now: Reflections on the King Years, is free and all are welcome. Several unique opportunities are developing around his visit including a booksigning and a visit by Branch on Tuesday, January 21, to speak at the Lake Agassiz Regional Library in Crookston at 10 a.m.

Taylor Branch is an American author and public speaker best known for his landmark trilogy on the civil rights era, America in the King Years. He has returned to civil rights history in his latest book, The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement(2013).  More: http://taylorbranch.com.

The visit by Branch is part of a day of activities in memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., designed around the theme "Faces of Civil Rights: It isnt' just a Black Thing." The day marks a Red River Valley Celebration of Dr. King with events at the University of North Dakota and the University of Minnesota Crookston throughout the day. 

This activity is funded, in part, by a grant from the Northwest Minnesota Arts Council and the Minnesota arts and cultural heritage fund appropriated by the Minnesota Legislature with money from the vote of the people of Minnesota on November 4, 2008. Other sponsors include the Northwest Minnesota Foundation, the Lake Agassiz Regional Library, Crookston High School, and Academic Affairs, Campus Ministry, Concerts & Lectures, Honors Program, and Career and Counseling at the U of M Crookston. 

Representatives from some of the groups sponsoring the event in recognition of Martin Luther King, Jr., 
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gathered recently for a photo.

In the group photo, left to right, are Laurie Wilson from Career and Counseling Services; Trey Everett from Campus Ministry; Lorna Hollowell, director of Diversity and Multicultural Programs; Barbara Keinath, vice chancellor for Academic Affairs; Dawn Ganje, program officer for the Northwest Minnesota Foundation; Chris Boike, Crookston hub supervisor, for the Lake Agassiz Regional Library; Lisa Loegering, assistant director of Community Engagement; Ken Mendez from Student Support Services; Associate Professor Brian Dingmann, advisor of the Honors Program; and Chancellor Fred Wood.


Contact: Kenneth Mendez, office support assistant, Post Office, 218-281-8329 (mende089@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The national crops judging contests have a long and celebrated history. The University of 
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Minnesota Crookston Collegiate Crops Teams have been a part of that history since 1967, and this year, the team from the Crookston campus placed third in both national competitions held in November in Kansas City, Mo., and Chicago, Ill. The 2013 three-member team included Amanda Crook, a senior from Brandon, Manitoba, Canada, double majoring in agronomy and agricultural business; Betsy Thoreson, a senior from Climax, Minn., majoring in agronomy; and Rachel Elshaug, a junior from Grand Forks, N.D., majoring in agronomy.  

The team was coached by agronomy lecturer Rob Proulx, who also serves as advisor to both the Agronomy Club and Delta Theta Sigma. 

In the Kansas City Crops Contest held November 19, Crook finished third in seed analysis, and seventh in both grain grading and identification for a seventh place finish overall. Elshaug finished eighth in seed analysis, ninth in grain grading, and tenth in identification for a ninth place finish overall. Thoreson finished tenth in seed analysis, and eleventh in grain grading and identification for a tenth place overall finish. 

In the Chicago Crops Contest held November 23, Crook finished fourth in seed analysis, seventh in identification, and twelfth grain grading for a sixth place finish overall. Elshaug finished sixth in grain grading, ninth in seed analysis, and tenth in identification for an eighth place finish overall. Thoreson finished tenth in grain grading, eleventh in seed analysis, and thirteenth in identification for a thirteenth place finish overall. 

Crook earned an All-American award from the American Society of Agronomy, which is awarded for scores of 570 (95%) or better, for her seed analysis scores in both Kansas City and Chicago. 

Both third place finishes by the team came behind Kansas State University who finished first, and University of Wisconsin Platteville who finished in second, and ahead of fourth place finisher Virginia Tech. Rounding out the top six were Oklahoma State University and South Dakota State University. 

Background
The crops contests integrate a student's knowledge of agronomy into three categories: seed analysis, grain grading and crop and weed identification. The Kansas City and Chicago contests represent the national finals of collegiate crops competition for the year. Preparation for crops contests teaches evaluation of crops for quality relative to certification, viability, and marketing. 

