Recently in aviation Category

Alex Viger, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Campbell, Minn., 
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majoring in agricultural aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Ali Jaffari, and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Alex Viger with Ali Jaffari. 

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Brian Lemay, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Roseville, Minn., 
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double major in natural resources law enforcement and law enforcement aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Ali Jaffari, and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, Brian Lemay with Ali Jaffari. 

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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Jake Traner (left), a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Scandia, Minn., majoring in natural resources aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Les Dillard (in photo with Traner at right), aviation lecturer and flight instructor at the U of M Crookston, and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. 

Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence 
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by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

University of Minnesota Crookston Senior Kole Pederson, Bejou, Minn., was recently 
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awarded a $5,000 Agricultural Aviation Scholarship, funded by an educational grant provided by BASF and administered by the National Agricultural Aviation Association (NAAA). Pederson, a quadruple major in aviation, agronomy, agricultural business, and agricultural systems management, will be presented the scholarship during the NAAA annual convention in Reno, Nev., to be held in early December. 

The purpose of the scholarship is to bring new pilots into agricultural aviation and help fund their training. The scholarship is to be used for flight training or ag-related coursework at a university, college, community college or other institution of higher learning. Applicants were required to submit a letter of recommendation, an essay explaining why they were deserving of an NAAA/BASF Agricultural Aviation Scholarship, and a one-page résumé or list of activities detailing all agricultural and aviation experiences, and education and training. To learn more, visit http://www.agaviation.org.

An active student, Pederson serves as vice president of Alpha Eta Rho; the Success Network Team Coordinator for the National Society of Leadership and Success; a Crookston Student Association representative, and an active member of the Ag Business Club; Alpha Lambda Delta; the Agronomy Club; and the Ag Industries Club. His advisor in the aviation program is Les Dillard, an aviation lecturer and flight instructor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department on the Crookston campus. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Stephanie Lane, a sophomore at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Holly Springs, 
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N.C., majoring in natural resource aviation recently completed her first student solo flight. Her flight instructor is Brandon Curry and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Brock Wood, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston from  
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Alexandria, Minn., majoring in agricultural aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. Flight instructor was Brandon Curry and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. (In the photo are Curry, left, and Wood.)

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology. With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree. "Small Campus. Big Degree." To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual Student Awards Program, a celebration of student service, leadership, and academic and athletic achievement, was held recently at the University of Minnesota Crookston. Assistant Professor Denis Maier, who teaches in the Business Department, was the 2012 Outstanding Educator and hosted this year's recognition.


Award recipients include the following students:

CSA Student Senators and Officers
Brooke Novak; Ross Sigler; Bryce Gillie; Aaron Soltau, Heather Rodriguez; Mariah Gautsche; Emily Goff; Molly Sheehan; Anthonette Sims; and Gyaltso Gurung, Laura Gabrielson; Ashlynn Hartung; Alexmai Addo; Adam Switzer; Kayla Bellrichard; and Shaolei "Sorry" Jin. 


Outstanding Ambassadors
Catlin Kersting, Tashi Gurung, Sam Zuck, Katie Hagen, Sarah Morris, Jordan Melbye
Tony Taylor, Kevin Lamp, Alex Skeeter, Alissa Hernandez, Jessica Girgen, Mikala Guidinger
Sorry Jin, Danny Lee, Bryce Gillie, Justin Goodroad

Ambassador of the Year Award
Bryce Gillie


Outstanding First-Year Biology Award
Ashley Martell


Outstanding Future Educator Award
Dabitna Chung, Amy Van Treeck

Marketing/ Management Academic Achievement Award
Dain Park and Alex Buscher


Marketing/Management Outstanding Leadership Award
Dain Park, Abbey Wemimo, Hannah Reysen, Kayla Bellrichard

Distinguished Service to the Accounting Program
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee

Outstanding SRM Student
Kari Bodine

Outstanding Communication Student
Jessica Stuber 

Outstanding Communication Minor
Connie Vandermay 


SOS Service Award
Alexmai Addo, Catilin Kersting

Outstanding SOS Leader
Almir Krdzalik

Peer Connection Service Award
Alexmai Addo and Brooke Novak

Peer Mentor of the Year Award
Catlin Kersting

Regal Spirit Award
Kayla Bellrichard, and Tyler Lowithan

Outstanding Turfgrass Student Award
Kyle Kreklow, Kurtis Wacker, Joey Schmidt, with Kristie Walker

Norman Pankratz Memorial Conservation Award
Jenny DuBay 

John Polley Soil and Water Conservation Award
Trent Brenny and Andrew Albertsen with Dan Svedarsky

The Wildlife Society Travel Award
Alisha Mosloff 

Outstanding Animal Science
Sara Scott (pre-vet) 

Outstanding Equine Science
Jess Charles (pre-vet)

Outstanding Ag Business Student
Amanda Crook 

Outstanding ASM Student
Leonard Will and Matt Green 

Outstanding Horticulture
Ashlynn Hartung


NACTA Recognition
Meats  Team: Dustin Wiese,  Katie Hagen, Justin Goodroad and Derek Suhonen 
Ag Business Dustin Smith, Katie Hagen, Matt Green, and Kayla Erickson
Ag Computers: Cedric Citrowske, Amanda Crook, Drew Underdahl and Brian Oachs 

