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The public is invited to attend a dedication of a campus garden at the University of Minnesota Crookston on Wednesday, May 21, 2014. The garden, located on the north side of campus near the Valley Technology Park, will be dedicated at noon in honor of Allen and Freda Pedersen. Visitors are encouraged to park in Lot A on the campus and walk across to the garden site for the ceremony.

The vegetable and flower garden is a first for the Crookston campus and the result of the generosity of Allen Pedersen. The collaboration by Sodexo Dining Services, Valley Technology Park, and the U of M Crookston Center for Sustainability helped make the garden a reality. Produce from the garden will be used in the campus dining hall and a student intern will be hired to assist with the garden's maintenance.
   
Allen and the late Freda Pedersen were long time residents of Crookston and avid gardeners. They were quick to share garden bounty, whether vegetables or flowers, with others. Freda passed away in 2012 just shy of the couple's 75th wedding anniversary. Allen, who celebrates his 98th birthday on May 22, is one of the speakers at the dedication ceremony that includes a welcome by Chancellor Fred Wood with Professor Dan Svedarsky, director of the Center for Sustainability serving as emcee. 

For information about the campus garden, contact the Center for Sustainability at 218-281-8129.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual Student Awards Program, a celebration of student service, leadership, and academic and athletic achievement, was held recently at the University of Minnesota Crookston.

To view or download photos, visit the photo gallery

ward recipients include the following students:

CSA Student Senators and Officers
Back row, left to right: Jesse Jennings, Trevor Buttermore, Kisun Kim, Ross Sigler, Jiwon Park, Brennan Andreas, Justin Goodroad. Middle row: Drew Underdahl, Monika Sweet, Sarah Muellner, Delaney Kohorst, Emily Campbell, Natalie Tym. Front row: Ashley Hoffman, Laura Gabrielson, Alexmai Addo, Kayla Bellrichard, with Lisa Sameulson, advisor. 

Outstanding Ambassadors
Back row, left to right, are Brant Moore, Dustin Smith, Rochelle Herzog, Randi Bethel, Cassie Hagg (Rookie Ambassador of the Year), Justin Goodroad, with Lisa Loegering
Front row: Michelle Boateng, Sarah Muellner, Toynell Delaney, Emily Caldis, Catlin Kersting (Ambassador of the Year), and Sarah Morris. Not pictured: Chris Kohloff, Karli Anderson, Shaolei (Sorry) Jin, Kevin Lamp, Alisha Grams

Outstanding First-Year Biology Award
Kary Sheppard and Sierra Trost with Katie Sheetz

Outstanding Future Educator Award
Amanda Overman, Alyssa Schneider with Marsha Odom

Marketing/Management Outstanding Leadership Award
Brooke Hoffman and Kayla Bellrichard

Outstanding Accounting Student
Abdou Niang with Scott Leckie

Outstanding Sport and Recreation Management Student
Brennan Andreas with Scott Leckie

Outstanding Communication Student
Steffanie Berg, Haley Weleski, and Ruth Navarro with Kevin Thompson

SOS Service Award
Katie Nenn, Kevin Lamp, Kayla Bellrichard, and Ross Sigler

Outstanding SOS Leader
Cody Current

Norman Pankratz Memorial Conservation Award
Cayla Bendel with Dan Svedarsky

John Polley Soil and Water Conservation Award
Mark Koep with Dan Svedarsky


Outstanding Horticulture
Justin Goodroad with Theresa Helgeson

Outstanding Ag Systems Management Student
Alex DeBoer with Paul Aakre

NACTA Recognition
In the photo, left to right, back row: Dylan Pratt, Cody Thompson, Brian Oachs, Andrew Clark, Justin Goodroad, Emily Goff. Middle row: Dustin Smith, Ashley Hoffman, Jared Nowacki, Ben Genereux, Eric Derosier, Emily Campbell.  Front row: Mitzi Marlin, Haley Weleski, Cassie Jo Adams, Sarah Morris, Ashley Radke with Margot Rudstrom. 

Outstanding International Student Scholar Award
Brennan Andreas with Kim Gillette

Multicultural and International Student Recognition
Rae French with Chia Moua, and Young A Choi

Support of Diversity Award
Anthonette Sims

Achievement in Music and Theater Award
Back row, left to right, are Justin Goodroad, Alex Conwell and front row TJ Chapman, band director, Tyler Lowthian, Alissa Hernandez, and George French, director of music and theater. 

Computer Help Desk
Isaac Osei with Thea Oertwich

Student Employee of the Year
Marissa Dempsey with Ken Mendez

NSIC Student Athlete Award
Josh Perea, Alyssa Schnieder with Natasha Kuhle and Stephanie Helgeson

Female and Male Student Athlete of the Year
Katie Sheetz and Jesse Jennings with Natasha Kuhle and Stephanie Helgeson

Female and Male Outstanding Athlete of the Year
Matt McClure and Katrina Moenkedick with Natasha Kuhle and Stephanie Helgeson

Justin Knebel Memorial Award
Natasha Kuhle and Tomas Parker with Stephanie Helgeson

Dale Knotek Community Service Award - National Society for Leadership and Success (NSLS)
Top left to right: Brennan Andreas, Brandon Schmidy, Alyssa Schneider
Bottom left to right: Rochelle Herzog, Emily Caldis, Alissa Hernandez


Presidents Volunteer Service Award
Front row, left to right:  Gyungyoun "Ann" Baek, Julia Rinn, Emily Caldis, Kaylina Paulley, Kevin Lamp, Alissa Hernandez, Katie Nenn, with Lisa Loegering. 2nd Row:  Stephanie Lane, Laura Gabrielson, Ashley Hoffman, Katelyn Johnson, Alexmai Addo, Andrew Buell. 3rd Row:  Adam Roerish, Kayla Bellrichard, Faith Benassi, Megan Luxford, Joanie Melichar, Karly Spohnholtz. Back Row:  Jesse Jennings, Isaac Ossei, Dominic Becker, Cody Current, Tyler Lowthian, Ross Sigler

Student Volunteer of the Year Award
Adam Roerish, Andrew Buell, with Lisa Loegering

Student Programmer of the Year
Emily Cauldis with Lisa Samuelson

Outstanding CSA Senator
Kayla Bellrichard with Alexmai Addo

Outstanding CSA Voting Delegate Award
Justin Goodroad with Aaron Bengston and Alexmai Addo

Student Achievement Awards
Back row: Andy Albertsen, a senior majoring in natural resources from Nelson, Minn.; Alexandra Skeeter, a senior majoring in health sciences from Milwaukee, Wis.; Justin Goodroad, a senior majoring in horticulture from Lindstrom, Minn.; and Alissa Hernandez, a senior majoring in animal science and equine science from Savage, Minn.
Middle row: Kevin Lamp, a junior majoring in natural resources from Long Lake, Minn.; Michael McMahon,a senior majoring in natural resources and aviation from St. Paul, Minn.; Tiffany Breth, a senior majoring in animal science from Albany, Minn.; Rowenna Fillmore, a senior majoring in animal science from Lake Nebagamon, Wis.; and Gyungyoun (Ann) Baek, a senior majoring in health sciences from Seoul, South Korea.
Front row: Cayla Bendel,a senior majoring in natural resources from Lakeville, Minn.; Man of the Year, Sean Rozell, a senior majoring in management from Eveleth, Minn.; Woman of the Year, Kayla Bellrichard, a senior majoring in management and marketing from Elk River, Minn.; Alexmai Addo, a senior from Monrovia, Liberia, majoring in communication; and Chancellor Fred Wood.

Man and Woman of Year
Sean Rozell and Kayla Bellrichard 

Athletic All-Academic Team (no photograph) - 3.2 GPA or higher and lettering in the same sport for two years

Softball         Women's Basketball
Cateline Fafard Avery Jackson
Alexis Khoshaba Kenzie Church
Kaylin Beatty Ashley Martell
Shelby Hollinger         Lindsey Lahr
Josee Plante Ericka McRoberts
Brooke Vatthauer Katrina Moenkedick
Allison Foley Alexa Thielman

Men's Basketball
John Hughes Soccer
Lucas Reller Erin Mears
        Delaney McIntyre
        Cayla Bendel
Football         Rachel Halligan
Ben Bucholz Samantha Berglin
Myint Maung Amanda Crook
Keith McBride
Josh Perea Baseball
Martin Throne Ryan Haggstrom
Jordan Manahah         Trevor Buttermore
Drew Selvestra Marcus Campbell
Andrew Steinfeldt Jesse Jennings
Matt Borowicz Travis Magdzas
Tennis Jon Mittag
Casey Paris Richie Navratil
Annaleis Yuhala         Equestrian
Emily Caldis Paige Clark
        Sabel Bettencourt
Women's Golf Hannah Nedrud
Mary Mikutowski Amanda Overman
Kelly Gustofson Amanda Guimont
Rikki Roscoe Emily Steeley
Katie Sheetz Chloe Nelson
        Amanda Stadtherr
Men's Golf
Zach Cymbaluk Volleyball
Matt Bjorgo Brittany Looker
Michael Roedl Mary Mikutowski
Jesse Roscoe Stephanie Pearson
        Alyssa Schneider
        Alexandra Skeeter
        Chelsea Wiesner

Faculty and Staff Awards

Outstanding Educator
Matt Simmons, Ph.D. 

Most Supportive of Students
Lyle Westrom, Ph.D.

Outstanding Service to Students
Laura Bell

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director, student activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M Extension Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership (NW RSDP) joins 6 organizations to bring natural play spaces to connect children and nature in Polk, Norman, and Mahnomen Counties. 

Even a generation ago, children spent more time outside because it was the normal thing to do. We can all remember the days when we would listen to the birds sing, play in the rain, and use our imagination to contrive games. 

These experiences are important as they provide a connection to nature and a way to use the imagination.  

NW RSDP was recently selected to receive $25,000 in Community Engagement Innovation funding from the Center for Prevention (the Center) at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota. This support will be used to connect children and nature in Northwest Minnesota. 

The grant will provide funding for a project called Tree Cookies and Mud Pies: A Recipe for Community Health.  Engagement activities will focus on four communities: Fosston, Crookston, Ada, and Mahnomen. 

This project engages in the development and use of natural play spaces in support of health equity and active living strategies. The NW Regional Partnership and its partners in public health, early childhood education, youth development, parks and rec, and resource management, will use storytelling, activity mapping and design workshops to enable communities to create and utilize natural play spaces. 

NW RSDP has leveraged partners from various disciplines and agencies.  A new partner this year is Alysa Zimmerle, serving with Conservation Corps MN & IA  as the Community Mapping and Outreach Specialist with Project Get Outdoors (Project GO), an organization that works to reintroduce kids to their natural environments. Collaboration with Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP) staff in the region continues with Kristen Fagerlund, Tammy Carlsrud, and Kelsey Borgen representing Polk, Norman-Mahnomen counties. SHIP works to help Minnesotans live longer, healthier lives by working with communities to gain better access to healthy foods and implement a healthier way of life.  

Sarah Reese, director of Polk County Public Health works to connect resources to community members and university partners interested in connecting children to nature.  Eric Castle, assistant professor at the U of M Crookston will work to facilitate the planning, design, and implementation of the natural play spaces. 

"This project has been a great way to connect university resources to the community.  Students in my classes and student researchers have been able to apply what they are learning in real world settings, said Castle."

To learn more about the work of the Northwest Regional Partnership go to http://blog.lib.umn.edu/rsdp/northwest.  For more information on Project GO initiatives visit www.facebook.com/pages/Project-Get-Outdoors-Inc/137770441949

The Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships (RSDPs) give communities in Greater Minnesota access to the University of Minnesota in order to help solve problems and take advantage of new opportunities. As a part of University of Minnesota Extension, NW RSDP brings together local talent and resources with University of Minnesota knowledge and seed funding to drive sustainability in four areas: agriculture and food systems, tourism and resilient communities, natural resources, and clean energy. 

Contact: Linda Kingery, executive director, U of M Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, 218-281-8697 (kinge002@umn.edu)

Hundreds of rooted poinsettia cuttings arrive in August at the University of Minnesota 
Poinsettia2013-Class 2793.jpg
Crookston in anticipation of another holiday season. Under the skill and coaxing of students involved in the commercial floriculture class, those cuttings develop into a beautiful poinsettia crop.

This year's poinsettias create a beautiful and colorful display with their showy "flowers" known as bracts and include varieties such as Candlelight White, Christmas Beauty Nostalgia, Christmas Feelings Red, Christmas Feelings White, Cinnamon Star, Classic Red, Enduring Marble, Enduring Pink, Prestige Red, Cortez Early Red, Dramatic Red and Prestige Red. 

Members of the fall semester class include: Amanda Thompson, a senior majoring in horticulture from Pine River, Minn.; Ashley Radke, a junior majoring in horticulture from Grand Forks, ND; and Stephanie Reko, a junior majoring in horticulture from Andover, Minn.  

In October, students started the process of forcing the plants to induce bract color in time for the holiday season in October. Following a specific procedure to control the light, the students covered the plants with a dark cloth at 4 p.m. and uncovered them at 8 a.m. each day to regulate the length of daylight the plants receive. The students are responsible for greenhouse chores on the weekends as well. Although the class is taught by Sue Jacobson, the crop is in the hands of the students. The work and production of the poinsettia crop is entirely the responsibility of the class.  Jacobson says, "It's better to learn expensive lessons in school than at your job.  We don't fire the students."

The Agriculture and Natural Resources Department offers commercial floriculture as part of the horticulture program to teach students to produce quality plants for a specific date - a skill necessary for employment in a greenhouse or garden center. "Poinsettias form their colored bracts, when the light is regulated," explains Jacobson. "The poinsettia really doesn't have a blossom like most flowers. Instead, the colorful red, pink, or white petals are modified leaves known as bracts. The blossoms are actually the small yellowish clusters in the center."

Jacobson often allows problems to develop to see how the students will solve them--something they would have to do in an employment situation and giving them an opportunity to apply what they have learned. The class demands hard work, dedication, and a strong team effort to grow the best poinsettias. Leadership and responsibility are two of the qualities that develop in this type of teaching and learning environment.

"Students learn so much from applying their classroom learning to real-world experience," Jacobson explains. "By taking responsibility for the crop, the students are accountable for the outcome making the commercial floriculture class one of the most memorable for the students." The class is excellent training for a career in horticulture, a multi-billion dollar industry in the U.S. 

To learn more about the horticulture program with emphases in environmental landscaping and production horticulture, visit www.UMCrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the group photo, left to right, are Amanda Thompson, Ashley Radke, Stephanie Reko and Sue Jacobson, instructor.

Contact: Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor, 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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Senior Ashlynn Hartung, a double major in horticulture and golf and turf management at the University of Minnesota Crookston is taking a classroom through an extreme makeover. The senior from Lindstrom, Minn., is using her artistic ability to transform the walls of Owen Hall 217 from drab to dramatic. 

She has created a landscape design on paper, transitioned it to a transparency, and then transferred the design onto the wall. Hartung took a number of art classes before college and was part of the art honor society in her high school. She is using that creativity to transform the classroom and the result is both attractive and pays tribute to the beauty of landscape design and horticulture. The work began in spring 2012 and currently one wall is completed and she is starting on the adjoining wall. 

A senator in the Crookston Student Association, the campus student governing body, in 
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2012-13, Hartung has been active across the campus. She earned honors as the Outstanding Horticulture Student at the UM Crookston in spring 2013 and was one of four seniors from the campus who earned top honors at the Mid-American Horticultural Society (MACHS) competition at the University of Wisconsin River Falls in October. She also competed with the horticulture team as part of the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA) competition in 2011. 

For her student internship, Hartung enjoyed her experience at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. She will graduate in May 2014, but her work in Owen Hall is a legacy, and she will leave it behind to be enjoyed by students, faculty, and staff for years to come. 

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Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Theresa Helgeson, coach, MACHS team, 218-281-8120 (helg0145@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Four seniors from the University of Minnesota Crookston took home top honors over the 
hort_MACHS.jpg
weekend at the Mid-American Horticultural Society (MACHS) competition at the University of Wisconsin River Falls. The horticulture majors making up the first place team included Catlin Kersting, Cloquet, Minn.; Ashlynn Hartung, Lindstrom, Minn.; Mitchell Sledge, Saint Louis Park, Minn.; and Tim Staudahar, Hibbing, Minn. The UM Crookston team finished in first place overall followed by Iowa State University in second and Colorado State University in third. The coach for the U of M Crookston is Theresa Helgeson. 

The teams competed in four categories with a total of 200 points each for a total of 800 points overall. The categories were General Knowledge; Judging in both fruit and vegetable classes and nursery and floriculture classes; Herbaceous Identification and Woody Identification. 
In the contest for herbaceous identification Staudahar tied for first place and Hartung tied for second. In Woody Identification Hartung took first and Staudahar took second and the two finished in first and second place respectively in Overall Individual. 

Juniors Ashley Radke, Grand Forks, N.D.; and Sarah Lanners, Nashwauk, Minn.; and Senior Amanda Thompson, Pine River, Minn., also competed as individuals. Lanners finished third in the Herbaceous Identification contest. 

The competition, which takes place during the MACHS annual conference, provides a means of communication between horticulture clubs of participating schools. This year marked the 41st annual conference of the organization. Sharing knowledge and ideas is an important part of the gathering. The MACHS competition includes collegiate horticulture clubs from 12 Mid-American states.

Keynote speaker at the conference was Mike Yanny, senior horticulturalist from Menomonee Falls, Wis. The conference offered students the opportunity to participate in educational tours of the Gertens Garden Center in Inver Grove Heights, Minn.; Bailey's Nursery in Newport, Minn.; St. Croix Valley Tree Farm in Sommerset, Wis.; A Future Farm and The Orchard in Baldwin, Wis.; and Wouterina de Raad's Garden Tour in Beldenville, Wis. 