The first Collegiate Crops Contest was held in 1923 and in Kansas City in 1929. Collectively in the 89 years of competition, 163 crops contests have taken place. Teams from the U of M Crookston have competed in the crops contests for 45 years. They have finished in the top four more than 30 times and four times when the team fell out of the top four, the teams consisted of only two members rather than the usual three-member team. Both times those teams placed sixth overall. To learn more about the contests, visit www.crops.org/students/contests. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photo, left to right, are Amanda Crook, Rob Proulx (coach), Betsy Thoreson, Rachel Elshaug.

Contact: Rob Proulx, instructor, agronomy, 218-281-8136 (prou0041@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

For UM Crookston Student Jessi Kappes, Ada, Minn., It's the Choreography

Jessi Kappes, Ada, Minn., is all about the dance in the latest theatrical production at the 
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University of Minnesota Crookston. Kappes, a post secondary enrollment option student, has been dancing since she was three years old. Her experience led her to an opportunity to choreograph the most recent performance of Church Basement Ladies this weekend on the campus. 

Wherever her family lived, her parents, Tod and Dawn Kappes, enrolled her in lessons at a nearby dance studio. Her father served in the U.S. Navy, and the family moved around the country, as well as Japan, until settling in Ada, Minn., her father's hometown. 

She is currently enjoying ballroom dance, but she loves all kinds: jazz, hop-hop, tap and ballet. She helped choreograph last year's performance of The Little Mermaid in the Ada High School. Now the high school senior is working with the cast of Church Basement Ladies, along with accompanist Associate Professor George French, on different styles of dance for each of the play's four major numbers. 

Kappes is enjoying her role as choreographer. "I like both dancing and directing the choreography," she says. "I have gained a deeper appreciation for all the work that goes into choreography and those who come up with the dance steps. Church Basement Ladies has a lot of variety and the choreography takes much longer than one might expect."

Her favorite song in the performance is the first one she choreographed called "Closer to Heaven." She says a heavy credit load prevented her from taking a speaking part in the play itself, so spending her time on the dancing helped fulfill a theater credit and allowed her to try her hand at creating the choreography. "I would love to do this again if I have the chance," Kappes says. 

The performance of Church Basement Ladies is scheduled for Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, December 13, 14, 15, 2013, in Kiehle Auditorium at the U of M Crookston. On Friday and Saturday evenings the performance is at 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children 10 and under with a $15 maximum for families.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: George French, associate professor, Music and Theater, 218-218-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Pulitzer Prize winning author and historian Taylor Branch will speak in the Kiehle Auditorium
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 at the University of Minnesota Crookston on Monday, January 20, 2014, at 7 p.m. The event is free and all are welcome. 

Taylor Branch is an American author and public speaker best known for his landmark trilogy on the civil rights era, America in the King Years. He his returned to civil rights history in his latest book, The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement(2013). More: http://taylorbranch.com/. 

This activity is funded, in part, by a grant from the Northwest Minnesota Arts Council and the Minnesota arts and cultural heritage fund appropriated by the Minnesota Legislature with money from the vote of the people of Minnesota on November 4, 2008. Other sponsors include the Northwest Minnesota Foundation, the Lake Agassiz Regional Library, Crookston High School, and Academic Affairs, Campus Ministry, Concerts & Lectures, Honors Program, and Career and Counseling at the U of M Crookston. 

Full release to follow. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Kenneth Mendez, office support assistant, Post Office, 218-281-8329 (mende089@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Hundreds of rooted poinsettia cuttings arrive in August at the University of Minnesota 
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Crookston in anticipation of another holiday season. Under the skill and coaxing of students involved in the commercial floriculture class, those cuttings develop into a beautiful poinsettia crop.

This year's poinsettias create a beautiful and colorful display with their showy "flowers" known as bracts and include varieties such as Candlelight White, Christmas Beauty Nostalgia, Christmas Feelings Red, Christmas Feelings White, Cinnamon Star, Classic Red, Enduring Marble, Enduring Pink, Prestige Red, Cortez Early Red, Dramatic Red and Prestige Red. 

