Recently in natural resources Category

Century Old Bird Collection Finds Home at U of M Crookston

They have been migrating around the region for a century, but it looks like a unique collection 
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of birds has landed at the University of Minnesota Crookston. 

For Laura Bell, lab services coordinator in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and her colleagues, it was an opportunity that couldn't be passed up. An offer of the collection of nearly 200 birds will become a significant teaching tool and a distinctive addition to the campus wildlife museum. 

A taxidermist named Williams began the collection in 1890 and in 1914, it was passed to an East Grand Forks hotel owner for display. Over time, the birds changed hands including a transaction that took place as the result of a poker game. Eventually, East Grand Forks businessman Leonard Zimmer purchased a café that had been home to the collection. 

For 49 years, the collection was in storage. In 2001, when Zimmer passed away, the collection was transferred to the Wetlands, Pines, and Prairie Audubon Sanctuary. When the collection needed to be transferred again and contact was made with staff in natural resources, they went to take a look. And, within the week, the birds had come home to the campus museum located in Owen Hall. 

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"We now have male and female pairs of waterfowl we did not have before," Bell says. "These birds were collected while it was legal to do so, and now our students have the opportunity to learn from the real specimen as part of a collection we own.

"We are grateful to have these birds and for the people who thought about our campus when considering a new home for them," Bell continues. "And, we are looking forward to sharing it with our students." Of the 200 birds in the original collection, almost all of them remain intact and in good condition. Considering the age and the history of the collection, it is remarkable that the work by this long ago taxidermist will live on. To learn 
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more about the collection, contact Bell at 218-281-8131. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Laura Bell, lab services coordinator, 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, University Relations, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The American Kestrel, sometimes known as a sparrow hawk, has a declining population and 
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student research at the University of Minnesota Crookston is taking a closer look. The study of the American Kestrel, the smallest falcon in North America, has become a community bird conservation and citizen-science research project.  

Andy Albertsen, a senior from Nelson Minn., majoring in natural resources, has been working with Associate Professor John Loegering, who teaches natural resources and conducts bird research, on a long-term project that would involve assistance from the Crookston community. The plan is to place ten nesting boxes in the city of Crookston, some on private property and some on public land. 

Retired telephone poles from PKM Electric and installed by Otter Tail Power Company will be used to place the nesting boxes built by students in the U of M Crookston Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society. A meeting held on Tuesday, March11 at the Lake Agassiz Regional Library in Crookston, introduced the project to the community and enlisted the help of community members to observe and gather information about the nesting boxes. 

The research project began last fall under Loegering's guidance. Spring semester, when Albertsen enrolled in Dani Johannesen's Writing in Your Profession class, the project took on additional depth and a team of peers. Skylar Reed, a sophomore majoring in agronomy from Lafayette, Minn.; Michael McMahon, a senior double majoring in natural resources and aviation from St. Paul. Minn.; Mitchell Lundeen, a senior majoring in natural resources from Little Falls, Minn.; and Jake Otto, a senior majoring in natural resources from Lester Prairie, Minn.; under the leadership of Albertsen, have expanded the outreach. Creating a team charter, a proposal, mission statement and a Crookston Kestrel Watch Facebook page were all a part of Johannesen's class project. The goal is to increase awareness about the kestrel, monitor the population and engage the community.  

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Johannesen has collaborated with Heidi Hughes of the Middle-Snake-Tamarac Rivers Watershed District in Warren, Minn., on class projects to increase tourism and bring the natural resources of the region to light. Albertsen's research project involved meeting with Hughes to determine appropriate sites for the nesting boxes. 

Albertsen is pleased with the way the project has crossed from natural resources to the liberal arts and he is excited about its potential. "My undergraduate research project has allowed me to take a broad approach and involve classmates, community members, local businesses, and club members," Albertsen says. "As I prepare to graduate in May, I look back on my experience on this campus as a great one. I have been involved in some powerful hands-on learning experiences and opportunities for leadership."

As Albertsen moves on to graduate school or a career, he will be watching the project he started as it takes shape, and no matter what he does, he plans to use what he has learned to make a difference in the field of natural resources. 

This long term monitoring effort is conducted in cooperation with the American Kestrel Partnership. To find out more, visit the Crookston Kestrel Watch on Facebook at (www.facebook.com/crookstonkestrels).

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, at top: Andy Albertsen holds one of the kestrel nesting boxes. 
At bottom, left: Albertsen presents at the Lake Agassiz Regional Library. 

Contact: Dani Johannesen, lecturer, Liberal Arts and Education Dept, 218-281-8250 ( johan259@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, University Relations, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Jenny DuBay, a senior majoring in natural resources from Apple Valley, Minn., was named 
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runner-up for her research poster at the annual meeting of The Minnesota Chapter of The Wildlife Society. DuBay, whose research involved the testing of selected plants for their ability to accumulate phosphorous from surface waters into the plant tissue, presented her poster at the conference held in Bemidji, Minn., February 4-6, 2014. 

The research project was part of ongoing research by Assistant Professor Katy (Smith) Nannenga. Overall, DuBay's research project showed that hybrid cattails accumulated the most phosphorus out of the plants tested. Approximately 3.75 grams per shoot and interestingly, almost 12 grams if you incorporate the roots.  Results from this study could inform water managers as to how to remove phosphorus from surface waters.

DuBay was pleased with her poster's placement. "My poster was recognized at a wildlife conference even though it was not directly related to wildlife and that is unusual," DuBay says. "I was in a tie for second place but I won the tie. It was an honor to be recognized for my project and the work."

Background
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Contamination of surface and ground water is a serious environmental concern. Nannenga whose research interests include the use of plants to clean the environment known as phytoremediation, led the development of the environmental sciences program at the U of M Crookston and her work includes research on soil management practices to improve both soil quality and productivity. 

Funding for DuBay's project came from the University of Minnesota Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program and the Northwest Minnesota Regional Sustainable Development Partnership. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 
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minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos, top right, Jenny DuBay at work in the lab; middle, left, DuBay with her poster at The Wildlife Society Annual Meeting; and bottom, right, close up of DuBay's poster on phytoremediation. 

Contact: Katy Nannenga, assistant professor, environmental science, 218-281- 8262, (katys@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The ice was filled with participants at the 4th Annual  Justin Knebel Memorial Ice Fishing 
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Tournament held Saturday, February 1, 2014, ready to catch fish and support a scholarship in memory of Justin Knebel at the University of Minnesota Crookston. The tournament, held at Zippel Bay Resort on Lake of the Woods, Williams, Minn., included nearly 100 participants and raised more than $3,300 in support of the Justin Knebel Memorial Scholarship. 

Results of the Justin Knebel Memorial Ice Fishing Tournament included first fish caught, Heidi Erickson; largest walleye, Adam Roerish; largest northern, Bryce Tiedemann; largest sauger, Jeannine Trappe; largest perch, Andrew Buell. Prizes were sponsored in part by Streiff Sporting Goods  in Warroad, Minn.

The top winners in the raffle included Gary Lund, who took home the Lowrance Out N Back GPS, and Tim Tulibaski, who won a stay in the Super 8 Jacuzzi Suite.  

The planning committee would like to thank the UMC Natural Resources Club and this year's tournament sponsors: Zippel Bay Resort; Strieff's Sporting Goods; Markit County Grain; 7 Clans Casino; Knebel Red Angus; Olson Cabintry; Bill & Mary Tyrrell; Sage's Angle West; Tom's Tackle, Inc.; and Slush Copter. 

If someone is interested in donating a prize or sponsoring the 2015 tournament, contact Tyrrell at 218-281-8436 or Alysa Tulibaski at 701-215-4300. Video highlights of this year's tournament are available at http://z.umn.edu/jk0. Members of the planning committee for the event include Corby Kemmer, Bill Tyrrell, Stephanie Helgeson, Amber Bailey, Rose Ulseth, and Alysa Tulibaski.

Background
Justin Knebel, who played basketball for the U of M, Crookston Golden Eagles, grew up in Warroad, Minn., graduating from Warroad High School in 2001. A talented athlete, he lettered in basketball, cross country, and track. After graduation, he attended the University of Minnesota, Crookston where he played basketball as a point guard for the Golden Eagles. Besides his passion for playing basketball, Knebel loved the Warroad area and outdoor sports in Minnesota, making the ice fishing tournament an apt tribute to the memory of this outstanding student-athlete. For more information on the tournament, visit www.umcrookston.edu/justinknebel. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo is the group enjoying a day on the lake at the 4th Annual Justin Knebel Memorial Ice Fishing Tournament held on February 1, 2014. 

Contact: Bill Tyrrell, director, athletic fundraising, 218-281-8436, (btyrrell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The second gardening and local foods seminar is scheduled for Thursday, February 6, 2014, at 5:30 in Bede Ballroom. Randel Hanson, Ph.D., will present the seminar "Anchoring Food Systems Change: The Sustainable Agriculture Project at the University of Minnesota, Duluth." Hanson is the founder and "farmer-in-chief" of the Sustainable Agriculture Project at University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD), where he leads a faculty collaborative for systems change that includes a 10-acre campus garden and a 5-acre orchard on the former Northeast Experimental Station. The garden produces a substantial portion of the food for UMD's food service. 

Seminar suppers are free, but reservations are required. Attendees are requested to go through the Brown Dining Hall at 5:30 p.m. and bring their meal down the hall to the Bede Ballroom. The program will begin at 6 p.m. and conclude around 7 p.m. For reservations, call or email Megan Luxford or Laura Gabrielson at 218-281-8128 (luxfo003@crk.umn.edu). For more information, contact Dan Svedarsky, director of the Center for Sustainability at 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@crk.umn.edu).

Earlier in the day, Hanson will be speaking to Svedarsky's capstone class in integrated resource management where his topic will be, "Managing Resources in Time and Space: The Case of our Agro-food system." The public is invited to attend that presentation from 2 to 3:15 p.m. in the Peterson Classroom in Heritage Hall on the U of M Crookston campus. 

Background
Hanson holds a faculty appointment in environment and sustainability at UMD, where he teaches courses in food systems, organic agriculture, urban ecology and ecological history. Before joining UMD, he held faculty positions at Arizona State University and Rice University. In addition to his work on regional food systems development, Hanson has published on challenges associated with locating and managing high-level radioactive waste, particularly with reference to American Indian communities.

His current focus engages organizational and institutional development and change in building small and mid-sized food and agricultural systems for creating better outcomes in human health, economic development and ecological resilience. He is interested in ways of networking stakeholders within institutions, communities and regions to create ideas, policies, and actions to expand production of and access to "good food." 

In particular, he is focused on integrating "anchor institutions" such as education, medical and other place-based organizations that have become increasingly important in local and regional sustainable development for many urban and regional economies. Colleges and universities have a special responsibility in preparing future leaders for a world of rising challenges around, but not limited to, sustainably-produced food and health.

This event is part of a continuing supper seminar series scheduled the spring semester at the U of M Crookston to explore and inform aspects of gardening and local food production in the Crookston community and the Crookston campus. The programs are supported by a Mini-Grant from the U of M's Institute on the Environment to UMC's Center for Sustainability and are free and open to all interested in the topic.

The kick-off of the seminar series occurred January 23 and featured Noelle Hardin, a U of MN Extension Educator whose focus is Community Food Systems in northwest Minnesota.  Hardin and U of M Crookston student sustainability assistant, Laura Gabrielson lead a workshop to explore the many values of local foods and over 35 participants from the community and campus shared their experiences. "It was a cold night but people turned out with great ideas and warm enthusiasm," according Svedarsky, "Folks even had an opportunity to draw out their vision of gardening on paper with colored markers." 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A campus legacy continues with hosting of the 39th annual Ag Arama at the University of 
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Minnesota Crookston. The weekend of events, scheduled for Friday and Saturday, January 24-25, 2014, is hosted by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and includes activities for the entire family. The theme for this year's event is "Down on the Farm." 

Dedication of Ag Arama

Ag Arama 2014 is dedicated to long time faculty member and alumna Susan Jacobson '87 and '96 (In photo below at right). She first graduated with her associate degree in floriculture/greenhouse management and later earned her bachelor of science degree in plant industries management both from the University of Minnesota Crookston. She has worked at the U of M Crookston for
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 the past twenty years and has enjoyed teaching the very classes that stimulated her own interests as a student. 

Jacobson is heavily involved in the community she lives in and is part of many professional affiliations including the Minnesota Nursery Landscaping Association. Jacobson was recognized with the Outstanding Alumni Award during homecoming last fall.

Ag Arama Activities

Most of the Ag Arama activities take place on Saturday, Jan. 25, in the University Teaching and Outreach Center (UTOC) located on the north edge of the campus.  

Contests in agronomy, animal science, horticulture, agricultural business, and natural resources highlight Ag Arama weekend. They serve as an opportunity for students to showcase their knowledge and skills and have a chance to interact with alumni and faculty members. Ag Arama is planned and operated by a committee of students advised by Terrill Bradford and Brenda Miller, who both teach in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department.

On Friday evening, the Animal Science Association sponsors a chili feed from 5 to 8 p.m. in UTOC for $5 per person. 

On Saturday morning from 8:30 a.m. until 1 p.m., the animal showmanship contests begin and the public is welcome to watch the competition as it unfolds in both novice and experienced categories. Students compete in western and English horse showmanship, lamb lead, and dairy, beef, sheep, and swine showing.  The novices are paired with experienced students prior to the contests to prepare for the day. Alumni showmanship will take place at 2 p.m.

From 9 a.m. to noon, an agricultural industries show features some of the latest in agricultural equipment. At 1:30 p.m., the Round Robin Showmanship will begin. Coronation of the Ag Arama royalty takes place at 2:30 p.m. followed by the presentation of specialty awards and the sweepstakes presentation. Emcees for this year's Ag Arama are alumni Matt Green '13 and Matthew Krueger '12.

In the evening, a social will be held at the Crookston American Legion from 5:30 to 7 p.m., with appetizers served from 6 to 7 p.m. Capping off the weekend will be dancing to "Eagle Creek" from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Legion. Admission is $10. 

Ag Arama Royalty candidates

For Ag Arama King the candidates are Donovan Rupprecht, a junior from Fertile, Minn., majoring in animal science; Dustin Smith, a senior from Browerville, Minn., double majoring in agricultural business and agronomy; Timothy Staudahar, a senior from Hibbing, Minn., majoring in horticulture; Sam Haugen, a junior from Fertile, Minn., majoring in agronomy; and Kevin Bunde, a junior from Parkers Prairie, Minn., majoring in agricultural systems management. 

Queen candidates include Rochelle Herzog, a junior from Randall, Minn., majoring in animal science; Sarah Morris, a senior from Ramsey, Minn., majoring in animal science; Emily Krull, a senior from Two Harbors, Minn., majoring in equine science; Chelsey Hettver, a senior from Brainerd, Minn., majoring in animal science; and Katie Nenn, a senior from Wyoming, Minn., majoring in animal science.

Candidates for Ag Arama Prince are Luke Lundeby, a sophomore from Osnabrock, N.D., majoring in agricultural systems management; Keith Yorek, a freshman from Little Falls, Minn., majoring in animal science; John DeBuhr, a sophomore from Chokio, Minn., majoring in aviation; Aaron Bengtson, a freshman from Battle Lake, Minn., majoring in agronomy; and Karson Dahl, a sophomore from Drayton, N.D., majoring in agronomy.

Princess candidates include Amberly Pesall, a sophomore from New Brighton, Minn., double majoring in agricultural business and equine science; Caitlin Wirth, a junior from Frazee, Minn., majoring in animal science; Kaylin Beatty, a sophomore from Andover, Minn., majoring in equine science; Rebekah Landmark, a freshman from Montevideo, Minn., double majoring in animal science and agronomy;  and Marilyn Lewis,a freshman from Bemidji, Minn., majoring in animal science.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Terrill Bradford, instructor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8108 (tbradfor@umn.edu); Brenda Miller, lecturer, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8140 (mill3707@umn.edu)

Students from more than 50 high schools, chapters and clubs were on campus Friday, December 6, 2013, to compete in more than 20 agriculture and natural resources related contests. The annual Agriculture and Natural Resources Day competition has been held for more than 30 years on the Crookston campus. 

With contests ranging from horticulture and forestry to ag mechanics, livestock and sales, the day brings out the competitive spirit of students culminating in an awards ceremony. The contests are overseen by U of M Crookston Agriculture and Natural Resources Department faculty.  The awards ceremony recognizes the top individuals and teams. 

Results of the day's competition are posted at www3.crk.umn.edu/ag/AAD/results.htm and all photographs of individuals and teams are available at www3.crk.umn.edu/photogallery/agnatrday/2013/index.html by selecting the photo and right clicking it to download.

Scholarships and plaques are awarded to school teams and individuals for each contest. Last year, $750 UMC scholarships were awarded for the high individual in each contest, $600 UMC scholarships were awarded for the second place individual, and $450 UMC scholarships were awarded for the third place individual. In all, more than $32,000 in scholarships is awarded during the competition. 

More information regarding Agriculture and Natural Resources Activities Day is available by contacting Leah Stroot at 218-281-8101 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/agnatrday

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Leah Stroot, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8101 (stro0525@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

December at the University of Minnesota Crookston brings the excitement and challenge of Agriculture and Natural Resources Activities Day. Students from more than 50 high schools, chapters and clubs will be on campus on Friday, December 6, 2013, to compete in more than 20 contests. The Ag and Natural Resources Day competition has been held for more than 30 years on the Crookston campus.

The day begins early with registration for the equine contests beginning at 7:15 a.m. With contests ranging from horticulture and forestry to ag mechanics, livestock and sales, the day brings out the competitive spirit of students culminating in an awards ceremony. The contests are overseen by U of M Crookston Agriculture and Natural Resources Department faculty.  All activities conclude with the awards ceremony at 1:15 p.m.in Lysaker Gymnasium. 

The awards ceremony recognizes the day's winning individuals and teams. Scholarships and plaques are awarded to school teams and individuals for each contest. Last year, $750 UMC scholarships were awarded for the high individual in each contest, $600 UMC scholarships were awarded for the second place individual, and $450 UMC scholarships were awarded for the third place individual. In all, more than $32,000 in scholarships is awarded during the competition. 

More information regarding Ag and Natural Resources Activities Day is available by contacting Leah Stroot at 218-281-8101 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/agnatrday

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Leah Stroot, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281 8101 (stro0525@umn.edu) ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu) ; Ruth Navarro, communications assistant, 218-281-8446, (nava0085@umn.edu)

Stephanie Lane, a sophomore at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Holly Springs, 
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N.C., majoring in natural resource aviation recently completed her first student solo flight. Her flight instructor is Brandon Curry and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the proud instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Grant Criger, a sophomore at the University of Minnesota Crookston from Eagan, Minn., 
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majoring in law enforcement aviation recently completed his first student solo flight. His flight instructor is Nic Huber and the milestone flight was completed at the Crookston Municipal Airport. 

The first solo flight is a significant accomplishment in a pilot's career and creates a memory that will stay with the student forever. During this flight, a new pilot completes three takeoffs and landings in a row while his or her eager flight instructor watches from the ground and stays in communication via radio. Much preparation has gone into the first solo flight, with the student and instructor putting in hours and hours of flight and ground training on a wide range of subjects including FAA regulations, weather, and aerodynamics. Eventually, after passing a written test and satisfying the instructor that he or she can consistently make safe landings, the instructor gets out of the airplane and endorses the student's logbook for solo flight. Landing an aircraft is one of the most difficult skills to master for any pilot and involves difficult and complex eye-hand coordination as well as good judgment.