Outstanding International Student Scholars Award
Ashley Yun Zhor; Brennan Andreas; Danny Lee; and Tashi Gurung

Learning Abroad Office Ambassador Awards
Tim Baker; Amanda Corneliussen; and DeAndra O'Connell 

Support of Diversity Award


Outstanding Theater Student Award
Liz Massie
Tyler Lowithan
Nathan Anderson

Outstanding Music Service Award
Rebecca Apitz 
Miah Smith 

Outstanding Writing Tutor
Rowenna Fillmore

Computer Help Desk
Melissa Freitag 

Student Employee of the Year
Adam Hoff 

Female and Male Student Athlete of the Year
Chelsea Wiesner and Almir Kradzlik

Female and Male Outstanding Athlete of the Year
Brittany Wiese and Brittany Looker and Richard Haley

Justin Knebel Memorial Award
Broderick Schmidt

Dale Knotek Community Service Award - Delta Theta Sigma (DTS)
Joshua Bruggman, Tim Lee, Brett Carlson, Clayton Lenk, Aaron Soltau, Marcus Twaddle
Kasey Okke, Adam Switzer, Dan Kimm, Hannah Reysen, Sami Benoy, Evan Boreen, Amanda Corneliussen, Brittany Fox

Presidents Volunteer Service Award
Megan Luxford, Chia Moua, Kari Bodine, Bailey Stratton (online student), Katie Nenn, Kevin Lamp Tony Taylor, Krista Kenyon, Emily Goff, Alexmai Addo, Catlin Kersting, Kayla Bellrichard, Alissa Hernandez, Almir Krdzalic Kasey Okke, Sean Rozell, Tyler Lowthian, Bryce Gillie, Ross Sigler

Student Volunteer of the Year Award
John Niemczyk with Lisa Loegering

Student Programmer of the Year
Ashley Hoffman

Outstanding CSA Senator
Alexmai Addo 

Outstanding CSA Voting Delegate Award
Megan Luxford

Faculty and Staff Awards

Outstanding Educator
Ron Del Vecchio 

Most Supportive of Students
Phil Baird 

Outstanding Service to Students
Lisa Samuelson 

Student Achievement Awards
en Williams, Bryce Gillie, Almir Krzadlic, Matt Green
Krista Kenyon, Tashi Gurung, Abbey Wemimo, Brooke Novak
Alexmai Addo, Danny Lee, Sam Zuck- Roscoe, and Alex Skeeter

Man and Woman of Year
Dae Yuel Danny Lee and Sam Zuck-Roscoe 


Athletic All-Academic Team - 3.2 GPA or higher and lettering in the same sport for two years

Rachelle Alcini - Women's Soccer
Matthew G. Borowicz - Football
Carli Bunning - Women's Basketball
Karen Carpenedo - Equestrian - Western
Jessica Charles - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Jensen Crots - Women's Soccer
Zach D. Cymbaluk - Men's Golf
Amanda Krueger - Equestrian - Western
Kelly Gustofson - Women's Golf
Rachel Halligan - Women's Soccer
Shelby Hollinger - Softball
Jesse Jennings - Baseball
Caitlin Kelley - Equestrian - Western
Samantha Kramer - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Almir Krdzalic - Men's Basketball
Brittany Looker - Women's Volleyball
Stacey Marcum - Softball
Ashley Martell - Women's Basketball
Myint Maung- Football
Keith McBride - Football
Erin Mears - Women's Soccer
Mary Mikutowski - Women's Volleyball & Golf
Brooks Miller - Baseball
Hannah Nedrud - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Amanda Overman - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Casey Paris - Women's Tennis
Josh Perea - Football
Angela Peterson - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Josee Plante - Softball
Jordan Prill - Baseball
Jesse Roscoe - Men's Golf
Shannan Salm - Equestrian - Western
Hannah Schiller - Women's Volleyball
Broderick Schmidt - Men's Basketball
Alyssa Schneider - Women's Volleyball
Christopher Secrest - Football
Drew Selvestra - Football
Alexandra Skeeter - Women's Volleyball
Joseph Stearly - Football
Andrew Steinfeldt - Football
Annalee Sundin - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Brooke Vatthauer - Softball
Chelsea Wiesner - Women's Volleyball
Yahna Zastrow - Equestrian - Western

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director of Student Activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Despite strong crosswinds and turbulent weather conditions, Douglas Peterson Potts (in photo), 
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Williams, Minn., recently completed his private pilot training. Potts, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston majoring in agricultural aviation, completed all necessary flight training for the Private Pilot certificate.  Anderson was trained by Chase Enghauser, a graduate of the U of M Crookston business management aviation program.
 
The private pilot certificate is typically the first pilot license that an aspiring pilot seeks on his or her way to becoming a professional pilot.  The Private Pilot certificate enables the aviator to carry passengers and travel cross country in many types of aircraft.  To complete that certification, the budding aviator must complete a series of lessons of increasing complexity, including planning and flying a solo flight of more than 150 miles, and many, many practice landings and takeoffs under the careful supervision of their flight instructor.  The Private Pilot certification process requires that the student pass a comprehensive knowledge exam, and the Stage 28 lesson includes both an oral and flight test. 