Members of the fall semester class include: Amanda Thompson, a senior majoring in horticulture from Pine River, Minn.; Ashley Radke, a junior majoring in horticulture from Grand Forks, ND; and Stephanie Reko, a junior majoring in horticulture from Andover, Minn.  

In October, students started the process of forcing the plants to induce bract color in time for the holiday season in October. Following a specific procedure to control the light, the students covered the plants with a dark cloth at 4 p.m. and uncovered them at 8 a.m. each day to regulate the length of daylight the plants receive. The students are responsible for greenhouse chores on the weekends as well. Although the class is taught by Sue Jacobson, the crop is in the hands of the students. The work and production of the poinsettia crop is entirely the responsibility of the class.  Jacobson says, "It's better to learn expensive lessons in school than at your job.  We don't fire the students."

The Agriculture and Natural Resources Department offers commercial floriculture as part of the horticulture program to teach students to produce quality plants for a specific date - a skill necessary for employment in a greenhouse or garden center. "Poinsettias form their colored bracts, when the light is regulated," explains Jacobson. "The poinsettia really doesn't have a blossom like most flowers. Instead, the colorful red, pink, or white petals are modified leaves known as bracts. The blossoms are actually the small yellowish clusters in the center."

Jacobson often allows problems to develop to see how the students will solve them--something they would have to do in an employment situation and giving them an opportunity to apply what they have learned. The class demands hard work, dedication, and a strong team effort to grow the best poinsettias. Leadership and responsibility are two of the qualities that develop in this type of teaching and learning environment.

"Students learn so much from applying their classroom learning to real-world experience," Jacobson explains. "By taking responsibility for the crop, the students are accountable for the outcome making the commercial floriculture class one of the most memorable for the students." The class is excellent training for a career in horticulture, a multi-billion dollar industry in the U.S. 

To learn more about the horticulture program with emphases in environmental landscaping and production horticulture, visit www.UMCrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the group photo, left to right, are Amanda Thompson, Ashley Radke, Stephanie Reko and Sue Jacobson, instructor.

Contact: Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor, 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota Crookston saw a need for additional on-campus housing and 
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started design work on Heritage Hall in 2011. At that point Ken Johnson, Energy Management Representative for Otter Tail Power Company, offered the company's Commercial Design Assistance (CDA) program, which encourages increased efficiency in new commercial buildings. The CDA program provides incentives to eligible building owners and their design teams to exceed Minnesota's energy code requirements in the building design and construction process.

Otter Tail Power Company has issued a $21,599.97 CDA incentive payment to UMC. "This building exceeds Minnesota State Building Code by 13.9 percent in terms of annual energy consumption," said Johnson. "The building envelope, lighting, heating, and cooling systems changes we recommended for this project will pay for themselves in energy cost savings in less than three years. Electricity consumption savings are projected to exceed 327,000 kwh with demand savings of 76 kw."

"Otter Tail Power Company has been an excellent partner with the University of Minnesota Crookston, especially in the areas of energy conservation and sustainability," said Fred Wood, UMC Chancellor. "We greatly appreciate the assistance and incentives they provided through the Commercial Design Assistance Program while we were building our newest residence hall, Heritage Hall. Through that program we can look forward to projected energy savings of more than $11,000 per year. Because of programs like this it's clear Otter Tail Power Company is committed to a sustainable energy future."

Among the energy-efficiency strategies employed in Heritage Hall are increased insulation in walls and ceilings, energy-efficient lighting and controls, high-efficiency heat pumps for heating and cooling in each room, and high-efficiency heating and cooling for the common areas and classroom.

First occupied in January and completed in August, this 47,774-square-foot building has two wings of dorm rooms with a lounge area in the center on both floors, a housing manager apartment, and a classroom on the north end. Heritage Hall is capable of housing 144 students in 35 two-bedroom four-student rooms and 4 one-student staff rooms.
Ruann Deschene was the project manager for Community Contractors Inc. of Grand Forks, North Dakota; the general contractor for the Heritage Hall project. JB Electrical Design of Coon Rapids. Minnesota; was the electrical engineering firm; Obermiller Nelson Engineering (ONE) of Fargo was the mechanical engineering firm, along with Michael J. Burns Architects, Bemidji. Jay Denny and Scott McCord from the St. Paul campus of the University of Minnesota also provided input.