For more information on horticulture at the U of M Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/hort.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, at top, left to right in the back row, are Sarah Lanners, Mitch Sledge, Tim Staudahar, Catlin Kersting, Ashley Radke, Ashlynn Hartung. In the front: Coach Theresa Helgeson and Amanda Thompson

Contact: Theresa Helgeson, coach, MACHS team, 218-281-8120 (helg0145@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota Crookston honored six remarkable individuals during 
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homecoming. Recognition for four Outstanding Alumni and three Athletic Hall of Fame inductees was held on Friday evening, October 4, 2013, in Bede Ballroom in the Sargeant Student Center. Hosting the evening were Corby Kemmer, director of development and alumni relations and Stephanie Helgeson, director of athletics and Chancellor Fred Wood brought greetings from the campus. The choir, under the direction of George French, sang several numbers including Hail! Minnesota and the Minnesota Rouser. 

Outstanding Alumni award was presented to Tyler Grove '94, Timothy Rhonemus '84, Susan Jacobson '86 & '96 and Gene Dufault '68 and inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame were Michele (Johnson) Allen ex.'88, and Craig Talberg ex. '91. 

A few highlights of these seven accomplished alumni include the following: 

Gene Dufault '68 graduated with a degree in business and has been involved in a number of professions since his graduation. His work experience includes working in food and beverage sales, both stand-alone restaurants and hotels, and operating his own business. 

During the past 19 years Dufault has dedicated his time and talent to working closely with township government. He serves as the district director for the association, which covers 5 counties. He also assists in lobbying efforts for the state legislature, sits on numerous boards, and helps train township officers for their elected positions.

He graduated from the Northwest School of Agriculture (NWSA) in 1963. He regards his time on campus as something very dear to him. Dufault remembers personally helping initiate both the Young Democrats and the Young Republicans along with participating in a number of other clubs and organizations. 

Timothy Rhonemus '84 graduated with a degree in dietetics. He first came to the university as a transfer student seeking to obtain his bachelor of science degree in restaurant management but all that changed when he found that the health care profession was just as rewarding. 

After graduating from U of M Crookston, he attended St. Cloud State University and received his bachelor of science degree in political science. In 1994 Rhonemus received his third degree this time in nursing. He currently works as a healthcare surveyor for the Minnesota Department of Health and Human Services. He assists in surveying nursing homes, out-patient surgical centers, dialysis units, rehab centers, out-patient physical therapy rehab clinics, and care facilities for the intellectually disabled. 

Rhonemus is grateful for his educational experiences at the U of M Crookston and knows that those experiences prepared him for his career in healthcare.  

Susan Jacobson '87 & '96 first graduated with her associate degree in floriculture/greenhouse management and later received her bachelor of science degree in plant industries management from the University of Minnesota Crookston. 

After relocating and being forced to change her career Jacobson found the perfect fit for her interests at the U of M Crookston. Jacobson is proud of the education that opened her eyes to the endless possibilities in the field of horticulture. Jacobson went on to work in the industry for a couple of years and also owned her own flower shop. 

She has worked at the U of M Crookston for the past twenty years and is excited to be teaching the very classes that stimulated her own interests in the beginning. Jacobson is heavily involved in the community she lives in and is part of many professional affiliations including the Minnesota Nursery Landscaping Association. She and her husband, David, make their home in Fertile, Minn.

Michele (Johnson) Allen ex. '88 was a multi-sport athlete at the University of Minnesota Crookston between 1986 and 1988. During that time she played Trojan volleyball, basketball, and softball. 

Allen's athletic skills helped the U of M Crookston place fifth in the 1986 State Junior College Tournament. She was the top passer in 1986 and 1987 and top server in 1988. Allen was named to the All-State Tournament Team, All-Region Tournament Team, and All-Northwest Division Honorable Mention Team in 1986. In 1987 she was named to the All-State Tournament Team and 1st Team All-Northwest Division.

Allen currently works as the laboratory director at Kittson Memorial Hospital where she's in charge of laboratory operations for critical access and oversees two rural health clinic laboratories.  She is also the director of ancillary services for the United States Army Reserve for laboratory, pharmacy, and radiology operations for a 146 bed combat support hospital. Allen received her master's degree from the University of North Dakota and currently resides in Kennedy, Minn., with her three children.

Craig Talberg ex. '91 had twelve interceptions in eight games in one season to lead the nation for the Trojan football team when the campus was part of the National Junior College Athletic Association. He was a First Team All-American in 1990 as well as section player of the year. Talberg was named All-Conference, All-Region, and Defensive Player of the Year in 1990. He went on to Minnesota State University Moorhead (MSUM) where he holds the interception record with six and was named Second Team All-American.

He has a bachelor of science degree from MSUM in teaching and coaching and went on for his developmental and adapted physical education (DAPE) licensure at St. Cloud State University. He also holds a master's degree from Bethel University. 

Talberg teaches physical education at Milaca Public Schools in Milaca, Minn., where he is the head coach for baseball and the eighth grade football coach. He and his wife, Lana, are the parents of three.

Tyler Grove '94 was one of the first to earn a four-year degree from the University of Minnesota Crookston. His major was in plant industries management with an agronomy emphasis. 

While at the U of M Crookston, he participated in the Crops Team and in NACTA (North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture) competition. In 2007 he earned his master's degree in agronomy from Iowa State University. 

In 1995, he was employed with American Crystal Sugar Company as an agriculturist for the East Grand Forks district, and in February, 2013, he accepted a position as the ag strategy development manager at the corporate office in Moorhead, Minn. 

In 2008, he was selected to attend MARL (Minnesota Ag and Rural Leadership) Program.  He and his wife, Rhea, have two children, Ryan and Madison. Grove looks back on his years at the University of Minnesota Crookston and is thankful for the support and encouragement he received from faculty. 

For more information on homecoming at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/alumni/homecoming.htm.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Back row, left to right: Chancellor Wood, Craig Talberg, Tyler Grove, Stephanie Helgeson, and Corby Kemmer. Front row: Gene Dufault, Sue Jacobson,Michele Allen and Timothy Rhonemus.

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Ruth Navarro, communications assistant, 218-281-8446, (nava0085@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual Student Awards Program, a celebration of student service, leadership, and academic and athletic achievement, was held recently at the University of Minnesota Crookston. Assistant Professor Denis Maier, who teaches in the Business Department, was the 2012 Outstanding Educator and hosted this year's recognition.


Award recipients include the following students:

CSA Student Senators and Officers
Brooke Novak; Ross Sigler; Bryce Gillie; Aaron Soltau, Heather Rodriguez; Mariah Gautsche; Emily Goff; Molly Sheehan; Anthonette Sims; and Gyaltso Gurung, Laura Gabrielson; Ashlynn Hartung; Alexmai Addo; Adam Switzer; Kayla Bellrichard; and Shaolei "Sorry" Jin. 


Outstanding Ambassadors
Catlin Kersting, Tashi Gurung, Sam Zuck, Katie Hagen, Sarah Morris, Jordan Melbye
Tony Taylor, Kevin Lamp, Alex Skeeter, Alissa Hernandez, Jessica Girgen, Mikala Guidinger
Sorry Jin, Danny Lee, Bryce Gillie, Justin Goodroad

Ambassador of the Year Award
Bryce Gillie


Outstanding First-Year Biology Award
Ashley Martell


Outstanding Future Educator Award
Dabitna Chung, Amy Van Treeck

Marketing/ Management Academic Achievement Award
Dain Park and Alex Buscher


Marketing/Management Outstanding Leadership Award
Dain Park, Abbey Wemimo, Hannah Reysen, Kayla Bellrichard

Distinguished Service to the Accounting Program
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee

Outstanding SRM Student
Kari Bodine

Outstanding Communication Student
Jessica Stuber 

Outstanding Communication Minor
Connie Vandermay 


SOS Service Award
Alexmai Addo, Catilin Kersting

Outstanding SOS Leader
Almir Krdzalik

Peer Connection Service Award
Alexmai Addo and Brooke Novak

Peer Mentor of the Year Award
Catlin Kersting

Regal Spirit Award
Kayla Bellrichard, and Tyler Lowithan

Outstanding Turfgrass Student Award
Kyle Kreklow, Kurtis Wacker, Joey Schmidt, with Kristie Walker

Norman Pankratz Memorial Conservation Award
Jenny DuBay 

John Polley Soil and Water Conservation Award
Trent Brenny and Andrew Albertsen with Dan Svedarsky

The Wildlife Society Travel Award
Alisha Mosloff 

Outstanding Animal Science
Sara Scott (pre-vet) 

Outstanding Equine Science
Jess Charles (pre-vet)

Outstanding Ag Business Student
Amanda Crook 

Outstanding ASM Student
Leonard Will and Matt Green 

Outstanding Horticulture
Ashlynn Hartung


NACTA Recognition
Meats  Team: Dustin Wiese,  Katie Hagen, Justin Goodroad and Derek Suhonen 
Ag Business Dustin Smith, Katie Hagen, Matt Green, and Kayla Erickson
Ag Computers: Cedric Citrowske, Amanda Crook, Drew Underdahl and Brian Oachs 

Outstanding International Student Scholars Award
Ashley Yun Zhor; Brennan Andreas; Danny Lee; and Tashi Gurung

Learning Abroad Office Ambassador Awards
Tim Baker; Amanda Corneliussen; and DeAndra O'Connell 

Support of Diversity Award


Outstanding Theater Student Award
Liz Massie
Tyler Lowithan
Nathan Anderson

Outstanding Music Service Award
Rebecca Apitz 
Miah Smith 

Outstanding Writing Tutor
Rowenna Fillmore

Computer Help Desk
Melissa Freitag 

Student Employee of the Year
Adam Hoff 

Female and Male Student Athlete of the Year
Chelsea Wiesner and Almir Kradzlik

Female and Male Outstanding Athlete of the Year
Brittany Wiese and Brittany Looker and Richard Haley

Justin Knebel Memorial Award
Broderick Schmidt

Dale Knotek Community Service Award - Delta Theta Sigma (DTS)
Joshua Bruggman, Tim Lee, Brett Carlson, Clayton Lenk, Aaron Soltau, Marcus Twaddle
Kasey Okke, Adam Switzer, Dan Kimm, Hannah Reysen, Sami Benoy, Evan Boreen, Amanda Corneliussen, Brittany Fox

Presidents Volunteer Service Award
Megan Luxford, Chia Moua, Kari Bodine, Bailey Stratton (online student), Katie Nenn, Kevin Lamp Tony Taylor, Krista Kenyon, Emily Goff, Alexmai Addo, Catlin Kersting, Kayla Bellrichard, Alissa Hernandez, Almir Krdzalic Kasey Okke, Sean Rozell, Tyler Lowthian, Bryce Gillie, Ross Sigler

Student Volunteer of the Year Award
John Niemczyk with Lisa Loegering

Student Programmer of the Year
Ashley Hoffman

Outstanding CSA Senator
Alexmai Addo 

Outstanding CSA Voting Delegate Award
Megan Luxford

Faculty and Staff Awards

Outstanding Educator
Ron Del Vecchio 

Most Supportive of Students
Phil Baird 

Outstanding Service to Students
Lisa Samuelson 

Student Achievement Awards
en Williams, Bryce Gillie, Almir Krzadlic, Matt Green
Krista Kenyon, Tashi Gurung, Abbey Wemimo, Brooke Novak
Alexmai Addo, Danny Lee, Sam Zuck- Roscoe, and Alex Skeeter

Man and Woman of Year
Dae Yuel Danny Lee and Sam Zuck-Roscoe 


Athletic All-Academic Team - 3.2 GPA or higher and lettering in the same sport for two years

Rachelle Alcini - Women's Soccer
Matthew G. Borowicz - Football
Carli Bunning - Women's Basketball
Karen Carpenedo - Equestrian - Western
Jessica Charles - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Jensen Crots - Women's Soccer
Zach D. Cymbaluk - Men's Golf
Amanda Krueger - Equestrian - Western
Kelly Gustofson - Women's Golf
Rachel Halligan - Women's Soccer
Shelby Hollinger - Softball
Jesse Jennings - Baseball
Caitlin Kelley - Equestrian - Western
Samantha Kramer - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Almir Krdzalic - Men's Basketball
Brittany Looker - Women's Volleyball
Stacey Marcum - Softball
Ashley Martell - Women's Basketball
Myint Maung- Football
Keith McBride - Football
Erin Mears - Women's Soccer
Mary Mikutowski - Women's Volleyball & Golf
Brooks Miller - Baseball
Hannah Nedrud - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Amanda Overman - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Casey Paris - Women's Tennis
Josh Perea - Football
Angela Peterson - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Josee Plante - Softball
Jordan Prill - Baseball
Jesse Roscoe - Men's Golf
Shannan Salm - Equestrian - Western
Hannah Schiller - Women's Volleyball
Broderick Schmidt - Men's Basketball
Alyssa Schneider - Women's Volleyball
Christopher Secrest - Football
Drew Selvestra - Football
Alexandra Skeeter - Women's Volleyball
Joseph Stearly - Football
Andrew Steinfeldt - Football
Annalee Sundin - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Brooke Vatthauer - Softball
Chelsea Wiesner - Women's Volleyball
Yahna Zastrow - Equestrian - Western

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director of Student Activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Children ages 3 and up can explore the world of agriculture and farm animals during the University of Minnesota Crookston Tours for Tots program to be held Wednesday, April 17 through Friday, April 26, 2013. The tours, recommended for children ages 4 -7 years old, will take children to visit the beef and sheep barn, horse stable and arena, and the greenhouse. Groups of 5 or more with adult supervision are best suited to the tours. To ensure a tour time, contact Leah Stroot in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at 218-281-8101 (stro0525@umn.edu) by Wednesday, April 10. 

Tours run Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and on weekends by appointment. Students in the Introduction to Animal Science class will be providing hands-on learning activities at each stop in the beef and sheep barns, horse stable and arena, and the greenhouse. 

Children will have the chance to see and interact with animals and hear about projects and activities from students on the Crookston campus. In the greenhouse, children will see the wide variety of plants that are grown and view research areas along the way. Tours for Tots is sponsored by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at the U of M Crookston.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu

Contact: Leah Stroot, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8101 (stro0525@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston is launching a project in Fosston, Minn., to design a natural play space somewhere along the Fosston Inspiration Trail (FIT). Eric Castle, assistant professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, teaches landscape design and construction courses on the Crookston campus.  Castle and Mitch Sledge, a junior majoring in horticulture from St. Louis Park, Minn., will be assisting Fosston in this project.  A design workshop to engage the community is scheduled for March 5 in Fosston starting with supper at 6 pm.  All are welcome.  Contact Chuck Lucken at City Hall for details at 218-435-1959. 

Funding for the design project comes from the U of M's Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership (RSDP) and Polk County Public Health's Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP).  

Polk County Public Health is focusing on active living through its Statewide Health Improvement Plan work, and natural play spaces are an excellent way for families to be active together.  

A natural play space is a playground that uses things found in nature - the kind of things that children used to find on their own.  Getting help with the design of the space will ensure that it is not only fun, but also safe, and aesthetically pleasing.  The design portion of the project will be completed by May 1 in time for the community to move from design to action during the summer of 2013.  This coincides with progress on the FIT trail.  

"Fosston aspires to be one of the best communities in the state of Minnesota to live and do business.  That's why the Fosston Economic Development Authority (FEDA) went after the natural play space grants," said Mark Finstad, FEDA board chair.  Fosston City Administrator Chuck Lucken agrees, saying "Fosston has a long tradition of finding ways to improve the community.  This project will provide a safe natural play space for children and their families and friends of all ages."  

The Fosston Athenian Club, a member of the General Federation of Women's Clubs, voted at their December meeting to take the lead for engaging the community in the process of designing the natural play space.  Club president Sue Balstad said, "This project is a perfect match with our Club Collect to be large in thought, word, and deed.  We look forward to convening a meeting to engage the Fosston community in this important project."  

The Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP) serves the people in northwestern Minnesota as they experiment with innovative ideas, build and strengthen relationships and take practical steps into a hopeful future.  For more details see http://rsdp.umn.edu/northwest. 

Contact: Linda Kingery, executive director, U of M Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, 218-281-8697 (kinge002@umn.edu)

2012_12-11_Poinsettia Class 4491.jpg
Hundreds of rooted poinsettia cuttings arrive in August at the University of Minnesota, Crookston in anticipation of another holiday season. Under the skill and coaxing of students involved in the commercial floriculture class, those cuttings develop into a beautiful poinsettia crop.

This year's poinsettias create a beautiful and colorful display with their showy "flowers" known as bracts and include varieties such as Winter Rose Early Red, Freedom Early Red, Polar Bear, Enduring Pink, Monet, Presitge Red, and Prestige Maroon (deep red bracts). With the sale of each Polar Bear cutting, Paul Ecke Ranch, the propagator, makes a donation to help save the polar bears. Winter Rose Early Red is unusual with its crinkly, curly leaves and bracts.

Members of the fall semester class include: Dan Brutlag, a junior majoring in horticulture from Wendell, Minn.; Ashlynn Hartung, a junior majoring in horticulture from Lindstrom, Minn.; Catlin Kersting, a junior majoring in horticulture from Cloquet, Minn.; Ethan Kojetin, a junior majoring in horticulture from Atwater, Minn.; Lexi Salonek, a sophomore majoring in horticulture from Montrose, Minn.; Mitchell Sledge, a junior majoring in horticulture from St. Louis Park, Minn.; and Tim Staudehar, a junior majoring in horticulture from Hibbing, Minn.  

In October, students started the process of forcing the plants to induce bract color in time for the holiday season in October. Following a specific procedure to control the light, the students covered the plants with a dark cloth at 4 p.m. and uncovered them at 8 a.m. each day to regulate the length of daylight the plants receive. The students are responsible for greenhouse chores on the weekends as well. Although the class is taught by Sue Jacobson, the crop is in the hands of the students. The work and production of the poinsettia crop is entirely the responsibility of the class.  Jacobson says, "It's better to learn expensive lessons in school than at your job.  We don't fire the students."