Following American aviation tradition, removing a new pilot's shirt tail is a sign of confidence by the instructor in the student following the completion of the first solo flight. This tradition stems from the days when a student sat in the front seat of the aircraft with the instructor behind. Radios and intercom systems were not a part of early aviation, making it necessary for the instructor to tug on the student pilot's shirt tail to get his/her attention. A successful first solo flight is significant in that it means the student can fly without the instructor, and consequently, no longer needs a shirt tail. In observance of this tradition, aviation students at U of M Crookston have their shirt tails cut off by the instructor, and they are displayed at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

The aviation program at University of Minnesota Crookston is a partnership between UM Crookston and the University of North Dakota Aerospace Foundation (UNDAF). All academic classes and ground schools are conducted at the University of Minnesota Crookston campus while hands-on flight training is conducted by UNDAF and UM Crookston staff just 3 miles north of campus at the Crookston Municipal Airport. Unlike most university aviation degree programs which focus solely on aviation, U of M Crookston's "dual function" degree programs offer students both strong fundamentals in aviation, as well as significant coursework specific to their "other" field of study whether it be agriculture, law enforcement or natural resources. This integrated approach prepares graduates for a career in aviation and much more. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology. With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree. "Small Campus. Big Degree." To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Flight instructor Nic Huber (left) congratulates Grant Criger on the completion of his solo flight. 

Contact: Les Dillard, aviation lecturer and flight instructor, 218-281-8114 (ldillard@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

It was down to the last few seconds when the answer to a question on herpetology led the 
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University of Minnesota Crookston to victory in the Wildlife Quiz Bowl held at the annual conference of The Wildlife Society. The conference contest, held in Milwaukee, Wis., was a big win for the UM Crookston over a team from Humboldt State University (HSU), Arcata, Calif., a perennial favorite. 

Coached by John Loegering and Vanessa Lane, the team of natural resources majors was led by captain Matt Toenies, a senior from Randall, Minn. Other members included Jennifer DuBay, a senior from Apple Valley, Minn.; Alisha Mosloff, a junior from Thief River Falls, Minn.; Emily Trappe, a senior from International Falls, Minn.; and Jacob Nelson, a senior from Lake Park, Minn. They competed through four rounds with sixteen other teams from across the country and finished against HSU with a final score of 105 to 100 and coming back after a 25 to 70 point deficit.

Loegering was proud of the team's professionalism and performance. "Our team won on a question in herpetology, taught by Vanessa Lane, and it's a class we just started offering this fall," Loegering says. "Our students were exemplary and Vanessa and I could not be more proud of the way they competed and represented the University of Minnesota Crookston." Students attending had an opportunity to visit the Leopold Shack and International Crane Foundation while at the conference along with valuable opportunities to network and meet professionals in the field.

Background
The Wildlife Society is an international, non-profit scientific and educational organization serving and representing wildlife professionals in all areas of wildlife conservation and resource management. The goal of the student chapter on the Crookston campus is to promote excellence in wildlife stewardship through science and education. For more information on natural resources at the U of M Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/natr.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Matt Toenies, Jennifer DuBay, Alisha Mosloff, Emily Trappe, and Jacob Nelson. 

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor and U of M Extension wildlife specialist, Ag and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M Crookston Students Gain Experience During Birding Open House

A Birding Open House was held on Saturday, September 7 at the Red River Valley Natural 
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History Area. Megan Betcher, Red Wing, Minn., was one of many University of Minnesota Crookston students involved in the open house. The sophomore, from Red Wing, Minn., is majoring in natural resources at the U of M Crookston Crookston. 

Workshop participants caught 88 birds in two hours representing 24 species and banded 80 of the birds. The other eight were released. 

Several migrating species, not commonly seen in this area, made the open house even more exciting for birders. Some 60 people were in attendance. Displays on bird feeding, bird adaptations, purple martins and martin housing, a build your own bird feeder station, and bird banding demonstration kept participants engaged and made the day enjoyable for all in attendance. 

In the photo: Sophomore Megan Betcher, Red Wing, Minn., majoring in natural resources

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

University of Minnesota Crookston natural resources majors Alisha Mosloff, a junior from Thief 
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River Falls, Minn., and Jenna Blace, a senior from Saginaw, Minn., assisted with the release of some eastern painted turtles as part of the new herpetology course taught fall semester by Vanessa Lane, Ph.D. 

In June, Lane was contacted about a painted turtle nest near the Pankratz Prairie just east of Crookston. A young skunk kit had dug up the nest and eaten all but three of the eggs. Unfortunately, the remaining three eggs were beginning to dry out because they had been unearthed. Since Lane breeds reptiles (ball pythons and leopard geckos) as a hobby,  she was contacted and put the turtle eggs in an incubator at her home. Thirty-days later (incubation period for painted turtles is around 60 days) the three tiny little turtles hatched.

When turtles hatch, their shells are still quite soft, especially their bellies where they finish absorbing their yolk. They also don't eat for 1-2 weeks after they hatch because they are still living on the remains of their yolk, which at that point is inside their body cavity. Baby turtles are very vulnerable when they first hatch and are eaten by almost everything. Lane kept them in a plastic sterilite container outside covered in hardware mesh to keep them safe but still expose them to all-important ultraviolet light, which allows them to metabolize vitamin D3 and turn calcium into bone and shell. After a week they began eating small live insects and commercial turtle pellets.

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Lane raised them for about a month until they were eating and growing well, and their shells had fully hardened. They were released this week with the help of Blace and Mosloff. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photo at the top right are Jenna Blace (left) and Alisha Mosloff (right) in photo hold the tiny Eastern Painted Turtles before release. 

Contact: Vanessa Lane, lecturer, Ag and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8111 (vlane@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

College students from around the area are invited to attend College Outdoor Skills Day, taking place on Wednesday, September 18, 2013, from 4:30 to 7 p.m. at the Crookston Gun Club, located north of the University of Minnesota Crookston campus on Highway 75 and 240th Street Southwest.  The event is free, but interested students are encouraged to pre-register. For more information or to register, contact Laura Bell, lab coordinator and naturalist at the U of M Crookston, at 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu).  Free t-shirts will be given to the first fifty college students to pre-register.

The event is designed to help college students experience new outdoor activities or sharpen the outdoor skills they already have. Programs will be offered throughout the evening, including fly-fish casting, target archery, slingshots/wrist rockets, rifle shooting, and trap shooting.  A free meal will be provided courtesy of the West Polk Deer Hunters.

College Outdoor Skills Day is sponsored by the University of Minnesota Crookston and the following organizations:  Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, West Polk Deer Hunters, Crookston Gun Club, Minn-Dak Border Chapter of MN Deer Hunters Association, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Federal Cartridge, and the U of M Crookston's Natural Resources Club and Student Chapter of the Wildlife Society.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Laura Bell, lab services coordinator, 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director of communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Wildlife Society's North Central Section recently selected the Student Chapter of the 
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Year award to the University of Minnesota Crookston Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society (TWS). The Student Chapter is advised by John Loegering, associate professor in natural resources in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at the U of M Crookston. A travel grant of up to $1,000 is awarded to the Section's Student Chapter of the Year.  The award will be presented at the Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference in Kansas City, Missouri.

The North Central Section presents the Student Chapter of the Year award to an outstanding student chapter each year for its exemplary contributions to the Society's mission and goals.  The goal of the award is to encourage and recognize exceptional achievements by Section student chapters.  "It is truly a great accomplishment and a testament to the dedication of your members and the organization and leadership of your officers" said Rochelle Renken, president of the North Central Section.  "The selection committee was impressed with your activities and the level of organizational achievement.  In particular I was impressed by your service activities and public outreach efforts.  Keep doing good work to prepare your members for professional roles and to engage the public in conservation education."

Emily Trappe, Student Chapter president, was pleased with the recognition. "This award recognizes the activity and work of our club and their passion for natural resources and wildlife," she said.
John Loegering echoed Trappe's sentiment, "I am extremely proud of the engagement of the students in the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society on the Crookston campus. They are leaders in their own right and this achievement reflects their dedication and effort. It is an honor to be recognized out of more than 25 chapters of the organization in the North Central Section and gratifying to work with students who are as committed as these students are." 

Student chapters strengthen the Society's membership recruitment and retention efforts by providing opportunities for member involvement in Society activities.  The Student Chapter of the Year award pays tribute to this important unit of The Wildlife Society. (For more, visit http://wildlife.org/ncs/awards)

Background
The Wildlife Society is an international, non-profit scientific and educational organization serving and representing wildlife professionals in all areas of wildlife conservation and resource management. The goal of the student chapter on the Crookston campus is to promote excellence in wildlife stewardship through science and education. 

Students in the organization are involved in a number of projects including duck banding at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge, Wood Duck Box Monitoring at Rydell National Wildlife Refuge, American Woodcock monitoring at Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge, black bear den monitoring, several environmental education programs at local schools, Prairie Chicken booming ground surveys, prairie seed cleaning, and youth deer hunts at Rydell National Wildlife Refuge as part of their community service.  They also hosted speakers on deer management and stream and ditch restoration that were educational for students and well attended by the public.  This past year the group also won wildlife quiz bowls at both the Minnesota and Midwest conclaves, competing against other universities through the Midwest.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo is Senior Jenny DuBay during a duck banding trip with the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society. 

Contact: : John Loegering, associate professor, Ag and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Dan Svedarsky was an invited speaker and conference co-summarizer at a recent conference 
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on, America's Grasslands: The Future of Grasslands in a Changing Landscape. Svedarsky is a research biologist at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center and director of the University of Minnesota, Crookston's Center for Sustainability. The meeting brought together researchers, natural resources professionals, farmers and ranchers, representatives of Native American tribes, and policy experts and conservationists from California to Washington, D.C. to discuss the outlook and opportunities to conserve North America's grasslands. 

The biennial conference was held in Manhattan, Kan., and was focused on working collaboratively with ranchers to conserve grasslands but also included presentations on prairie ecology, interpretation, and restoration techniques. 

Primary sponsors of the conference were the National Wildlife Federation and Kansas State University along with the World Wildlife Fund, Environmental Defense Fund, The Nature Conservancy, Ducks Unlimited, Sharp Brothers Seed Company, Grassland Heritage Foundation, and the Consortium for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability. 
In his paper entitled, Prairie restoration - up close and personal - on a University Campus, Svedarsky reported on his long-time work with restoring prairie at the Red River Valley Natural History Area of the Northwest Research and Outreach Center in Crookston and the use of prairie plants in interpretative demonstrations on the Crookston campus. 

He and other faculty, staff, and students have installed prairie plants in the Nature Nook, Youngquist Prairie Garden, and currently in a raingarden in front of Heritage Hall; the newest resident hall on the Crookston campus. "Prairie plants have the advantage of being adapted to local growing conditions, are readily available, low maintenance, and are the "architects" of the rich fertile soils of the Red River Valley," notes Svedarsky. A number of UMC natural resource graduates are currently employed in land management capacities where they use prairie plants in their work. Svedarsky has also worked closely with The Nature Conservancy in northwest Minnesota in projects such as the Pankratz Prairie, Pembina Trail Preserve, and the Glacial Ridge Project. He received the President's Stewardship Award from The Nature Conservancy in 1981.

Over 250 participants attended the conference which included field trips to the Konza Prairie Biological Station of Kansas State and the National Tall Grass Prairie Preserve. The regional setting was the Flint Hills region of the North American Tallgrass Prairie where limestone geology lies close to the surface thus favoring grassland development on the thin soils and a ranching culture. Kansas State has been the center of numerous research studies on tallgrass prairie ecology including vegetation and animal interactions including the Greater Prairie Chicken.

"Native grasslands and the wildlife that depend on them are disappearing at alarming rates," said Aviva Glaser, agriculture policy specialist at the National Wildlife Federation and conference co-organizer. Recent surges in grain prices have prompted the extensive conversion of native grasslands and CRP grasslands in the Dakotas, many of which are erosion-prone due to steep slopes and droughty soils. "We want to do what we can to help the conservation and careful management of the American grassland," said Dr. John Briggs, Kansas State professor of biology and director of the Konza Prairie Biological Station who also helped organize the conference. "It's going to take all of these groups working together. We can't just work in a vacuum."

In his summary remarks, Svedarsky posed the question of why people should care about prairies in the first place, with their rich diversity of plants and animals; large and small. "I think often of the following words of Larry Kruckenberg, former North Dakota Game and Fish Commissioner:  for people to care about something, they must; feel it is of consequence, believe that it affects them, and believe they can do something about it. Does an unemployed single mom in the Bronx care about the conversion of South Dakota grassland to row crops? I doubt it, but before real consequential action is taken at the regional and national level, the base of caring constituency must be broadened."

Svedarsky believes in educational solutions and also quoted the Central African Conservationist, Baba Dioum. "For in the end we will conserve only what we love, we will love what we understand, and we will understand only what we are taught." Being a college natural resources conservation professor, Svedarsky adds to this his mantra for teaching, "So let us teach often, and well."

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Dan Svedarsky by a raingarden of mostly native prairie plants in front of the Flint Hills Discovery Center in Manhattan, Kansas. Svedarsky and assistants are installing a similar raingarden in front of Heritage Hall on the University of Minnesota Crookston campus.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, professor, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A birding open house is slated for Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013, and hosted by the University of Minnesota at the Red River Valley Natural History Area, located across from the Crookston campus on the west side of U.S. Highway 2. The open house runs from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Visitors will have the chance to see mist netting and bird banding demonstrations and tour a number of education stations including bird identification, bird feeding, bird beaks, and more. Representatives from the Purple Martin Association of the Dakotas and the Minnesota Master Naturalist Program will be available, and children will have the opportunity to make and take home birdfeeders and hike along the trails that wind through the 85-acre Natural History Area. 

Driving Directions:  From US 2 on the north side of Crookston, turn west on North Acres Drive (El Metate restaurant and Crookston Armory are at this corner), drive 0.25 miles, pass the residence, and follow the road as it turns right and heads north.  Cross the railroad tracks and continue along the road as it turns west and northwest to the History Area parking lot.  Directions:  http://z.umn.edu/urocmaps

For more information, contact Laura Bell at 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu). 
Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Laura Bell, lab services coordinator, Ag and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Wade Jackson '13 and Senior Bob Guetter were recently named recipients of 2013 Student 
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Conservationist Awards from the Minnesota Chapter of the Soil and Conservation Society. 
 
The Award is given to outstanding conservation students at a Minnesota college or university and consists of a $ 500 stipend. Students are typically nominated by one of more of their professors based on their academic and leadership achievements. They are also required to complete an essay in which they outline how they would personally address the range of current conservation issues but especially those related to soil and water conservation. 
 
Jackson, from Walker, Minn., recently graduated with a degree in natural resources management and is on a career track appointment with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). He will be based in Crookston on a training assignment this summer. In the summer of 2012, Jackson was on assignment in Duluth [Minn.] where he worked with Dan Weber, a 2003 graduate who is based there with the NRCS. Wade is an older-than-average student who made a considerable sacrifice to return to college and complete his degree. 

"We especially appreciated Wade sharing his life experiences in classes and their conservation implications," notes Professor Dan Svedarsky. "It was especially fitting that Kathy Fillmore was able to present Wade with his award since Kathy also completed her UMC degree as an older-than-average student." Fillmore, a '99 graduate, is now a district conservationist with the NRCS in Thief River Falls, Minn. 

Guetter is from Miltona, Minn., and is on a career track with the NRCS but has launched his career in North Dakota, having worked in Valley City, Bottineau, and now this summer in Fessenden. Guetter is maintaining a 3.75 grade point average while majoring in wildlife management and natural resource management and plans to graduate at the end of winter semester of 2013. He also finds time to provide key leadership to the Golden Ducks, Crookston Chapter of Duck Unlimited as well as being a member of the UMC Natural Resources Club. 

"Bob did not grow up on a farm but purposely wanted to gain first-hand farm experience since NRCS personnel work with private  landowners so he hired on part-time with Wayne and Kevin Capistran Farms of Crookston," according to Svedarsky. "Somehow or another, Bob was able to squeeze a lot into a full schedule and do a great job on all of it!" Guetter received the UMC John Polley Soil and Water Conservation Award in 2012. 

Background

The Minnesota Chapter of the Soil and Conservation Society is affiliated with the national Soil and Water Conservation Society (SWCS), a nonprofit scientific and educational organization -- founded in 1943 -- that serves as an advocate for conservation professionals and for science-based conservation practice, programs, and policy. SWCS has over 5,000 members around the world, including researchers, technical advisors, teachers, students, farmers, and ranchers. Members come from nearly every academic discipline and many different public, private, and nonprofit institutions. Chapters, numbering 75 are located throughout the United States and Canada and conduct a variety of activities at local, state, and provincial levels and on university campuses. Discussions are underway between Regional One Representative, Kathy Fillmore and UMC conservation faculty to establish a student SWCS affiliated chapter on the UMC campus.

For more information, contact Svedarsky at 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@crk.umn.edu).

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photo: Brenda Miller, lecturer in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department; Robert Guetter; Wade Jackson; and Kathy Fillmore, district conservationist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Thief River Falls, Minn. 

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual Student Awards Program, a celebration of student service, leadership, and academic and athletic achievement, was held recently at the University of Minnesota Crookston. Assistant Professor Denis Maier, who teaches in the Business Department, was the 2012 Outstanding Educator and hosted this year's recognition.


Award recipients include the following students:

CSA Student Senators and Officers
Brooke Novak; Ross Sigler; Bryce Gillie; Aaron Soltau, Heather Rodriguez; Mariah Gautsche; Emily Goff; Molly Sheehan; Anthonette Sims; and Gyaltso Gurung, Laura Gabrielson; Ashlynn Hartung; Alexmai Addo; Adam Switzer; Kayla Bellrichard; and Shaolei "Sorry" Jin. 