How Otter Tail Power Company's Commercial Design Assistance Program works

Otter Tail Power Company's free Commercial Design Assistance Program allows qualifying building owners, architectural and engineering firms, and developers to participate in an integrated design process to increase energy efficiency in new commercial buildings.

"We bring in a third-party consultant who reviews the building's design and offers computer modeling of how it will use energy. The consultant then presents various packages of efficiency options, the customer selects one, and we provide an incentive to the customer based on how much the building's efficiency exceeds state code," explained Johnson. "When construction is completed we verify that the building matches construction documents and reflects original design intentions."

CDA incentives help offset the cost of more efficient materials and equipment, and incorporating energy efficiency into building plans may help reduce equipment maintenance and replacement costs for additional long-term savings. The CDA Program also compensates design-team members for their time to explore energy-saving alternatives.

In the photo: The University of Minnesota Crookston received an Otter Tail Power Company's Commercial Design Assistance Program incentive for its new residence hall. Pictured, left to right, at the presentation of the $21,599.97 check representing Otter Tail Power Company are Crookston Area Manager Leon Kremeier and Energy Management Representative Ken Johnson; representing the University are Chancellor Fred Wood and Chief Development Officer Corby Kemmer. 

Contact: Andrew Svec, director of communications, marketing, and public relations, 218-281-8432 (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

When Beth Motley (in photo) talks about the latest theater performance at the University of Minnesota Crookston, it is easy to see she is comfortable in her role as student director. It is no wonder as the senior brings years of experience to her role. 

Motley, an equine science major and music minor from Vadnais Heights, Minn., was first involved in theater as 
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a freshman in high school where she says the theater program was well developed. She was part of the tech crew for plays in high school, and today, is leading the musical production of the Church Basement Ladies under the guidance of Associate Professor George French, who she says makes it fun. 

In the time she has been here, she has worked on seven theatrical productions including Dracula, the Musical?, Zombie Prom, Oklahoma, and the current production of Church Basement Ladies. Her preference is to direct musical productions. "I like musicals best because of the way the music makes the story memorable," Motley says. "The cast has a good time, and so does the audience." 

Since her first experience directing Dracula, she has steadily taken on more responsibility with each production. "It is very busy at first when you are reading scripts and selecting the cast," she continues. "Then, you have the props and set to consider. It is ready, set, wait at the beginning, but as the process moves along, I have to coordinate schedules which can be quite a challenge, and then all of sudden, it seems like there are a million last minute things that need to fall into place."

How many times has Motley been a cast member? Never. She says memorization is a stickler for her, but she loves to sing, and if she had to, she could dance. As far as the Church Basement Ladies goes, Motley saw the original production and loved it immediately. "The jokes are not hard to understand because there will be someone whose character you identify with," Motley says. "You will will relate to one of them and they will make you laugh even if you didn't grow up in a church in the era of the play."  

The performance of Church Basement Ladies is scheduled for Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, December 13, 14, 15, 2013, in Kiehle Auditorium at the U of M Crookston. On Friday and Saturday evenings the performance is at 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children 10 and under with a $15 maximum for families.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: George French, associate professor, Music and Theater, 218-218-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The musical production "Church Basement Ladies" is based on recipes, food, and change in 
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the church. It's funny, heartwarming, and down to earth and will bring back memories of people in churches everywhere. This student-directed theatrical production is scheduled in Kiehle Auditorium at the University of Minnesota Crookston on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, December 13, 14, 15, 2013. On Friday and Saturday evenings the performance is at 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children 10 and under with a $15 maximum for families.  

Church Basement Ladies is a musical written by Jim Stowell and Jessica Zuehlke with music and lyrics by Drew Jansen. The church basement kitchen throughout much of America is often the heart and soul of any church. In "Church Basement Ladies" we meet the pastor, three main kitchen cooks and one daughter, who run the kitchen and care for the congregation by preparing and serving the food. Like any great kitchen, problems are solved here as well. 