The Agriculture and Natural Resources Department offers commercial floriculture as part of the horticulture program to teach students to produce quality plants for a specific date - a skill necessary for employment in a greenhouse or garden center. "Poinsettias form their colored bracts, when the light is regulated," explains Jacobson. "The poinsettia really doesn't have a blossom like most flowers. Instead, the colorful red, pink, or white petals are modified leaves known as bracts. The blossoms are actually the small yellowish clusters in the center."

Jacobson often allows problems to develop to see how the students will solve them--something they would have to do in an employment situation and giving them an opportunity to apply what they have learned. The class demands hard work, dedication, and a strong team effort to grow the best poinsettias. Leadership and responsibility are two of the qualities that develop in this type of teaching and learning environment.

"Students learn so much from applying their classroom learning to real-world experience," Jacobson explains. "By taking responsibility for the crop, the students are accountable for the outcome making the commercial floriculture class one of the most memorable for the students." The class is excellent training for a career in horticulture, a multi-billion dollar industry in the U.S. 

To learn more about the horticulture program with emphases in environmental landscaping, production horticulture or urban forestry, visit www.UMCrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, back row, l to r: Ethan Kojetin, Tim Staudehar, and Mitchell Sledge
Front row: Ashlynn Hartung, Lexi Salonek, Catlin Kersting and Sue Jacobson, instructor.

Contact: Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor, 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

December at the University of Minnesota, Crookston brings the excitement and challenge of Agriculture and Natural Resources Activities Day. Students from almost 50 high schools will be on campus on Friday, December 7, 2012, to compete in more than 20 contests. The Ag and Natural Resources Day competition has been held for more than 30 years on the Crookston campus.

The day begins early with registration for the equine contests beginning at 7:15 a.m. With contests ranging from horticulture and forestry to ag mechanics, livestock and sales, the day brings out the competitive spirit of students culminating in an awards ceremony. The contests are overseen by U of M, Crookston Agriculture and Natural Resources Department faculty.  All activities conclude with the awards ceremony at 1:15 p.m.in Lysaker Gymnasium. 

The awards ceremony recognizes the day's winning individuals and teams. Scholarships, plaques and certificates are awarded to school teams and individuals for each contest. Last year, $750 UMC scholarships were awarded for the high individual in each contest, $600 UMC scholarships were awarded for the second place individual, and $450 UMC scholarships were awarded for the third place individual. In all, more than $32,000 in scholarships is awarded during the competition. 

More information regarding Ag and Natural Resources Activities Day is available by contacting Leah Stroot at 218-281-8101 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/agnatrday. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Leah Stroot, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8101(stro0525@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

It was another successful year for the University of Minnesota, Crookston at the annual 
MACHS_team.jpg
conference of the Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) held recently in Brookings, S.D. Placing second overall, the team from Crookston consisted of four juniors all majoring in horticulture. Ashlynn Hartung, Lindstrom, Minn., placed first in woody plant identification, first in herbaceous plant identification, and earned first place overall individual honors. Tim Staudahar, Hibbing, Minn., walked away with first place in woody plant identification, as well as herbaceous plant identification, and finished as the third place overall individual. Other members of the winning team were Catlin Kersting, Cloquet, Minn., and Mitch Sledge, St. Louis Park, Minn.

Additional horticulture students who competing individually included Ethan Kojetin, a junior from Atwater, Minn.; Sarah Lanners, a sophomore from Nashwauk, Minn.; Ashley Radke, a sophomore from Grand Forks, N.D.; and Amanda Thompson, a junior from Pine River, Minn. The MACHS team from the U of M, Crookston is coached by Theresa Helgeson, lab services coordinator and Sue Jacobson, instructor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department. 

The teams compete in the areas of plant judging, plant identification, and a general knowledge examination. This year's competition, which took place Oct 11-14, at South Dakota State University included teams from the University of Minnesota, Crookston, University of Wisconsin-River Falls, Iowa State University, North Dakota State University, Northwest Missouri State, and Western Illinois University. The theme for this year's event was Local Treasures and celebrated the organization's 40th anniversary. 

The keynote speaker for the conference, Karl Schmidt, owner and founder of Glacial Lakes Permaculture, spoke on the topic of "Permaculture? That's nice, but how do I make a living doing it?" Conference attendees also had an opportunity to tour the Prairie Coteau Garlic Farm, Volga, S.D.; Shade Vineyard, Volga, S.D.; Linda's Gardens in Chester, S.D.; and North American Wholesale Florist and the Falls Park in Sioux Falls, S.D. The three day event concluded on Sunday, October 14 with the annual business meeting and awards ceremony at the McCrory Gardens Visitor Center.

The MACHS competition will be held at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls in 2013 followed by North Dakota State University in Fargo in 2014. 

The MACHS organization and contest provide a means of communication between horticulture clubs of participating schools. Sharing knowledge and ideas is an important part of the gathering. The MACHS competition includes collegiate horticulture clubs from 12 Mid-American states. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Back row, left to right, Tim Staudahar and Mitch Sledge and in the front row Catlin Kersting and Ashlynn Hartung.

Contact: Theresa Helgeson, lab services coordinator, 218281-8120 (helg0145@umn.edu; Sue Jacobson, instructor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept. 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@u

A day of discussion and presentations on creating nature-based community play spaces will be held at the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Wednesday, October 17, 2012, in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. A $15 registration fee includes lunch and participants may complete their registration online at http://z.umn.edu/NaturalPlaySpace. The workshop runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The morning offers presentations by staff from the U of M, Crookston and local partners covering planning, installation, and the programming aspects of nature-based play spaces. In the afternoon, break-out discussions will address specific areas of interest to help move projects forward no matter what stage they are in currently. 

For more information, contact Marlne LeBlanc at the Extension Regional Center at 218-281-8696 or mleblanc@umn.edu. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Marlene LeBlanc, Extension Regional Center, 218-281-8696 (mleblanc@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Junior Catlin Kersting, Cloquet, Minn., Enjoys Summer in the Greenhouse

kersting_56.jpgThis past spring Catlin Kersting, a junior horticulture major at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, found herself in a unique position. While most of her fellow classmates were trying to find summer employment, she was being offered a job -- a job she didn't even apply for.  This summer Kersting, a 2010 graduate of Cloquet High School, is working at Wagner's Landscaping Inc., in Fisher, Minn., near Crookston. She attributes her current position with Wagner's to the hands-on approach in her classes at the U of M, Crookston.

Kersting is often found out in the campus greenhouses, whether participating in classes or labs, working with the Horticulture Club, which she was the president of this last semester, or just enjoying the company of the plants or the faculty and staff that work there.  Theresa Helgeson, lab coordinator in the greenhouses, mentioned to Kersting that Roger Wagner, a former instructor on the Crookston campus for a little over 30 years and the owner of Wagner's Landscaping Inc., was looking for a hard worker for the summer at his landscaping business. Helgeson encouraged Kersting to consider it. One day in the greenhouses Kersting and Wagner crossed paths and began to chat about her summer plans.

Originally, she was planning to go home and work at The Green House in Carlton, Minn., Kersting_58.jpgwhere she has worked for the past five years. Wagner instead offered her a job in his greenhouses, he had seen her at UMC and knew she had a passion for horticulture and thought she would be a great addition to his staff. After some support and encouragement from Helgeson, Kersting took a trip out to the nursery and loved it. She took the job offer after the visit, excited about the chance to try something different and gain new experiences.

At Wagner's Kersting has been able to put a lot of what she has learned in the classroom into real world, practical use. She has also had the opportunity to broaden her knowledge base, "I have learned a lot about trees, from grafting and planting to what trees pollinate with one another. I now know which trees need pollinators and which crab apple trees drop their fruit and which keep their fruit. I could not have told you that before," she says.

This job has really showed Kersting that she is on the right path in her college career. "I hope to one day manage my own greenhouse or work in a nursery, and I have really been able to get those experiences here, starting with the planting of the seedlings this winter and selling those same plants to the customers now, as well as all the day-to-day functions."  At Wagner's Kersting can usually be found in one of the greenhouses watering the plants or helping out customers--her favorite part of the job.

kersting_64.jpg"Sometimes the customers will bring out cookies and want to sit down and chit-chat with you! It is really family-like out here which is really nice." The friendly atmosphere at Wagner's is what also drew her to the U of M, Crookston. In both places she is able to work directly with the plants and in both places she feels like a part of a family. "At a big campus you might get lost in the crowd, but at UMC, you are one of the family," Kersting explains. "Everyone really wants you to succeed and will do anything to help you out."

At UMC Kersting has grown into a leader, something she never thought she would be. In addition to being the Horticulture Club president last semester, this fall she will be leading a group of freshmen and transfer students as they become accustomed to campus and each other as well as leading a team of about 20 fellow UMC students as one of the student team leaders for the new student orientation program. These are experiences she feels will be valuable when it comes time to start a career. "If I am going to be running a greenhouse I will be managing employees. These experiences will help me know how to do that effectively."

Kersting views her summer job as more than just watering plants to help them grow. It's a great learning opportunity that is helping her to grow both personally and professionally.

Listen to Catlin Kersting share her experience as a horticulture major: 

For more information about the horticulture program at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/hort.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos, top, left, Catlin Kersting surrounded by plants in front of Wagner's Landscaping, Inc.

Middle, right: Kersting, a junior horticulture major at UMC in one of the greenhouses at Wagner's Landscaping, Inc. where she has been working this summer.

Bottom, right: Putting her green thumb to work, Kersting waters the plants in the greenhouse at Wagner's Landscaping Inc.

Contact: Austin Czichozki, communications assistant, 218-281-8446 (czich003@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual Student Awards Program, a night celebrating student service and achievement, 2012_4-19-Service Awards 0277.jpgwas held recently at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Associate Professor Kevin Thompson, who teaches in the Liberal Arts and Education Department, was the 2011 Outstanding Educator and hosted this year's recognition.

Award recipients include the following students:
(Numbers correspond to the number of the photo in the online photo gallery.)

1.    Fall 2011 CSA Senators and Officers
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Hannah Frey, junior, communication, La Crosse, Wis.
Kate Holmquist, senior, communication, Middleton, Wis.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Jennifer Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Anthonette Sims, sophomore, communication, Robbinsdale, Minn.
Michelle Boateng, junior, applied studies, Bloomington, Minn.
Adam Switzer, junior, sport and recreation management, Apple Valley, Minn.
Brooke Novak, junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.
Hannah Reysen, sophomore, double major marketing and business management, Adell, Wis.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Kayla Bellrichard, freshman, business management, Elk River, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
Emily Goff, sophomore, double major animal science and equine science, Danvers, Minn.
Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.

2.    Spring 2012 CSA Senators and Officers
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Kate Holmquist, senior, communication, Middleton, Wis.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Anthonette Sims, sophomore, communication, Robbinsdale, Minn.
Michelle Boateng, junior, applied studies, Bloomington, Minn.
Adam Switzer, junior, sport and recreation management, Apple Valley, Minn.
Brooke Novak, junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.
Hannah Reysen, sophomore, double major marketing and business management, Adell, Wis.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Kayla Bellrichard, freshman, business management, Elk River, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
Emily Goff, sophomore, double major animal science and equine science, Danvers, Minn.
Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.

3.    Student Ambassadors
Kourtney Brevik, sophomore, animal science, Erskine, Minn.
Jessica Stuber, senior, natural resources, Hill City, Minn.
Samantha Zuck, junior, animal science, Jamestown, N.D.
Rachel Keimig, senior, ag systems management, Princeton, Minn.
Alexandra Skeeter, sophomore, health sciences, Milwaukee, Wis.
Victoria Martin, sophomore, animal science, Worland, Wyo.
Tony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridan, Wyo.
Amanda Pihlaja, junior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management,  Duluth, Minn.
Erica Nelson, junior, double major animal science and equine science, Carols, Minn.
Whitney Lian, junior, agricultural education, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Bryce Gillie, junior, agronomy, Hallock, Minn.
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Samantha Lahman, senior, animal science, Parkers Prairie, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
Josh Lunak, advisor

4.    Ambassador of the Year
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.

Campus Ministry Award (No photograph available)
Jenna Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.

5.    Outstanding Leadership in FCA Award
 Jensen Crots, junior, health management, Chesterton, Ind.

Outstanding Achievement in Math and Physics Award (No photograph available)
Tyler Brazier, senior, software engineering, Greenbush, Minn.
Tyler Berglund, junior, health sciences, Warren, Minn.

6.    Outstanding First Year Biology Award
Brittany Looker, freshman, health sciences, Rochester, Minn.
Ashley Martell, freshman, health sciences, Somerset, Wis.

7.    Excellence in Early Childhood Education Award
Megan Eul, senior, early childhood education, Rosemount, Minn.
Janie Bauer,  senior, early childhood education, Durand, Wis.

8.    Outstanding Academic Achievement Award - Business Department

Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.
Sheila Lynch, senior, business management, Inver Grove Heights, Minn.
Alisha Hillstrom, senior, business management, Maple Grove, Minn.
Christopher Bargsten, senior, double major business management and quality management, New Brighton, Minn.
Michael Cloutier, senior, business management, Zimmerman, Minn.
Bryan Boutain, senior, marketing, Alexandria, Minn.
Adam Grahek, senior, marketing, Minneapolis, Minn.
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal

9.    Outstanding Leadership Award -  Business Department
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Julie Trotter, senior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management, Eagan, Minn.
Tony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridan, Wyo.
Brittany Bergemann, senior, marketing, Good Thunder, Minn.

10.    Outstanding Accounting Student
Hwee Kim, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea

11.    Hotel, Restaurant & Tourism Hospitality Award
Amoy Carty, senior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management; Sandy Point, Saint Kitts.
Lauren Ferrara, senior, hotel, restaurant and tourism management; Eden Prairie, Minn.

12.    Outstanding Communication Student Award
 Kristine Neu, senior, double major, horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.

Outstanding Communication Student (Minor) Award

Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal

13.    Outstanding Sport and Recreation Management Student
Paul Adelman, junior, sport and recreation management, Bellingham, Minn.
Danielle Rueter, senior, sport and recreation management, Burlington, Wis.

14.    SOS Service Award
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Alysia Osowski, senior, double major in agricultural business and agronomy, Grafton, N.D.

SOS Leadership Award
Katelyn Zins, senior, communication, Starbuck, Minn.

15.    Peer Connections Service Award
Kristine Neu, senior, double major in horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Brooke Novak,  junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.

Peer Connections Peer Mentor of the Year (No photograph available)
Samantha Zuck, junior, animal science, Jamestown, N.D.

16.    Outstanding Turfgrass Student Award
Trenton Waters, senior, golf and turf management, Rush City, Minn.
 
Turf Bowl Team Members
Trenton Waters, senior, golf and turf management, Rush City, Minn.
Nick Walters, senior, golf and turf management, Plymouth, Minn.
Nick Harreld, senior, golf and turf management, New Brighton, Minn.
Kyle Rick, senior, double major golf and turf management and manufacturing management, Coon Rapids, Minn.

17.    Norman Pankratz Memorial Conservation Award
Ben Williams, senior, natural resources, Excelsior, Minn.

John Polley Soil and Water Conservation Award
Bob Guetter, sophomore, natural resources, Miltona, Minn.

18.    Minnesota Soil and Water Conservation
Kelsey Kaiser, junior, natural resources, Streeter, N.D.
Austin Link, senior, natural resources, Sebeka, Minn.

19.    June Shaver /The Wildlife Society Scholarship
Krista Kenyon, junior, natural resources, Sanford, Manitoba, Canada
Austin Link, , senior, natural resources, Sebeka, Minn.

20.    Outstanding Animal Science Student of the Year
 Kayla Klehr, senior, animal science, Richmond, Minn.

Outstanding Equine Science Student of the Year
 Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.

21.    Outstanding Dedication to the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department
Sara Wells, senior, double major equine science and biology, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

22.    Outstanding Ag Business
Alysia Osowski, senior, double major agricultural business and agronomy, Grafton, N.D.

23.    Outstanding Ag Systems Management Student
 Matt Green, senior, triple major agricultural systems management, agronomy, and ag business, Greenbush, Minn.

24.    Hort Club Award and Exceptional Service to the Hort Club Award
Catlin Kersting, sophomore, horticulture, Cloquet, Minn. (Hort Club Award)
Kristine Neu, senior, double major horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn. (Exceptional Service to the Hort Club

25.    Study Abroad Seniors
Emily Caillier, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Crookston, Minn.
Sheila Carleton, senior, double major agronomy and natural resources, Baxter, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Jennifer Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Trista Halland, senior, business management, Crookston, Minn.

26.    International Student Scholars Awards
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Tashi Wongdi Gurung, junior, environmental sciences, Mustang, Nepal
Amoy Carty, senior, hotel, restaurant and tourism management, Sandy Point, Saint Kitts
Nana Sarkodie Boaten, senior, marketing, Accra, Ghana

Outstanding achievement by an International Student
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal

27.    Outstanding ESL Student    
Han Gyu Kang, Busan, South Korea

Outstanding ESL Tutor
Tashi Gurung, junior, environmental sciences, Mustang, Nepal


28.    Together Everyone Achieves More
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal
Shirley Osborne, Crooskton, Minn.

29.    Support of Diversity Award presented by the Black Student Association
Ashley Crowe, Circle of Nations Indigenous Association, senior, sport and recreation management, Long Prairie, Minn.
Rae French, coordinator of study abroad
Alvin Killough, assistant professor, Liberal Arts and Education Department
Gary Willhite, director of residential life
Peter Phaiah, associate vice chancellor for student affairs
Charles H. Casey, chancellor
Kristie Jerde, assistant director residential life and advisor for the Black Student Association

30.    Achievement in Music
Tyler Lowthian, freshman, business management, Richfield, Minn.
Bryce Gillie, junior, agronomy, Hallock, Minn.
Miah Smith, freshman, health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Liz Massie, sophomore, communication, Eagan, Minn.
Nathan Anderson, freshman, agricultural education, Appleton, Minn.
Chelsea Swenson, senior, software engineering, Fertile, Minn.
Beth Motley, sophomore, equine science, Vadnais Heights, Minn.
Casey Paris, sophomore, agricultural business, Fairmont, Minn.
Mark Frenzel, sophomore, agricultural systems management, Blackduck, Minn.