Outstanding Ambassadors
Catlin Kersting, Tashi Gurung, Sam Zuck, Katie Hagen, Sarah Morris, Jordan Melbye
Tony Taylor, Kevin Lamp, Alex Skeeter, Alissa Hernandez, Jessica Girgen, Mikala Guidinger
Sorry Jin, Danny Lee, Bryce Gillie, Justin Goodroad

Ambassador of the Year Award
Bryce Gillie


Outstanding First-Year Biology Award
Ashley Martell


Outstanding Future Educator Award
Dabitna Chung, Amy Van Treeck

Marketing/ Management Academic Achievement Award
Dain Park and Alex Buscher


Marketing/Management Outstanding Leadership Award
Dain Park, Abbey Wemimo, Hannah Reysen, Kayla Bellrichard

Distinguished Service to the Accounting Program
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee

Outstanding SRM Student
Kari Bodine

Outstanding Communication Student
Jessica Stuber 

Outstanding Communication Minor
Connie Vandermay 


SOS Service Award
Alexmai Addo, Catilin Kersting

Outstanding SOS Leader
Almir Krdzalik

Peer Connection Service Award
Alexmai Addo and Brooke Novak

Peer Mentor of the Year Award
Catlin Kersting

Regal Spirit Award
Kayla Bellrichard, and Tyler Lowithan

Outstanding Turfgrass Student Award
Kyle Kreklow, Kurtis Wacker, Joey Schmidt, with Kristie Walker

Norman Pankratz Memorial Conservation Award
Jenny DuBay 

John Polley Soil and Water Conservation Award
Trent Brenny and Andrew Albertsen with Dan Svedarsky

The Wildlife Society Travel Award
Alisha Mosloff 

Outstanding Animal Science
Sara Scott (pre-vet) 

Outstanding Equine Science
Jess Charles (pre-vet)

Outstanding Ag Business Student
Amanda Crook 

Outstanding ASM Student
Leonard Will and Matt Green 

Outstanding Horticulture
Ashlynn Hartung


NACTA Recognition
Meats  Team: Dustin Wiese,  Katie Hagen, Justin Goodroad and Derek Suhonen 
Ag Business Dustin Smith, Katie Hagen, Matt Green, and Kayla Erickson
Ag Computers: Cedric Citrowske, Amanda Crook, Drew Underdahl and Brian Oachs 

Outstanding International Student Scholars Award
Ashley Yun Zhor; Brennan Andreas; Danny Lee; and Tashi Gurung

Learning Abroad Office Ambassador Awards
Tim Baker; Amanda Corneliussen; and DeAndra O'Connell 

Support of Diversity Award


Outstanding Theater Student Award
Liz Massie
Tyler Lowithan
Nathan Anderson

Outstanding Music Service Award
Rebecca Apitz 
Miah Smith 

Outstanding Writing Tutor
Rowenna Fillmore

Computer Help Desk
Melissa Freitag 

Student Employee of the Year
Adam Hoff 

Female and Male Student Athlete of the Year
Chelsea Wiesner and Almir Kradzlik

Female and Male Outstanding Athlete of the Year
Brittany Wiese and Brittany Looker and Richard Haley

Justin Knebel Memorial Award
Broderick Schmidt

Dale Knotek Community Service Award - Delta Theta Sigma (DTS)
Joshua Bruggman, Tim Lee, Brett Carlson, Clayton Lenk, Aaron Soltau, Marcus Twaddle
Kasey Okke, Adam Switzer, Dan Kimm, Hannah Reysen, Sami Benoy, Evan Boreen, Amanda Corneliussen, Brittany Fox

Presidents Volunteer Service Award
Megan Luxford, Chia Moua, Kari Bodine, Bailey Stratton (online student), Katie Nenn, Kevin Lamp Tony Taylor, Krista Kenyon, Emily Goff, Alexmai Addo, Catlin Kersting, Kayla Bellrichard, Alissa Hernandez, Almir Krdzalic Kasey Okke, Sean Rozell, Tyler Lowthian, Bryce Gillie, Ross Sigler

Student Volunteer of the Year Award
John Niemczyk with Lisa Loegering

Student Programmer of the Year
Ashley Hoffman

Outstanding CSA Senator
Alexmai Addo 

Outstanding CSA Voting Delegate Award
Megan Luxford

Faculty and Staff Awards

Outstanding Educator
Ron Del Vecchio 

Most Supportive of Students
Phil Baird 

Outstanding Service to Students
Lisa Samuelson 

Student Achievement Awards
en Williams, Bryce Gillie, Almir Krzadlic, Matt Green
Krista Kenyon, Tashi Gurung, Abbey Wemimo, Brooke Novak
Alexmai Addo, Danny Lee, Sam Zuck- Roscoe, and Alex Skeeter

Man and Woman of Year
Dae Yuel Danny Lee and Sam Zuck-Roscoe 


Athletic All-Academic Team - 3.2 GPA or higher and lettering in the same sport for two years

Rachelle Alcini - Women's Soccer
Matthew G. Borowicz - Football
Carli Bunning - Women's Basketball
Karen Carpenedo - Equestrian - Western
Jessica Charles - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Jensen Crots - Women's Soccer
Zach D. Cymbaluk - Men's Golf
Amanda Krueger - Equestrian - Western
Kelly Gustofson - Women's Golf
Rachel Halligan - Women's Soccer
Shelby Hollinger - Softball
Jesse Jennings - Baseball
Caitlin Kelley - Equestrian - Western
Samantha Kramer - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Almir Krdzalic - Men's Basketball
Brittany Looker - Women's Volleyball
Stacey Marcum - Softball
Ashley Martell - Women's Basketball
Myint Maung- Football
Keith McBride - Football
Erin Mears - Women's Soccer
Mary Mikutowski - Women's Volleyball & Golf
Brooks Miller - Baseball
Hannah Nedrud - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Amanda Overman - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Casey Paris - Women's Tennis
Josh Perea - Football
Angela Peterson - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Josee Plante - Softball
Jordan Prill - Baseball
Jesse Roscoe - Men's Golf
Shannan Salm - Equestrian - Western
Hannah Schiller - Women's Volleyball
Broderick Schmidt - Men's Basketball
Alyssa Schneider - Women's Volleyball
Christopher Secrest - Football
Drew Selvestra - Football
Alexandra Skeeter - Women's Volleyball
Joseph Stearly - Football
Andrew Steinfeldt - Football
Annalee Sundin - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Brooke Vatthauer - Softball
Chelsea Wiesner - Women's Volleyball
Yahna Zastrow - Equestrian - Western

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director of Student Activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society team took top honors in the wildlife quiz bowl 
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competition at the Midwest Student Conclave in Twin Lakes, Mich.  This is the first time University of Minnesota Crookston students attended the conclave and competed in the quiz bowl.    Members of the team were natural resources majors Senior Jennifer DuBay, Apple Valley, Minn.; Junior Michael McMahon, St. Paul, Minn.; Sophomore Alisha Mosloff, Thief River Falls, Minn.; and Senior Matt Toenies, Randall, Minn.

"We totally rocked!" said senior wildlife management student  Jennifer DuBay.  "It was great fun.  This was without a doubt a great victory for us and a great example of the education a student can receive in the Natural Resources Department at the University of Minnesota Crookston."

"I heard someone in the crowd say 'Is that kid a genius?'"aid Jim Schneider, advisor to the host chapter at Michigan State University.

"This is an incredible achievement," said John Loegering, U of M Crookston professor and student chapter advisor.  "To compete so well against the powerhouse programs of the Midwest at the team's first appearance at this level is a real testament to the commitment and dedication of these students to their studies, their academic performance, and their profession.  I am very proud of their performance." 

The student chapter won the state competition last February and will compete in the national competition next fall in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The quiz bowl is a one-on-one competition between teams and features questions on  wildlife biology, taxonomy, ecology, biogeography, biodiversity, population ecology, management techniques, conservation policies, and other topics relevant to wildlife management majors. Other wildlife programs competing included Michigan State University, Central Michigan University, Lake Superior State University, Iowa State, Purdue University, University of Missouri-Columbia, University of Central Missouri, Southern Illinois University, and University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point.  

Conclaves are hosted by student chapters and offer professional training on a variety of topics.  This year students gained experience in several techniques including amphibian sampling, mist netting birds, capturing and handling small mammals, capturing fish with electrofishing gear, and locating animals with radio-telemetry.  There also was a resume workshop and networking events.  The conclave was at Camp Pinewood, a 200-acre YMCA camp near Twin Lakes, Michigan.  

The U of M Crookston Chapter has 25 members and is part of the over 10,000 members of The Wildlife Society, which represents and serves the professional community of scientists, managers, educators, technicians, planners, and others who work actively to study, manage, and conserve wildlife and habitats worldwide.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Jenny DuBay, Matt Toenies, Alisha Mosloff, Michael McMahon. 


Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Jon Foley, Ph.D., director of the Institute on the Environment (IonE) at the University of the Minnesota, will speak at the University of Minnesota Crookston on Tuesday, April 30, 2013, at 7 p.m. His presentation "Can we feed the world without destroying it?" will take place in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. The event is free and the public is invited. 

Foley holds a McKnight Presidential Chair in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, and his work focuses on the behavior of complex global environmental systems and their interactions with human societies. In particular, Foley's research group uses state-of-the-art computer models and satellite measurements to analyze changes in land use, ecosystems, climate and freshwater resources across regional and global scales. 

He joined the University of Minnesota in 2008, after spending 15 years on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin. He has won numerous awards and honors, including the National Science Foundation's Faculty Early Career Development Award, the Samuel C. Johnson Distinguished Faculty Fellowship, the J.S. McDonnell Foundation's 21st Century Science Award, and the Sustainability Science Award from the Ecological Society of America. In 1997, President Bill Clinton awarded him the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. He has also been named an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow.

The visit by Foley is part of a series of events taking place in recognition of Earth Week and as a keynote in a Sustainability Summit taking place on April 30 and May 1. For more information about the Sustainability Summit and all related activities, visit www.umcrookston.edu/today. 

To learn more about the Institute on the Environment at the University of Minnesota, visit www.environment.umn.edu. 

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Amy Childers from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Division of Ecological and Water Resources will speak on Wednesday, April 17, 2013, at the University of Minnesota Crookston. Her presentation on the Impacts of Ditching on Streams and Restoration Alternatives will take place in Youngquist Auditorium at 3 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend and there is no admission charge.

Topics to be discussed include the fundamental concepts in fluvial geomorphology and ecology; including dynamic equilibrium, channel shape, stream flows; how our streams have been impacted by ditching and dams; and stream restoration designs and restoration projects with DNR cooperators.

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources, 218-281-8132 (jlogeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Associate Professor John Loegering and Senior Jenny DuBay, Apple Valley, Minn., were recently recognized at the annual meeting of the Minnesota Chapter of the Wildlife Society (TWS). Loegering, was honored with the Service to Chapter Award and DuBay with the Bob Fedeler Memorial Award. 

The Service to Chapter Award is presented for exceptional service and commitment to the 
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Minnesota chapter (that is a quote from the bylaws). Loegering was recognized for his long-term leadership on the executive board, his commitment as webmaster for the chapter since 2000, and his continuing work with digital communication with the membership. Loegering was president of the Minnesota Chapter in 2009. 

The Bob Fedeler Memorial Award is presented to one undergraduate and one graduate student who have a 3.0 or better grade point average, a strong interest in a career in wildlife biology, is active in extracurricular activities, has a strong sense of public service and has demonstrated good communication skills. DuBay will graduate in December 2013 with a degree in natural resources with an emphasis on wildlife management. 

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"Jenny consistently has been one of the most active students in our Student Chapter of the Wildlife Society and Natural Resources Club," says Loegering. "She is involved in or leading most of the activities in both clubs. Her enthusiasm and willingness to serve naturally draws other students into action instead of sitting on the sidelines! Jenny clearly excels in all of the criteria for the Fedeler award."

The Minnesota Chapter of TWS annual meeting meeting held, February 5-7, 2013, in Walker, Minn., focused on its theme "Ensuring Ecological Services from our Changing Landscapes

Background
Fedeler was a popular and longtime biology and natural resources instructor at Staples Technical College and in the Natural Resources Department at Central Lakes College in Brainerd, Minn. He served as chapter president in 1997 and membership chair in 1998. He died of cancer in March 1999 after teaching for nearly two decades. 

The Award consists of two full memberships (one undergraduate student, one graduate student) in The Wildlife Society including all publications. The Fedeler Awards helps beginning wildlife professionals get started with membership in TWS providing them with high quality peer reviewed research, issues and discussions through the Society's various publications and access to TWS's regional and local networks of professional wildlife managers, researchers, conservation practitioners, policy makers, academics, other students and  opportunities to participate or attend conferences and meetings. For more information, visit http://www.mntws.org/mn/awards.html.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, right, Associate Professor John Loegering (right) receives the Service to Chapter Award at the annual meeting of the Minnesota Chapter of The Wildlife Society. The award was presented by Minnesota Chapter of TWS President Wayne Brininger (left), Detroit Lakes.

In the photo, left, Jenny DuBay (left) is presented with the Fedeler Award by John Loegering. 

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources, 218-281-8132 (jlogeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A generous donation of some 590 fish specimens was recently added to the Wildlife Museum
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 in the natural resources program at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The specimens, donated by the University of Minnesota's Bell Museum of Natural History curated by Andrew Simons, cover 79 species of fish in Minnesota.  

Simons is an associate professor in the U of M's  Department of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology and Curator of Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles at the Bell Museum of Natural History. He is also a colleague of Associate Professor John Loegering who has a joint appointment with the Department of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at the U of M and the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at the U of M, Crookston. Loegering serves as curator and manager of the Wildlife Museum on the Crookston campus. 

"I have taught an introductory principles of fisheries management course for years, and we did not have a very good fish collection until now," says Loegering. "The staff at the Bell collected these as part of a larger project with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to assess the biological condition of Minnesota waterways and our campus is reaping the benefit."

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This week Kristi Bernat, a junior natural resources major from Fisher, Minn.; Jenny DuBay, a senior natural resources major from Apple Valley, Minn.; and Jeremy Walker, a senior natural resources major from Villard, Minn.; processed the specimens and labeled them before placing them into the teaching collection for students to use for years to come.

The donation is also an example of inter-unit collaboration and the unique opportunities afforded the campus as part of the U of M system. To learn more about the Bell Museum, visit www.bellmuseum.umn.edu/index.htm. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photos: Junior Kristi Bernat (left) assists John Loegering, Ph.D., in processing the donated fish specimens in the Wildlife Museum at the U of M, Crookston. 

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Whether you are interested in learning more about trapping in Minnesota or would like to earn your certification, a course hosted by the University of Minnesota, Crookston will help. The trapper certification series will be held on Monday and Wednesday, January 28 and 30, from 6 to 9 p.m. in Owen Hall 222. The final session, a field day, will take place on Saturday, February 2, from 9 a.m. to noon at the Red River Valley Natural History Area located less than a mile from the U of M, Crookston campus.  The certification course, limited to 20 participants, costs $15 and those interested should register with Laura Bell at 218-281-8131. 

Teaching the sessions will be Terry Wolfe, a retired wildlife biologist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. He will cover such topics as safety, ethics, and trapping tips for beginners. Persons born after Dec. 31, 1989, who have not been issued a trapping license in a previous year, may not obtain a trapping license without a trapper education certificate.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Laura Bell, lab services coordinator, 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Aldo Leopold was a conservationist, forester, philosopher, educator, writer, and outdoor 
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enthusiast. Storyteller Jim Pfitzer (right) will bring Leopold to life on the stage of Kiehle Auditorium on Thursday, January 31, 2013, at 7 p.m. The performance titled "Aldo Leopold - A Standard of Change" is free and all are welcome. 

The one-man play, written by and starring storyteller Jim Pfitzer, is set during an evening in and around the famous Wisconsin Shack that inspired much of Leopold's writing, the performance explores the influences and challenges that led to the writing of the widely popular book A Sand County Almanac. 

As a U.S. forester, Leopold was instrumental in the creation of our first federally designated wilderness in the Gila National Forest. In 1935, he and his family initiated an ecological restoration experiment on a worn-out farm along the Wisconsin River outside of Baraboo, Wisconsin where they planted thousands of pine trees, and restored prairies. 

A little more than a year after his death in 1948, Leopold's collection of essays A Sand 
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County Almanac was published and required reading for most wildlife management students across the country. With over two million copies sold, it is one of the most respected books about the environment ever published, and Leopold has come to be regarded by many as the most influential conservation thinker of the twentieth century as well as the father of the field of wildlife management. 

"When confronted with a modern conservation dilemma, those in the wildlife profession often ask, 'What would Aldo Do?' and there is generally a quote from Leopold's writings that nails it!" says Professor Dan Svedarsky, former president of The Wildlife Society. "Many of Leopold's writings are applicable to the sustainability movement as well."


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Best known for his nature-based personal tales told with a distinctly southern delivery, storyteller and native Chattanoogan Jim Pfitzer has been lauded a "true Tennessee treasure" and his work called "old fashioned and avant-garde at the same time." Pfitzer performs and teaches workshops from coast to coast. To learn more about Pfitzer and the performance, visit http://www.jimpfitzer.com. 

The event is sponsored by UMC Concerts & Lectures, UMC Natural Resources Club, and the Coca Cola Beverage Partnership Grant. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Phil Baird, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources, 218-281-8130 (pbaird@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

2012 marked the first year wildlife management students from the University of Minnesota, 
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Crookston attended the annual meeting of The Wildlife Society, held this October at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland, Ore. Making the trip were Krista Kenyon and Austin Link. The annual meeting of wildlife managers, professors, students, and researchers is the premiere gathering of wildlife professionals in North America with several attendees from foreign countries as well. In addition to their own personal funds, students were aided with support from a special professional development fund established in 2011 by UMC benefactor, June Shaver. Shaver endowed the fund in honor of Dr. Dan Svedarsky, long-time wildlife professor at the University. 

Kenyon, a senior from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, notes, "I'm deeply grateful for the generosity of Ms. Shaver for without this support, this great trip would not have been possible. It was fascinating to attend the various presentations and meet wildlife researchers from the U.S. and Canada." Kenyon was also able to participate in a trapping techniques workshop which attracted several stares from passers-by as participants worked with traps on the Convention Center grounds. Austin Link, from Perham, Minn., was equally enthusiastic about the trip. "The opportunity was an invaluable part of my education and experience at the U of M, Crookston and is sure to benefit future students as well. These meetings expose students to a wealth of knowledge and the chance to meet future employers. I so appreciate the generosity and vision of those who make this opportunity possible." Link, a great-grandson of former North Dakota Governor, Art Link, graduated from the Crookston campus last spring and is attending graduate school at North Dakota State University where he is pursuing a master's degree in range management. 

To be considered for the professional travel stipend, students must be a junior or senior majoring in wildlife management and a member of both the U of M, Crookston student chapter of The Wildlife Society and at the national level. Link is the former president of the student chapter and Kenyon is the current president. Students must excel academically and display outstanding character and leadership. In addition, they must complete a 400-word essay on Aldo Leopold, the father of wildlife management and the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation. 

Svedarsky is a former national president of The Wildlife Society (TWS). Associate Professor John Loegering is advisor to the UMC Student Chapter of TWS, past president of the Minnesota State Chapter, and current president of the 8-state, North Central Section of TWS. "It is a real eye and ear-opening experience for students to listen to authors of their text-books give presentations and meet well-known wildlife professionals from other universities and agencies," according to Loegering. Several U of M, Crookston alumni, who are presently in graduate school or working for agencies, were also in attendance. 

"I can't thank June Shaver enough for setting up this wonderful professional development fund for wildlife students," Svedarsky says. "The impact of budding professionals attending a national meeting like this is hard to measure; but June's support goes much beyond that, she endowed the Shaver Butterfly Garden in the Nature Nook on campus and numerous scholarships in honor of faculty and staff."

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right, are Dan Svedarsky, Krista Kenyon, John Loegering, Austin Link. 

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Whether interested in wildlife management as a career or in learning more about the specifics of managing a deer population, everyone is invited to a presentation by Lou Cornicelli, Ph.D., who works with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) as a wildlife research manager. Cornicelli will present on Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at 7 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. Topics will include Minnesota deer management history, estimating population sizes and management, along with a look at future wildlife research in the state. The event is free and open to the public. 

Prior to becoming the DNR's wildlife research manager, Cornicelli was the big game program leader, a position he held for ten years. He is an expert in deer population management, and as the big game program leader, he was responsible for managing deer, elk, and moose seasons and populations. 

Cornicelli's presentation is sponsored by the U of M, Crookston Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society. For more information on majoring in natural resources on the Crookston campus, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

December at the University of Minnesota, Crookston brings the excitement and challenge of Agriculture and Natural Resources Activities Day. Students from almost 50 high schools will be on campus on Friday, December 7, 2012, to compete in more than 20 contests. The Ag and Natural Resources Day competition has been held for more than 30 years on the Crookston campus.

The day begins early with registration for the equine contests beginning at 7:15 a.m. With contests ranging from horticulture and forestry to ag mechanics, livestock and sales, the day brings out the competitive spirit of students culminating in an awards ceremony. The contests are overseen by U of M, Crookston Agriculture and Natural Resources Department faculty.  All activities conclude with the awards ceremony at 1:15 p.m.in Lysaker Gymnasium. 

The awards ceremony recognizes the day's winning individuals and teams. Scholarships, plaques and certificates are awarded to school teams and individuals for each contest. Last year, $750 UMC scholarships were awarded for the high individual in each contest, $600 UMC scholarships were awarded for the second place individual, and $450 UMC scholarships were awarded for the third place individual. In all, more than $32,000 in scholarships is awarded during the competition. 

More information regarding Ag and Natural Resources Activities Day is available by contacting Leah Stroot at 218-281-8101 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/agnatrday. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Leah Stroot, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8101(stro0525@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Managing land to enhance wildlife, specifically birds, will be the topic of the "Bird-friendly Forest Management" workshop slated for Thursday, September 20, 2012, at the Forest 
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History Center near Grand Rapids, Minn. The workshop, which runs from 7 a.m.to 1 p.m., will include an optional birding walk. The cost is $10 and includes workshop materials, breakfast treats, and lunch. Pre-registration by September 18 is required and registration fees will be collected on the day of the workshop.  Participants should register online at http://z.umn.edu/BFFM (preferred) or call the University of Minnesota Extension-Itasca County at 218-327-7486.  