At three points during the aspiring pilot's training, he or she flies with an evaluator or check airman, who is typically more experienced than the flight instructor.  These evaluations are called stage checks, and at the successful conclusion of the Stage 28 (lesson number 28), students at the University of Minnesota Crookston receive their private pilot certificate.

The University of Minnesota Crookston partners with the University of North Dakota to provide students with flight training and academic coursework in Agricultural Aviation, Business Management Aviation, Law Enforcement Aviation and Natural Resources Aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Michael McMahon, St. Paul, Minn., (pictured at right) a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston 
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majoring in agricultural aviation, recently completed flight training for the Private Pilot certificate.  McMahon was trained by Chase Enghauser, a graduate of the UMC Business Management Aviation program.

The private pilot certificate is typically the first pilot license that an aspiring pilot seeks on his or her way to becoming a professional pilot.  The Private Pilot certificate enables the aviator to carry passengers and travel cross country in many types of aircraft.  To complete that certification, the budding aviator must complete a series of lessons of increasing complexity, including planning and flying a solo flight of more than 150 miles, and many, many practice landings and takeoffs under the careful supervision of their flight instructor.  The Private Pilot certification process requires that the student pass a comprehensive knowledge exam, and the Stage 28 lesson includes both an oral and flight test. 

At three points during the aspiring pilot's training, he or she flies with an evaluator or check airman, who is typically more experienced than the flight instructor.  These evaluations are called stage checks, and at the successful conclusion of the Stage 28 (lesson number 28), students at the University of Minnesota Crookston receive their private pilot certificate.

The University of Minnesota Crookston partners with the University of North Dakota to provide students with flight training and academic coursework in Agricultural Aviation, Business Management Aviation, Law Enforcement Aviation and Natural Resources Aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Travis Anderson, Prinsburg, Minn., (pictured at right) a freshman at the University of Minnesota Crookston 
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majoring in agricultural aviation, recently completed flight training for the Private Pilot certificate.  Anderson was trained by Chase Enghauser, a graduate of the U of M Crookston Business Management Aviation program.

The private pilot certificate is typically the first pilot license that an aspiring pilot seeks on his or her way to becoming a professional pilot.  The Private Pilot certificate enables the aviator to carry passengers and travel cross country in many types of aircraft. To complete that certification, the budding aviator must complete a series of lessons of increasing complexity, including planning and flying a solo flight of more than 150 miles, and many, many practice landings and takeoffs under the careful supervision of their flight instructor.  The Private Pilot certification process requires that the student pass a comprehensive knowledge exam, and the Stage 28 lesson includes both an oral and flight test. 

At three points during the aspiring pilot's training, he or she flies with an evaluator or check airman, who is typically more experienced than the flight instructor.  These evaluations are called stage checks, and at the successful conclusion of the Stage 28 (lesson number 28), students at the University of Minnesota Crookston receive their private pilot certificate.

The University of Minnesota Crookston partners with the University of North Dakota to provide students with flight training and academic coursework in Agricultural Aviation, Business Management Aviation, Law Enforcement Aviation and Natural Resources Aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual spring Fly-In/Drive-In Pancake Breakfast, will take place on Sunday, April 28, 2013, at the Crookston Municipal Airport. The breakfast, scheduled from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., is sponsored by and hosted by Alpha Eta Rho, the aviation fraternity at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, and Crookston Aviation. Tickets for the breakfast for adults are $6 in advance and $8 at the door; children 4 to 12 are $3 and children 3 and under are free. Tickets may be purchased from Alpha Eta Rho members or by contacting John Niemczyk 651-829-1731.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218- 281-8141 (mvivion@un.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Freshman Douglas Potts Completes First Student Solo Flight

D Potts solo.jpg
Douglas Potts, Williams, Minn., a freshman at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his student solo flight.  An agricultural aviation major, Pott's advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus. His flight instructor is Chase Enghauser, a 2012 graduate of the U of M, Crookston with a business management aviation degree. The milestone flight was completed at the Thief River Falls [Minn.] Regional Airport due to runway construction activity at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The first student solo flight is a significant accomplishment and cannot be overemphasized.  Landing an aircraft involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  
Doug Potts Shirt.jpg
As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest. 

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student having him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. It stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios were not a part of early aviation making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this 
DPotts taxi out.jpg
tradition, aviation students at the U of M, Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. Students have the option to choose tracks in agricultural aviation, business aviation, law enforcement aviation, or natural resources aviation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Travis Anderson, Prinsburg, Minn., a freshman at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, 
Anderson with flight instructor Chase Enghauser.jpg
recently completed his student solo flight.  An  agricultural aviation major,  Anderson's advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus. His flight instructor is Chase Enghauser, a 2012 graduate of the U of M, Crookston with a business management aviation degree. The milestone flight was completed at the Thief River Falls [Minn.] Regional Airport due to runway construction activity at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The first student solo flight is a significant accomplishment and cannot be overemphasized.  Landing an aircraft involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of 
Anderson with plane.jpg
the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest. 