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Under the guidance of Associate Professor George French, Beth Motley, a senior from Vadnais Heights, Minn., majoring in equine science leads as the student director and choreographed by Jessica Kappes, a postsecondary enrollment option student from Ada, Minn. Cast members include Alissa Hernandez, a senior from double majoring in animal science and equine science in Savage , Minn.; Jessica Stone, a freshman from Cloquet, Minn., majoring in equine science; Cassie Hagg, a freshman from Pillager, Minn., majoring in health sciences; Cheyanne Bell,a freshman from Lakeville, Minn., majoring in sport and recreation management; and Alex Conwell, a post-secondary enrollment option student from Red Lake Falls, Minn. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Cassie Hagg, Alex Conwell, Cheyanne Bell, Jessica Stone, and Alissa Hernandez. 

Contact: George French, associate professor, Music and Theater, 218-218-8266 (gfrench@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

It is a night of remembrance and a time to show your appreciation for the U.S. Military. Demonstrate your support by wearing gold at this weekend's "Gold Out" during the men's and women's basketball games on Saturday, December 7, 2013, in Lysaker Gymnasium. The women's game begins at 4 p.m. followed by the men's game at 6 p.m. with both teams taking on teams from St. Cloud State University. The "Gold Out" is sponsored by the Sport and Recreation Management Association (SRMA) and the Crookston Student Association (CSA) at the University of Minnesota Crookston. 

The Military Appreciation night "Gold Out" is designed to show the men and women serving as well as those who have served that we appreciate what they do.  SRMA will be taking donations to help Operation Gratitude send care packages overseas. People who give a donation will be given raffle tickets to enter a drawing to win numerous prizes. Raffle ticket prices are $1 per ticket, 7 tickets for $5, and a wing span for $10. You must be present to win. 

Admission to the basketball games for an adult is $6 for the doubleheader or $5 for a single game; children in grades 1-12 are $3 for the doubleheader and $2 for a single game; children in kindergarten and younger are free.  

Ashley Manusos, vice president of SRMA encourages people to attend in support of the military, "Be a hero to the men and women who have risked their lives protecting our freedom."

The evening will also incorporate "Letters to Soldiers," allowing students, faculty, staff, and community members to show their gratitude in a letter for a soldier on deployment. Other competitions and activities will be a part of half time at each of the games. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Ashley Manusos, vice president, SRMA, manus003@crk.umn.edu; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8342 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Join us for the 2014 Local Foods College. The series of 8 sessions is designed for gardeners and farmers that are part of the growing community-based food system.  Sessions focus on production, food safety and marketing skills. 

The first session of the series will be held on the evening of Tuesday, January 21, 2013, and will continue on Tuesday evenings through mid-March. The series will be available via webinar at several locations throughout northern and central Minnesota, and may also be viewed at a home computer. Registration is FREE with print-your-own materials.  If you prefer to purchase printed materials, they are available, $30 for printed materials for the entire series mailed to you, and $25 for the Beginner Growers Manual. 

Session topics include: Soil Quality and Fertility; Specialty Products: Asparagus, Garlic, Wild Foods, Harvester Handbook;  Tree Fruit and Berries in High Tunnel; Post Harvest Handling and Storage, Peddling you Pickles Safely, Food safety for Famers Markets; Marketing Local Foods: and Commercial Kitchens for Processing Local Food.   

Participants will learn from practitioners, educators, and those involved in the growing movement to build resilient local foods systems. Participants will choose their level of participation and viewing location. 

The Local Foods College is part of a movement to strengthen local and regional food systems. The 2014 Local Foods College is supported by University of Minnesota Extension, the Statewide Health Improvement Program and North Country Community Transformation Grant.

For more detailed information and registration, visit: http://localfoods.umn.edu/college or call 888-241-0781. 

Contact: Linda Kingery, executive director, U of M Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, 218-281-8697 (kinge002@umn.edu)

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