The workshop is open to the general public as well as natural resource professionals and is under the coordination of John Loegering, University of Minnesota Extension. Woodland Advisor Credit (WAC7) also is available (http://woodlandadvisor.org/classes).  Highlights include habitat management for wildlife; strategies for ruffled grouse, American woodcock, and other brushland species; financial assistance and incentives, property tax programs, invasive species; and a panel discussion of the implications for forests and wildlife in the future.  Workshop content questions may be directed to Loegering at jloegeri@umn.edu or 218-281-8132.

"This workshop will be a great opportunity for woodland landowners with an interest in managing their forest for birds," Loegering says.  "We will have several great presentations by resource professionals from three different agencies with a mission to offer technical assistance to landowners."

Background
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Public interest in birds and birding has increased in the past decade.  Private forest landowners have an opportunity to manage their land to produce forest products as well as enhancing wildlife values, especially for birds.  The workshop will review the basics of private forest management as well as strategies to enhance forests for migratory songbirds, ruffed and sharp-tailed grouse, American woodcock, and cavity-nesting species. This workshop is supported by the Renewable Resources Extension Act Program, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and University of Minnesota Extension. To learn more, visit 
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http://z.umn.edu/BFFMinfo.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos: 
Top, right: workshop brochure
Middle, left: yellow warbler, courtesy of US Fish and Wildlife Service
Bottom, right: woodcock, courtesy of US Fish and Wildlife Service

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

MCFI Mike Vivion, MN (Apr12).jpgMichael T Vivion (at left), a 6-time Master and Society of Aviation and Flight Education (SAFE) member, recently renewed his Master CFI accreditation.  Vivion is a check airman and teaching specialist in the University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program. The 1998 Nat'l Aviation Safety Counselor of the Year, he also serves as a FAASTeam representative in the FAA's Minneapolis FSDO area.  

Master Instructors LLC takes great pride in announcing a significant aviation accomplishment on the part of Michael T Vivion, a check airman in the University of Minnesota's aviation program and resident of Crookston, Minnesota.  Recently, Vivion's accreditation as a Master Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI) was renewed by Master Instructors LLC, the international accrediting authority for Master Instructor designations as well as the FAA-approved Master Instructor Program.  He first earned this national professional accreditation in 2002, has held it continuously since then, and is one of only 24 worldwide to earn the credential six times.        

To help put these achievements in their proper perspective, there are approximately 96,000 CFIs in the United States.  Fewer than 700 of those aviation educators have achieved that distinction thus far.  The last 17 national Flight Instructors of the Year were Master CFIs (see www.GeneralAviationAwards.org/)  while Vivion is one of only eight Minnesota teachers of flight to earn this prestigious "Master" title.  

In the words of former FAA Administrator Marion Blakey, "The Master Instructor accreditation singles out the best that the right seat has to offer."

The Master Instructor designation is a national accreditation recognized by the FAA.  Candidates must demonstrate an ongoing commitment to excellence, professional growth, and service to the aviation community, and must pass a rigorous evaluation by a peer Board of Review.  The process parallels the continuing education regimen used by other professionals to enhance their knowledge base while increasing their professionalism. 

Designees are recognized as outstanding aviation educators for not only their excellence in teaching, but for their engagement in the continuous process of learning -- both their own, and their students'.  The designation must be renewed biennially and significantly surpasses the FAA requirements for renewal of the candidate's flight instructor certificate.

Questions regarding the Master Instructor Program may be directed to 303-485-8136 or MasterInstrs@aol.com.  For more information about the Master Instructor Program and to locate other Masters, please visit the "Find a Master Instructor" section of www.MasterInstructors.org.  To learn more about the Society of Aviation and Flight Educators (SAFE), visit http://SafePilots.org. The International Aerobatic Club (IAC) can be reached through their website at http://IAC.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Ron Del Vecchio, professor and head, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8109 delve004@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@um

Minnesota Campus Compact held their annual awards ceremony in early June 2012 at IMG_4314.jpgMacalester College in Minneapolis. University of Minnesota, Crookston Chancellor Charles H. Casey attended the awards ceremony along with Rachel Lundbohm, instructor in the Business Department and Alexandra Buscher, a senior from Merrifield, Minn., majoring in business management. Also joining them was Dave Bennet who represented the Rydell National Wildlife Refuge and Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge at the ceremony.  

Each year presidents and chancellors from the 40 college and university members are invited to give statewide recognition to effective civic engagement leaders in three categories including Presidents' Student Leadership Award, Presidents' Community Partner Award, and the Presidents' Civic Engagement Award.

The Presidents' Student Leadership Award was awarded to Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) and accepted by Alexandra Buscher. The award is for an individual student or a student organization that models a deep commitment to civic responsibility and leadership, evidenced by initiative, innovative and collaborative approaches to addressing public issues, effective community building, and integration of civic engagement into the college experience.
SIFE students work with small businesses and organizations. Locally, they assisted an entrepreneur with his startup taxicab service and a jam and bagel maker expand her business. They also worked with local elementary and high school students. Globally, they have been focused on the need for clean water. They established a permanent water filtration at a boarding school in Nepal and are currently working on a similar project in Nigeria.

The Presidents' Community Partner Award was awarded to Rydell National Wildife Refuge/Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge and accepted by Dave Bennett. The award is for a community-based organization that has enhanced the quality of life in the community in meaningful and measurable ways and has engaged in the development of sustained, reciprocal partnerships with the college or university, thus enriching educational as well as community outcomes.

Rydell National Wildlife Refuge and Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge have both served as sites for students to learn about resource management, assist with research studies, and recreate. Students, staff, and refuge staff work together on bluebird house monitoring, photo point monitoring, wood duck box monitoring, buckthorn control, forest restoration, and vegetation inventories.

The Presidents' Civic Engagement Steward Award was awarded to Rachel Lundbohm. This award is for a member of the faculty, administration, or staff or for a group (e.g., advisory committee, task force, project team) that has significantly advanced their campus' distinctive civic mission by forming strong partnerships, supporting others' civic engagement, and working to institutionalize a culture and practice of engagement.

As an instructor and associate director of the Center for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies, Lundbohm has assisted local farmers marketing their produce and improved local farmers' markets through service-learning projects. She was an early proponent of service-learning and partners with several different organizations. Lundbohm says that "marketing students need to be able to market anything," and she is always willing to take on new challenges with her enthusiasm and creative ideas.

Minnesota Campus Compact supports civic engagement and democratic renewal through its diverse network of colleges and universities. To learn more, visit http://www.mncampuscompact.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photo, left to right, are Chancellor Charles H. Casey, Dave Bennett, Rachel Lundbohm, and Alex Buscher.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, service learning, 218-281-8526 (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual Student Awards Program, a night celebrating student service and achievement, 2012_4-19-Service Awards 0277.jpgwas held recently at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Associate Professor Kevin Thompson, who teaches in the Liberal Arts and Education Department, was the 2011 Outstanding Educator and hosted this year's recognition.

Award recipients include the following students:
(Numbers correspond to the number of the photo in the online photo gallery.)

1.    Fall 2011 CSA Senators and Officers
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Hannah Frey, junior, communication, La Crosse, Wis.
Kate Holmquist, senior, communication, Middleton, Wis.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Jennifer Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Anthonette Sims, sophomore, communication, Robbinsdale, Minn.
Michelle Boateng, junior, applied studies, Bloomington, Minn.
Adam Switzer, junior, sport and recreation management, Apple Valley, Minn.
Brooke Novak, junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.
Hannah Reysen, sophomore, double major marketing and business management, Adell, Wis.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Kayla Bellrichard, freshman, business management, Elk River, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
Emily Goff, sophomore, double major animal science and equine science, Danvers, Minn.
Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.

2.    Spring 2012 CSA Senators and Officers
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Kate Holmquist, senior, communication, Middleton, Wis.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Anthonette Sims, sophomore, communication, Robbinsdale, Minn.
Michelle Boateng, junior, applied studies, Bloomington, Minn.
Adam Switzer, junior, sport and recreation management, Apple Valley, Minn.
Brooke Novak, junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.
Hannah Reysen, sophomore, double major marketing and business management, Adell, Wis.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Kayla Bellrichard, freshman, business management, Elk River, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
Emily Goff, sophomore, double major animal science and equine science, Danvers, Minn.
Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.

3.    Student Ambassadors
Kourtney Brevik, sophomore, animal science, Erskine, Minn.
Jessica Stuber, senior, natural resources, Hill City, Minn.
Samantha Zuck, junior, animal science, Jamestown, N.D.
Rachel Keimig, senior, ag systems management, Princeton, Minn.
Alexandra Skeeter, sophomore, health sciences, Milwaukee, Wis.
Victoria Martin, sophomore, animal science, Worland, Wyo.
Tony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridan, Wyo.
Amanda Pihlaja, junior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management,  Duluth, Minn.
Erica Nelson, junior, double major animal science and equine science, Carols, Minn.
Whitney Lian, junior, agricultural education, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Bryce Gillie, junior, agronomy, Hallock, Minn.
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Samantha Lahman, senior, animal science, Parkers Prairie, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
Josh Lunak, advisor

4.    Ambassador of the Year
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.

Campus Ministry Award (No photograph available)
Jenna Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.

5.    Outstanding Leadership in FCA Award
 Jensen Crots, junior, health management, Chesterton, Ind.

Outstanding Achievement in Math and Physics Award (No photograph available)
Tyler Brazier, senior, software engineering, Greenbush, Minn.
Tyler Berglund, junior, health sciences, Warren, Minn.

6.    Outstanding First Year Biology Award
Brittany Looker, freshman, health sciences, Rochester, Minn.
Ashley Martell, freshman, health sciences, Somerset, Wis.

7.    Excellence in Early Childhood Education Award
Megan Eul, senior, early childhood education, Rosemount, Minn.
Janie Bauer,  senior, early childhood education, Durand, Wis.

8.    Outstanding Academic Achievement Award - Business Department

Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.
Sheila Lynch, senior, business management, Inver Grove Heights, Minn.
Alisha Hillstrom, senior, business management, Maple Grove, Minn.
Christopher Bargsten, senior, double major business management and quality management, New Brighton, Minn.
Michael Cloutier, senior, business management, Zimmerman, Minn.
Bryan Boutain, senior, marketing, Alexandria, Minn.
Adam Grahek, senior, marketing, Minneapolis, Minn.
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal

9.    Outstanding Leadership Award -  Business Department
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Julie Trotter, senior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management, Eagan, Minn.
Tony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridan, Wyo.
Brittany Bergemann, senior, marketing, Good Thunder, Minn.

10.    Outstanding Accounting Student
Hwee Kim, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea

11.    Hotel, Restaurant & Tourism Hospitality Award
Amoy Carty, senior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management; Sandy Point, Saint Kitts.
Lauren Ferrara, senior, hotel, restaurant and tourism management; Eden Prairie, Minn.

12.    Outstanding Communication Student Award
 Kristine Neu, senior, double major, horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.

Outstanding Communication Student (Minor) Award

Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal

13.    Outstanding Sport and Recreation Management Student
Paul Adelman, junior, sport and recreation management, Bellingham, Minn.
Danielle Rueter, senior, sport and recreation management, Burlington, Wis.

14.    SOS Service Award
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Alysia Osowski, senior, double major in agricultural business and agronomy, Grafton, N.D.

SOS Leadership Award
Katelyn Zins, senior, communication, Starbuck, Minn.

15.    Peer Connections Service Award
Kristine Neu, senior, double major in horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Brooke Novak,  junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.

Peer Connections Peer Mentor of the Year (No photograph available)
Samantha Zuck, junior, animal science, Jamestown, N.D.

16.    Outstanding Turfgrass Student Award
Trenton Waters, senior, golf and turf management, Rush City, Minn.
 
Turf Bowl Team Members
Trenton Waters, senior, golf and turf management, Rush City, Minn.
Nick Walters, senior, golf and turf management, Plymouth, Minn.
Nick Harreld, senior, golf and turf management, New Brighton, Minn.
Kyle Rick, senior, double major golf and turf management and manufacturing management, Coon Rapids, Minn.

17.    Norman Pankratz Memorial Conservation Award
Ben Williams, senior, natural resources, Excelsior, Minn.

John Polley Soil and Water Conservation Award
Bob Guetter, sophomore, natural resources, Miltona, Minn.

18.    Minnesota Soil and Water Conservation
Kelsey Kaiser, junior, natural resources, Streeter, N.D.
Austin Link, senior, natural resources, Sebeka, Minn.

19.    June Shaver /The Wildlife Society Scholarship
Krista Kenyon, junior, natural resources, Sanford, Manitoba, Canada
Austin Link, , senior, natural resources, Sebeka, Minn.

20.    Outstanding Animal Science Student of the Year
 Kayla Klehr, senior, animal science, Richmond, Minn.

Outstanding Equine Science Student of the Year
 Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.

21.    Outstanding Dedication to the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department
Sara Wells, senior, double major equine science and biology, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

22.    Outstanding Ag Business
Alysia Osowski, senior, double major agricultural business and agronomy, Grafton, N.D.

23.    Outstanding Ag Systems Management Student
 Matt Green, senior, triple major agricultural systems management, agronomy, and ag business, Greenbush, Minn.

24.    Hort Club Award and Exceptional Service to the Hort Club Award
Catlin Kersting, sophomore, horticulture, Cloquet, Minn. (Hort Club Award)
Kristine Neu, senior, double major horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn. (Exceptional Service to the Hort Club

25.    Study Abroad Seniors
Emily Caillier, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Crookston, Minn.
Sheila Carleton, senior, double major agronomy and natural resources, Baxter, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Jennifer Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Trista Halland, senior, business management, Crookston, Minn.

26.    International Student Scholars Awards
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Tashi Wongdi Gurung, junior, environmental sciences, Mustang, Nepal
Amoy Carty, senior, hotel, restaurant and tourism management, Sandy Point, Saint Kitts
Nana Sarkodie Boaten, senior, marketing, Accra, Ghana

Outstanding achievement by an International Student
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal

27.    Outstanding ESL Student    
Han Gyu Kang, Busan, South Korea

Outstanding ESL Tutor
Tashi Gurung, junior, environmental sciences, Mustang, Nepal


28.    Together Everyone Achieves More
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal
Shirley Osborne, Crooskton, Minn.

29.    Support of Diversity Award presented by the Black Student Association
Ashley Crowe, Circle of Nations Indigenous Association, senior, sport and recreation management, Long Prairie, Minn.
Rae French, coordinator of study abroad
Alvin Killough, assistant professor, Liberal Arts and Education Department
Gary Willhite, director of residential life
Peter Phaiah, associate vice chancellor for student affairs
Charles H. Casey, chancellor
Kristie Jerde, assistant director residential life and advisor for the Black Student Association

30.    Achievement in Music
Tyler Lowthian, freshman, business management, Richfield, Minn.
Bryce Gillie, junior, agronomy, Hallock, Minn.
Miah Smith, freshman, health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Liz Massie, sophomore, communication, Eagan, Minn.
Nathan Anderson, freshman, agricultural education, Appleton, Minn.
Chelsea Swenson, senior, software engineering, Fertile, Minn.
Beth Motley, sophomore, equine science, Vadnais Heights, Minn.
Casey Paris, sophomore, agricultural business, Fairmont, Minn.
Mark Frenzel, sophomore, agricultural systems management, Blackduck, Minn.

31.    Computer Help Desk Award
Kelsey Kaiser, junior, natural resources, Streeter, N.D.

32.    Student Employee of the Year Award
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.

33.    Athletic Department All Academic Team
To be eligible for this honor, the student-athlete must be a member of the varsity traveling team and have a cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or better.  Furthermore, the athlete must have reached sophomore athletic and academic standing at her/his institution (true freshmen, red-shirt freshmen and ineligible athletic transfers are not eligible) and must have completed at least one full academic year at that institution.

Janie Bauer, volleyball, senior, early childhood education, Durand, Wis.
Jonathon Blazek, men's golf, senior, business management, Owatonna, Minn.
Kari Bodine, women's golf, junior, sport and recreation management, Babbitt, Minn.
Carli Bunning, women's basketball, junior, natural resources, Boone, Iowa
Karen Carpendo, equestrian, senior, equine science, Bessemer, Mich.
Jessica Charles, equestrian, senior, animal science, Belgrade Lakes, Maine
Jensen Crots, soccer, junior, health management, Chesterton, Ind.
Megan Eul, women's basketball, senior, early childhood education, Rosemount, Minn.
Amanda Flint, equestrian, senior, double major equine science and agricultural business, Aberdeen, S.D.
Megan Flynn, soccer, senior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management, Chanhassen, Minn.
Jessica Goodrich, soccer, sophomore, communication, Munster, Ind.
Kelly Gustofson, women's golf, junior, early childhood education, Hermantown, Minn.
Rachel Halligan, soccer, junior, early childhood education, Duluth, Minn.
Theresa Hamel, women's golf, senior, double major agronomy and agricultural business, Lakota, N.D.
Lauren Kessler, women's basketball, senior, early childhood education, Albertville, Minn.
Megan Kramer, equestrian, senior, equine science, Owatonna, Minn.
Almir Krdzalic, men's basketball, junior, biology, Sioux Falls, S.D.
Stacey Marcum, softball, junior, communication, Merrill, Wis.
Keith McBride, football, junior, double major business management and accounting, Lodi, Wis.
Addie O'Neil, equestrian, junior, agricultural education, Redwood Falls, Minn.
Amanda Overman, equestrian, junior, early childhood education, Lindenhurst, Ill
Casey Paris, tennis, sophomore, agricultural business, Fairmont, Minn.
Josh Perea, football, sophomore, criminal justice, Pico Rivera, Calif.
Angela Peterson, equestrian, senior, double major equine science and animal science, Detroit Lakes,  Minn.
Melanie Rodriguez, equestrian, senior, animal science, Minneapolis, Minn.
Danielle Rueter, volleyball senior, sport and recreation management, Burlington, Wis.
Alyssa Schneider, volleyball, senior, early childhood education, Racine, Wis.
Rachel Schoenborn, softball, sophomore, biology, Anchorage, Alaska
Christopher Secrest, football, junior, criminal justice, Hollywood, Fla.
Alexandra Skeeter, volleyball, sophomore, health sciences, Milwaukee, Wis.
Joseph Stearly, football, junior, health management, Hamlake, Minn.
Andrew Steinfeldt, football, sophomore, health sciences, Green Bay, Wis.
Annalee Sundin, equestrian, junior, double major equine science and animal science, Deer River, Minn.
Denise Thompson, equestrian, sophomore, equine science, Rochester, NY
Amy Van Treeck, equestrian, junior, early childhood education, Sheboygan Falls, Wis.
Kaytlin Weiger, equestrian, senior, equine science, Duluth, Minn.
Sara Wells, equestrian, senior, double major equine science and biology, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Chelsea Wiesner, volleyball, sophomore, double major health sciences and biology, Rochester, Minn.
Yahna Zastrow, equestrian, senior, equine science, Easton, Minn.


34.    Student Programmer of the Year
 Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.

35.    Dale Knotek Community Service Award
Student  Athletic  Advisory Committee (SAAC)

36.    President's Volunteer Service Awards
Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.
Sabra Amundson, sophomore, animal science, Crooks, S.D.
Chris Anderson, senior, natural resources, Missoula, Mont.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Gyungyoun "Ann" Baek, sophomore, health sciences,  Seoul, South Korea
Samm Blees, senior, criminal justice, North St. Paul, Minn.
Nana Boaten, senior, marketing, Accra, Ghana
Michelle Boateng, junior, applied studies, Bloomington, Minn.
Tiffany Breth, junior, animal science, Upsala, Minn.
Kourtney Brevik, sophomore, animal science, Erskine, Minn.
Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.
Sophie Cross, freshman, animal science, Farmington, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Bryce Gillie, junior, agronomy, Hallock, Minn.
Katie Hagen, sophomore, agricultural business, Epping, N.D.
Alissa Hernandez, freshman, double major animal science and equine science, Savage, Minn.
Catlin Kersting, sophomore, horticulture, Cloquet, Minn.
Moysey Kutsev, sophomore, business management, Erskine, Minn.
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul,  South Korea
Whitney Lian, junior, agricultural education, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Nongye Lo, senior, business management, St. Paul, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
May Nabirye, junior, software engineering, Eagan, Minn.
Erica Nelson, junior, double major equine science and animal science, Carlos, Minn.
Kasey Okke, junior, agricultural education, Hawley, Minn.
Isaac Osei, sophomore, software engineering, Cottage Grove, Minn.
Alysia Osowski, senior, double major agricultural business and agronomy, Grafton, N.D.
Jennifer Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Amanda Reineke, senior, double major, equine science and agricultural business, Fisher, Minn.
Hannah Reysen, sophomore, double major marketing and business management, Adell, Wis.
Donovan Rupprecht, freshman, undeclared, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Allison Schumacher, senior, sport and recreation management, Crookston, Minn.
Anthonette Sims, sophomore, communication, Robbinsdale, Minn.
Karlie Sorrell, senior, animal science, Altona, N.Y.
Anthony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridean, Wyo.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Abbie Westby, senior, agricultural education, Erhard, Minn.
Anton Young, senior, senior, natural resources, St. Cloud, Minn.
Katelyn Zins, senior, communication, Starbuck, Minn.