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student having him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

Anderson with shirt tail.jpg
Following American aviation tradition, removing new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. It stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios were not a part of early aviation making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at the U of M, Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. Students have the option to choose tracks in agricultural aviation, business aviation, law enforcement aviation, or natural resources aviation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

100_1466.jpg

Michael McMahon, St. Paul, Minn., a sophomore at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his student solo flight.  A natural resources aviation major,  McMahon's advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus. His flight instructor is Chase Enghauser, a 2012 graduate of the U of M, Crookston with a business management aviation degree. The milestone flight was completed at the Thief River Falls [Minn.] Regional Airport due to runway construction activity at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The first student solo flight is a significant accomplishment and cannot be overemphasized.  

20121022_122024.jpg

Landing an aircraft involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest.

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student having him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

100_1472.jpg

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. It stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios were not a part of early aviation making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at the U of M, Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

20121022_123918.jpg

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. Students have the option to choose tracks in agricultural aviation, business aviation, law enforcement aviation, or natural resources aviation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:

Top, left: Michael McMahon

Top, right: Chase Enghauser (left) shakes the hand of his first solo flight student Michael McMahon after his successful completion of the important milestone flight.

Center, left: Enghauser cuts the shirttail of McMahon according to American aviation tradition.

Bottom, left: McMahon's signed shirttail is ready to go on display at the airport. 

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

If you are interested in aviation or history, learn more about the Wright Brothers and the 
Darrell Collins poster.jpg
history of the first flight at Kitty Hawk with renowned aviation historian Darrell Collins at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. His presentation, which takes place at 7 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium, will be followed by a question and answer period. The presentation is free and open to the public and refreshments will follow.

Background
Collins is a native of the North Carolina's Outer Banks and resides in Manteo, on Roanoke Island, N.C.  He is a graduate of Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina and holds a B. S. degree in geology with a minor in history.

He has worked with the National Park Service in the division of interpretation and education for 33 years, spending the majority of his time at the Wright Brothers National Memorial, where he serves as the historian. He served with NASA is a series of educational programs promoting aviation and the Wright brothers to young children. 

In 1990, he was nominated as the National Park Service top interpretative ranger for the Freeman Tilden award.  He was nominated by the Department of the Interior in 1999 to represent the National Park Service for the "Park Ranger Tour Program", an outreach program for children in major U. S. cities. In 2003 the centennial year of the world's first flight at Kitty Hawk, he presented the National Park Service national and international promoting the 100th Anniversary of that great milestone in human history. 

For the past twenty-four years he has been on the aviation/ aerospace lecture circuit.  Pervious speaking engagements include the Aero Club of Washington's Wright Memorial Dinner, National Air Transportation, Aerospace Industries of America, Aircraft Owners and Pilot Association, 40th Ralph Barnaby Lecture, National Business Aviation Association.   

He is a regular speaker at the Speakers' Showcase Series at the Oshkosh Fly-In Convention. Australian International Airshow DownUnder and many other aviation/ aerospace oriented groups and events.  Collins ranks in the top 5 historians in the world on early aviation and the Wright brothers. He is the author on numerous articles and consulting editor for play writes and authors on early aviation and the Wright brothers. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

MCFI Mike Vivion, MN (Apr12).jpgMichael T Vivion (at left), a 6-time Master and Society of Aviation and Flight Education (SAFE) member, recently renewed his Master CFI accreditation.  Vivion is a check airman and teaching specialist in the University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program. The 1998 Nat'l Aviation Safety Counselor of the Year, he also serves as a FAASTeam representative in the FAA's Minneapolis FSDO area.  

Master Instructors LLC takes great pride in announcing a significant aviation accomplishment on the part of Michael T Vivion, a check airman in the University of Minnesota's aviation program and resident of Crookston, Minnesota.  Recently, Vivion's accreditation as a Master Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI) was renewed by Master Instructors LLC, the international accrediting authority for Master Instructor designations as well as the FAA-approved Master Instructor Program.  He first earned this national professional accreditation in 2002, has held it continuously since then, and is one of only 24 worldwide to earn the credential six times.        

To help put these achievements in their proper perspective, there are approximately 96,000 CFIs in the United States.  Fewer than 700 of those aviation educators have achieved that distinction thus far.  The last 17 national Flight Instructors of the Year were Master CFIs (see www.GeneralAviationAwards.org/)  while Vivion is one of only eight Minnesota teachers of flight to earn this prestigious "Master" title.  

In the words of former FAA Administrator Marion Blakey, "The Master Instructor accreditation singles out the best that the right seat has to offer."

The Master Instructor designation is a national accreditation recognized by the FAA.  Candidates must demonstrate an ongoing commitment to excellence, professional growth, and service to the aviation community, and must pass a rigorous evaluation by a peer Board of Review.  The process parallels the continuing education regimen used by other professionals to enhance their knowledge base while increasing their professionalism. 

Designees are recognized as outstanding aviation educators for not only their excellence in teaching, but for their engagement in the continuous process of learning -- both their own, and their students'.  The designation must be renewed biennially and significantly surpasses the FAA requirements for renewal of the candidate's flight instructor certificate.