31.    Computer Help Desk Award
Kelsey Kaiser, junior, natural resources, Streeter, N.D.

32.    Student Employee of the Year Award
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.

33.    Athletic Department All Academic Team
To be eligible for this honor, the student-athlete must be a member of the varsity traveling team and have a cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or better.  Furthermore, the athlete must have reached sophomore athletic and academic standing at her/his institution (true freshmen, red-shirt freshmen and ineligible athletic transfers are not eligible) and must have completed at least one full academic year at that institution.

Janie Bauer, volleyball, senior, early childhood education, Durand, Wis.
Jonathon Blazek, men's golf, senior, business management, Owatonna, Minn.
Kari Bodine, women's golf, junior, sport and recreation management, Babbitt, Minn.
Carli Bunning, women's basketball, junior, natural resources, Boone, Iowa
Karen Carpendo, equestrian, senior, equine science, Bessemer, Mich.
Jessica Charles, equestrian, senior, animal science, Belgrade Lakes, Maine
Jensen Crots, soccer, junior, health management, Chesterton, Ind.
Megan Eul, women's basketball, senior, early childhood education, Rosemount, Minn.
Amanda Flint, equestrian, senior, double major equine science and agricultural business, Aberdeen, S.D.
Megan Flynn, soccer, senior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management, Chanhassen, Minn.
Jessica Goodrich, soccer, sophomore, communication, Munster, Ind.
Kelly Gustofson, women's golf, junior, early childhood education, Hermantown, Minn.
Rachel Halligan, soccer, junior, early childhood education, Duluth, Minn.
Theresa Hamel, women's golf, senior, double major agronomy and agricultural business, Lakota, N.D.
Lauren Kessler, women's basketball, senior, early childhood education, Albertville, Minn.
Megan Kramer, equestrian, senior, equine science, Owatonna, Minn.
Almir Krdzalic, men's basketball, junior, biology, Sioux Falls, S.D.
Stacey Marcum, softball, junior, communication, Merrill, Wis.
Keith McBride, football, junior, double major business management and accounting, Lodi, Wis.
Addie O'Neil, equestrian, junior, agricultural education, Redwood Falls, Minn.
Amanda Overman, equestrian, junior, early childhood education, Lindenhurst, Ill
Casey Paris, tennis, sophomore, agricultural business, Fairmont, Minn.
Josh Perea, football, sophomore, criminal justice, Pico Rivera, Calif.
Angela Peterson, equestrian, senior, double major equine science and animal science, Detroit Lakes,  Minn.
Melanie Rodriguez, equestrian, senior, animal science, Minneapolis, Minn.
Danielle Rueter, volleyball senior, sport and recreation management, Burlington, Wis.
Alyssa Schneider, volleyball, senior, early childhood education, Racine, Wis.
Rachel Schoenborn, softball, sophomore, biology, Anchorage, Alaska
Christopher Secrest, football, junior, criminal justice, Hollywood, Fla.
Alexandra Skeeter, volleyball, sophomore, health sciences, Milwaukee, Wis.
Joseph Stearly, football, junior, health management, Hamlake, Minn.
Andrew Steinfeldt, football, sophomore, health sciences, Green Bay, Wis.
Annalee Sundin, equestrian, junior, double major equine science and animal science, Deer River, Minn.
Denise Thompson, equestrian, sophomore, equine science, Rochester, NY
Amy Van Treeck, equestrian, junior, early childhood education, Sheboygan Falls, Wis.
Kaytlin Weiger, equestrian, senior, equine science, Duluth, Minn.
Sara Wells, equestrian, senior, double major equine science and biology, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Chelsea Wiesner, volleyball, sophomore, double major health sciences and biology, Rochester, Minn.
Yahna Zastrow, equestrian, senior, equine science, Easton, Minn.


34.    Student Programmer of the Year
 Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.

35.    Dale Knotek Community Service Award
Student  Athletic  Advisory Committee (SAAC)

36.    President's Volunteer Service Awards
Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.
Sabra Amundson, sophomore, animal science, Crooks, S.D.
Chris Anderson, senior, natural resources, Missoula, Mont.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Gyungyoun "Ann" Baek, sophomore, health sciences,  Seoul, South Korea
Samm Blees, senior, criminal justice, North St. Paul, Minn.
Nana Boaten, senior, marketing, Accra, Ghana
Michelle Boateng, junior, applied studies, Bloomington, Minn.
Tiffany Breth, junior, animal science, Upsala, Minn.
Kourtney Brevik, sophomore, animal science, Erskine, Minn.
Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.
Sophie Cross, freshman, animal science, Farmington, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Bryce Gillie, junior, agronomy, Hallock, Minn.
Katie Hagen, sophomore, agricultural business, Epping, N.D.
Alissa Hernandez, freshman, double major animal science and equine science, Savage, Minn.
Catlin Kersting, sophomore, horticulture, Cloquet, Minn.
Moysey Kutsev, sophomore, business management, Erskine, Minn.
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul,  South Korea
Whitney Lian, junior, agricultural education, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Nongye Lo, senior, business management, St. Paul, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
May Nabirye, junior, software engineering, Eagan, Minn.
Erica Nelson, junior, double major equine science and animal science, Carlos, Minn.
Kasey Okke, junior, agricultural education, Hawley, Minn.
Isaac Osei, sophomore, software engineering, Cottage Grove, Minn.
Alysia Osowski, senior, double major agricultural business and agronomy, Grafton, N.D.
Jennifer Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Amanda Reineke, senior, double major, equine science and agricultural business, Fisher, Minn.
Hannah Reysen, sophomore, double major marketing and business management, Adell, Wis.
Donovan Rupprecht, freshman, undeclared, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Allison Schumacher, senior, sport and recreation management, Crookston, Minn.
Anthonette Sims, sophomore, communication, Robbinsdale, Minn.
Karlie Sorrell, senior, animal science, Altona, N.Y.
Anthony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridean, Wyo.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Abbie Westby, senior, agricultural education, Erhard, Minn.
Anton Young, senior, senior, natural resources, St. Cloud, Minn.
Katelyn Zins, senior, communication, Starbuck, Minn.

37.    President's Student Leadership Award
Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) representing SIFE are
Tony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridan, Wyo.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.
Dae Yuel "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea

38.    Outstanding CSA Senator
Adam Switzer, junior, sport and recreation management, Apple Valley, Minn.

Outstanding CSA Voting Delegate Award, in memory of Karolyn Joop (No photograph available)
Victoria Martin, sophomore, animal science, Worland, Wyo.

39.    Outstanding Educator
Dennis Maier, assistant professor, Business Department

Most Supportive of Students
Kim Cousins, student personnel coordinator, Academic Assistance Center

40.    Student Achievement Awards
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Sheila Carleton, senior, double major natural resources and agronomy, Baxter, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Megan Eul, senior, early childhood education, Rosemount, Minn.
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal
Samantha Lahman, senior, animal science, Parkers Prairie, Minn.
Whitney Lian, junior, agricultural education, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Kristine Neu, senior, double major, horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Brooke Novak, junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.
Samantha Zuck, senior, animal science, Jamestown, N.D.
Chris Anderson, senior, natural resources, Missoula, Mont.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Matthew Green, senior, triple major agricultural systems management, agronomy, and agricultural business, Greenbush, Minn.
Dae Yeul Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria


41.    Man and Woman of the Year
Kristine Neu, senior, double major in horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.

42.    Student Volunteer of the Year Award
Alissa Hernandez, freshman, double major animal science and equine science, Savage, Minn.

43. Outstanding Service to Students
Phil Baird, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department

From the group of students received the Student Achievement Awards, two students were chosen as the "Man and Woman of the Year," the year's top academic, service and leadership award. Honors for 2012 go to (pictured l to r) UMC Man of the Year, Austin Czichotzki, a senior from Barnesville, Minn., majoring communication; and Woman of the Year Kristine Neu, a senior from Pelican Rapids, Minn., who is a double major in horticulture and communication. Czichotzki is the son of Terry and Sandi Czichotzki and Neu is the daughter of Mark and Karen Neu.

Special thanks to the Crookston Noon Day Lions Club for their continued support of the awards reception and program.

Members of the Student Awards committee are Lisa Samuelson, Sue Jacobson, Lynne Mullins, Patti Tiedemann, Terrill Bradford, Christiana Boadu, Kayla Bellrichard, and Emily Goff.

Visit the Student Awards Program photo gallery.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Student Achievement Award recipients
Back row: Brooke Novak, Abbey Wemimo, Chris Anderson, Megan Eul, Dae Yuel "Danny" Lee, Alisha Aasness, and Angie Bartholomew.


Front row: Whitney Lian, Matt Green, Austin Czichotzki, Kristine Neu, Jackie Dullinger, and Yangchen Gurung.



 

Contact: Lisa Sameulson, director, student activities, 218-281-8507(samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Two students in the horticultural studies program at University of Minnesota, Crookston recently received scholarships sponsored by the Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association (MNLA) Foundation. The scholarship recipients are Lexi Salonek_Lexi.jpgSalonek (at right), a freshman from Montrose, Minn., and Alisha Aasness (at left, below), a senior from Fergus Falls, Minn.

The MNLA scholarship program recognizes superior students enrolled in horticultural or landscape studies programs at several area colleges and universities.  The scholarships are designed by MNLA and its member companies to help grow future leaders in the nursery and landscape industry.

Two MNLA member firms sponsored the scholarships for the University of Minnesota - Crookston students. Countryside Gardens, Inc., based in Delano, sponsored the scholarship for Salonek and Hoffman & McNamara Nursery and Landscape, based in Hastings, sponsored the scholarship for Aasness.
 
Aasness_Alisha_notweb.jpgTo be eligible for an MNLA scholarship, applicants must possess a "C" grade average or better, present letters of recommendation from instructors and employers, and submit an essay stating their career goals and objectives. 

The Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association is the state's largest green industry trade association with over 1,200 member companies.  Members include nurseries, garden centers, landscape contractors, landscape designers, irrigation contractors, commercial flower growers, tree care specialists, professional gardening services, and turf and landscape management professionals.
 

Contact: Jodi Larson, MNLA Foundation Program Director (jodi@mnla.biz)

Students Named to Dean's List for Fall Semester 2011 at the U of M, Crookston

Students named to the fall semester 2011 Dean's List at the University of Minnesota, Crookston were announced by the Office of the Registrar. The U of M, Crookston is one of the most respected career-oriented, technology-based universities in the nation.

To qualify for a place on the Dean's List, students must complete 12 or more letter-graded (A-F) credits while attaining a 3.66 grade point average. The Crookston campus is the online leader in the University of Minnesota system and the only campus providing every full-time student with a laptop computer.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Fall Semester 2011 Dean's List

Name Major


Abdullahi, Ahmad Applied Studies 
Addo, Alexmai B Undecided
Albertsen, Andrew Natural Resources 
Baek, Gyungyoun Health Management 
Bainter, Tiffany Business Management 
Ball-Warriner, Melissa Ann Applied Studies 
Barta,Michelle Lee Hotel/Rest/Tourism Mgmt 
Beattie, Morgan Marie Criminal Justice 
Benson, Amanda Marketing 
Benson, Christina Ann Communication 
Berens, Sean Andrew Natural Resources 
Berg, Steffanie Jean Communication 
Biermaier, Rachel LaVerne Post-Secondary Enrollment Opt
Bitschenauer, Anna Christine Accounting 
Blace, Jenna Natural Resources 
Brenny, Trenton Gene Natural Resources 
Breth, Tiffany Nicole Animal Science 
Buesing, Samuel T Business Management 
Carpenedo, Karen M Equine Science 
Chang, Feng Software Engineering 
Charles, Jessica L Animal Science 
Chen, Qi Business Management 
Chu, Yiqi Agricultural Business 
Church, Kenzie Business Management 
Crots, Jensen Health Management 
Cymbaluk, Zach D Agricultural Business 
Dagoberg, Seth D Agricultural Business/Agronomy
Darst, Ericka Ann Marketing 
Dohmeier, Nicole Marie Accounting 
Dutchak, Taylor Health Management 
Erickson, Kayla W Agricultural Education 
Feng, Jiaolong Business Management 
Fenno, Dillon J Post-Secondary Enrollment Opt
Fillmore, Rowenna Animal Science 
Flaagan, Shandy L Animal Science 
Flint, Amanda Kristine Agricultural Business/Equine Science
Flynn, Megan Hotel/Rest/Tourism Mgmt 
Folkert, Kelsey Animal Science 
French, Sarah Lynn Business Management 
Fu, Xianfeng Software Engineering 
Funk, Maria C Agricultural Education 
Goodroad, Justin J Agricultural Education/Animal Science
Gorentz, Andrew Agronomy 
Granfors, Jacob W Natural Resources 
Gregory, Stephen L Manufacturing Management 
Guetter, Robert Natural Resources 
Gurung, Tashi Wongdi Environmental Sciences
Gurung, Yangchen Dolker Business Management 
Gustofson, Kelly Jo Early Childhood Education 
Hagen, Katie Agricultural Business/Animal Science
Han, Myoung Don Business Management 
Hartung, Ashlynn R Horticulture 
Haug, Erika Maxine Equine Science 
Hedberg, Benjamin John Business Management 
Held, Blake Business-Undeclared
Hersy, Abdi E Applied Studies 
Hoff, Adam Software Engineering 
Holzbauer, Skyler S Agronomy 
Hong, JuA Accounting 
Hu, Wenjun Business Management 
Hua, Guogang Agricultural Business 
Huynh, Zachary Software Engineering 
Jackson, Mark Thomas Natural Resources 
Jackson, Wade Theodore Natural Resources 
Jacobson, Whitney M Agricultural Education/Animal Science
Jennings, Jesse J Criminal Justice 
Jensen, Tanner L Hotel/Rest/Tourism Mgmt 
Jeong, Seongbin Organizational Psychology 
Jin, Chen Agricultural Business 
Johnson, Scott L Golf and Turf Mgmt/Horticulture
Joppru, Caitlin M Business Management 
Jung, Eun Ki Business Management 
Jung, Sun Jung Communication 
Kalinowski, Ethan Natural Resources 
Keimig, Rachel F Agricultural Systems Mgmt 
Kim, Deok-Won Business Management 
Kim, Hwee Accounting 
Kim, Ye Eun Organizational Psychology 
Klehr, Kayla Animal Science 
Kocina, Kathleen J Accounting 
Koep, Mark Natural Resources 
Kramer, Megan E Equine Science 
Kubica, Melanie Applied Studies 
Kutsev, Hionia Petrovna Health Management 
LaCoursiere, Emmett Peter Post-Secondary Enrollment Opt
Lamp, Kevin J Natural Resources 
Lee, Amy Rae Agricultural Education 
Lee, Jin-Seung Undecided
Li, Shuhang Software Engineering 
Liebl, Quinton Nels Natural Resources 
Lim, Ji-Su Business Management 
Lindstrom, Shannon Michelle Business Management 
Liu, Yundi Accounting 
Looker, Brittany A Hlth Sciences Pre Prof Tr 
Lovins, John E Business Management/Quality Management
Lu, Yang Software Engineering 
McArthur, Leah Nicole Quality Management 
McGraw, Thomas A. Undecided
Meissner, Brendan Agricultural Business 
Melin, Mariah C Animal Science/Equine Science
Mikutowski, Mary C Hlth Sciences Pre Prof Tr 
Miller, Geoffrey Marketing 
Moore, Malcolm Xavier Business Management 
Morris, Sarah E Animal Science 
Mosher, Presley E Horticulture 
Munson, Jeremy George Business Management 
Nedrud, Hannah R Equine Science 
Neu, Kristine M Communication/Horticulture
Novak, Brooke N Communication 
O'Neil, Addie Equine Science 
Pearson, Nicole Applied Studies 
Perea, Josh Criminal Justice 
Pierce, Cassandra Jean Business Management 
Plante, Josee Hlth Sciences Pre Prof Tr 
Plautz, Katelin Mary Natural Resources 
Ramponi, Andrea L Animal Science 
Rarick, Jessica Ray Natural Resources 
Rattanasamay, Mariah Post-Secondary Enrollment Opt
Reed, Megan Elizabeth Marketing 
Reysen, Hannah M Business Management/Marketing
Ritter, Alena Quality Management 
Robinson, Trista Business Management 
Robles, Audrey Undecided
Roder, Ashley Megan Sport &Recreation Mgmt 
Rodriguez, Melanie C Animal Science 
Rollness, Jayden Thomas Agricultural Business 
Roy, Lindsey J Accounting 
Rupprecht, Donovan Reese Agri/NatRes-Undeclared
Samuelson, Rick Allen Hotel/Rest/Tourism Mgmt 
Schliep, Michael Leroy Software Engineering 
Schmierer, Jeremy Agricultural Business 
Schmitz, Gemma C Natural Resources 
Schneider, Alyssa Elementary Education 
Selvestra, Drew A Criminal Justice 
Setness, Blake David Animal Science 
Shin, Hye Won Health Management/Information Technology Mgmt 
Sigler, Ross A Accounting 
Sim, Ye Young Undecided
Skoien, Brittney Marie Agricultural Business/Equine Science
Sorlie, Katherine Marie Business Management 
Sorlie, Nicole E Animal Science 
Sorrell, Karlie Elizabeth Animal Science 
Stang, Candice Elizabeth Business Management 
Stanley, Christa Pauline Business Management 
Sugar, Joshua L Business Management 
Tan, Chong Agricultural Business 
Teixeira, Leonardo Business Management 
Trotter, Julie Ann Hotel/Rest/Tourism Mgmt/Marketing
Van Dyke, Vayla M Natural Resources 
Vaughn, Craig Agricultural Systems Mgmt 
Wacker, Daniel Accounting 
Walters, Nicholas Golf and Turf Mgmt 
Waters, Trenton R Golf and Turf Mgmt 
Wavra, Danielle Biology 
Weng, Yaowen Agricultural Business 
Westby, Abbie Agricultural Education 
Will, Leonard Thomas Agricultural Systems Mgmt 
Williams, Benjamin Rex Natural Resources 
Wilson, William R Accounting 
Wright, Joscelyn Accounting 
Wrzos, Holly Hotel/Rest/Tourism Mgmt 
Yao, Jiabin Business Management 
Yimgnia, Christian Guy Accounting 
Zhou, Xi Business Management/Marketing
Zhou, Xiaowei Accounting 
Zhou, Yun Agricultural Business 
Zieska, Nicole A Accounting 
Zuck, Samantha Ann Animal Science 


Contact: Andrew Svec, director of communications, 218-281-8438, (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Students named to the fall semester 2011 Chancellor's List at the University of Minnesota, Crookston were announced by the Office of the Registrar. The U of M, Crookston is one of the most respected career-oriented, technology-based universities in the nation.