37.    President's Student Leadership Award
Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) representing SIFE are
Tony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridan, Wyo.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.
Dae Yuel "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea

38.    Outstanding CSA Senator
Adam Switzer, junior, sport and recreation management, Apple Valley, Minn.

Outstanding CSA Voting Delegate Award, in memory of Karolyn Joop (No photograph available)
Victoria Martin, sophomore, animal science, Worland, Wyo.

39.    Outstanding Educator
Dennis Maier, assistant professor, Business Department

Most Supportive of Students
Kim Cousins, student personnel coordinator, Academic Assistance Center

40.    Student Achievement Awards
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Sheila Carleton, senior, double major natural resources and agronomy, Baxter, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Megan Eul, senior, early childhood education, Rosemount, Minn.
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal
Samantha Lahman, senior, animal science, Parkers Prairie, Minn.
Whitney Lian, junior, agricultural education, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Kristine Neu, senior, double major, horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Brooke Novak, junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.
Samantha Zuck, senior, animal science, Jamestown, N.D.
Chris Anderson, senior, natural resources, Missoula, Mont.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Matthew Green, senior, triple major agricultural systems management, agronomy, and agricultural business, Greenbush, Minn.
Dae Yeul Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria


41.    Man and Woman of the Year
Kristine Neu, senior, double major in horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.

42.    Student Volunteer of the Year Award
Alissa Hernandez, freshman, double major animal science and equine science, Savage, Minn.

43. Outstanding Service to Students
Phil Baird, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department

From the group of students received the Student Achievement Awards, two students were chosen as the "Man and Woman of the Year," the year's top academic, service and leadership award. Honors for 2012 go to (pictured l to r) UMC Man of the Year, Austin Czichotzki, a senior from Barnesville, Minn., majoring communication; and Woman of the Year Kristine Neu, a senior from Pelican Rapids, Minn., who is a double major in horticulture and communication. Czichotzki is the son of Terry and Sandi Czichotzki and Neu is the daughter of Mark and Karen Neu.

Special thanks to the Crookston Noon Day Lions Club for their continued support of the awards reception and program.

Members of the Student Awards committee are Lisa Samuelson, Sue Jacobson, Lynne Mullins, Patti Tiedemann, Terrill Bradford, Christiana Boadu, Kayla Bellrichard, and Emily Goff.

Visit the Student Awards Program photo gallery.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Student Achievement Award recipients
Back row: Brooke Novak, Abbey Wemimo, Chris Anderson, Megan Eul, Dae Yuel "Danny" Lee, Alisha Aasness, and Angie Bartholomew.


Front row: Whitney Lian, Matt Green, Austin Czichotzki, Kristine Neu, Jackie Dullinger, and Yangchen Gurung.



 

Contact: Lisa Sameulson, director, student activities, 218-281-8507(samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

farrell2010.jpgJim Farrell, Ph.D. (at left), a professor of history at St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn., will highlight Earth Week at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. On Thursday, April 19, 2012, he will speak on "The Nature of Our Lives: How College Culture Degrades Nature and How it Might be Different" beginning at 12:15 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. The event is free and the public is invited to attend.

His presentation explores the intersections of college culture, consumer culture and the environment by looking at the social construction of common sense and at the emerging uncommon sense of sustainability that's increasingly a part of campus cultures.

As background for his presentation, Farrell includes these important considerations: College students study cultures all the time, in history and the Humanities, sociology and anthropology, languages and literature.  But students don't often study their own culture, which just seems "natural" to them.  Waking up to an alarm, going to the bathroom, sorting through the clothes in their closets, eating in the cafeteria, watching TV and playing video games, using computers and iPods, driving cars and hooking up and hanging out, having fun and partying, practicing religion and politics (or not), students teach each other the cultural scripts of college culture, few of which are good for the planet we inhabit.

Farrell, a professor of history, American studies, environmental studies and American conversations, is an innovative teacher and St. Olaf's first Boldt Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Humanities. As a member of the college's Sustainability Task Force, he's had a hand in the greening of St. Olaf. With colleagues at Carleton College, he's facilitated a series of sustainability workshops on "Cows, Colleges and Curriculum."  Most recently, he served as a member of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education's Summit on Sustainability in the Curriculum, held February 2010 in San Diego, CA. He holds a B.A. in Political Science from Loyola University in Chicago (1971), and both an M.A. in History (1972) and a Ph.D. in American Culture from the University of Illinois (1980). For more information, visit http://www.stolaf.edu.  

The program is co-sponsored by U of M, Crookston Concerts and Lectures, Crookston Students for Sustainable Development (CSSD), Institute on Environment - U of MN, and UMC Center for Sustainability.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual spring Fly-In/Drive-In Pancake Breakfast, will take place on Sunday, April 15, 2012, at the Crookston Municipal Airport. The breakfast, scheduled from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., is sponsored by , hosted by Alpha Eta Rho, the aviation fraternity at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, and Crookston Aviation. Tickets for the breakfast for adults are $6 in advance and $8 at the door; children 4 to 12 are $3 and children 3 and under are free. Tickets may be purchased from Alpha Eta Rho members or by contacting Chris Anderson at 612-715-2483.

The University of North Dakota (UND) Student Chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association will be offering FREE airplane rides for those 8 to 17 years of age from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. A legal guardian must be present to sign permission forms for the airplane rides. To learn more about these Young Eagle Flights, visit http://www.youngeagles.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218- 281-8141 (mvivion@un.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Students in the Natural Resource Management Program within the Agriculture and Natural 07 S-130 Classroom 003.jpgResources Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston recently completed wildland firefighter training. This year's class of 64 trainees included 48 students enrolled in the Introduction to Forestry class at the U of M, Crookston. They were joined by 16 faculty and students coordinated by Susan N. Ellis-Felege, Ph.D., an assistant professor in  the Biology Department from the University of North Dakota, along with 2 members of the Middle River Volunteer Fire Department.  A total of 623 students have completed this training on the Crookston campus in the last 14 years. 

Since 1999, both the S-130: Basic Wildland Firefighter Training and S-190: Basic Fire Weather & Fire Behavior courses have been offered for students.  These courses are the first level of training required nationally for anyone to work on a wild fire or prescribed burn for state and federal agencies. The S-130/190 training consists of at least 32 hours of classroom training and tests as well as "hands-on" training in the field using personal protective equipment, tools and working on a controlled fire. This certification has opened the door to many employment opportunities in the natural resource field for hundreds of our students and graduates. Another 33 UMC students took advantage of an annual Wildland Firefighters Safety refresher course also offered.

07 S-130 Classroom 007.jpg"Fire impacts natural resource management," says Tom Feiro, one of the wildfire firefighter trainers. "Whether it is in a wildfire situation or using fire to manage the resources, a career in this field will at some point involve fire. Our students need to know how to handle a wildfire or use fire effectively in management."

Offering the training began as a joint venture by U of M, Crookston and the U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service when staff from Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge provided the instruction. It has blossomed into a multi-agency training staff sharing their expertise with the students.  This year the instructors represented the U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service from both Minnesota and North Dakota, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, U. S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management.  Other years the National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Nature Conservancy have also been represented. Several upperclassmen from the U of M, Crookston with firefighting experience also assisted with the instruction.

The training is coordinated by Associate Professor Phil Baird, and laboratory coordinators Laura Bell, and Tom Feiro, all from the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department on the Crookston campus. In April students will have field training. This training is conducted by breaking the students into crews where they use different tools and techniques in a situation with fire present but under close supervision of the instructors.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top, right: Classroom instruction takes place in Bede Ballroom. In April, students will use what they learned in a practice exercise in the field.

Middle, left: Students carry a fire shelter in their pack and during training they must be able to deploy the shelter in 25 seconds or less.  These fire shelters protect the firefighters when the fire is in danger of overwhelming them
.

Contact: Tom Feiro, laboratory coordinator, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8300 (tfeiro@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A spring Aviation Safety Seminar will be held on Tuesday, April 3, 2012, at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The seminar, which begins at 7 p.m., features Chuck Adams, a Grand Forks Air Traffic Control Tower supervisor, and Jim Neihoff, who is a maintenance inspector for the Minneapolis Flight Standards office. The Aviation Safety Seminar is open to all, pilot or non pilot, and everyone is welcome to attend.

Adams will address the "Top Ten Pilot/Controller Mistakes" with his entertaining style while conveying important information about the business of pilots interacting with air traffic controllers. Neihoff will host a session entitled "Ask the FAA," a question and answer session for pilots.

For more information regarding the Aviation Safety Seminar, contact Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus, at 218-281-8114.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Kleinscmidt Award Photo Fargo a.jpgAdam Kleinschmidt, a senior from Glenwood, Minn., majoring in natural resources at the University of Minnesota, Crookston received the Student Conservationist award from the Minnesota Chapter of The Wildlife Society at its annual meeting in Fargo,N.D. This award marks the 10th time in the last 15 years that a U of M, Crookston student has recognized with the award. The annual meeting was held jointly by the Minnesota Chapter and the North Dakota chapters of the organization.

The Student Conservationist Award is awarded to a student "who has shown a commitment to wildlife, has high scholastic achievement, and shows promise as a future wildlife professional." Kleinschmidt is double majoring in wildlife management and natural resources law enforcement.

The Wildlife Society is the professional organization made up of researchers, managers, professors and students with an interest in wildlife or who work in the wildlife field with agencies, colleges, or non-governmental organizations.

"Adam is clearly one of our most committed and passionate conservation students," according to Dr. Dan Svedarsky, wildlife professor and Director of UMC's Center for Sustainability. "He is very involved in a variety of clubs and volunteer activities, but one of his most outstanding achievements is that he has provided the leadership and spark for staging the local Ducks Unlimited Banquet in the community for the last 4 years! He has mobilized a core of some 25 students to join together and pull off this fairly major undertaking.  It is unusual for a younger student to take on leadership of this kind for the campus and community."

Kleinschmidt has accumulated a variety of hands-on experience ranging from a bio-tech at two national wildlife refuges to land management with prairie land management to yard maintenance. In the summer of 2011, he was an invasive species technician at the Glacial Ridge and Rydell National Wildlife Refuges near Crookston and plans to work there again in the coming field season.

Refuge Biologist, Jessica Dowler, had this to say about Adam; "During his time at the refuge, he exemplified the traits of an ideal employee. He was always on time, saw every job to its completion, continued to learn from new opportunities, lead field crews, and worked as part of many teams. He was a go-to guy and the entire staff knew that if Adam was on the job, it would get done and it would get done well."

While not officially on the job, Kleinschmidt also volunteered at the refuge where he organized a group of students to help with a fencing project that saved the refuge many hours and many more dollars to finish the project.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


In the photo: Adam Kleinschmidt (left) is presented the Student Conservationist Award from UMC professor, Dan Svedarsky.


Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Mild temperatures and a light breeze greeted participants in the Justin Knebel Memorial Ice Fishing Tournament on Saturday, February 4, 2012. The daylong fishing tournament, which supports scholarships at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, was held at Zippel Bay Resort on Lake of the Woods, Williams, Minn. To date, nearly $6,000 has been raised for the Justin Knebel Scholarship and this marks the successful ice fishing tournament's second year. Next year's tournament date has been set for February 2, 2013.

Results of the Justin Knebel Memorial Ice Fishing Tournament included first fish caught, Emil Belin_Emil with Alysa_Tulibaski.jpgBelin, Fertile, Minn.; largest walleye, Dan Quaife, Baudette,Minn.; largest northern, Marc Ulseth, Crookston, Minn.; largest sauger, Mike Lindholm, Thief River Falls, Minn. Prizes were sponsored in part by Streiff Sporting Goods  in Warroad, Minn.

The top winners in the raffle included Polly Dehnert, Grygla, Minn., who won the 19" television donated by Dakota TV & Appliance of Grand Forks, N.D., and Kevin Dammahn, Stephen, Minn., who won the U of M, Crookston jacket donated by the UMC Bookstore.

Students_NatR.jpgBill Tyrrell, director of athletic fund raising was grateful to those who assisted with this year's tournament. "We are thankful for help from a number of students from the UMC Natural Resources Club," Tyrrell said. "They assisted with weighing fish and a number of other aspects of the tournament. Zippel Bay Resort was a great place for fishing, and we really appreciate what they did for us along with the leadership we received from the tournament committee especially Alysa Tulibaski and Amber Bailey. It was an all around great day."

If someone is interested in donating a prize or sponsoring the 2013 tournament, contact Tyrrell at 218-281-8436 or Alysa Tulibaski at 701-215-4300. Video highlights of this year's tournament are available at http://youtu.be/qUUqidaLh6E.

Justin Knebel, who played basketball for the U of M, Crookston Golden Eagles, grew up in Warroad, Minn., graduating from Warroad High School in 2001. A talented athlete, he lettered in basketball, cross country, and track. After graduation, he attended the University of Minnesota, Crookston where he played basketball as a point guard for the Golden Eagles. Besides his passion for playing basketball, Knebel loved the Warroad area and outdoor sports in Minnesota, making the ice fishing tournament an apt tribute to the memory of this outstanding student-athlete. For more information on the tournament, visit www.umcrookston.edu/justinknebel.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:

Top, right: Emil Belin, Fertile, Minn., receives his prize for the first fish caught from Alysa Tulibaski, one of the members of the tournament committee.

Bottom, left: Marc Ulseth, Amber Bailey, Alysa Tulibaski, and Bill Tyrrell with members of the U of M, Crookston Natural Resources Club for a photo on Lake of the Woods at the Justin Knebel Memorial Ice Fishing Tournament. The club helped weigh fish and other aspects of the tournament.



Contact: Bill Tyrrell, director, athletic fundraising, 218-281-8436, (btyrrell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A legacy continues at the University of Minnesota, Crookston with hosting of the 37th annual Ag Arama. The weekend of events, scheduled for Friday and Saturday, January 27-28, 2012, is hosted by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and includes fun and excitement for the entire family. Most of the activities take place on Saturday, Jan. 28, in the University Teaching and Outreach Center (UTOC) located on the north edge of the campus.

Contests in agronomy, animal science, horticulture, and natural resources highlight Ag Arama weekend. They serve as an opportunity for students to showcase their knowledge and skills and have a chance to interact with alumni and faculty members. Ag Arama is planned and operated by a committee of students advised by Terrill Bradford and Brenda Miller, who both teach in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department.

On Friday evening, the Animal Science Association will sponsor a chili feed from 5 to 7 p.m. in UTOC for $5 per person.

On Saturday morning from 8:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., the animal showmanship contests begin and the public is welcome to watch the competition as it unfolds in both novice and experienced categories. Students compete in western and English horse showmanship, lamb lead, and dairy, beef, sheep, and swine showing.  The novices are paired with experienced students prior to the contests to prepare for the day. Alumni showmanship will take place at 12:30 p.m.

From 9 a.m. to noon, an agricultural industries show features some of the latest in agricultural equipment. At noon, the Round Robin Showmanship will begin. Coronation of the Ag Arama royalty takes place at 1 p.m. followed by the presentation of specialty awards and the sweepstakes presentation. Several games and competitions, including men's and women's crosscut saw contests and log splitting, begin at 2:30 p.m.

In the evening, a walleye or rib dinner will be served at the Crookston Eagles Club from 6 to 7 p.m., along with an alumni social from 6 to 8 p.m. also at the Eagles. Cost of the dinner will be $11 for the walleye and $10 for the ribs.

Capping off the weekend will be dancing to "Pick Six" from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Eagles.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Terrill Bradford, instructor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8108 (tbradfor@umn.edu); Brenda Miller, lecturer, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8140 (mill3707@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communicati

IMG_1037.jpgUniversity of Minnesota Crookston Junior Jacob Pastoors, an agricultural aviation major from Olivia, Minn., recently completed training as a private pilot at the Crookston Municipal Airport.

Under Federal Aviation Administration examining authority, University of Minnesota, Crookston students can complete all requirements for Private Pilot certification locally.  Pastoors completed an oral examination and a 1.7 hour flight during which he demonstrated navigation, maneuvering, and communications skills, as well as the most important skill of all--landings.  

Pastoors is the first of the fall semester private pilot students at the U of M, Crookston to complete his training.  The agricultural aviation major has already worked one season as a loader man for an agricultural applicator in Olivia, Minn.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

If you are interested in growing more of your own food or scaling up production to market garden scale, the upcoming Local Foods College is designed for you. The series, which begins on January 24, 2012, will offer an overview of the basics, from planning to soils, fruit and vegetable production and business planning. The series, available via interactive television (ITV) at several locations across northwestern Minnesota, continues on Tuesday evenings through mid-March. Registration is $10 per session or $50 for the entire series.

Participants will learn from practitioners and educators and share personal experiences with others who are part of the growing movement to build resilient local food systems. Registration can be completed online by visiting www.rsdp.umn.edu/Northwest and payment sent to the Regional Extension Office Crookston, 2900 University Ave, Crookston, Minn., 56716.

Participants will choose the location as well as select the sessions they wish to attend and may bring a family member or partner along for no additional cost. Host sites include the University of Minnesota Crookston; Bemidji State University; Minnesota State University Moorhead; Northland Technical College in Thief River Falls; Central Lakes College in Staples;
Clearwater County Courthouse in Bagley; Lake of the Woods High School in Baudette; and
Minnesota State Community and Technical College in Fergus Falls. Check the locations for the Local Foods College sites.

Session topics will include: Whole farm planning, nutrient cycles and interactions; soils and composting; vegetable production and planning a market garden; starting and managing an apple orchard; small fruit production; backyard poultry; and farm business management. For more detailed information or questions, visit www.rsdp.umn.edu/Northwest or call 888-241-0781.

The Local Foods College is sponsored by the University of Minnesota; Statewide Health Improvement Program; Blue Cross and Blue Shield Foundation; Minnesota State Colleges and Universities; and North Central Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education.

The Local Foods College is one aspect of a movement to strengthen local and regional food systems. It encompasses healthy foods for healthy people, stronger demand for healthy local foods, available accessible and affordable healthy local foods, and marketing and policy support for farmers and food producers. To learn more, visit www.localfoods.umn.edu.

The Northwest Minnesota Sustainable Development Partnership serves the people in northwestern Minnesota as they experiment with innovative ideas, build and strengthen relationships and take practical steps into a hopeful future. They connect university resources and citizen leaders in support of regional aspirations for natural resources, clean energy, agriculture and food systems, and resilient communities. The Northwest region encompasses Kittson, Roseau, Lake of the Woods, Marshall, Pennington, Red Lake, Polk, Norman, Mahnomen, Clay and Wilkin counties.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: : Linda Kingery, executive director, NWRSDP, 218-281-8697 (kinge002@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

As university and college campuses work toward goals of climate neutrality and UND Sustainability Supper.jpgimproved sustainability, the University of Minnesota, Crookston and the University of North Dakota (UND) staged a unique evening of sharing and discussion around this vital topic. A "sustainability supper" was held on Wednesday, December 14, 2011, at the UND Memorial Union in Grand Forks. Participants from Crookston included students, Jen Rasmussen, Jeanne Collins, and Beth Walter; Rich Connell, director of facilities and operations; Peter Phaiah, associate vice chancellor of student affairs; Kent Freberg, assistant professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department; Linda Kingery, executive director of the Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership; Vicki Svedarsky, UMC counselor; and Dan Svedarsky, director of UMC's Center for Sustainability.