Questions regarding the Master Instructor Program may be directed to 303-485-8136 or MasterInstrs@aol.com.  For more information about the Master Instructor Program and to locate other Masters, please visit the "Find a Master Instructor" section of www.MasterInstructors.org.  To learn more about the Society of Aviation and Flight Educators (SAFE), visit http://SafePilots.org. The International Aerobatic Club (IAC) can be reached through their website at http://IAC.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Ron Del Vecchio, professor and head, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8109 delve004@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@um

The annual spring Fly-In/Drive-In Pancake Breakfast, will take place on Sunday, April 15, 2012, at the Crookston Municipal Airport. The breakfast, scheduled from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., is sponsored by , hosted by Alpha Eta Rho, the aviation fraternity at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, and Crookston Aviation. Tickets for the breakfast for adults are $6 in advance and $8 at the door; children 4 to 12 are $3 and children 3 and under are free. Tickets may be purchased from Alpha Eta Rho members or by contacting Chris Anderson at 612-715-2483.

The University of North Dakota (UND) Student Chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association will be offering FREE airplane rides for those 8 to 17 years of age from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. A legal guardian must be present to sign permission forms for the airplane rides. To learn more about these Young Eagle Flights, visit http://www.youngeagles.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218- 281-8141 (mvivion@un.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A spring Aviation Safety Seminar will be held on Tuesday, April 3, 2012, at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The seminar, which begins at 7 p.m., features Chuck Adams, a Grand Forks Air Traffic Control Tower supervisor, and Jim Neihoff, who is a maintenance inspector for the Minneapolis Flight Standards office. The Aviation Safety Seminar is open to all, pilot or non pilot, and everyone is welcome to attend.

Adams will address the "Top Ten Pilot/Controller Mistakes" with his entertaining style while conveying important information about the business of pilots interacting with air traffic controllers. Neihoff will host a session entitled "Ask the FAA," a question and answer session for pilots.

For more information regarding the Aviation Safety Seminar, contact Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus, at 218-281-8114.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

IMG_1037.jpgUniversity of Minnesota Crookston Junior Jacob Pastoors, an agricultural aviation major from Olivia, Minn., recently completed training as a private pilot at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

Under Federal Aviation Administration examining authority, University of Minnesota, Crookston students can complete all requirements for Private Pilot certification locally.  Pastoors completed an oral examination and a 1.7 hour flight during which he demonstrated navigation, maneuvering, and communications skills, as well as the most important skill of all--landings.  

Pastoors is the first of the fall semester private pilot students at the U of M, Crookston to complete his training.  The agricultural aviation major has already worked one season as a loader man for an agricultural applicator in Olivia, Minn.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Boredom won't be a problem for Alumna Amy Brown. At any given moment, the 2008 brown_amy2.jpggraduate may be driving through North Dakota terrain, boating across a river, or watching from above in her 2006 Cessna 182. Originally from Lake George, Minn., she finds herself living a life she has dreamed about for a long time.

Brown is a game warden/pilot for the state of North Dakota. With that role comes a great deal of responsibility for this young woman, but she remains undaunted.  

"In high school as a post-secondary-enrollment-option student, I met with Dan Svedarsky to ask what classes I should be taking in preparation to attend the University of Minnesota, Crookston," explains Brown. "I have known I wanted to be a game warden since I was in my early teens. It combined my interests in natural resources and law enforcement and Crookston happened to be one of just a few places I could pursue my dream."

She discovered her love of flying when she decided to earn her private pilot's license as a student on the Crookston campus. "It is funny that I decided to add a major in aviation, because before I came to campus, the only flight I had ever been on was one to Disney World with my parents," Brown smiles.  

"I ended up falling in love with flying," she continues. As a result, her major included law enforcement aviation and natural resources law enforcement. She interned in summer 2008 for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Devils Lake, N.D.
Brown liked her study at the U of M, Crookston. "It is something I hold dear," she reflects. "I have a lot of respect for Chief Pilot Mike Vivion; he has a lot of experience and a lot to offer students. I learned a great deal from him."
It might sound cliché but Brown enjoys the kind of serenity she finds in the air. And, she treasures the opportunity to see what most of the rest of the world will never see from her vantage point in the cockpit.

Her job isn't focused solely on flying. She spends plenty of time on the ground or in a boat on the water. It all depends on the time of year and the demands of the job. She can be involved in a search-and-rescue effort or flying at night looking for spot lighters. "If the state needs a pilot, I am in the airplane," she declares. "As the primary pilot, I am kind of always on call."

Those demands prove the most challenging aspect of her work, but it is a job Brown loves and finds deeply rewarding.
Brown is one of only a few women in the field. Vivion explains, "I am not sure how many women conservation officers the states have who also fly, but I'm guessing the number is close to one.  The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has nine pilots and none of them are women."

Brown doesn't think about this fact much. She is concentrating on the job she has always wanted to do, and that fact is the only one that matters to her.