To qualify for a place on the Chancellor's List, students must complete 12 or more letter-graded (A-F) credits while attaining a 4.00 grade point average. The Crookston campus is the online leader in the University of Minnesota system and the only campus providing every full-time student with a laptop computer.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Chancellors List for Fall 2011

Name Major
   
Abbey, Wemimo S Business Management 
Bakken, Keith Jory Business Mgmt/Quality Mgmt/Health Mgmt
Bartholomew, Angela Marie Business Management/Equine Science 
Bauer, Janie M Early Childhood Education 
Bendel, Cayla R Natural Resources 
Beth, Brianna S Biology 
Bjorgo, Matthew J Undecided
Boen, Chase P Agricultural Business/Agronomy
Borowicz, Matthew G Hlth Sciences Pre Prof Tr 
Bullo, Aman Amano Applied Studies 
Buscher, Alexandra W Business Management 
Chen, Xihao
Cho, Hyun Min
Agricultural Business 
Biology
Cloutier, Michael A Business Management 
Cook, Allison Joy Health Management 
Czichotzki, Austin Communication 
Denver, Megan I Natural Resources 
Dohmeier, Alexa Equine Science 
Eul, Megan Elizabeth Early Childhood Education 
Geller, Stephanie H Post-Secondary Enrollment Opt
Grahek, Adam Michael Marketing 
Green, Matthew Agr Systems Mgmt/Agronomy/Agr Business 
Gu, Yue Software Engineering 
Haggerty, Stephanie Business Management 
Harren ,Joseph Agronomy 
Hillstrom, Alisha Marie Business Management 
Hinzmann, Mary L Accounting 
James, Josh Natural Resources 
Jiang, Hong Cheng Business Management 
Johnson, Katy Natural Resources 
Kaiser, Kelsey S Natural Resources 
Kankelfritz, Megan Nicole Applied Studies 
Kenyon, Krista A Natural Resources 
Koo, Kyungwook Accounting 
Koval, Katelyn Elizabeth Post-Secondary Enrollment Opt
Krikke, Alyssa Hlth Sciences Pre Prof Tr 
Kuznia, Destiny Eve Business Management 
Lee, Dae Yeul Accounting 
Lee, Dong Sung Undecided
Liu, Siyuan Business Management 
Lu, Zhou Software Engineering 
Maki, Samantha J Early Childhood Education 
Martell, Ashley E Hlth Sciences Pre Prof Tr 
Miller, Maranda Natural Resources 
Mo, Chengyu Business Management 
O'Connell, Stephanie Animal Science/Equine Science 
Origas, Nicole Marie Business Management 
Packer, Lindsey Renae Applied Studies 
Palm, Heather Lea Health Management 
Pan, Fangjing Business Management 
Paris, Casey Lee Agricultural Business 
Park, Koung Un Accounting 
Pepper, Trista Business Management 
Pristanski, Madelyn K Equine Science 
Rindahl, April Jean Accounting 
Scully, Shannon R Animal Science 
Sibert, Jeremy L Criminal Justice 
Simon, Kassandra Joy Marketing 
Stanton, Dawn Marie Accounting 
Stolp, Shane A Accounting 
Sullivan, Brandi Nicole Equine Science 
Thompson, William Agronomy 
Van Treeck, Amy L
Wood, Aliscia
Early Childhood Education
Early Childhood Education
Zastrow, Yahna K Equine Science 

Contact: Andrew Svec, director of communication, 218-281-8438, (asvec@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

2011_12_Poinsettia Class 0305.jpgHundreds of rooted poinsettia cuttings arrive in August in anticipation of another holiday season. For seven students involved in the commercial floriculture class at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, those cuttings have developed into a beautiful poinsettia crop under their skill and coaxing.

This year's poinsettias create a beautiful and colorful display with their showy "flowers" known as bracts and include varieties such as Freedom Early Red, Freedom Early White, Freedom Early Pink, Ice Punch (red bracts with pink centers), Red Glitter (red bracts with speckles of white) and Prestige Maroon (deep red bracts).  

Members of the fall semester class include: Mitch Allore, a senior majoring in golf and turf management from North Mankato, Minn.; Ben Sullivan, senior majoring in natural resources from Crookston, Minn.; Clay Schmitt, a senior majoring in golf and turf management from Delano, Minn.; Kevin Coyne, a senior majoring in golf and turf management from St. Paul, Minn.; Chad Harrer, a senior majoring in golf and turf management and horticulture from Brooklyn Park, Minn.; Kelsey Leake, a junior majoring in horticulture from Emerado, N.D.; and Josh Trottier, a senior majoring in golf and turf management from Devils Lake, N.D.

The students started the process of forcing the plants to induce bract color in time for the holiday season in October. Following a specific procedure to control the light, the students covered the plants with a dark cloth at 4 p.m. and uncovered them at 8 a.m. each day to regulate the length of daylight the plants receive. The students are responsible for greenhouse chores on the weekends as well. Although the class is taught by Sue Jacobson, the crop is in the hands of the students. The work and production of the poinsettia crop is entirely the responsibility of the class.  Jacobson says "It's better to learn expensive lessons in school than at your job.  We don't fire the students."

The Agriculture and Natural Resources Department offers commercial floriculture as part of the horticulture program to teach students to produce quality plants for a specific date - a skill necessary for employment in a greenhouse or garden center. "Poinsettias form their colored bracts, when the light is regulated," explains Jacobson. "The poinsettia really doesn't have a blossom like most flowers. Instead, the colorful red, pink, or white petals are modified leaves known as bracts. The blossoms are actually the small yellowish clusters in the center."

Jacobson often allows problems to develop to see how the students will solve them--poinsettia_tree.jpgsomething they would have to do in an employment situation and giving them an opportunity to apply what they have learned. The class demands hard work, dedication, and a strong team effort to grow the best poinsettias. Leadership and responsibility are two of the qualities that develop in this type of teaching and learning environment.

"Students learn so much from applying their classroom learning to real-world experience," Jacobson explains. "By taking responsibility for the crop, the students are accountable for the outcome making the commercial floriculture class one of the most memorable for the students." The class is excellent training for a career in horticulture, a multi-billion dollar industry in the U.S. To learn more about the horticulture program with emphases in environmental landscaping, production horticulture or urban forestry, visit www.UMCrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo at top are members of the fall semester class including: back row (l to r):  Mitch Allore,  Ben Sullivan, Clay Schmitt, and Kevin Coyne. Front row: Chad Herrer, Kelsey Leake, and Josh Trottier.

In the lower right photo shows the poinsettia tree in the Sargeant Student Center.

Contact: Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor, 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston Horticulture Club hosted the Mid-America MACHS_2.jpgCollegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) 39th annual conference from Thursday, October 20 to Sunday, October 23, 2011. The theme was "Little Campus on the Prairie." This was the first time the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club hosted the event. There were 33 students and 3 advisors from 6 universities in attendance including: Iowa State University, North Dakota State University, Northwest Missouri State University, South Dakota State University, the University of Wisconsin- River Falls, and Western Illinois University.

Thursday evening students gathered in the U of M, Crookston greenhouse classroom for registration, refreshments, and a campus welcome by Ron DelVecchio, U of M, Crookston professor and head of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department. Friday morning began with the general knowledge exam, plant identification, and plant judging. Each school had a team of 4 students whose individual scores contribute to the team total. This contest was designed to challenge the horticulture students and allow them to see where they stand in relation to other universities.

Friday afternoon included three guest speakers. Linda Kingery of the Northwest Regional and Sustainable Development Partnership talked to the students about the dynamic local foods in this region. Kathleen Brokke, historian and horticulturalist, performed her interpretation of Fannie Manhood Heath, a pioneer horticulturalist in the region. Minnesota Nursery and Landscaping Association President Bert Swanson shared his industry perspective with the up and coming industry leaders. Also taking place Friday afternoon was the planting of an apple tree in the U of M, Crookston Nature Nook to honor Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai. Friday evening included a banquet meal with keynote speaker Rusty Schmidt, natural resource specialist with the Washing Conservation District. Schmidt is one of three authors of the Blue Thumb Guide to Raingardens which has changed the way people think about using water in the Twin Cities area and beyond.

MACHS_1.jpgSaturday was a day of regional tours highlighting the diversity of Minnesota. Students began the day with naturalist Rhett Johnson leading the group through the Agassiz Dunes Scientific and Natural Area in Fertile, Minn. Traveling south to Detroit Lakes, Minn., the group saw the poinsettia growing operation of Bergen's Greenhouse, Inc. In Park Rapids, Minn., students visited the wholesale perennial growing operation of Bergen's Nursery. The final stop for the group was Itasca State Park where they took a tour of Minnesota's conifers. All of the students had an opportunity to cross the headwaters of the Mississippi River which was a first-time experience for many students.

Sunday marked the end of the weekend conference as the MACHS students held their annual business meeting, elected the 2011-2012 officer team, and selected a host school for 2013. Awards from Friday's team contest were presented.  The top overall individual was Winston Beck from Iowa State University. The first place team was South Dakota State University. Iowa State University was the second place team with the team from Northwest Missouri State University placing third. The U of M, Crookston observed the MACHS tradition that the host school is allowed to compete but not receive awards.

The entire event was planned by the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club students with MACHS_3.jpgsupport from U of M, Crookston staff and faculty. U of M, Crookston senior Kristine Neu served as the chair of MACHS 2011. The MACHS annual conference is the largest undertaking in the history of the Horticulture Club, and they were excited to showcase their program, the campus, and the community to the visiting universities. The host school for the 2012 MACHS conference will be South Dakota State University chaired by Sarah Custer. The host school for the 2013 MACHS conference will be the University of Wisconsin- River Falls chaired by Joel Sehloff. For more information about MACHS and to see more event photos visit the group's Facebook page: Mid America Collegiate Horticulture Society 2011.  

MACHS is comprised of horticulture clubs from universities  and two-year colleges in the Midwest Region including Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. MACHS is a branch of the Association of Collegiate Branches (ACB) within the American Society for Horticultural Sciences (ASHS). ACB is a national forum comprised of undergraduate horticulture clubs within ASHS.

The objective of MACHS is to promote an awareness of the profession of horticulture, furnish a medium of communication for horticulture students, and exchange club and professional ideas. These objectives are met through a variety of activities taking place throughout the weekend conference.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top right:

U of M, Crookston horticulture students with Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor (in purple): Standing left to right: Michael Laurich, Alisha Aasness, Catlin Kersting, Chad Harrer, Mitch Sledge, Kristine Neu and Chancellor Charles H. Casey. In the front (left to right): Ashlynn Hartung and Amanda Thompson.

Middle, left: The entire Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society crossing the headwaters of the Mississippi River on Saturday, October 22, 2011.

Bottom right: Four generations of MACHS chairpersons (l to r): Joel Sehloff, 2013 chair, University of Wisconsin- River Falls; Sarah Custer, 2012 chair, South Dakota State University; Kristine Neu, 2011 chair, U of M, Crookston; Winston Beck, 2010 chair, Iowa State University



Contact: Kristine Neu, communications assistant, (neuxx019@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A legend has passed. On September 25, 2011, Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and sustainable development activist died in Nairobi, Kenya, after a prolonged battle with cancer. In her memory and as a tribute to her legacy, the University of Minnesota, Crookston will plant a memorial apple tree on campus. In coordination with the hosting of the Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) conference, a Honeycrisp apple tree will be planted at 4 p.m. on Friday, October 21, 2011, in the Nature Nook, near the west entrance to Bergland Laboratory on the campus. The public is invited to attend.

The family of Maathai and the Green Belt Movement asks well-wishers to plant a tree to provide a living symbol of Wangari and her tireless work to make the world a better and more peaceful place. U of M, Crookston Chancellor Charles H. Casey will make comments during the tree planting along with Harouna Maiga, Ph.D., associate professor of animal science and a native of Mali, Africa.

The recipient of numerous awards commemorating her activities with sustainability, international conservation, women's rights, health, Maathai is perhaps best known for wangari.jpgfounding the Green Belt Movement in 1977. The movement was launched in Kenya primarily to inspire women to improve their livelihoods by planting trees for firewood, clean water, and soil protection. It has become a world-wide movement, particularly in third-world countries.

Dan Svedarsky, director of the Center for Sustainability had the pleasure of meeting Maathai at the U.N. Conference on Global Climate Change held in Copenhagen in December of 2009. "A group of us met with her at the Danish Film Institute to view the premier showing of, 'Taking Root,' a film featuring her life story. That film and discussions with her which followed, were an incredibly moving experience," according to Svedarsky.

Background

Wangari Maathai was born in Nyeri, Kenya (Africa) in 1940. The first woman in East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate degree, Professor Maathai obtained a degree in Biological Sciences from Mount St. Scholastica College in Atchison, Kansas (1964).(Her studies in American were supported by a Kennedy Foundation scholarship for Kenyans which also included President Obama's father.)  She subsequently earned a Master of Science degree from the University of Pittsburgh (1966). Professor Maathai pursued doctoral studies in Germany and later obtained a Ph.D. (1971) from the University of Nairobi where she also taught veterinary anatomy. She became chair of the Department of Veterinary Anatomy in 1976.

Professor Maathai is internationally recognized for her persistent struggle for democracy, human rights and environmental conservation. She has addressed the UN on several occasions and spoke on behalf of women at special sessions of the General Assembly during the five-year review of the Earth Summit. She and the Green Belt Movement have received numerous awards, most notably the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize. In 2005, Professor Maathai was honored by Time Magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world, and by Forbes Magazine as one of 100 most powerful women in the world.

Apple experts at the University of Minnesota were responsible for the development of the Honeycrisp apple making it an apt tribute to Maathai on the Crookston campus. The event is sponsored by the Crookston Students for Sustainable Development (CSSD) and the Center for Sustainability. It commences an initiative to develop an "Edible Campus Landscape" where fruit-producing trees and shrubs will be planted along with possibly campus gardening. "Wangari would have liked that," according to Svedarsky.

To learn more, visit www.greenbeltmovement.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and sustainable development activist, from www.greenbeltmovement.org.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, communications, University Relations, 218-281-8342 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston Horticulture Club is hosting the Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) 39th annual conference. This event will be from Thursday, October 20 to Sunday, October 23, 2011, and the theme is "Little Campus on the Prairie." The MACHS conference is expected to bring more than 40 horticultural students from across the Midwest to the U of M, Crookston campus. This is the first time that the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club has hosted this event. 

machs2011.jpgMACHS is comprised of horticulture clubs from universities  and two-year colleges in the Midwest Region including Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. MACHS is a branch of the Association of Collegiate Branches (ACB) within the American Society for Horticultural Sciences (ASHS). ACB is a national forum comprised of undergraduate horticulture clubs within ASHS.

The objective of MACHS is to promote an awareness of the profession of horticulture, furnish a medium of communication for horticulture students, and exchange club and professional ideas. These objectives are met through a variety of activities taking place throughout the weekend conference.

 Thursday night students will gather in the U of M, Crookston greenhouse classroom for registration, refreshments, and a campus welcome by Ron DelVechio, U of M, Crookston professor and head of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department. Friday morning begins with a contest which includes a general knowledge exam, plant identification, and plant judging. Each school has a team of four students whose individual scores contribute to the team total. This contest is designed to challenge the horticulture students and allow them to see where they stand in relation to other universities.

Friday afternoon will include three guest speakers. Linda Kingery of the Northwest Regional and Sustainable Development Partnership will be talking to students about local foods. Kathleen Brokke, historian and horticulturalist, will be performing her interpretation of Fannie Manhood Heath, a pioneer horticulturalist in this region. Minnesota Nursery and Landscaping Association president Bert Swanson will also be sharing his industry perspective with the up and coming industry leaders. Friday evening will include a banquet meal with keynote speaker Rusty Schmidt, natural resource specialist with the Washing Conservation District. Schmidt is one of three authors of the Bluethumb Guide to Raingardens which has changed the way people think about using water in the Twin Cities area and beyond.

Saturday is a day of regional tours. Students will begin the day with naturalist Rhett Johnson leading the group through the Agassiz Dunes Scientific and Natural Area in Fertile, Minn. Traveling south to Detroit Lakes, Minn. the group will see the poinsettia growing operation of Bergen's Greenhouse, Inc. In Park Rapids, Minn. students will visit the wholesale perennial growing operation of Bergen's Nursery. The final stop for the group will be Itasca State Park where the group will take a tour of Minnesota's conifers. Students will also have an opportunity to cross the headwaters of the Mississippi River which will be a first-time experience for many students who come from much farther downriver.

Sunday marks the end of the weekend conference as the MACHS students hold their annual business meeting. Awards from Friday's team contest also will be presented. It will be a weekend of learning, networking, and growing as a horticulturalist for all students involved.

The entire event is being planned by the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club students with support from U of M, Crookston staff and faculty. The MACHS annual conference is the largest undertaking in the history of the Horticulture Club, and they are excited to showcase their program, the campus, and the community to many other universities and technical colleges.


U of M, Crookston senior Kristine Neu currently serves as the chair of MACHS, and she works with a team of four other officers from South Dakota State University; the University of Wisconsin, River Falls; and Iowa State University. For more information about MACHS visit, www.umcrookston.edu/machs.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 


Contact: Kristine Neu, communications assistant, (neuxx019@umn.ed) ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Final concepts for nature-based play spaces for the cities of Crookston and Warren, Minn. have now been completed and approved. The children's play space for Crookston was designed for Castle Park (at right below), which is located off of Castle Street to the west of the Crookston hospital complex. The play space for Warren was designed for Island Park (at left below) located off of Warren's South Division Street.