The supper began with a welcome by UND President Robert Kelley who noted that he was, "delighted that both campuses are making very good progress in addressing the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and exploring novel, innovative new energy sources in the process." Larry Zitzow, director of facility management at UND, provided an overview of sustainability initiatives at UND with special emphasis on implementation strategies for their Climate Action Plan and improvements in energy efficiency. A couple of years ago, a UND campus input session generated over 90 possible sustainability and energy efficiency projects. Three selection criteria have been applied to choose which to do; 1) return on investment, 2) greenhouse gas reduction, and 3) in line with UND's sustainability efforts.

UND sustainability supper1.jpgA similar overview for the Crookston campus was provided by Svedarsky, Connell, Phaiah, and Kingery. The session provided an opportunity for networking between the two campuses as far as student groups, curriculum initiatives, research possibilities, and facilities management.  Kylie Oversen, UND's student body president noted that she was excited with the possibilities of more interdisciplinary student involvement in sustainability and with the themes of landscaping and faith-based approaches to land stewardship. Juan Pedraza, UND University Relations, reflected back on growing up near Lisbon, Spain, where, "I didn't know what garbage was. Everything was used and re-used." The evening concluded with a discussion around maintaining synergy between the two campuses as they work toward a sustainable future, figure out ways to improve energy efficiency and save money, and collaborate.

Background

In June 2010, U of M, Crookston Chancellor Charles Casey approved an Action Plan for Climate Neutrality and Sustainability which outlines somewhat of a strategic plan for campus sustainability action. The plan sets a target date of 2030 to achieve a balance between carbon released (primarily in the form of carbon dioxide) and the amount trapped or not produced; primarily by conserving energy and shifting to renewable sources. The plan is far reaching and extends not only to energy conservation and efficiency issues directly, but also to transportation, communication, local foods, recycling, and interdisciplinary education approaches. These climate action plans are part of the requirements of campuses signing on to the American College and University Presidents' Climate Commitment (ACUPCC), which the University of Minnesota agreed to in 2008. Colleges and universities have a special responsibility to provide a leadership role in this regard according to Michael Crow, president of Arizona State University and one of the founders of ACUPCC.  "While college and university campuses across the country are, in aggregate, responsible for only about three percent of the total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions emitted by the U.S., we are educating 100 percent of our future political, business, and social leaders. This fact alone places significant accountability on higher education and its leaders to take action."

The Sustainability Supper initiative is sponsored by the University of Minnesota's Institute on Environment, Mini-Grant Program. Past themes have included international dimensions of sustainability, faith-based approaches to sustainability, and defining what the sustainability means. The system dynamics approach to complex decision making is the theme of the next meeting scheduled for UMC on January 31. One of the over-arching goals of the sustainability supper seminar series has been to better connect campuses to their community by creating a more functional, "Communiversity."  In this way, participants will reach a deeper understanding of collaborative problem solving, sustainability and its many applications, strive toward a more functional "learning community," and seek ways for better synergy in the use of common resources. For more information about sustainability and communiversity initiatives, contact Dan Svedarsky, dsvedars@crk.umn.edu or 218-281-8129.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top, right: Larry Zitzow explaining UND's climate action plan. Peter Johnson, UND director of Unviersity Relations, President Robert Kelley.
 
Bottom, left: Peter Phaiah, Rich Connell, and Kent Freberg listen to UND student body president Kylie Oversen, outline her hopes for more student engagement in sustainability initiatives.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

wildlife_conf.jpgSeven students from the University of Minnesota, Crookston Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society, along with their advisor Associate Professor John Loegering, Ph.D., attended the Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference in early December. The conference held this year in Des Moines, Iowa, was a great opportunity for networking for students and professionals.

This year's conference marked the 72nd year that natural resource professionals in the Midwest have met to share research, management experiences, and valuable insight on issues related to fish and wildlife. During the conference more than 500 scientific presentations, posters, and symposia were presented and students had an opportunity to participate in a valuable workshop on "Beginning Your Professional Journey." Professionals and students shared their latest work and discussed the challenges of the future. To learn more about the conference, visit www.midwest2011.org.

Six of the students took advantage of the conference location by attending an evening performance of the Broadway musical "Wicked" which happened to be playing just a few blocks from the hotel on the evening before the conference.

Students attending the Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference were Andy Albertsen, a sophomore natural resources major from Nelson, Minn.; Tim Baker, a senior natural resources major from Gilbert, Minn.; Austin Link, a senior natural resources major from Sebeka, Minn.; Krista Kenyon, a junior natural resources major from Sanford, Manitoba, Canada; Jenny DuBay, a junior natural resources major from Apple Valley, Minn.; Jessica Fenlason, a senior agricultural education and natural resources double major from Evansville, Minn.; Sheila Carleton, a senior agronomy and natural resources double major from Baxter, Minn.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

2011_12_Poinsettia Class 0305.jpgHundreds of rooted poinsettia cuttings arrive in August in anticipation of another holiday season. For seven students involved in the commercial floriculture class at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, those cuttings have developed into a beautiful poinsettia crop under their skill and coaxing.

This year's poinsettias create a beautiful and colorful display with their showy "flowers" known as bracts and include varieties such as Freedom Early Red, Freedom Early White, Freedom Early Pink, Ice Punch (red bracts with pink centers), Red Glitter (red bracts with speckles of white) and Prestige Maroon (deep red bracts).  

Members of the fall semester class include: Mitch Allore, a senior majoring in golf and turf management from North Mankato, Minn.; Ben Sullivan, senior majoring in natural resources from Crookston, Minn.; Clay Schmitt, a senior majoring in golf and turf management from Delano, Minn.; Kevin Coyne, a senior majoring in golf and turf management from St. Paul, Minn.; Chad Harrer, a senior majoring in golf and turf management and horticulture from Brooklyn Park, Minn.; Kelsey Leake, a junior majoring in horticulture from Emerado, N.D.; and Josh Trottier, a senior majoring in golf and turf management from Devils Lake, N.D.

The students started the process of forcing the plants to induce bract color in time for the holiday season in October. Following a specific procedure to control the light, the students covered the plants with a dark cloth at 4 p.m. and uncovered them at 8 a.m. each day to regulate the length of daylight the plants receive. The students are responsible for greenhouse chores on the weekends as well. Although the class is taught by Sue Jacobson, the crop is in the hands of the students. The work and production of the poinsettia crop is entirely the responsibility of the class.  Jacobson says "It's better to learn expensive lessons in school than at your job.  We don't fire the students."

The Agriculture and Natural Resources Department offers commercial floriculture as part of the horticulture program to teach students to produce quality plants for a specific date - a skill necessary for employment in a greenhouse or garden center. "Poinsettias form their colored bracts, when the light is regulated," explains Jacobson. "The poinsettia really doesn't have a blossom like most flowers. Instead, the colorful red, pink, or white petals are modified leaves known as bracts. The blossoms are actually the small yellowish clusters in the center."

Jacobson often allows problems to develop to see how the students will solve them--poinsettia_tree.jpgsomething they would have to do in an employment situation and giving them an opportunity to apply what they have learned. The class demands hard work, dedication, and a strong team effort to grow the best poinsettias. Leadership and responsibility are two of the qualities that develop in this type of teaching and learning environment.

"Students learn so much from applying their classroom learning to real-world experience," Jacobson explains. "By taking responsibility for the crop, the students are accountable for the outcome making the commercial floriculture class one of the most memorable for the students." The class is excellent training for a career in horticulture, a multi-billion dollar industry in the U.S. To learn more about the horticulture program with emphases in environmental landscaping, production horticulture or urban forestry, visit www.UMCrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo at top are members of the fall semester class including: back row (l to r):  Mitch Allore,  Ben Sullivan, Clay Schmitt, and Kevin Coyne. Front row: Chad Herrer, Kelsey Leake, and Josh Trottier.

In the lower right photo shows the poinsettia tree in the Sargeant Student Center.

Contact: Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor, 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston and the Crookston community are in for a treat Leopoldphoto.jpgthis Thursday evening, December 8, 2011,  when the U of M, Crookston Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society will sponsor the showing of Green Fire - Aldo Leopold and a land ethic for our time. A documentary of the life of Leopold, the father of wildlife management, the film also tells the story of the national wilderness system and the science of ecological restoration. He also had a key role in integrated land use which led to what is now the Natural Resources Conservation Service. The film is free and open to the public and commences at 7 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. Student chapter representative, Kelsey Kaiser, can provide further information and can be reached at kaise233@umn.edu


"Aldo Leopold is considered the most important conservationist of the 20th century,' according to Dan Svedarsky, U of M, Crookston wildlife professor, "because his ideas are so relevant to the environmental issues of our time. I've been a Leopold disciple since my college days in the 60's but seeing the synthesis of his life in this film was a powerful, moving experience." Leopold founded the first wildlife management program in the nation at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

His classic book A Sand County Almanac still inspires us to see the natural world as a community to which we belong. Green Fire explores Leopold's personal journey of observation and understanding, It reveals how his ideas resonate with people across the entire American landscape, from inner cities to the most remote wild lands. The film challenges viewers to contemplate their own relationship with the land.

"Green Fire" is the first feature documentary about Aldo Leopold's life and contemporary legacy. It features commentary from conservation leaders including scientists, ranchers, scholars and three of Aldo Leopold's children--Nina, Carl, and Estella. Curt Meine, history professor and Leopold's biographer, serves as the on-camera guide, making connections between Leopold's ideas and their expression in the conservation movement today.  
 
Leopold's notion of an evolving land ethic provides the backbone of the narrative. It was the organizing idea that defined not only his personal, intellectual, and spiritual growth but in many ways the development of the American conservation and environmental movements over the last century. In particular, Leopold sought to resolve the long-standing (and often divisive) tension between the preservationist and utilitarian strains of conservation thought, policy, and advocacy.

"Green Fire" also examines the theme of community--both within the natural world and in the social context of conservation. The related themes of sense of place, stewardship, and responsibility derive from Leopold's notion of community and connect his story to creative contemporary expressions of an environmental ethic. His personal journey is part of a still larger, longer-term, and unfinished journey of Americans (and indeed people around the world) as their relationships to the natural world continue to evolve. The contemporary stories woven into the film illustrate Leopold's continuing influence today, while also demonstrating a diversity of human relationships to nature.

Central to the film is the image of the "fierce green fire" that Leopold saw in the eyes of a dying wolf.  In his famous essay, "Thinking Like a Mountain,"  Leopold reveals a transformation in his own basic values.  His journey to a new way of looking at the world provides the narrative arc of the film as Curt Meine sets out to explore both the man and his contemporary legacy.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, communications, University Relations, 218-281-8342 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Boredom won't be a problem for Alumna Amy Brown. At any given moment, the 2008 brown_amy2.jpggraduate may be driving through North Dakota terrain, boating across a river, or watching from above in her 2006 Cessna 182. Originally from Lake George, Minn., she finds herself living a life she has dreamed about for a long time.

Brown is a game warden/pilot for the state of North Dakota. With that role comes a great deal of responsibility for this young woman, but she remains undaunted.  

"In high school as a post-secondary-enrollment-option student, I met with Dan Svedarsky to ask what classes I should be taking in preparation to attend the University of Minnesota, Crookston," explains Brown. "I have known I wanted to be a game warden since I was in my early teens. It combined my interests in natural resources and law enforcement and Crookston happened to be one of just a few places I could pursue my dream."

She discovered her love of flying when she decided to earn her private pilot's license as a student on the Crookston campus. "It is funny that I decided to add a major in aviation, because before I came to campus, the only flight I had ever been on was one to Disney World with my parents," Brown smiles.  

"I ended up falling in love with flying," she continues. As a result, her major included law enforcement aviation and natural resources law enforcement. She interned in summer 2008 for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Devils Lake, N.D.
Brown liked her study at the U of M, Crookston. "It is something I hold dear," she reflects. "I have a lot of respect for Chief Pilot Mike Vivion; he has a lot of experience and a lot to offer students. I learned a great deal from him."
It might sound cliché but Brown enjoys the kind of serenity she finds in the air. And, she treasures the opportunity to see what most of the rest of the world will never see from her vantage point in the cockpit.

Her job isn't focused solely on flying. She spends plenty of time on the ground or in a boat on the water. It all depends on the time of year and the demands of the job. She can be involved in a search-and-rescue effort or flying at night looking for spot lighters. "If the state needs a pilot, I am in the airplane," she declares. "As the primary pilot, I am kind of always on call."

Those demands prove the most challenging aspect of her work, but it is a job Brown loves and finds deeply rewarding.
Brown is one of only a few women in the field. Vivion explains, "I am not sure how many women conservation officers the states have who also fly, but I'm guessing the number is close to one.  The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has nine pilots and none of them are women."

Brown doesn't think about this fact much. She is concentrating on the job she has always wanted to do, and that fact is the only one that matters to her.


In the photo: Amy  Brown attended the meeting of the Program Improvement Audit Committee for aviation in October.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Agriculture and Natural Resources Activities Day brings high school students from some 40 high schools to the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Friday, December 2, 2011. The annual event, which involves the students competing in more than 20 contests, has been held on the campus since 1969.

Ranging from horticulture and forestry to ag mechanics, livestock and sales, the day is fraught with excitement and culminates in an awards ceremony. The contests are overseen by U of M, Crookston Agriculture and Natural Resources Department faculty. The day begins early with registration for the equine contests beginning at 7:15 a.m. All activities conclude with the awards ceremony at 1:15 p.m.in Lysaker Gymnasium.

Scholarships, plaques and certificates are awarded to school teams and individuals for each contest. Over $32,000 in scholarships are available to award-winning students.  Last year, $750 UMC scholarships were awarded for the high individual in each contest, $600 UMC scholarships were awarded for the second place individual, and $450 UMC scholarships were awarded for the third place individual.

More information regarding Ag and Natural Resources Activities Day is available by contacting Leah Stroot at 218-281-8101 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/agnatrday.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: : Leah Stroot, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8101 (stro0525@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

dubay_jenny.jpgStudents from the University of Minnesota, Crookston assisted staff at the Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) banding ducks as part of the nationwide effort to assess he survival and migration patterns of waterfowl in North America.

The ANWR is charged by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) with banding 1200 Mallards in four groups including adults vs. the young of the year and males vs. females for a total of 300 in each group. The banding effort in northern Minnesota permits the USFWS to document the migration patterns and timing of the banded birds as well as estimate survival for each of the banded age/gender groups.  

Banding data is important to understanding bird ecology and gathering feedback for determining management actions by wildlife professionals. It also is significant in monitoring the status of bird populations particularly for those populations that might be threatened. Bands on ducks taken by hunters are typically recovered and reported assisting the USFWS efforts in tracking.  The public is encouraged to report any bands found to the Bird Banding Laboratory at 1-800-327-BAND (2263) and include the bird species, date, and location.

Associate Professor John Loegering serves as an advisor to the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society on the Crookston campus as well as teaching a fall semester course in wildlife ecology and management. Most of the students participating are either members of the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society or Loegering's wildlife ecology class.

Loegering attests to the benefit this opportunity provides students in natural resources. "The duck banding trip is intended to teach students about a small part of a huge monitoring system, offer them practical hands-on banding experience, and give them an opportunity to interact with staff from the federal agency that employs many of our graduates.  Other than departing the Owen Hall parking lot at 4:15 a.m., it is a fabulous experience."

Kupferschmid_brett.jpgThe captured ducks are nearly all mallards, but they do catch an occasional Northern Pintail or Wood Duck. Most ducks are all in their 'eclipse' phase akin to other birds winter plumage - their coloring is drab, rather than the colorful plumage one would expect.  For mallards, this period lasts a few weeks to a few months.

To learn more about the natural resources degree program, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/agri.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:

Top, left: Jenny DuBay, a junior majoring in wildlife management from Apple Valley, Minn., holds a male mallard at the Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge where the duck banding took place.

Bottom, right: Brett Kupferschmid, a junior majoring in natural resources from Perham, Minn., holds a female mallard in preparation for release after banding.


Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281- 8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston Horticulture Club hosted the Mid-America MACHS_2.jpgCollegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) 39th annual conference from Thursday, October 20 to Sunday, October 23, 2011. The theme was "Little Campus on the Prairie." This was the first time the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club hosted the event. There were 33 students and 3 advisors from 6 universities in attendance including: Iowa State University, North Dakota State University, Northwest Missouri State University, South Dakota State University, the University of Wisconsin- River Falls, and Western Illinois University.

Thursday evening students gathered in the U of M, Crookston greenhouse classroom for registration, refreshments, and a campus welcome by Ron DelVecchio, U of M, Crookston professor and head of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department. Friday morning began with the general knowledge exam, plant identification, and plant judging. Each school had a team of 4 students whose individual scores contribute to the team total. This contest was designed to challenge the horticulture students and allow them to see where they stand in relation to other universities.

Friday afternoon included three guest speakers. Linda Kingery of the Northwest Regional and Sustainable Development Partnership talked to the students about the dynamic local foods in this region. Kathleen Brokke, historian and horticulturalist, performed her interpretation of Fannie Manhood Heath, a pioneer horticulturalist in the region. Minnesota Nursery and Landscaping Association President Bert Swanson shared his industry perspective with the up and coming industry leaders. Also taking place Friday afternoon was the planting of an apple tree in the U of M, Crookston Nature Nook to honor Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai. Friday evening included a banquet meal with keynote speaker Rusty Schmidt, natural resource specialist with the Washing Conservation District. Schmidt is one of three authors of the Blue Thumb Guide to Raingardens which has changed the way people think about using water in the Twin Cities area and beyond.

MACHS_1.jpgSaturday was a day of regional tours highlighting the diversity of Minnesota. Students began the day with naturalist Rhett Johnson leading the group through the Agassiz Dunes Scientific and Natural Area in Fertile, Minn. Traveling south to Detroit Lakes, Minn., the group saw the poinsettia growing operation of Bergen's Greenhouse, Inc. In Park Rapids, Minn., students visited the wholesale perennial growing operation of Bergen's Nursery. The final stop for the group was Itasca State Park where they took a tour of Minnesota's conifers. All of the students had an opportunity to cross the headwaters of the Mississippi River which was a first-time experience for many students.

Sunday marked the end of the weekend conference as the MACHS students held their annual business meeting, elected the 2011-2012 officer team, and selected a host school for 2013. Awards from Friday's team contest were presented.  The top overall individual was Winston Beck from Iowa State University. The first place team was South Dakota State University. Iowa State University was the second place team with the team from Northwest Missouri State University placing third. The U of M, Crookston observed the MACHS tradition that the host school is allowed to compete but not receive awards.

The entire event was planned by the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club students with MACHS_3.jpgsupport from U of M, Crookston staff and faculty. U of M, Crookston senior Kristine Neu served as the chair of MACHS 2011. The MACHS annual conference is the largest undertaking in the history of the Horticulture Club, and they were excited to showcase their program, the campus, and the community to the visiting universities. The host school for the 2012 MACHS conference will be South Dakota State University chaired by Sarah Custer. The host school for the 2013 MACHS conference will be the University of Wisconsin- River Falls chaired by Joel Sehloff. For more information about MACHS and to see more event photos visit the group's Facebook page: Mid America Collegiate Horticulture Society 2011.  

MACHS is comprised of horticulture clubs from universities  and two-year colleges in the Midwest Region including Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. MACHS is a branch of the Association of Collegiate Branches (ACB) within the American Society for Horticultural Sciences (ASHS). ACB is a national forum comprised of undergraduate horticulture clubs within ASHS.