In the photo: Amy  Brown attended the meeting of the Program Improvement Audit Committee for aviation in October.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Alysia Osowski, Grafton, N.D., a senior double majoring in agricultural business and osowski_a.jpgagronomy at the University of Minnesota, Crookston  recently completed her student solo flight at the Crookston Municipal Airport. She completed the flight on November 10, 2011. Her advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus.

The significance of the first student solo flight cannot be overemphasized.  Landing an aircraft involves very difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest.

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student having him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. It stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios were not a part of early aviation making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at the U of M, Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

furry_m.jpgMichael Furry, Omaha, Neb., a freshman at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his student solo flight at the Crookston Municipal Airport. He is pursuing a bachelor's degree in natural resources and completed the flight on Sunday, October 30, 2011. His advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus, and his flight instructor is Carolyn Clark.

The significance of the first student solo flight cannot be overemphasized.  Landing an aircraft involves very difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest.

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student furry_m2.jpghaving him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Veterans Club at the University of Minnesota, Crookston will host a special presentation on Friday, November 11, 2011, at 1 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. Stewart Bass will be the featured guest speaker during a program commemorating Veterans Day on the campus.

Bass, a naval aviator who flew a TBM Avenger torpedo bomber in World War II, fought in the Pacific and was awarded the Navy Cross for valor in action.  The honor is the second highest combat decoration our nation awards. Bass will discuss the carrier war, operations in the Pacific, and flying the TBM.

After the war, Bass returned to his home near Missoula, Montana, and attended the University of Montana.  He worked for American Crystal Sugar Company for many years, and from 1974 until his retirement in 1986, he was vice president for the company.

In 1919, President Wilson first proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day. In 1938, November 11 was set aside as a legal holiday--a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as "Armistice Day." Armistice Day primarily recognized veterans of World War I, but in 1954, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting in its place the word "Veterans." It continues as a day of celebration to honor America's veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good. To learn more, visit www.va.gov/opa/vetsday.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

IMG_1958.jpgDerek Cox, an aviation major at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his student solo flight at the Crookston Municipal Airport. The Walker, Minn., native is a freshman and completed his solo flight on Wednesday, October 26, 2011. His advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus.

The significance of the first student solo flight cannot be overemphasized.Landing an aircraft involves very difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest.

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student IMG_1952.jpghaving him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Jacob Pastoors, a junior at the University of Minnesota, Crookston from Olivia, Minn., pastoors_j.jpgcompleted his first student solo flight on Saturday, October 22, 2011, at the Crookston Municipal Airport.  

Pastoors is an agricultural aviation major and following his first solo flight, he will continue to expand his flight skills toward achieving his private pilot certificate. His advisor is U of M, Crookston Chief Pilot Mike Vivion.

pastoors_j2.jpgThe University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

University of Minnesota, Crookston Freshman John Niemczyk, an aviation major from John Niemczyk.jpgHugo, Minn., completed his first solo flight on October 12, 2011.  Niemczyk is the first member of this fall's private pilot class at the University of Minnesota, Crookston to complete the important milestone of flying an airplane without an instructor aboard.

 In keeping with an age-old tradition, Niemczyk's shirt-tail was "trimmed" and his name and the date of first solo was inked onto the cloth, which is now posted prominently at the Crookston Airport.

The John Niemczyk2.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. His advisor is U of M, Crookston Chief Pilot Mike Vivion. Niemczyk's flight instructor is Carolyn Clark from UND. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of more than 1,500 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu)

Fly-In, Drive-In Pancake Breakfast Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011

Join members of Alpha Eta Rho, the University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation fraternity, for their annual pancake breakfast, where they will be serving pancakes, eggs, sausages, coffee, and orange juice. 

Date/Time:  Sunday, September 25, 2011, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.AHP Logo.jpg
Location: Crookston Municipal Airport, two and 1/2 miles north of the UMC campus on Highway 75.

Cost:  advance $6; at door: $8; kids ages 4-12: $3; ages 3 and younger: FREE!
Free breakfast for any Pilot in Command.

Sponsored by Alpha Eta Rho International Aviation Fraternity (AHP) and Crookston Aviation

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu)

You are conducting an aerial census of bighorn sheep in mountainous terrain when a strong gust of wind causes a temporary upset of your aircraft.  Your response in the next few seconds can mean the difference between life and death.  Studies have shown that pilots exposed to such potential loss of control in training stand a much better chance of extricating themselves from an in-flight emergency.

Rich Stowell of Santa Paula, Calif., the 2007 National Flight Instructor of the Year, createdLo_Nongye.jpg his nationally acclaimed Emergency Maneuver Training ™ program specifically to help pilots avoid loss of control emergencies and to improve their odds of survival in the unlikely event that they find themselves in such a situation.  Stowell has been so generous as to permit the U of M, Crookston to use his training syllabus in offering this invaluable training to students.  Federal and State conservation and law enforcement agencies and many airlines now require this type of training of their pilots.