A final design was prepared for each community. Both designs were a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota, Crookston and Twin Cities campuses. The nature-based play space final design concepts were created by Kristen Murray, U of M, Twin Cities landscape architecture graduate student, and Kristine Neu, U of M, Crookston environmental landscaping undergraduate. Funding for Murray's research assistant position was provided by the Community Assistantship Program (CAP) at the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs at the U of M Twin Cities campus. Both students were advised by Eric Castle, landscape architect and U of M, Crookston assistant professor of horticulture.

A nature-based play space is not the average playground. It looks more like woods, castle-color-small.gifprairie, or garden. Unlike the open woods, the design has a border, so that parents know where their children are, and children can play freely in the space. The design incorporates plants and materials native to the area. The purpose of the design was to create a space that reconnects children to nature and improves overall health of children and families in the community.

The design process for both Castle and Island parks has been ongoing since early summer. The final design for Crookston was based on community feedback gathered at National Night Out on August 2 and input from the City of Crookston. Community feedback from Warren was gathered at the Marshall County Fair, and the City of Warren and Warren Jaycees also gave important input. Both communities will begin installation of their nature-based play spaces this fall. The students of the U of M, Crookston landscape installation and maintenance class, lead by Castle, will be providing installation assistance at both sites. In Warren, the Jaycees will be providing volunteer assistance for the installation.

island-color-small.gifThe nature-based play spaces in Crookston and Warren were two of several regional installations under the Children Discovering Nature in Northwest Minnesota Project. The project team also included Daniel Handeen and Virajita Singh, both research fellows at the U of M, Twin Cities Center for Sustainable Building Research (CSBR), and Linda Kingery, executive director of the Northwest Minnesota Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP). Sarah Reese, Polk County Public Health Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP) Coordinator and Kirsten Fagerlund, SHIP staff, served as the liaison between the community of Crookston and the project team. Frances Tougas, North Valley SHIP coordinator, served a similar role in Warren. A portion of the financial support for the planning and implementation of each play space is being provided by a grant received from the Otto Bremer Foundation and the U of M Office of Community Engagement for Health's Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

The project team is forming a core advisory committee for the nature-based play space in each community. Each committee would be comprised of a group of volunteers who will help make decisions, organize other volunteer efforts, and generally help create a vision for the play space into the future. If interested in being a part of the advisory committee in Crookston, community members are encouraged to contact Kirsten Fagerlund 218-281-3385 kfagerlund@pcphealth.org for more information. Community members of Warren should contact Gail Larson, North Valley Public Health Director, 218-745-5154 glarson@nvhc.net or Frances Tougas 218-745-5154 ftougas@nvhc.net.

The final designs are available for viewing at www.umcrookston.edu/childrenandnature.
The Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP), an integral part of Minnesota's nation-leading 2008 health reform law, strives to help Minnesotans lead longer, healthier lives by preventing the chronic disease risk factors of tobacco use and exposure, poor nutrition and physical inactivity.

For moreinformation,visit www.health.state.mn.us/healthreform/ship.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Eric Castle, assistant professor, castl047@umn.edu; Kristine Neu, communications assistant, neuxx019@umn.edu ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Preliminary design concepts for nature-based play spaces for the cities of Crookston and Warren, Minn. have now been completed, and community feedback is needed. The children's play space for Crookston is being designed for Castle Park, which is located off Castle Street to the west of the Crookston hospital complex. The play space for Warren is being designed for Island Park located off Warren's South Division Street.  

Two preliminary designs were prepared for each community. All four designs were a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota, Crookston and Twin Cities campuses. The Warren designs are being displayed at the Marshall County Fair from July 27-31 while the Crookston designs will be displayed on Tuesday, August 2 at National Night Out held in Crookston's Central Park.

The nature-based play space preliminary design concepts were created by Kristen Murray, U of M, Twin Cities landscape architecture graduate student, and Kristine Neu, U of M, Crookston environmental landscaping undergraduate. Both students were advised by Eric Castle, landscape architect and U of M, Crookston assistant professor of horticulture.

A nature-based play space is not the average playground. It looks more like woods, prairie, or garden. Unlike the open woods, the designs have a border, so that parents know where their children are, and children can play freely in the space. The designs incorporate plants and materials native to the area, with the intention of highlighting local stories and the talents and skills of people who live in the area.

Nature-based play puts kids in touch with nature by encouraging them to play with rocks, water, sand, leaves, sticks and other materials found outdoors. Nature-based play includes everything from active play (climbing, jumping, running) and creative play (make-believe, building, art-making). Usually this play is unstructured: kids can choose what they want to do, unlike in a structured group activity or class. Research is demonstrating that this is necessary for healthy child development.

The design process for both Castle and Island Park has been ongoing since early summer. In June there was a gathering of community members in each city to share ideas about how to transform a portion of their community's park into a nature-based play space. Further input was gathered from small group interactions with parents and children. The ideas gathered, along with countless hours of research, turned into the two preliminary designs for each community. The June brainstorming sessions were part of a larger process to develop plans, create, and install the play spaces.

Displaying the preliminary designs at the Marshall County Fair and National Night Out is part of the process of gathering community feedback about the designs. In the coming weeks the project team will be using community feedback to draft final designs for each site to be revealed in the end of August. Installation of the nature-based play spaces will begin this fall and carry over into next spring. The projects will likely be completed in phases.

ProjectTeam-web.JPG

Members of the Children Discovering Nature in Northwest Minnesota project team at the Marshall County Fair in Warren, Minn. with two preliminary design concepts for a nature-based play space for the city of Warren. A similar presentation of designs for Castle Park in Crookston, Minn. will be made Tuesday, August 2 at National Night Out.  Pictured are (L to R) Daniel Handeen, U of M, Twin Cities Center for Sustainable Building Research; Kristen Murray, U of M, Twin Cities landscape architecture graduate student; Frances Tougas, North Valley Public Health SHIP coordinator; Kristine Neu, U of M, Crookston environmental landscaping undergraduate; and Eric Castle, landscape architect and U of M, Crookston Assistant Professor of Horticulture

In addition to creating new play spaces for children, the project is investigating how the process of designing these spaces can influence public health.  Assistant Professor Eric Castle remarked, "a main objective of this project is to stimulate people to start thinking about children's health as well as their own health, and getting people outdoors is a great way to do that."   

The nature-based play spaces in Crookston and Warren are two of several regional installations under the Children Discovering Nature in Northwest Minnesota Project, which is providing design and financial support for nature based-play spaces in six area communities. The project team also includes Daniel Handeen and Virajita Singh, both research fellows at the U of M, Twin Cities Center for Sustainable Building Research (CSBR), and Linda Kingery, executive director of the Northwest Minnesota Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP). Kirsten Fagerlund, interim Statewide Health Improvement (SHIP) coordinator on behalf of Sarah Reese, SHIP coordinator, is serving as the liaison between the community of Crookston and the project team. Frances Tougas, North Valley Public Health Statewide Health Improvement (SHIP) coordinator, is serving a similar role in Warren.

The team is working with city officials who will be instrumental in the approval of the design and installation of the space. In Warren, the team is also working with the Jaycees as the group will be providing a portion of the financial resources and volunteers to make the installation of their community's play space a reality. A portion of the financial support for the planning and implementation of both play spaces is being provided by a grant received from the Otto Bremer Foundation.

The project team is interested in forming a core advisory committee for the nature-based play space in each community. This committee would be comprised of a group of volunteers who will help make decisions, organize other volunteer efforts, and generally help create a vision for the play space into the future. If interested in being a part of the advisory committee in Crookston, community members are encouraged to contact Kirsten Fagerlund 218-281-3385 kfagerlund@pcphealth.org for more information. Community members of Warren should contact Frances Tougas 218-745-5154 ftougas@nvhc.net.

 

CastleParkConcept1-web.jpgCastleParkConcept2-web.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concepts for Castle Park in Crookston (above)
Concepts for Island Park in Warren (below)

 

IslandParkConcept1-web.jpgIslandParkConcept2-web.jpg

 

 

 

 

 


 

All community members and their children are encouraged to give feedback about the preliminary design concepts for Castle and Island Park . A short online feedback form is available at www.umcrookston.edu/childrenandnature; simply click on "Share Your Feedback" to give your much appreciated input.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

 

Contact: Eric Castle, assistant professor, castl047@umn.edu; Kristine Neu, communications assistant, neuxx019@umn.edu; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Since early July, volunteers have been out on the Minnesota prairie taking a very special census of a threatened prairie wildflower. The prairie fringed orchid has been on the U.S. List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants since 1989, and the annual census gives researchers important data necessary in the protection of the delicate orchid and its habitat.

Under the direction of Nancy Sather, botanist and the statewide orchid count coordinator, students with orchid.jpgvolunteers are out all over the state of Minnesota gathering data. Dan Svedarsky, director of the Center for Sustainability at the U of M, Crookston and research biologist with the Northwest Research and Outreach Center along with seniors Kristine Neu, Pelican Rapids, Minn., a double major in horticulture and communication; Ben Sullivan, Crookston, Minn.; and GreenCorps member Michael Knudson, Glencoe, Minn., both majoring in natural resources, recently  assisted with the census at the Pankratz Prairie located 11 miles southeast of Crookston and owned by The Nature Conservancy.  

"We are always working to better understand the threats and environmental factors affecting the flowering cycle of species like the prairie fringed orchid," Svedarsky explains. "We will be hosting a coordinating meeting on the Crookston campus on July 20 regarding this annual census and on-going research. This information is critical to protecting the prairie orchid. ; Polk County happens to be one of the hot spots for the orchid in our state."

FPO_closeup.jpgThe orchid's population has fluctuated over the years. Across 43 sites in Minnesota the count had declined steadily from 2001 to 2006. The plants prefer moist soil and warm temperatures, but like to grow on the higher side of ditches or hollows. The most common threats to the orchids are habitat destruction including the conversion of land for agricultural purposes, conversion of lands for housing or commercial uses, herbicide drift, and spread of invasive species.

"One of the places providing the perfect growing conditions for the orchid is near Glacial Ridge Project on the tallgrass prairie landscape of the Pembina Trail Preserve," says Svedarsky. "The Glacial Ridge Project, located 10 miles east of campus, is one of the largest wetland and prairie restoration projects in North America."

The prairie fringed orchid attracts hawk moths that feed on the nectar and transfer pollenorchid.jpg from flower to flower and plant to plant according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Web site (www.fws.gov). Pollination can be influenced by timing of the flowering, availability of other flowering species for the hawk moth, and the range of the pollinator in relation to the orchid populations. To learn more about the prairie fringed orchid, visit www.iucnredlist.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top, right: 

Ben Sullivan (center), a Shaver Environmental Landscaping intern working with the Northwest Research and Outreach Center, holding a Trimble GPS unit which is used to plot the precise location of the endangered plant in the foreground; Michael Knudson (left), a Minnesota GreenCorps stormwater management specialist working with the Center for Sustainability; and Kristine Neu (right), who is working with the Connecting Children to Nature in Northwest project this summer. Photo by Dan Svedarsky.

Bottom, left and right: Western Prairie Fringed Orchid on the Pankratz Prairie near Crookston, Minn. Photos by Ben Sullivan.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Eight University of Minnesota, Crookston students studied abroad in China for three great_wall_group_photo.jpgweeks as a cultural immersion experience through the university. Cities visited in China included Beijing, Hangzhou, and Shanghai. Students were overseas from Monday, May 16 through Tuesday, June 7, 2011.

The time abroad was part of the curriculum of the GNED 3000 Global Seminar course taught by Associate Professor Soo-Yin Lim-Thompson. This three credit spring course fulfilled the liberal education requirement of global perspectives. The course was not major exclusive and encompassed a wide variety of career interests. The time abroad was about more than site seeing; the goal was to experience history, language, food, relational and cultural aspects of China.

Students in the Global Seminar course included Kristine Neu, senior, Pelican Rapids, Minn., majoring in horticulture and communication; Donna Malarkey, junior, Crookston, Minn., majoring in quality management; James Kriegh, junior, Crookston, Minn., majoring in software engineering; Allison Schumacher, senior, Crookston, Minn., majoring in sport and recreation management; Rob Canny, senior, Oshkosh, Wis., majoring in business management; Levi Atinda, sophomore, Maple Grove, Minn., majoring in biology; Sang Jun "Jeff" Lee, freshman, Incheon, Korea, majoring in business management; and Alysha Thielen, junior, Maple Grove, Minn., majoring in animal science. 

Beijing was the first city visited during the three weeks abroad. Students were climbing the Great Wall of China on their first day in the country. It was a once in a lifetime experience that tested everyone's endurance. Other stops in Beijing include the 2008 Olympic Village, the Forbidden City, Tiananmen Square, the Temple of Heaven, and the Summer Palace. The time spent in Beijing was filled with historic cultural experiences that allowed students to become part of China's long, rich history.

Hangzhou was where the students spent the majority of their trip. The city is famous for schumacher_neu_temple_cave.jpgWest Lake, which is a fresh water lake approximately 2.3 square miles in area.  Students were able to take a boat ride around the lake to absorb the sites of Hangzhou. Further appreciation of West Lake was instilled after the viewing of West Lake Impression, which is a theatrical performance set on the lake that encompasses music and lights to tell a Romeo and Juliet story of China.

While in Hangzhou students learned about Chinese commodities including tea and silk through visits to the Mei jia wu tea village, the China National Tea Museum, and the China National Silk Museum. Other visits in Hangzhou included the Six Harmonies Pagoda overlooking the Qiantang River, the Ling Yin Temple, Hu Xue Yan's Former Residence, and He Fang Street which is a noted shopping area.

levi_atinda_tea.jpgTo give U of M, Crookston students the opportunity to truly be international students, the time in Hangzhou included a one week stay at Zhejiang Agriculture & Forestry University (ZAFU). Students stayed on campus and were able to experience housing, meals, classes, and student life. ZAFU provided instructors for a variety of topics related to Chinese culture including language, history, tea culture, calligraphy & painting, traditional medicine, folk music, tai chi, and martial arts. This was a valuable portion of the trip as it allowed the U of M, Crookston students to learn what it is like to be an international student in China as well as compare and contrast the university systems between the two countries.

Another university visit was made by the students as they spent a day at Zhejiang Economic & Trade Polytechinic (ZJETP) which was the host university for the three week trip in China. Students were treated to a campus tour and had the chance to interact with ZJETP students who were interested in future study in America. University President Shuming Li formally recognized each U of M, Crookston student and presented them with a certificate of completion for their time abroad. President Li also treated to the students to a gracious Chinese meal for which they were joined by three U of M, Crookston professors. Business Department Head Dr. Susan Brorson, Associate Professor Margot Rudstrom, Associate Professor Jingpeng Tang, were each teaching Chinese students at ZJETP during the same time frame.

As the students traveled from Hangzhou they spent a day in Wuzhen Town in Tongxiang City. Wuzhen Town has a history of over 1,000 years and is a town built on the water. The students were able to walk the narrow streets and venture into various buildings to learn about the culture and history of the town. A boat ride on the canal through the town took students under the many bridges that span the vast amount of water. It was a quiet stop that allowed the students to see a less urbanized place in China.

The three week journey in China ended in Shanghai and gave students the opportunity to see a westernized city in Asia. U of M, Crookston students were able to overlook the city from the Oriental Pearl TV Tower which is the third tallest TV tower in the world. Time was spent on Nanking Road, the famous shopping district in Shanghai, as well as the Bund which runs along the western bank of the Huangpu River. A highlight of being in Shanghai was a nighttime boat tour along the Huangpu which allowed students to see the millions of lights from the buildings and skyscrapers of Shanghai.

This was the third time the U of M, Crookston has sent students to study in China. The study abroad experience is the result of an international partnership that was formed in 2005 with Zhejiang Economic & Trade Polytechnic (ZJETP), a three year university in Hangzhou, China. ZJETP serves as the primary coordinator for the U of M, Crookston's time in China. U of M, Crookston also has an exchange agreement with Zhejiang Agriculture & Forestry University and hosts students from ZAFU at the U of M, Crookston each year. Further collaboration with Zhejiang Agriculture & Forestry University (ZAFU), a four year university in Zhejiang province, provides a week of cultural classes for U of M, Crookston students and allows for immersion in a higher education program in China. Through the Global Seminar course the U of M, Crookston has sent students to China in 2008, 2009, and 2011. For more information about studying abroad visit www.umcrookston.edu/learningabroad.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, top, right: U of M, Crookston students prior to climbing up the Great Wall of China. Front row, l to r: Kristine Neu, Donna Malarkey, James Kriegh, Allison Schumacher, Professor Soo-Yin Lim-Thompson, Xie "Sara" Yu (2009 alumni), Back row: Rob Canny, Levi Atinda, Sang Jun "Jeff" Lee, Alysha Thielen

In the photo, bottom, right: Exploring caves near Ying Lin Temple outside of Hangzhou, China, are Allison Schumacher (left) and Kristine Neu.

In the photo, bottom, left: Levi Atinda, taking part in a tea culture class at Zhejiang Agriculture & Forestry University (ZAFU).


Contact: Kristine Neu, Communications Assistant, neuxx019@umn.edu ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Campus and Community challenges on track to surpass energy-savings goals

Hard work to sustain savings begins

Fergus Falls, Minnesota, April 20, 2011 Otter Tail Power Company celebrated with the University of Minnesota, Crookston, and the community of Rothsay, Minnesota, as the company announced preliminary energy savings associated with the Campus and Community Energy Challenges.

In 2010 the University of Minnesota, Crookston, achieved metered kilowatt-hour savings of approximately 7 percent to 8 percent. From early 2009 through early 2011 Rothsay achieved metered kilowatt-hour savings of approximately 3 percent. When all technology improvements and behavioral change initiatives have been in place for a full year, and when results are adjusted for changes in weather and normally occurring growth, the University of Minnesota, Crookston, is on track to save 17 percent of its prior electricity use. Rothsay is on track to save more than 19 percent. The goals of these challenges are based on sustained savings over a five-year period. Pending regulatory review and approval, that means the campus and town are on track to surpass their energy-savings goals.