The objective of MACHS is to promote an awareness of the profession of horticulture, furnish a medium of communication for horticulture students, and exchange club and professional ideas. These objectives are met through a variety of activities taking place throughout the weekend conference.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top right:

U of M, Crookston horticulture students with Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor (in purple): Standing left to right: Michael Laurich, Alisha Aasness, Catlin Kersting, Chad Harrer, Mitch Sledge, Kristine Neu and Chancellor Charles H. Casey. In the front (left to right): Ashlynn Hartung and Amanda Thompson.

Middle, left: The entire Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society crossing the headwaters of the Mississippi River on Saturday, October 22, 2011.

Bottom right: Four generations of MACHS chairpersons (l to r): Joel Sehloff, 2013 chair, University of Wisconsin- River Falls; Sarah Custer, 2012 chair, South Dakota State University; Kristine Neu, 2011 chair, U of M, Crookston; Winston Beck, 2010 chair, Iowa State University



Contact: Kristine Neu, communications assistant, (neuxx019@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

furry_m.jpgMichael Furry, Omaha, Neb., a freshman at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his student solo flight at the Crookston Municipal Airport. He is pursuing a bachelor's degree in natural resources and completed the flight on Sunday, October 30, 2011. His advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus, and his flight instructor is Carolyn Clark.

The significance of the first student solo flight cannot be overemphasized.  Landing an aircraft involves very difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest.

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student furry_m2.jpghaving him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

IMG_1958.jpgDerek Cox, an aviation major at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, recently completed his student solo flight at the Crookston Municipal Airport. The Walker, Minn., native is a freshman and completed his solo flight on Wednesday, October 26, 2011. His advisor is Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus.

The significance of the first student solo flight cannot be overemphasized.Landing an aircraft involves very difficult and complex eye-hand coordination. A student pilot begins flight training by learning a wide variety of tasks of which landing is one of the most difficult.  As flight training progresses, the ability to solo is largely predicated upon the flight instructor's assessment of the student's landings. Consistency is critical and sometimes one of the most difficult to achieve as even the best pilot can attest.

Around the middle of a private pilot's flight training, the instructor flies with the student IMG_1952.jpghaving him/her land. The instructor will exit the airplane and endorse the student pilot certificate and logbook for solo. With that designation, the budding aviator is sent off for three trips around the traffic pattern each followed by that all important landing.

The University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation program is a partnership in which aviation fundamentals are provided by the University of North Dakota (UND) Aerospace Foundation. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/aviation.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A legend has passed. On September 25, 2011, Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and sustainable development activist died in Nairobi, Kenya, after a prolonged battle with cancer. In her memory and as a tribute to her legacy, the University of Minnesota, Crookston will plant a memorial apple tree on campus. In coordination with the hosting of the Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) conference, a Honeycrisp apple tree will be planted at 4 p.m. on Friday, October 21, 2011, in the Nature Nook, near the west entrance to Bergland Laboratory on the campus. The public is invited to attend.

The family of Maathai and the Green Belt Movement asks well-wishers to plant a tree to provide a living symbol of Wangari and her tireless work to make the world a better and more peaceful place. U of M, Crookston Chancellor Charles H. Casey will make comments during the tree planting along with Harouna Maiga, Ph.D., associate professor of animal science and a native of Mali, Africa.

The recipient of numerous awards commemorating her activities with sustainability, international conservation, women's rights, health, Maathai is perhaps best known for wangari.jpgfounding the Green Belt Movement in 1977. The movement was launched in Kenya primarily to inspire women to improve their livelihoods by planting trees for firewood, clean water, and soil protection. It has become a world-wide movement, particularly in third-world countries.

Dan Svedarsky, director of the Center for Sustainability had the pleasure of meeting Maathai at the U.N. Conference on Global Climate Change held in Copenhagen in December of 2009. "A group of us met with her at the Danish Film Institute to view the premier showing of, 'Taking Root,' a film featuring her life story. That film and discussions with her which followed, were an incredibly moving experience," according to Svedarsky.

Background

Wangari Maathai was born in Nyeri, Kenya (Africa) in 1940. The first woman in East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate degree, Professor Maathai obtained a degree in Biological Sciences from Mount St. Scholastica College in Atchison, Kansas (1964).(Her studies in American were supported by a Kennedy Foundation scholarship for Kenyans which also included President Obama's father.)  She subsequently earned a Master of Science degree from the University of Pittsburgh (1966). Professor Maathai pursued doctoral studies in Germany and later obtained a Ph.D. (1971) from the University of Nairobi where she also taught veterinary anatomy. She became chair of the Department of Veterinary Anatomy in 1976.

Professor Maathai is internationally recognized for her persistent struggle for democracy, human rights and environmental conservation. She has addressed the UN on several occasions and spoke on behalf of women at special sessions of the General Assembly during the five-year review of the Earth Summit. She and the Green Belt Movement have received numerous awards, most notably the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize. In 2005, Professor Maathai was honored by Time Magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world, and by Forbes Magazine as one of 100 most powerful women in the world.

Apple experts at the University of Minnesota were responsible for the development of the Honeycrisp apple making it an apt tribute to Maathai on the Crookston campus. The event is sponsored by the Crookston Students for Sustainable Development (CSSD) and the Center for Sustainability. It commences an initiative to develop an "Edible Campus Landscape" where fruit-producing trees and shrubs will be planted along with possibly campus gardening. "Wangari would have liked that," according to Svedarsky.

To learn more, visit www.greenbeltmovement.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and sustainable development activist, from www.greenbeltmovement.org.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, communications, University Relations, 218-281-8342 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston Horticulture Club is hosting the Mid-America Collegiate Horticultural Society (MACHS) 39th annual conference. This event will be from Thursday, October 20 to Sunday, October 23, 2011, and the theme is "Little Campus on the Prairie." The MACHS conference is expected to bring more than 40 horticultural students from across the Midwest to the U of M, Crookston campus. This is the first time that the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club has hosted this event. 

machs2011.jpgMACHS is comprised of horticulture clubs from universities  and two-year colleges in the Midwest Region including Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. MACHS is a branch of the Association of Collegiate Branches (ACB) within the American Society for Horticultural Sciences (ASHS). ACB is a national forum comprised of undergraduate horticulture clubs within ASHS.

The objective of MACHS is to promote an awareness of the profession of horticulture, furnish a medium of communication for horticulture students, and exchange club and professional ideas. These objectives are met through a variety of activities taking place throughout the weekend conference.

 Thursday night students will gather in the U of M, Crookston greenhouse classroom for registration, refreshments, and a campus welcome by Ron DelVechio, U of M, Crookston professor and head of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department. Friday morning begins with a contest which includes a general knowledge exam, plant identification, and plant judging. Each school has a team of four students whose individual scores contribute to the team total. This contest is designed to challenge the horticulture students and allow them to see where they stand in relation to other universities.

Friday afternoon will include three guest speakers. Linda Kingery of the Northwest Regional and Sustainable Development Partnership will be talking to students about local foods. Kathleen Brokke, historian and horticulturalist, will be performing her interpretation of Fannie Manhood Heath, a pioneer horticulturalist in this region. Minnesota Nursery and Landscaping Association president Bert Swanson will also be sharing his industry perspective with the up and coming industry leaders. Friday evening will include a banquet meal with keynote speaker Rusty Schmidt, natural resource specialist with the Washing Conservation District. Schmidt is one of three authors of the Bluethumb Guide to Raingardens which has changed the way people think about using water in the Twin Cities area and beyond.

Saturday is a day of regional tours. Students will begin the day with naturalist Rhett Johnson leading the group through the Agassiz Dunes Scientific and Natural Area in Fertile, Minn. Traveling south to Detroit Lakes, Minn. the group will see the poinsettia growing operation of Bergen's Greenhouse, Inc. In Park Rapids, Minn. students will visit the wholesale perennial growing operation of Bergen's Nursery. The final stop for the group will be Itasca State Park where the group will take a tour of Minnesota's conifers. Students will also have an opportunity to cross the headwaters of the Mississippi River which will be a first-time experience for many students who come from much farther downriver.

Sunday marks the end of the weekend conference as the MACHS students hold their annual business meeting. Awards from Friday's team contest also will be presented. It will be a weekend of learning, networking, and growing as a horticulturalist for all students involved.

The entire event is being planned by the U of M, Crookston Horticulture Club students with support from U of M, Crookston staff and faculty. The MACHS annual conference is the largest undertaking in the history of the Horticulture Club, and they are excited to showcase their program, the campus, and the community to many other universities and technical colleges.


U of M, Crookston senior Kristine Neu currently serves as the chair of MACHS, and she works with a team of four other officers from South Dakota State University; the University of Wisconsin, River Falls; and Iowa State University. For more information about MACHS visit, www.umcrookston.edu/machs.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 


Contact: Kristine Neu, communications assistant, (neuxx019@umn.ed) ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

College students from around the area are invited to attend College Outdoor Skills Day, taking place on Wednesday, October 12, 2011, from 4 to 7:30 p.m. at the Crookston Gun Club, located north of the University of Minnesota, Crookston campus on Highway 75 and 240th Street Southwest.  The event is free, but interested students must pre-register. For more information or to register, contact Laura Bell, lab coordinator and naturalist at the U of M, Crookston, at 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu).  Free t-shirts will be given to the first fifty college students to pre-register.

The event is designed to help college students experience new outdoor activities or sharpen the outdoor skills they already have. Programs will be offered throughout the evening, including fly-fish casting, target archery, slingshots/wrist rockets, outdoor survival, outdoor first aid, rifle shooting, trap shooting, and tree stand safety.

College Outdoor Skills Day is sponsored by the University of Minnesota, Crookston and the following organizations:  Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, West Polk Deer Hunters, Crookston Gun Club, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Federal Cartridge, and the U of M, Crookston's Natural Resources Club and Student Chapter of the Wildlife Society.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Laura Bell, lab services coordinator, 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director of communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Fly-In, Drive-In Pancake Breakfast Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011

Join members of Alpha Eta Rho, the University of Minnesota, Crookston's aviation fraternity, for their annual pancake breakfast, where they will be serving pancakes, eggs, sausages, coffee, and orange juice. 

Date/Time:  Sunday, September 25, 2011, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.AHP Logo.jpg
Location: Crookston Municipal Airport, two and 1/2 miles north of the UMC campus on Highway 75.

Cost:  advance $6; at door: $8; kids ages 4-12: $3; ages 3 and younger: FREE!
Free breakfast for any Pilot in Command.

Sponsored by Alpha Eta Rho International Aviation Fraternity (AHP) and Crookston Aviation

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu)

Final concepts for nature-based play spaces for the cities of Crookston and Warren, Minn. have now been completed and approved. The children's play space for Crookston was designed for Castle Park (at right below), which is located off of Castle Street to the west of the Crookston hospital complex. The play space for Warren was designed for Island Park (at left below) located off of Warren's South Division Street.

A final design was prepared for each community. Both designs were a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota, Crookston and Twin Cities campuses. The nature-based play space final design concepts were created by Kristen Murray, U of M, Twin Cities landscape architecture graduate student, and Kristine Neu, U of M, Crookston environmental landscaping undergraduate. Funding for Murray's research assistant position was provided by the Community Assistantship Program (CAP) at the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs at the U of M Twin Cities campus. Both students were advised by Eric Castle, landscape architect and U of M, Crookston assistant professor of horticulture.

A nature-based play space is not the average playground. It looks more like woods, castle-color-small.gifprairie, or garden. Unlike the open woods, the design has a border, so that parents know where their children are, and children can play freely in the space. The design incorporates plants and materials native to the area. The purpose of the design was to create a space that reconnects children to nature and improves overall health of children and families in the community.

The design process for both Castle and Island parks has been ongoing since early summer. The final design for Crookston was based on community feedback gathered at National Night Out on August 2 and input from the City of Crookston. Community feedback from Warren was gathered at the Marshall County Fair, and the City of Warren and Warren Jaycees also gave important input. Both communities will begin installation of their nature-based play spaces this fall. The students of the U of M, Crookston landscape installation and maintenance class, lead by Castle, will be providing installation assistance at both sites. In Warren, the Jaycees will be providing volunteer assistance for the installation.

island-color-small.gifThe nature-based play spaces in Crookston and Warren were two of several regional installations under the Children Discovering Nature in Northwest Minnesota Project. The project team also included Daniel Handeen and Virajita Singh, both research fellows at the U of M, Twin Cities Center for Sustainable Building Research (CSBR), and Linda Kingery, executive director of the Northwest Minnesota Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP). Sarah Reese, Polk County Public Health Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP) Coordinator and Kirsten Fagerlund, SHIP staff, served as the liaison between the community of Crookston and the project team. Frances Tougas, North Valley SHIP coordinator, served a similar role in Warren. A portion of the financial support for the planning and implementation of each play space is being provided by a grant received from the Otto Bremer Foundation and the U of M Office of Community Engagement for Health's Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

The project team is forming a core advisory committee for the nature-based play space in each community. Each committee would be comprised of a group of volunteers who will help make decisions, organize other volunteer efforts, and generally help create a vision for the play space into the future. If interested in being a part of the advisory committee in Crookston, community members are encouraged to contact Kirsten Fagerlund 218-281-3385 kfagerlund@pcphealth.org for more information. Community members of Warren should contact Gail Larson, North Valley Public Health Director, 218-745-5154 glarson@nvhc.net or Frances Tougas 218-745-5154 ftougas@nvhc.net.

The final designs are available for viewing at www.umcrookston.edu/childrenandnature.
The Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP), an integral part of Minnesota's nation-leading 2008 health reform law, strives to help Minnesotans lead longer, healthier lives by preventing the chronic disease risk factors of tobacco use and exposure, poor nutrition and physical inactivity.

For moreinformation,visit www.health.state.mn.us/healthreform/ship.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Eric Castle, assistant professor, castl047@umn.edu; Kristine Neu, communications assistant, neuxx019@umn.edu ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Since early July, volunteers have been out on the Minnesota prairie taking a very special census of a threatened prairie wildflower. The prairie fringed orchid has been on the U.S. List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants since 1989, and the annual census gives researchers important data necessary in the protection of the delicate orchid and its habitat.

Under the direction of Nancy Sather, botanist and the statewide orchid count coordinator, students with orchid.jpgvolunteers are out all over the state of Minnesota gathering data. Dan Svedarsky, director of the Center for Sustainability at the U of M, Crookston and research biologist with the Northwest Research and Outreach Center along with seniors Kristine Neu, Pelican Rapids, Minn., a double major in horticulture and communication; Ben Sullivan, Crookston, Minn.; and GreenCorps member Michael Knudson, Glencoe, Minn., both majoring in natural resources, recently  assisted with the census at the Pankratz Prairie located 11 miles southeast of Crookston and owned by The Nature Conservancy.  

"We are always working to better understand the threats and environmental factors affecting the flowering cycle of species like the prairie fringed orchid," Svedarsky explains. "We will be hosting a coordinating meeting on the Crookston campus on July 20 regarding this annual census and on-going research. This information is critical to protecting the prairie orchid. ; Polk County happens to be one of the hot spots for the orchid in our state."

FPO_closeup.jpgThe orchid's population has fluctuated over the years. Across 43 sites in Minnesota the count had declined steadily from 2001 to 2006. The plants prefer moist soil and warm temperatures, but like to grow on the higher side of ditches or hollows. The most common threats to the orchids are habitat destruction including the conversion of land for agricultural purposes, conversion of lands for housing or commercial uses, herbicide drift, and spread of invasive species.

"One of the places providing the perfect growing conditions for the orchid is near Glacial Ridge Project on the tallgrass prairie landscape of the Pembina Trail Preserve," says Svedarsky. "The Glacial Ridge Project, located 10 miles east of campus, is one of the largest wetland and prairie restoration projects in North America."

The prairie fringed orchid attracts hawk moths that feed on the nectar and transfer pollenorchid.jpg from flower to flower and plant to plant according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Web site (www.fws.gov). Pollination can be influenced by timing of the flowering, availability of other flowering species for the hawk moth, and the range of the pollinator in relation to the orchid populations. To learn more about the prairie fringed orchid, visit www.iucnredlist.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top, right: 

Ben Sullivan (center), a Shaver Environmental Landscaping intern working with the Northwest Research and Outreach Center, holding a Trimble GPS unit which is used to plot the precise location of the endangered plant in the foreground; Michael Knudson (left), a Minnesota GreenCorps stormwater management specialist working with the Center for Sustainability; and Kristine Neu (right), who is working with the Connecting Children to Nature in Northwest project this summer. Photo by Dan Svedarsky.

Bottom, left and right: Western Prairie Fringed Orchid on the Pankratz Prairie near Crookston, Minn. Photos by Ben Sullivan.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Land Management Field School Held at U of M, Crookston in June

The University of Minnesota, Crookston and the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) recently co-hosted a land management field school for new employees of resource management agencies, particularly the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Agriculture and land use was a primary focus of the 4-day field school which was held from June 21- 24 on the Crookston campus with field excursions to various sites within the county.

Dan Svedarsky, Director of the Center for Sustainability at the U of M, Crookston and Sims and ag research.jpgresearch biologist with the NWROC and Glen Kajewski, Assistant State Conservationist with NRCS organized the session along with U of M, Crookston Associate Professor David Demuth, who served as field camp coordinator.  

"Fewer graduates have farm backgrounds these days," according to Svedarsky, "and as they go to work for natural resource agencies and interact with agriculture, it is imperative that they have a familiarity with the process and the culture of folks who make their living on the land."

Eighteen participants from the NRCS, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Soil and Water Conservation Districts learned from technical personnel through lecture and lab sessions; most speakers were from the U of M, NWROC, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, and Extension. Equally important, field school participants learned from practitioners on trips to working farms. These ranged from the highly specialized operation of the Wagner Farms located in the heart of the Red River Valley where precision agriculture has been pioneered, to a 5-generation, conventional dairy farm, to a fruit and vegetable farm, to a diverse Amish farm in the eastern part of Polk County. Emphasis was placed on the natural resource base of soil and water and how farmers use these resources in agriculture, management considerations, and relationships with various agencies.

Wagner and precision ag.jpgThe intensive session provided an exposure to practical land use in Northwest Minnesota and was structured for participants to learn from each other as well as from more formal instruction. Participants came from all over the state and represented a broad spectrum of experiences and cultural diversity. According to one participant, "The skills and information I attained by participating in the school were absolutely invaluable and very applicable to my job and will make me a better employee for my agency."

Polk County and the Crookston campus were ideally suited for the field school due to the diversity of agricultural land uses within walking or commuting distance of the modern instructional and residential facilities on campus. The Red River Valley in the western part of the county has large intensive farms located on deep, rich prairie soils which transition to lighter soils developed under deciduous forests to the east with smaller, more diversified farms.  

Mary Lien and local foods.jpgParticipants were able to tour the Glacial Ridge Project, located 10 miles east of campus, where the NRCS has played in key role in investing Wetland Reserve Program resources to create the largest wetland and prairie restoration project in North America. This project is transitioning to the Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  A system of prescribed burning to increase forage quality for livestock is being implemented on Glacial Ridge, and is being evaluated as a wildlife management technique as well. Water table effects also are being evaluated in concert with shallow wetland restoration

Additional sponsors of the session included; U of M Extension; Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Wagner Farms; Truax Company, and the Minnesota Corn Growers. This was essentially the first field school of this sort to be hosted in Minnesota and plans are underway to make it an annual occurrence.

"There is an incredible transition of personnel within all agencies due to retirement of baby boomers." says Svedarsky, "That, plus the need for new hires to know more about the practical considerations of land use and the need to collaborate with other agencies really puts a high priority on these kind of sessions."

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top, right: Albert Sims, Ph.D., director of Operations at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center explaining the nature of agricultural research as applied to soils and agronomy at the University of Minnesota.


Center, left: Alumnus Gary Wagner '75 an area farmer explains the fundamentals of precision agriculture. Glen Kajewski, NRCS Assistant State Conservationist is to the right of Wagner.


Bottom, left: Mary Lien from Gonvick, Minn., describing a local foods meal catered to field school participants at the headquarters of the Rydell National Wildlife Refuge.

 


Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu) ; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Students Gain Firsthand Insight into Swiss Agriculture

Four University of Minnesota, Crookston students studied agricultural practices abroad in Switzerland from May 15 through May 29, 2011. Cities visited included Landquart, Chur, Sorenberg, and Luzern.