Recently, nine U of M, Crookston aviation students participated in Emergency Maneuver Training ™ at the Crookston Municipal airport.  Kaitlyn Linde, a junior from Apple Valley, Minn.;  Nik Jiran, a senior from Hayden, Idaho; Nongye Lo, a junior from St. Paul, Minn.; Kyle Sveen, a senior from Hoople, N.D.; Lucas Rosemeyer, a senior from Dorchester, Wis.; David Carignan, a senior from Walhalla, N.D.; Anthony Young, a senior from St. Cloud, Minn.; Jeff Sieger, a senior from Grand Forks, N.D.; Cody McLean, a junior from East Grand Forks, Minn., participated in the training.

The course involves three blocks of training, including introduction to spin training in partner UNDAF Cessna 172s, followed by two blocks of spin and unusual attitude recovery training in a Bellanca Decathlon.  The training includes spins, spin avoidance and recovery, recovery from rolling upsets (inverted flight), recovery from jammed or failed controls, and an introduction to aerobatic flight.

Rich Stowell took his first flying lesson in 1982 and earned his Private license in early 1984. He began his career as a full-time instructor in 1987. In February 2001, Stowell was designated the country's first Master CFI-Aerobatics and has served on the Master Instructors LLC Board of Review for Master CFI-Aerobatic applicants ever since. To learn more, visit www.richstowell.com.

To learn more about aviation on the Crookston campus, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Nongye Lo, seated in the pilot seat of a Cessna 172, prior to a spin flight, giving a thumbs up.


Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston co-hosted the National Intercollegiate Flying NIFA_airplane.jpgAssociation's Region 5 Regional Flying contest at Crookston Municipal Airport during the week of October 11, 2010.  For the first time in 20 years, the U of M, Crookston fielded a team in the competition. Team members included Senior Andrew Knapton, Rockford, Minn.; Junior Nongye Lo, St. Paul., Minn.; and Senior Anthony Young, St. Cloud, Minn.

The competition consisted of nine separate events, including both flying and ground-based competitions.  Contestants may compete in one or all of the contests.  Most of the competitors in this year's event had competed in past events, including several who have competed in the national championships.   Most of the teams practice all year for this competition.

The team members from the U of M, Crookston acquitted themselves superbly, especially considering a relatively short training period and the fact that none of them had past experience with these particular contests. Lo finished 6th overall out of 46 competitors, while Knapton finished 27th and Young finished 28th overall.   

For Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus, the results were a source of pride. "Our Flying Team performed extremely well, and we congratulate them and wish them good luck in next year's event, which will be held in St. Cloud, Minn.," Vivion says.  "All three of the team members are enthusiastic about participating in next year's regional competition, and with more time to practice and one competition under their belt, they should be even more of a threat to the top contenders.

"Most teams brought 10 or more competitors, so UMC is looking to grow its flying team prior to next year's event.  With Andrew, Nongye and Anthony, we've got a great core for a successful team."

To learn more about the opportunities in aviation on the Crookston campus, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics or contact Vivion at 218-281-8114.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Judges observe during the spot landing competition.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

What to do when you're a college student in Minnesota, and you want to attend a Tong_Rice.jpgprofessional conference in Idaho?  Junior Andrew Rice (right in photo) and Senior Alvin Tong (left in photo) from the University of Minnesota, Crookston didn't let the distance stop them.  The two natural resources aviation majors climbed into an airplane and flew to the conference.  

 The intrepid aviators took to the cockpit of Andrew's father's Piper Tri Pacer flying both to and from Boise, Idaho, to attend the annual Conference and Safety Workshop of the International Association of Natural Resource Pilots during the week of October 1 -5, 2010.

While crystal clear weather and tailwinds favored the two on the trip to Boise, headwinds, thunderstorms, rain, and darkness plagued them on the return trip.  They handled it all safely and with aplomb during a trip that provided great real-world experience for these budding professional aviators.  

The IANRP is a group of pilots who utilize aircraft in the field of renewable resources. Their aviation specialties are varied and include aircraft use for forestry, wildlife, and fisheries applications, plus enforcement of natural resource regulations. To learn more, visit ianrp.org.

Natural resource aviation is just one of many opportunities for students on the Crookston campus, to learn more about natural resources and other degree programs, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: : Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Five colleges in the upper Midwest will be participating in a flight competition as part of the National Intercollegiate Flying Association (NIFA) in mid-October. The Region 5 Safecon will kick off with a briefing on Wednesday, October 13, 2010, in Youngquist Auditorium located at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center adjacent to the campus of the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The competition runs through Saturday, October 16 with much of the activity taking place at the Crookston Municipal Airport. The event is hosted by the University of North Dakota (UND) with assistance from Mike Vivion, chief pilot at the U of M, Crookston and his staff.

Students must meet eligibility requirements to compete in the wide range of contests designed to test skills such areas as navigation, message drop, computer accuracy, aircraft inspection, and others. The Region 5 Safecon will be the first time the U of M, Crookston will have a team in the competition. Members of that team include two seniors Andrew Knapton, Rockford, Minn., Anthony Young, St. Cloud, Minn., and a junior Nongye Lo, St. Paul, Minn.

Students at the Crookston campus majoring in aviation learn aviation fundamentals through a partnership with UND and the U of M, Crookston. Other colleges competing include Iowa State University; Minnesota State University, Mankato; St. Cloud State University; and the University of Dubuque.