"We launched these challenges with a call to imagine all of the residents of a small rural community and all the students, faculty, and staff of a college campus working together to reduce the electricity use of their entire town and campus each by 10 to 15 percent," said Kim Pederson, Otter Tail Power Company Manager, Market Planning. "What they've accomplished so far was more than we imagined possible, but the hard work is still in front of them as they strike out on their own to sustain these savings."

The Crookston campus achieved much of its savings from upgrading campus lightingTree Planting 3598.jpg and installing automated controls on variable-frequency drives for some of the ventilation systems. Otter Tail Power Company assisted with the audits to identify high-level savings projects and provided more than $86,000 in grants and rebates to encourage the investments by reducing payback times.

"Significant savings also were noted when the Facilities Management Department implemented a new work order system in August that took deliberate steps to change operational procedures such as shutting off more lights than before, closing shades, and reducing heating levels in certain areas," said Chancellor Charles Casey. "I'm proud but not surprised about just how much the people on this campus have been able to accomplish. And I'm confident that the behavior changes we've been focused on will continue to show real results."

The community of Rothsay achieved more than half of its cumulative savings from behavioral changes on the part of Rothsay Public School, homeowners, and businesses. Otter Tail Power Company also granted almost $117,000 in rebates for energy-efficient lighting and technology improvements. "This program was developed as a three-legged stool," said Pederson. "Education, efficient end-use technologies, and incentivized behavioral changes each play a critical role in the success of these projects. And achieving long-term savings in Rothsay will be possible only with ongoing energy-saving behaviors and a community that won't settle for anything less than achieving its goal."

Rothsay Public School is committed to continuing its leadership role in this challenge. "The Community Energy Challenge has been an excellent program that has brought a new sense of awareness regarding energy use throughout the community," said Ehren Zimmerman, Dean of Students/Principal at Rothsay Public School. "And it has brought a new approach to hands-on learning for our faculty, staff, and students. Now it's our turn to pay it forward and keep the savings going."

Otter Tail Power Company, a subsidiary of Otter Tail Corporation (NASDAQ Global Select Market: OTTR), is headquartered in Fergus Falls, Minnesota. It provides electricity and energy services to more than a quarter million people in Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. To learn more about Otter Tail Power Company visit www.otpco.com. To learn more about Otter Tail Corporation visit www.ottertail.com.

In the photo: To celebrate the success of the Campus Energy Challenge at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, Otter Tail Power Company donated two basswood trees. The shade trees were planted on the west side of the Early Childhood Building to help provide energy savings in the summer. Project leaders and guests marking the event include (left to right): Student Green Team leader Ben Williams, Center for Sustainability Director Dan Svedarsky, Vice Chancellor of Academics and Student Affairs Thomas Baldwin, Chancellor Charles Casey, Otter Tail Power Company Project Manager Jon Fabre, University of Minnesota, Crookston, Facilities Green Team member Brian Christianson; former Student Green Team lead Lisa Gentele, Otter Tail Power Company Crookston Area Energy Management Representative Ken Johnson, Otter Tail Power Company President and CEO Chuck MacFarlane, Minnesota Department of Commerce Deputy Commissioner Bill Grant, U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar's Moorhead Office Representative Andrew Martin, U.S. Senator Al Franken's Northwestern Minnesota Field Representative Valerie Graveseth, and U.S. Representative Collin Peterson's Red Lake Falls Office Representative JoAnn Zutz.

Contact: Cris Kling, Otter Tail Power Compnay, 218-739-8297; Andrew Svec, director of communications, U of M, Crookston, 218-281-8432 (asvec@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston recently honored students with achievement and service awards at the annual Student Awards Reception. The ceremony is held each spring to honor those who have made outstanding leadership and service contributions or who have achieved high academic standing at the University's Crookston campus.

33+ Student Achievement Awards 1239.jpgThirteen students received Student Achievement Awards, which the U of M, Crookston presents to recognize those students who have excelled not only academically, but also through leadership and service to the University and local community.

Students receiving the Student Achievement Award were:
Brittany Novak, a senior from Dahlen, N.D., majoring in biology;       
Nana Boaten, a senior from Accra, GHA, majoring in marketing
Alyssa Krikke, a senior from Grand Rapids, Mich., majoring in health sciences
Derek Ricke, a senior from Park Rapids, Minn., majoring in sport and recreation management
Kristine Neu, a senior from Pelican Rapids, Minn., majoring horticulture and communication
Joseph Harren, a senior from Eagle Bend, Minn., majoring in agronomy
Heather Donati-Lewis, a senior from Narcoossee, Fla., majoring in equine science
Alvin Tong, a senior from Singapore, SGP, majoring in natural resources and business management (not pictured)
Lhakpa Gurung, a senior from Mustang, Nepal, majoring in early childhood education
Shawn Friedland, a senior from New Bern, N.C., majoring in biology
Eun Hye Kang, a senior from Seoul, South Korea, majoring in communication
Austin Czichotzki, a  junior from Barnesville, Minn., majoring in communication
Tammy Wroblewki, a senior from Milwaukee, Wis., who is a triple major golf and turf management, communications, and horticulture

From this group, two students were chosen as the "Man and Woman of the Year," theMan+Woman of the Year 1247.jpg year's top academic, service and leadership award. Honors for 2011 go to (pictured l to r) UMC Man of the Year, Austin Czichotzki (at left in photo), a junior from Barnesville, Minn., majoring communication; and Woman of the Year Tammy Wroblewski (at right in photo), a senior from Milwaukee, Wis., who is a triple major in golf and turf management, communications, and horticulture. Czichotzki is the son of Terry and Sandi Czichotzki and Wroblewski is the daughter of Diane and Jeff Wroblewski.

32+ Faculty Staff Honors 1231.jpgFaculty and staff, also recognized during the evening, are significant in that the entire student body votes to select the award recipients. Awards for Most Creative Use of Technology went to Associate Professor Brian Dingmann who teaches in the Math, Science and Technology Department; Outstanding Educator, and Most Supportive of Students Awards were presented to Assistant Professor Kevin Thompson, who teaches in the Liberal Arts and Education Department; and Outstanding Service to Students was awarded to Pam Sullivan, who oversees operations in the Eagles Nest.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In group photo, at top left: Back row, l to r: Kristine Neu, Heather Donati-Lewis, Joe Harren, and Derek Ricke. Middle row: Brittany Novak, Halie Kang, Alyssa Krikke, Nana Boaten, and Lisa Samuelson, director of student activities. Front row: Lhakpa Gurung, Tammy Wroblewski, Austin Czichotzki, and Shawn Friedland.

In group photo, at bottom, left: (l to r): Shawn Friedland, president of the Crookston Student Association; Pam Sullivan; Kevin Thompson; Brian Dingmann; and Anna Wagner, vice president of the Crookston Student Association.  


Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director, student activities, 218-281-8507 (same026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Highlights Earth Week 2011

Earth Week will be marked by several events at the University of Minnesota, Crookston Earth Week.jpgincluding a campus clean up, activities to raise awareness, and a celebration of campus efforts to save energy. Crookston Students for Sustainable Development (CSSD) will kick off the week on Monday, April 18, 2011, with Trash and Recycling Awareness Day, an effort to demonstrate how much trash an individual creates in a single day.

On Tuesday, April 19, Otter Tail Power Company will join members of the campus and community for a celebration of the success of the Campus Energy Challenge, a special project that brought Otter Tail and the U of M, Crookston together to help reduce energy consumption. Special highlights include community-wide networking beginning at 11:45 a.m. followed by an energy savings celebration at noon with remarks by Chuck MacFarlane, president of Otter Tail Power Company, Charles H. Casey, chancellor at the U of M, Crookston and William Grant, deputy commissioner at the Minnesota Department of Commerce Energy Division. A ceremonial tree planting will take place at 1 p.m., weather permitting.

Beautiful "U" Day will be the focus on Wednesday, April 20 and include a campus and community cleanup. At noon in Youngquist Auditorium, Dr. Larry Baker, a research professor in the Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities will present "Urban Heat Islands and Global Climate Change." Everyone is welcome.

An internationally recognized authority on the water and nutrient cycle of urban environments, Baker will be the featured speaker in the evening as part of a "sustainability supper seminar" beginning at 5 p.m. with a meal in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. His evening presentation, open to the public, will begin at 6 p.m. in Youngquist Auditorium on the topic "Urban Ecosystems and Implications for Global Survivability." To make reservations for the meal, contact, Michael Knudson, Minnesota GreenCorps member at 218-281-8128 (knud0189@umn.edu). For more information on Dr. Larry Baker, visit www.bbe.umn.edu/People/LarryBaker.

On Thursday, April 21, the campus and community are invited to join in a Critical Mass Bike Ride. The ride begins at 5:30 p.m. and participants are asked to gather at Crookston High School parking lot for the ride. Helmets are required. Because of liability concerns, Critical Mass bike rides are not sponsored by any person or entity, they are just a group of people getting together to go on a ride.  The route will be on roads and paths that are not as busy and all traffic laws will be obeyed.  Those who are unfamiliar with riding on streets will be informed by more experienced group riders.  
 
A mini-grant from the University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment helps fund the series of bi-weekly, "sustainability supper seminars" designed to educate the campus and the local community on sustainability applications as well as explore the "Communiversity" concept.

Earth Day, observed annually on April 22, marks the anniversary of what may be considered the birth of the modern environmental movement. The first Earth Day was held in 1970. To learn more, visit www.earthday.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

 

Contact: Michael Knudson, Minnesota GreenCorps member, 218-281-8128 (knud0189@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Wroblewski_Tammy 9029.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston Senior Tammy Wroblewski, Milwaukee, Wis., was named a recipient of a $1,000 North Central Turf Grass Association (NCGTA) scholarship. Wroblewski, a triple major in golf and turf management, horticulture, and communication, was awarded the scholarship during the NCTGA annual meeting held in Fargo, N.D., in late February.

Last summer, she completed an internship at the U of M, Crookston working in the areas of golf and turf management and horticulture. Her advisors are Kristina Walker, assistant professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and Rachel McCoppin, associate professor in the Liberal Arts and Education Department.

An active student at the U of M, Crookston, Wroblewski has been a member of the Golden Eagle Golf Team, served as an Ambassador, was named to the Athletic All-Academic Team, and worked as a tutor in the Academic Assistance Center.

The purpose of the North Central Turf Grass Association is to promote the turfgrass industry, to encourage and support the further study and research of turf, to gather and distribute this information, and to represent this group on matters of policy regarding the turf grass industry. To learn more, visit http://www.nctga.net.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Kristie Walker, assistant professor, Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8116 (kswalker@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston Turf Bowl Team placed 24th out of 87 turf bowl Turf Bowl Team 2011 2922.jpgteams from across the United States in the National Turf Bowl Competition held recently. Members of the team included: Theodore Gutman, a senior majoring in both golf and turf management and horticulture from Burlington, Iowa; Thomas Halver, a senior majoring in golf and turf management from Chaska, Minn.; Mark Michalski, a senior golf and turf management major from Silver Bay, Minn.; and Tammy Wroblewski, a triple major in golf and turf management, horticulture, and communications from Milwaukee, Wis.

The 3 ½ hour turf bowl exam  is comprised of nine sections including identification (turfgrass, seed, soil, weed, insect, and disease), turfgrass growth and development, soil and soil fertility, weed management, disease management, insect management, turfgrass calculations, business management, and  a case study essay. The competition was held during the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America Education and Trade Show on February 10, 2011, in Orlando, Fla.

The Crookston campus requires internships for students as part of its commitment to applied learning. Michalski interned at the U of M, Crookston in golf and turf management, during summer 2010, and Halver interned for at the Bluff Creek Golf Course in Chaska. Gutman interned at Spirit Hollow Golf Course, in Burlington, Iowa, and Wroblewski interned at the U of M, Crookston in both golf and turf management and horticulture.

The advisor of the U of M, Crookston Turf Bowl Team is Kristina S. Walker, Ph.D. She earned her doctoral and master's degrees in agronomy specializing in turfgrass management from Purdue University. Walker has been teaching courses in agronomy and turfgrass management since January 2009 at the Crookston Campus.

With a degree in golf and turf management, graduates are qualified for positions in the golf industry, sports field management, lawn care, sod production, grounds maintenance, sales or pursue an advanced degree. For more information on golf and turf management at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/agri/golfturf.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo (l to r): Tammy Wroblewski, Mark Michalski, Teddy Gutman, Tom Halver, with their advisor, Kristina Walker, Ph.D.
 

Contact: Kristie Walker, assistant professor, Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8116 (kswalker@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Senior Theodore Lenneman Receives MNLA Scholarship

One student in the horticultural studies program at University of Minnesota-Crookston recently received a scholarship sponsored by the Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association (MNLA) Foundation.  The scholarship recipient was Theodore Lenneman, a senior double majoring in golf and turf management and horticulture from St. Michael, Minn.

lenneman_t.jpgThe MNLA scholarship program recognizes superior students enrolled in horticultural or landscape studies programs at several area colleges and universities.  The scholarships are designed by MNLA and its member companies to help grow future leaders in the nursery and landscape industry.

The MNLA Commercial Arborist Committee co-sponsored the scholarship for Lenneman.

To be eligible for an MNLA scholarship, applicants must possess a "C" grade average or better, present letters of recommendation from instructors and employers, and submit an essay stating their career goals and objectives.

The Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association is the state's largest green industry trade association with over 1,200 member companies.  Members include nurseries, garden centers, landscape contractors, landscape designers, irrigation contractors, commercial flower growers, tree care specialists, professional gardening services, and turf and landscape management professionals.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact:  Cassie Larson, Education & Industry Advancement Director, 651-633-4987, (cassie@mnla.biz); Sue Jacobson, instructor, horticulture, 218-281-8118, (sjacobso@umn.edu)

The last weekend in January celebrates the theme "Country Strong" during the 36th annual Ag Arama at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Scheduled for Friday and Bigger_Cindy.jpgSaturday, January 28-29, 2011, Ag Arama is hosted by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and includes fun for the entire family. This year's event is dedicated to 1979 graduate Cindy Bigger (In photo at left) who served as a judge for Ag Arama for many years.
 
Most of the activities take place on Saturday, Jan. 29, in the University Teaching and Outreach Center (UTOC) located on the north edge of the campus. The weekend begins with contests for students in agronomy, horticulture and natural resources beginning on Friday, January 28 at noon. Friday evening from 6-8 p.m., the Animal Science Association will host a chili feed for $5 per person in UTOC.

Contests in agronomy, animal science, horticulture, and natural resources highlight AgAg_Arama_2010.jpg Arama weekend. They serve as an opportunity for students to showcase their knowledge and skills and have a chance to interact with alumni and faculty members. Ag Arama is planned and operated by a committee of students advised by Terrill Bradford, animal science instructor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department.

On Saturday morning from 8:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., the animal showmanship contests are held and the public is welcome to watch the competition as it unfolds in both novice and experienced categories. Students compete in western and English horse showmanship, lamb lead, and dairy, beef, sheep, and swine showing.  The novices are paired with experienced students prior to the contests to prepare for the competition.

From 9 a.m. to noon, there is an ag industries show and a picnic style lunch is served at 12:30 p.m. Coronation of the Ag Arama royalty begins at 1 p.m. with the presentation of awards to follow. Several games and competitions, including men's and women's crosscut saw contests and log splitting, will be held beginning at 2:15 p.m.

Alumni from the U of M, Crookston are invited to a social at the Irishman's Shanty in Crookston from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Capping off the weekend is a dance with the band Silverado to be held at the Crookston Eagles Club.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 applied-science undergraduate degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; math, science and technology; and natural resources. To learn more, visit www.UMCrookston.edu.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In photo at bottom right: Alumna Cindy Bigger, '79, visits with students during sheep judging at Ag Arama 2010. 

Contact: Terrill Bradford, agriculture instructor, 218-281-8108 (tbradfor@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Hundreds of rooted poinsettia cuttings arrive in August in anticipation of another holiday season. For seven students involved in the commercial floriculture class at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, those cuttings have developed into a beautiful poinsettia crop under their skill and coaxing.

This year's poinsettias create a beautiful and colorful display including varieties such as Freedom Fireworks, Monet Twilight, Salmon Star and Orange Spice, a new exciting color.  Most greenhouses grow a large percentage of red, but the UMC students grow more of the novelty colors.

In the photo are members of the fall semester class including: back row (l to r):  JordanPoinsettia Class2010 2475-1.jpg Jacobson, a senior from Thief River Falls, Minn.; Brandon Pinnow, a senior from Minot, N.D.;  Mike Field a senior from Spicer and Tammy Cruz, a sophomore from Gary.  Front Row: Bethany Jenkins, a sophomore from Grand Forks, N.D.; Tammy Wroblewski, a senior from Milwaukee, Wis.; and Alisha Aasness, a sophomore from Fergus Falls, Minn.

The students started the process of forcing the plants to bloom in time for the holiday season in October. Following a specific procedure to control the light, the students covered the plants with a dark cloth at 4 p.m. and uncovered them at 8 a.m. each day to regulate the length of daylight the plants receive. The students are responsible for greenhouse chores on the weekends as well. Although the class is taught by Sue Jacobson, the crop is in the hands of the students. The work and production of the poinsettia crop is entirely the responsibility of the class.  Jacobson says "It's better to learn expensive lessons in school than at your job.  We don't fire the students."

The Agriculture and Natural Resources Department offers commercial floriculture as part of the horticulture program to teach students to produce quality plants for a specific date - a skill necessary for employment in a greenhouse or garden center. "Poinsettias form their colored "flowers" when the light is regulated," explains Jacobson. "The poinsettia really doesn't have a blossom like most flowers. Instead, the colorful red, pink, or white petals are modified leaves known as bracts. The blossoms are actually the small yellowish clusters in the center."