NIFA sponsors the flying competitions which include both flight and ground-based competitions for member schools. The competitions are held first at the regional level and winners of the regional competition move on to a national contest.
For information about the competition, contact Mike Vivion at 218-281-8114.

The National Intercollegiate Flying Association was formed for the purposes of developing and advancing aviation education; to promote, encourage and foster safety in aviation; to promote and foster communications and cooperation between aviation students, educators, educational institutions and the aviation industry; and to provide an arena for collegiate aviation competition. For more information, visit www.nifa.us.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: : Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Vivion_Mike 131.jpgMaster Instructors LLC takes great pride in announcing a significant aviation accomplishment on the part of Michael T. Vivion (photo left), a check airman in the University of Minnesota's aviation program and resident of Crookston, Minnesota.  Recently, Vivion's accreditation as a Master CFI (Certified Flight Instructor) was renewed by Master Instructors LLC, the international accrediting authority for Master Instructor designations as well as the FAA-approved Master Instructor Programä.  He first earned this national professional accreditation in 2002, has held it continuously since then, and is one of only 23 worldwide to earn the credential five times.   

A teaching specialist in the aviation program at the U of M, Crookston, Vivion was the 1998 National Aviation Safety Counselor of the Year. He also serves as a FAASTeam representative in the FAA's Minneapolis FSDO area.   

To help put Vivion's achievements in their proper perspective, there are approximately 93,000 CFIs in the United States.  Fewer than 700 of those aviation educators have achieved that distinction thus far.  The last 15 national Flight Instructors of the Year were Master CFIs while Mike is one of only 8 Minnesota teachers of flight to earn this prestigious "Master" title.  In the words of former FAA Administrator Marion Blakey, "The Master Instructor accreditation singles out the best that the right seat has to offer."


The Master Instructor designation is a national accreditation recognized by the FAA.  Candidates must demonstrate an ongoing commitment to excellence, professional growth, and service to the aviation community, and must pass a rigorous evaluation by a peer Board of Review.  The process parallels the continuing education regimen used by other professionals to enhance their knowledge base while increasing their professionalism.  Designees are recognized as outstanding aviation educators for not only their excellence in teaching, but for their engagement in the continuous process of learning -- both their own, and their students'. The designation must be renewed biennially and significantly surpasses the FAA requirements for renewal of the candidate's flight instructor certificate.

Questions regarding the Master Instructor Program may be directed to 303-485-8136 or MasterInstrs@aol.com  To learn more about the Society of Aviation and Flight Educators (SAFE), visit http://www.SafePilots.org. For more information about the program and to locate other Master Instructors, please visit the "Find a Master Instructor" section of www.MasterInstructors.org.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Anderson_Top_Ciub.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston Junior Christopher Anderson, from Becker, Minn., majoring in natural resources aviation, completed flight training in the U of M, Crookston's Top Cub, including a solo flight.  The Top Cub flight training is an integral component of the natural resources aviation degree program at the Crookston Campus.
 
The Top Cub airplane exposes students to the demands of flying a high performance conventional- landing-gear equipped airplane which is commonly used in natural resource aviation programs.  The Top Cub is also used to train students in low level reconnaissance missions and animal telemetry. 

Anderson is a recent transfer from the University of Montana, and will complete flight and academic training next academic year in instrument flight as well as continuing his academic course work in natural resources. 

The Natural Resources Aviation degree program at the U of M, Crookston is the only degree of its kind in the United States. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Junior Chris Anderson recently completed his Top Cub Flight Training including a solo flight. 

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Parks_Vivion.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston Freshman Tim Parks, a law enforcement aviation major from Baltimore, Md., successfully completed the final training requirements to be issued a private pilot certificate on April 19, 2010. 

Parks has worked very hard this academic year to fulfill the requirements of the Federal Aviation Administration approved private pilot course at the U of M, Crookston.
 
The course includes both rigorous academic and flight training programs.  Parks completed his final stage check in this course in a Piper Warrior III at the Crookston Municipal Airport on the evening of the April 19.
 
Parks will proceed to instrument pilot training in his sophomore year while continuing his criminal justice academic studies.  The University of Minnesota, Crookston is one of only a few institutions of higher learning offering a degree in law enforcement aviation.  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Freshman Tim Parks (left) is congratulated by Chief Pilot Mike Vivion on the completion of his training requirements to be issued a private pilot certificate on Monday, April 19, 2010.
 

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Freshman Jeremy Olsen, Lino Lakes, Minn., a natural resources aviation major at the Jeremy Olsen Solo.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his first solo flight. Olsen started flight training in mid-winter and recently completed his first solo flight.
 
The first solo is a major milestone in a fledgling pilot's progression to pilot certification. Olsen will now progress to cross country flights, night flying, and maneuvering flight training, all of which will culminate in his being qualified as a private pilot with single engine land privileges. The natural resource degree with an Aviation emphasis that Olsen is enrolled in will result in certification as a commercial pilot with instrument privileges upon his completion of the degree.

At the U of M, Crookston, the natural resource aviation degree program offers "dual function" degree programs by combining degrees in agriculture, law enforcement, natural resources or business management with professional flight training. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/agri/aviation.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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