Jacobson often allows problems to develop to see how the students will solve them--something they would have to do in an employment situation and giving them an opportunity to apply what they have learned. The class demands hard work, dedication, and a strong team effort to grow the best poinsettias. Leadership and responsibility are two of the qualities that develop in this type of teaching and learning environment.

"Students learn so much from applying their classroom learning to real-world experience," Jacobson explains. "By taking responsibility for the crop, the students are accountable for the outcome making the commercial floriculture class one of the most memorable for the students." The class is excellent training for a career in horticulture, a multi-billion dollar industry in the U.S. To learn more about the horticulture program with emphases in environmental landscaping, production horticulture or urban forestry, visit www.UMCrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor, 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

High school students have a chance to compete with their peers during Agriculture and Natural Resources Day scheduled for Friday, December 3, 2010, at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. With more than 20 contests ranging from horticulture and forestry to ag mechanics, livestock and sales, the day is fraught with excitement for students from some 50 high schools who participate in the competition.

An awards ceremony highlights the day beginning at 1:15 p.m. in Lysaker gymnasium in the Sports Center on the Crookston campus. Scholarships, plaques and certificates are awarded to school teams and individuals for each contest. More than $32,000 in scholarships are available to award-winning students. Last year, $750 UMC scholarships were awarded for the high individual in each contest; $600 UMC scholarships were awarded for the second place individual; and $450 UMC scholarships were awarded to third place individuals.  

The event, which has been held for more than 30 years on the campus, is sponsored by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at the U of M, Crookston. If you would like more information regarding Agriculture and Natural Resources Activities Day events, contact Amy Lubarski at 218-281-8101 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/ag/AAD.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Amy Lubarski, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8101 (lubarski@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

RESCHEDULED for Wednesday, December 1, 2010 from 4-7 p.m.

The most wonderful time of the year will get a jump start when the U of M, Crookston hosts its fourth annual holiday social on Tuesday, November 30, 2010. The fun begins at 4 p.m. with a silent auction, and throughout the evening until 7 p.m., there will be several raffles. All proceeds will be used to support scholarships on the Crookston campus. Wine and hors de oeuvres will be served. Admission is free and public is invited to attend.

Three new raffles have been added to this year's event. The holiday raffle is one of the most exciting additions. It includes a grand prize of a day spa courtesy of Shear Sisters, an overnight stay in a Jacuzzi suite from the AmericInn of Crookston, and Lynn Willhite Watercolor apparel.

Second and third prizes include a Hugo's After-hours Selection; and a maroon and gold ensemble sponsored by the U of M, Crookston Bookstore. The number of tickets is limited and may be purchased for $25 by contacting members of the holiday social committee. Also new are the $2 per chance wine raffle and a $2 per chance bucket raffle along with the many baskets/containers available on the silent auction. There will be something for everyone.

Back again this year is the UMC Horticulture Club selling their holiday arrangements, candy bouquets, and wreaths to decorate your home and to give as gifts. If you would like more information, visit the holiday social Web page at www.umcrookston.edu/holidaysocial.

Planning committee members for the holiday social include: Sherry Just, Emily Knutson, Jody Clauson, Ardith Pelton, Diane Bachmeier, Jeannine Windels, Barbara Muesing, Judy Nepple, Corby Kemmer, and Michelle Christopherson.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Michelle Christopherson, director, Center for Adult Learning, 218-281-8679 (mchristo@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A team of horticulture students placed fourth in competition at the annual conference of MACHS Team 2010.jpgthe Mid-American Collegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS), held October 14-16, 2010, at Iowa State University in Ames.  The U of M, Crookston team, comprised of horticulture majors Jonathan Fillmore, a sophomore from White Bear Lake, Minn.; Ashlynn Hartung, a freshman from Lindstrom, Minn.; Keunyung Kim, a senior from Gwangju, South Korea; and Kristine Neu, a senior from Pelican Rapids, Minn., competed in a written general knowledge exam, herbaceous and woody plant identification, and judging categories.
 
The delegation from the U of M, Crookston competed against students representing Northwest Missouri State, University of Wisconsin - River Falls, South Dakota State, University of Wisconsin - Platteville.  University of Wisconsin - River Falls placed first followed by Michigan State University and South Dakota State University respectively.

Other students attending from the Crookston campus included Mike Field, a senior from Spicer, Minn.; Catlin Kersting, a freshman from Cloquet, Minn,; Ethan Kojetin, a freshman from Atwater, Minn.; Theo Lenneman, a junior from St. Michael, Minn.; Nathan Peikert, a sophomore from Woodbury, Minn.; Mitchell Sledge, a freshman from St. Louis Park, Minn.; Amanda Thompson a freshman from Pine River, Minn.
 
The MACHS organization and contest provide a means of communication between horticulture clubs of participating schools. Sharing knowledge and ideas is an important part of the gathering. The MACHS competition includes collegiate horticulture clubs from 12 Mid-American states. The conference offered students the opportunity to participate in educational tours of the Iowa Arboretum, Iowa Department of Natural Resources state nursery, Iowa State horticulture farm tours, and Evergreen Gardens.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo (l to r): Kristine Neu, Jonathan Fillmore, Keunyung Kim, and Ashlynn Hartung.
 

Contact: Eric Castle, assistant professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8119 (castl047@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

After an extremely competitive selection process Mike Field, a senior at the University of Jacobson-Field-Castle 0008.jpgMinnesota, Crookston was selected by the Professional Landcare Network (PLANET), the national organization for the landscaping industry, to be a student ambassador for the upcoming annual Green Industry Conference in Louisville, Ky.  Field who is from Spicer, Minn., is a double major in horticulture and golf and turf management.

The 2010 Green Industry Conference which takes place on October 27-30, 2010, provides the opportunity for both landscape professionals and business experts to network and learn the latest in this rapidly growing field. Jamie Clarke, extreme adventurer and motivational speaker will provide the keynote address at the conference.

As part of the ambassador program, Field will receive complimentary registration, hotel, meals, and a daily stipend.  He will be able to take advantage of the educational sessions as well as national networking opportunities, and he will assist PLANET staff with conference operations.

To learn more about the PLANET, visit www.landcarenetwork.org.
 
 Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo (l to r): Sue Jacobson, instructor in horticulture, Mike Field, and Eric Castle, assistant professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department.

Contact: Eric Castle, assistant professor, 218-281-8119 (castl047@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Create a miniature plant world during a workshop presented by horticulture students at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. A terrarium, or dish garden, is a collection of compatible plants in a clear container, and you can create one of your own on Wednesday, April 28, 2010, in the UMC Production Greenhouse. The workshop begins at 6 p.m. and registration is $20. Attendees should pre-register and decide if they want to create a terrarium or a dish garden by calling 218-371-1332. If you provide your own container, the registration price will be reduced.

The cost for the workshop covers soil mixture, growing tips, and instructions, along with a container, if needed. Jada Ellenberg, president of the Horticulture Club, is excited to offer the workshop to the community and campus. "With such a variety of plants all in one container, it is like having a mini dessert right there on your desk," Ellenberg says.

Students will use the funds raised to benefit the Horticulture Club on the Crookston Campus.  For information about the terrarium workshop, contact Ellenberg at 218-371-1332.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor, 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

PLANET students.jpgSix students from the Horticulture Club at the University of Minnesota, Crookston competed recently in the Professional Landcare Network (PLANET) Student Career Days, a three-day competition for students enrolled in collegiate horticulture programs. National celebrity garden designer P. Allen Smith was the keynote speaker at this year's PLANET Student Career Days held April 8-11 at Chattahoochee Technical College in Atlanta, Ga. Smith is a regular contributor on The TODAY Show.

Students competed against 900 of their peers from 70 universities and colleges in 26 different events.  To place in the top 10 in any event is a challenge requiring thorough preparation and precise execution of both skill and application of knowledge.
 
Highlights from the competition include:

Senior Jada Ellenberg, Perham, Minn.; and Sophomore Theo Lenneman, St. Michael, Minn. finished 5th in paver installation and Senior Keunyung Kim, Gwangju, Korea, finished 6th in interior landscape design. Finishing in 10th in Landscape maintenance operations were Ellenberg and Senior Michael Field, Spicer, Minn., and Senior Jordan Jacobson, Thief River Falls, Minn., finished 14th in small engine repair. Field and Jacobson finished 20th in truck and trailer operations with Field finishing 21st in leadership skills.

Overall individual finishes by U of M, Crookston students out of the 900 students competing were Ellenberg at 33rd, Lenneman at 44th, and Field at 45th.

"Our students have proven their ability to compete at the national level with peers from all over the country," says Assistant Professor Eric Castle, advisor for the Horticulture Club. "We are extremely proud of them and their performance during the competition. The trip to Atlanta was a great opportunity for them and also gave them an opportunity for nationwide networking with industry professionals and future colleagues."

Student Career Days, which began in 1977, is an annual three-day competitive event among students enrolled in horticulture programs from colleges and universities across the country. The students have the chance to compete in events that are directly related to the skills necessary for a career in the green industry. For more information about PLANET, visit www.landcarenetwork.org/cms/studentcareerdays.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: are (front row, l to r) Assistant Professor Eric Castle, Keunyung Kim, Jada Ellenberg, and Justin Erdmann. Back row: Theo Lenneman, Jordan Jacobson, and Michael Field. 

Contact: Eric Castle, assistant professor, 218-281-8119 (cast1047@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Turf Team.jpgThe University of Minnesota, Crookston Turf Bowl Team placed 7th in the National Turf Bowl Competition held recently. Members of the team included Junior Tom Halver, Chaska, Minn.; Senior Philip Holland, New London, Minn.; Senior Mark Michalski, Silver Bay, Minn.; and Senior Weston Wander, Sauk Centre, Minn. They competed against 67 turf bowl teams from universities all across the United States.  The competition was held during the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America Education and Trade Show on February 11, 2010, in San Diego, Calif.

Of the 67 teams represented by the 31 universities who competed, the U of M, Crookston Turf Bowl Team ranked 5th golf_turf_team_ocean.jpgbehind some major turfgrass programs including Iowa State University located in Ames; University of Massachusetts in Amherst; Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind.; and Penn State located in State College.

The 3 ½ hour turf bowl exam  is comprised of nine sections including identification (turfgrass, seed, soil, weed, insect, and disease), turfgrass growth and development, soil and soil fertility, weed management, disease management, insect management, turfgrass calculations, business management, and  a case study essay.

Tom Halver, a golf and turf management major, interned for Superintendent Michael Cohrs at the Bluff Creek Golf Course in Chaska. Philip Holland interned for Superintendent John Kelley, Jr., at the Kittansett Club in Marion, Mass. Mark Michalski interned for Superintendent Roger Stewart at TPC Twin Cities in Blaine, Minn., during summer 2009. Weston Wander interned last summer for Superintendent Lee Mahnke at the Greystone Golf Club in Sauk Centre, Minn. Holland, Michalski, and Wander are all pursuing double majors in golf and turf management and horticulture with an emphasis in environmental landscaping.

The advisor of the U of M, Crookston Turf Bowl Team is Kristina S. Walker, Ph.D. She earned her doctoral and master's degrees in agronomy specializing in turfgrass management from Purdue University. Walker has been teaching courses in agronomy and turfgrass management since January 2009 at the Crookston Campus.

With a degree in golf and turf management, graduates are qualified for positions in the golf industry, sports field management, lawn care, sod production, grounds maintenance, sales or pursue an advanced degree. For more information on golf and turf management at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/agri/golfturf.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In photo at top, left (l to r): Gregg Breningmeyer, John Deere Golf, director of Sales and Marketing; Kristina S. Walker, Ph.D., advisor and lecturer in golf and turf management at the U of M, Crookston; Philp Holland; Weston Wander; Mark Michalski; Tom Halver; and Mark Kuhns, GCSAA president.
 

In the photo at right (l to r): Philip Holland, Mark Michalski, Weston Wander, and Tom Halver.

Contact: Kristina Walker, lecturer, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8116 (kswalker@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

University of Minnesota, Crookston Senior Jennifer Lyn Zoch, Remer, Minn., recently fulfilled the necessary qualifications to be awarded the designation of "Certified Professional (CP) with an emphasis in Grower" by the Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association (MNLA).

To be granted certification status, Zoch had to pass a comprehensive examination Zoch_Jennifer 8716.jpgadministered by the MNLA and the University of Minnesota. All recipients of the certification status must also accumulate a minimum of 2,000 hours in horticulture-related employment, or two years in an educational program that includes a structured internship.

The certification exam consists of plant identification, landscape planning, sales and marketing procedures, general knowledge of horticulture, and practical application skills. The exam was developed through the efforts of faculty members from the Department of Horticultural Science at the University of Minnesota and members of the MNLA Certification Committee. Since the program's inception in 1978, nearly 770 individuals have achieved the status of MNLA Certified Professional.

The test is designed to measure the skills of practicing professionals and to improve the quality and standards of the nursery and landscape industry. As a continuing education requirement, Zoch must earn recertification points every three years to maintain the MNLA Certified Professional status.
 
"Experienced nursery and greenhouse growers, landscape designers and contractors, and garden center owners know that education and training are essential to becoming competent in their professions," says Tim Power, former MNLA president and co-owner of Law's Nursery Inc. in Hastings.

"This certification process provides our member businesses with employees of the highest quality, and, more importantly, ensures that our customers receive the best knowledge and experience available in the nursery and landscape industry."

The Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association is a statewide trade association with over 1,500 members. Association members include nurseries, garden centers, landscape designers, landscape contractors, irrigation contractors, professional gardening services, tree care specialists, commercial flower growers, and turf and landscape management professionals from throughout Minnesota and neighboring states. MNLA represents and provides service to its member businesses through educational programs, conventions and trade shows, marketing activities and public policy initiatives.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Photo above: Jennifer Zoch holds one of the poinsettias raised in the commercial floriculture class at the University of Minnesota, Crookston.

Contact: Susan Flynn, MNLA Executive Assistant susan@mnla.biz; 651-633-4987; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

University of Minnesota, Crookston Junior Kristine Marie Neu, Pelican Rapids, Minn., recently fulfilled the necessary qualifications to be awarded the designation of "Certified Professional (CP) with an emphasis in Garden Center" by the Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association (MNLA).
Neu_K.jpg
To be granted certification status, Neu had to pass a comprehensive examination administered by the MNLA and the University of Minnesota. All recipients of the certification status must also accumulate a minimum of 2,000 hours in horticulture-related employment, or two years in an educational program that includes a structured internship. The certification exam consists of plant identification, landscape planning, sales and marketing procedures, general knowledge of horticulture, and practical application skills. The exam was developed through the efforts of faculty members from the Department of Horticultural Science at the University of Minnesota and members of the MNLA Certification Committee.

Since the program's inception in 1978, nearly 770 individuals have achieved the status of MNLA Certified Professional. The test is designed to measure the skills of practicing professionals and to improve the quality and standards of the nursery and landscape industry. As a continuing education requirement, Neu must earn recertification points every three years to maintain the MNLA Certified Professional status.
 
"Experienced nursery and greenhouse growers, landscape designers and contractors, and garden center owners know that education and training are essential to becoming competent in their professions," says Tim Power, former MNLA president and co-owner of Law's Nursery Inc. in Hastings.

"This certification process provides our member businesses with employees of the highest quality, and, more importantly, ensures that our customers receive the best knowledge and experience available in the nursery and landscape industry."

The Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association is a statewide trade association with over 1,500 members. Association members include nurseries, garden centers, landscape designers, landscape contractors, irrigation contractors, professional gardening services, tree care specialists, commercial flower growers, and turf and landscape management professionals from throughout Minnesotaand neighboring states. MNLA represents and provides service to its member businesses through educational programs, conventions and trade shows, marketing activities and public policy initiatives.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Photo above: Kristine Neu holds one of the poinsettias raised in the commercial floriculture class at the University of Minnesota, Crookston.

Contact: Susan Flynn, MNLA executive assistant, susan@mnla.biz; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Two students in the horticultural studies program at University of Minnesota, Crookston recently received scholarships sponsored by the Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association (MNLA) Foundation.  Scholarship recipients are Jada Ellenberg, Perham, Minn., and Kristine Neu, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Cayard_Ellenberg_HoffmanMcNamara.JPG
The MNLA scholarship program recognizes superior students enrolled in horticultural, nursery or landscape studies programs at several area colleges and universities.  The scholarships are designed by MNLA and its member companies to help grow future leaders in the nursery and landscape industry.

In photo at left: Annette Cayard, Dakota County Technical College, left, and Jada Ellenberg, University of Minnesota , Crookston, right, with scholarship sponsor Mike McNamara, Hoffman and McNamara Nursery & Landscape.

In photo at right, below:  Front row (left to right): Davin Shokes, University of Minnesota - St. Paul, third from left, and Kristine Neu, University of Minnesota , Crookston, sixth from left, with scholarship sponsors Dennis Ullom, St. Croix Tree Service, Jim Walsh, Vineland Treecare, Steve Sylvester, S & S Tree Specialists, Inc., Bert Swanson, Swanson's Nursery Consulting, Greg Krogstad, Rainbow Treecare, Jim Ostvig, Ostvig Tree Service, and Dave Nordgard, A Top Notch Equipment. 


Two MNLA member firms co-sponsored the scholarships for the University of Minnesota,Neu_Shokes_MNLAArboristCommittee.JPG Crookston students.  MNLA Commercial Arborist Committee sponsored the scholarship for Neu.  Hoffman and McNamara, based in Hastings, sponsored the scholarship for Ellenberg.
 
To be eligible for an MNLA scholarship, applicants must possess a "C" grade average or better, present letters of recommendation from instructors and employers, and submit an essay stating their career goals and objectives. 

The Minnesota Nursery and Landscape Association is the state's largest green industry trade association with over 1,500 member companies.  Members include nurseries, garden centers, landscape contractors, landscape designers, irrigation contractors, commercial flower growers, tree care specialists, professional gardening services, and turf and landscape management professionals.     
                             
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Cassie Larson, Education & Industry Advancement Director - cassie@mnla.biz; Sue Jacobson, instructor, horticulture, 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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