Abbie Westby, an agricultural education major from Pelican Rapids, Minn., was joined by group_mtn.jpgShelia Carleton, a senior majoring in agronomy and natural resources from Baxter, Minn.; Shelia Dombeck, a junior agronomy major from Perham, Minn.; and Alisha Fritz, a post-secondary enrollment option (PSEO) student from Perham, Minn.

The time abroad was the primary component of the Swiss mountain agriculture course through the U of M, Twin Cities College of Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS). This three credit summer course was offered through the U of M, Twin Cities, but other university students were invited to join. The four U of M, Crookston students joined with twelve students from the U of M, Twin Cities. The group was lead by Julie Tesch, who is an employee of the MN Ag Education Leadership Council (MAELC).

The purpose of the course was to give students greater understanding of spring time agricultural activities in a mountain ecosystem. Students witnessed management of farming enterprises to be productive in the context of Europe, and learn how Switzerland has developed their agro-tourism industry. Students also had the opportunity to interact directly with farmers, researchers, students, professionals, and government officials who share expertise and interest in agricultural issues as well as experience rural Swiss family life.
The first four days abroad the students stayed at Plantahof, an agricultural college in Landquart.

Each day the group visited various farms that were within driving distance. Students made visits to various farms including a co-operative called Landi; a fruit farm specializing in strawberries, raspberries, and plums; and a barn owned and operated by three farmers to reduce overhead and share the work load. Westby also was introduced to two separate agro-tourist farms. The first tourist farm gave visitors an opportunity to actually "sleep in the straw," which was their slogan, while the second, Kuhe-Villa, the cow villa, was focused on teaching visitors about the dairy industry. The group also had the opportunity to tour the city of Chur, which is the oldest and biggest city in Graubunden, one of 26 cantons (states) in Switzerland.

During the first weekend stay in Switzerland each student had the opportunity to experience Swiss home life by staying with a host family. Westby was joined by a U of M, Twin Cities student at a home in the village of Jenins in the Graubunden canton. The two students not only got to experience daily life in Switzerland; they worked right alongside their host parents to complete chores on the farm. Westby assisted with the spring haying process and spent time in the family's vineyard. She was even asked to assist with putting cowbells onto the cows before they left for the Alp pastures; a true Switzerland experience.

During their second week abroad, the students stayed at a holiday farm called, Birkenhof, in the town of Sorenberg. The students stayed in a renovated barn that was used to house tourists. Agricultural visits included touring a Holstein and water buffalo dairy farm, a deer farm specializing in meat production, and a cheese making factory. One of the more interesting specializations Westby saw was a sheep dairy farm. The sheep would stand on a pedestal to make milking more ergonomically friendly. Besides agricultural adventures, Westby also had the chance to visit the "Top of Europe," one of the highest places on the continent that can be visited by train.

Spending so much time on farms, it was easy to see differences in farming practices. A noticeable change coming from the Midwest was the size of Swiss farms. Most operations were family owned and in the 50-100 acre range, and because of the small field sizes much of the work was done by hand. The farms with cattle usually had between only 10-15 head noted Westby. She appreciated how the people she encountered in agriculture really cared about what they were doing.

One theme Westby noticed while in Switzerland was the conservation and conscientious use of resources. During her host family stay she was given the task of raking up all extra hay that was left in the field so that nothing was wasted. In the mountains, with less grass able to grow, every last bit is important for Swiss farmers to feed their livestock. Westby appreciated the fact that the best land the country had to offer was reserved for farming only. In the flat areas of the mountain valleys farmers produced their grain crops and other crops that couldn't survive in the higher, steeper altitudes. Very few houses and cities were put on the flat land which was more valuable for farming. Westby commented, "When they only have so much workable land to use it makes sense that agriculture is put first instead of personal use."

The time traveling in Switzerland put agriculture into a new perspective for Westby. She was able to take her knowledge past the farming practices of Midwestern America, "To truly understand agriculture you need to expand your experiences past what is common to what you already know." These experiences will prove valuable as Westby prepares for student teaching in the Spring of 2012.

From Westby's perspective, the push with American agriculture is to get everything done with bigger and better machines and technology, "This approach works just fine because we have vast areas of land and we need to be efficient. In other countries, bigger and faster are not always the most effective way to produce their products. "

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, (l to r): Sheila Carlton, Abbie Westby, Shelia Dombeck, and Alisha Fritz spent two weeks studying agriculture in Switzerland.


Contact: Kristine Neu, communications assistant, neuxx019@umn.edu; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Eighteen members of the University of Minnesota, Crookston Natural Resources Club treeplanting.jpgalong with several natural resources faculty and staff members returned to the Little Cutfoot Sioux region of the Chippewa National Forest the weekend of April 30-May 1 for the 29th consecutive tree planting trip for the U.S. Forest Service.  The Crookston Crew, as they've come to be known by Forest Service personnel, planted 4,500 red pine seedlings on a clearcut area near Talmoon, Minn.

Phil Baird, associate professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department knows the impact of these trips on students. "This is something students will remember for the rest of their lives," says Baird."Each year we have a number of alumni returning to join us from across the region and country. It's hard to believe that the club first hoisted their dibble bars on the Chippewa more than 12 years before this year's incoming freshman class was born!"

treeplanting2.jpgThe crew was joined by former students from Washington and Wisconsin who couldn't pass up another shot at this rite of spring for the club. The club returns to the forest each spring to plant trees and again each fall to budcap some of their younger plantings to protect the seedlings from deer browsing.

For more information on the natural resources program at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/agri/natr.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Phil Baird, associate professor, 218-281-8130 (pbaird@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A snowy morning in April didn't stop a group of enthusiastic participants in the first annual Pi Run sponsored by the Alpha Lambda Delta (ALD) Honor Society at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The Pi Run, meaning 5 km (3.1 miles), roughly equal to pi, was a road race designed to raise funds to benefit academic co-curricular programs, such as after-school programs like the speech team for example, in the Crookston High School. The race took place on Saturday, April 16, 2011, with 50 runners/walkers participating in the event.

Check presentation

ALD President Heather Donati-Lewis, a senior majoring in equine science from ALD_check.jpgNarcoossee, Fla., was on hand before her graduation on Saturday, May 7, to present a $500 check from ALD to Wayne Gilman, superintendent of the Crookston Public Schools and Lon Jorgenson, principal at the Crookston High School. The successful fundraising effort was an opportunity for students at the U of M, Crookston to support programs for high school students.
 
Race Results

top_three_men_Pi_Run.jpgThe top three male and female runners were awarded prizes during a ceremony following the race, including an iPod Shuffle for the first-place finishers. Josh Parill, East Grand Forks, Minn., was the top male finisher with a time of 20:26.1 and Stacy Kusler, Grand Forks, N.D., finished with a time of 22:57.7 as the top female finisher. Both runners are members of Red River Runners Grand Forks, an area running club.

Finishing in second and third respectively in the men's race were Nico Bennett, Thief River Falls, Minn., and Anton Young, St. Cloud, Minn. Bennett is a 2003 graduate of the U of M, Crookston and Young is a senior majoring in natural resources. Lonnie Olson, Crookston, Minn., finished fourth. Women's finishers in second and third were Elizabeth Tollefson, Crookston, Minn., and Nicole Langerud, East Grand Forks, Minn., respectively Kerri Brantner,Pi Run top female.jpg Crookston, Minn., finished fourth.

Alpha Lambda Delta is an honor society for students who have maintained a 3.5 or higher grade point average and are in the top 20% of their class during their first year or term of higher education.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top., right (l to r): Crookston High School Principal Lon Jorgenson, ALD President Heather Donati-Lewis,  and Crookston Public Schools Superintendent Wayne Gilman.

Middle, left: Top male finishers: Anton Young, Josh Parill, and Nico Bennett.

Bottom, right: Top female finishers: Elizabeth Tollefson, Stacy Kusler, and Nicole Langerud. 

 

Contact: Brian Dingmann, associate professor, 218-281-8249 (dingm021@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

gustafson_c.jpg Biofuels Economist Cole Gustafson, Ph.D., from North Dakota State University (NDSU) will present "Economics and Biofuel Opportunities for Agriculture in Northern Minnesota" as part of the fourth in a series of seminars at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The upcoming Sustainability Supper Seminar, scheduled on May 10, 2011, begins at 5 p.m. with a meal in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center, followed by Gustafson's presentation at 6 p.m. in Youngquist Auditorium. For meal reservations, contact Michael Knudson, Minnesota GreenCorps member at 218-281-8128 (knud0189@umn.edu).
 
Dan Svedarsky, professor and director of the Center for Sustainability on the Crookston campus, is pleased to have Gustafson headline the seminar. "We are privileged to have a leading expert on the economic aspects of biofuels in the Upper Midwest as our guest speaker for this seminar," Svedarsky says. "He is a distinguished member of the Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics faculty at NDSU and the NDSU Extension Service biofuels specialist."

Gustafson's research responsibilities include development of financial management strategies for farms, ranches, agribusinesses, and agricultural lenders. He has authored more than 30 peer-reviewed journal articles and has obtained grant funding totaling $1.1 million. He most recently received a $300,000 grant  to research an energy beet for the biofuel industry in North Dakota. In addition to serving as a faculty member, Gustafson has also served as department chair and associate dean of research. For more information on Gustafson, visit www.ext.nodak.edu/homepages/aedept/staff/bio_gustafson_c.htm.

A mini-grant from the University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment helps fund the series of bi-weekly, "sustainability supper seminars" designed to educate the campus and the local community on sustainability applications as well as explore the "Communiversity" concept.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Michael Knudson, Minnesota GreenCorps member, 218-281-8128 (knud0189@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Campus and Community challenges on track to surpass energy-savings goals

Hard work to sustain savings begins

Fergus Falls, Minnesota, April 20, 2011 Otter Tail Power Company celebrated with the University of Minnesota, Crookston, and the community of Rothsay, Minnesota, as the company announced preliminary energy savings associated with the Campus and Community Energy Challenges.

In 2010 the University of Minnesota, Crookston, achieved metered kilowatt-hour savings of approximately 7 percent to 8 percent. From early 2009 through early 2011 Rothsay achieved metered kilowatt-hour savings of approximately 3 percent. When all technology improvements and behavioral change initiatives have been in place for a full year, and when results are adjusted for changes in weather and normally occurring growth, the University of Minnesota, Crookston, is on track to save 17 percent of its prior electricity use. Rothsay is on track to save more than 19 percent. The goals of these challenges are based on sustained savings over a five-year period. Pending regulatory review and approval, that means the campus and town are on track to surpass their energy-savings goals.

"We launched these challenges with a call to imagine all of the residents of a small rural community and all the students, faculty, and staff of a college campus working together to reduce the electricity use of their entire town and campus each by 10 to 15 percent," said Kim Pederson, Otter Tail Power Company Manager, Market Planning. "What they've accomplished so far was more than we imagined possible, but the hard work is still in front of them as they strike out on their own to sustain these savings."

The Crookston campus achieved much of its savings from upgrading campus lightingTree Planting 3598.jpg and installing automated controls on variable-frequency drives for some of the ventilation systems. Otter Tail Power Company assisted with the audits to identify high-level savings projects and provided more than $86,000 in grants and rebates to encourage the investments by reducing payback times.

"Significant savings also were noted when the Facilities Management Department implemented a new work order system in August that took deliberate steps to change operational procedures such as shutting off more lights than before, closing shades, and reducing heating levels in certain areas," said Chancellor Charles Casey. "I'm proud but not surprised about just how much the people on this campus have been able to accomplish. And I'm confident that the behavior changes we've been focused on will continue to show real results."

The community of Rothsay achieved more than half of its cumulative savings from behavioral changes on the part of Rothsay Public School, homeowners, and businesses. Otter Tail Power Company also granted almost $117,000 in rebates for energy-efficient lighting and technology improvements. "This program was developed as a three-legged stool," said Pederson. "Education, efficient end-use technologies, and incentivized behavioral changes each play a critical role in the success of these projects. And achieving long-term savings in Rothsay will be possible only with ongoing energy-saving behaviors and a community that won't settle for anything less than achieving its goal."

Rothsay Public School is committed to continuing its leadership role in this challenge. "The Community Energy Challenge has been an excellent program that has brought a new sense of awareness regarding energy use throughout the community," said Ehren Zimmerman, Dean of Students/Principal at Rothsay Public School. "And it has brought a new approach to hands-on learning for our faculty, staff, and students. Now it's our turn to pay it forward and keep the savings going."

Otter Tail Power Company, a subsidiary of Otter Tail Corporation (NASDAQ Global Select Market: OTTR), is headquartered in Fergus Falls, Minnesota. It provides electricity and energy services to more than a quarter million people in Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. To learn more about Otter Tail Power Company visit www.otpco.com. To learn more about Otter Tail Corporation visit www.ottertail.com.

In the photo: To celebrate the success of the Campus Energy Challenge at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, Otter Tail Power Company donated two basswood trees. The shade trees were planted on the west side of the Early Childhood Building to help provide energy savings in the summer. Project leaders and guests marking the event include (left to right): Student Green Team leader Ben Williams, Center for Sustainability Director Dan Svedarsky, Vice Chancellor of Academics and Student Affairs Thomas Baldwin, Chancellor Charles Casey, Otter Tail Power Company Project Manager Jon Fabre, University of Minnesota, Crookston, Facilities Green Team member Brian Christianson; former Student Green Team lead Lisa Gentele, Otter Tail Power Company Crookston Area Energy Management Representative Ken Johnson, Otter Tail Power Company President and CEO Chuck MacFarlane, Minnesota Department of Commerce Deputy Commissioner Bill Grant, U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar's Moorhead Office Representative Andrew Martin, U.S. Senator Al Franken's Northwestern Minnesota Field Representative Valerie Graveseth, and U.S. Representative Collin Peterson's Red Lake Falls Office Representative JoAnn Zutz.

Contact: Cris Kling, Otter Tail Power Compnay, 218-739-8297; Andrew Svec, director of communications, U of M, Crookston, 218-281-8432 (asvec@umn.edu)

John Loegering, Ph.D., associate professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources LoegeringJohnP-small.jpgDepartment at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, was elected to the position of president-elect of the North Central Section of The Wildlife Society (TWS). The three-year commitment includes serving as the section's president and past-president as well.

A certified wildlife biologist, Loegering (photo at right) currently serves as advisor to the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society, a group he helped organize when he arrived on the Crookston campus in 2000. His efforts were recognized in 2004 when he received the Student Chapter Advisor of the Year from The Wildlife Society at the 11th Annual Conference in Calgary, Alberta.

He also received the Outstanding Service Award from the Minnesota Chapter of The Wildlife Society in 2008 and served as the organization's president in 2009. Loegering, who advises more than 35 undergraduate students, has a unique teaching appointment that includes a 50% joint appointment on the St. Paul campus that focuses primarily on outreach and research. Loegering has been a member of The Wildlife Society for more than 26 years, and over that time, has served as an officer at the student, state, and section levels.  He currently serves as the treasurer for the College and University Education Working Group of TWS.

His leadership comes at an important time for the organization, "I appreciate the opportunity to serve and lead these large scale organizations at a time when interstate cooperation is critical to successful natural resource management," Loegering says. "Challenges such as chronic wasting disease, Asian carp, climate change, or invasive species management clearly will benefit from a regional strategy.  I look forward to the opportunity to contribute to the strategic conservation management of the resources in the Midwest."

The North Central Section includes the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, Wisconsin and Minnesota. Sections are the regional networks of The Wildlife Society in North America and bring a regional perspective to wildlife conservation issues and enable members to be active in professional affairs in a regional context. They promote cooperative efforts and the exchange of information among wildlife professionals and Wildlife Society chapters in a broad geographic area. For example, they recently sponsored a symposium for Midwestern states on the impacts on wildlife of lead in the environment, principally from hunting and fishing activities.  Continuing to develop these multi-state information exchanges on critical issues will be one of Loegering's priorities as president.

The mission of The Wildlife Society is to represent and serve the professional community of scientists, managers, educators, technicians, planners, and others who work actively to study, manage, and conserve wildlife and its habitats worldwide. To learn more, visit http://joomla.wildlife.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Highlights Earth Week 2011

Earth Week will be marked by several events at the University of Minnesota, Crookston Earth Week.jpgincluding a campus clean up, activities to raise awareness, and a celebration of campus efforts to save energy. Crookston Students for Sustainable Development (CSSD) will kick off the week on Monday, April 18, 2011, with Trash and Recycling Awareness Day, an effort to demonstrate how much trash an individual creates in a single day.

On Tuesday, April 19, Otter Tail Power Company will join members of the campus and community for a celebration of the success of the Campus Energy Challenge, a special project that brought Otter Tail and the U of M, Crookston together to help reduce energy consumption. Special highlights include community-wide networking beginning at 11:45 a.m. followed by an energy savings celebration at noon with remarks by Chuck MacFarlane, president of Otter Tail Power Company, Charles H. Casey, chancellor at the U of M, Crookston and William Grant, deputy commissioner at the Minnesota Department of Commerce Energy Division. A ceremonial tree planting will take place at 1 p.m., weather permitting.

Beautiful "U" Day will be the focus on Wednesday, April 20 and include a campus and community cleanup. At noon in Youngquist Auditorium, Dr. Larry Baker, a research professor in the Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities will present "Urban Heat Islands and Global Climate Change." Everyone is welcome.

An internationally recognized authority on the water and nutrient cycle of urban environments, Baker will be the featured speaker in the evening as part of a "sustainability supper seminar" beginning at 5 p.m. with a meal in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. His evening presentation, open to the public, will begin at 6 p.m. in Youngquist Auditorium on the topic "Urban Ecosystems and Implications for Global Survivability." To make reservations for the meal, contact, Michael Knudson, Minnesota GreenCorps member at 218-281-8128 (knud0189@umn.edu). For more information on Dr. Larry Baker, visit www.bbe.umn.edu/People/LarryBaker.

On Thursday, April 21, the campus and community are invited to join in a Critical Mass Bike Ride. The ride begins at 5:30 p.m. and participants are asked to gather at Crookston High School parking lot for the ride. Helmets are required. Because of liability concerns, Critical Mass bike rides are not sponsored by any person or entity, they are just a group of people getting together to go on a ride.  The route will be on roads and paths that are not as busy and all traffic laws will be obeyed.  Those who are unfamiliar with riding on streets will be informed by more experienced group riders.  
 
A mini-grant from the University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment helps fund the series of bi-weekly, "sustainability supper seminars" designed to educate the campus and the local community on sustainability applications as well as explore the "Communiversity" concept.

Earth Day, observed annually on April 22, marks the anniversary of what may be considered the birth of the modern environmental movement. The first Earth Day was held in 1970. To learn more, visit www.earthday.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

 

Contact: Michael Knudson, Minnesota GreenCorps member, 218-281-8128 (knud0189@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Under consideration for placement on the Threatened Species list by the U.S. Fish and GWWA-Dennis Malueg.jpgWildlife Service, saving the Golden-winged Warbler (photo at right), a small forest songbird, has brought recognition to a research team concerned with its survival. The Golden-winged Warbler Working Group was recently recognized for their efforts with the Region 3 Award for Strategic Conservation. The 12-member working group includes Associate Professor John Loegering (photo at left below)  who teaches in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston.

The award recognizes individuals and teams who apply the principles of Strategic Habitat Conservation in an exemplary manner to their conservation activities. The Golden-winged Warbler Working Group was a 2011 winner in the Notable Projects/Team Achievement category for their work in the Upper Midwest.

LoegeringJohnP-small.jpgThe Golden-winged Warbler can vanish quickly when its habitat is threatened and Loegering's research has centered on the examination of healthy, stable, but rare populations of this vulnerable species and developing effective strategies to preserve them. Members of the Golden-winged Warbler Working Group conducted comparable research throughout the range of the species.
 

To earn the recognition, the group had to meet several criteria: The work has to be landscape in scale; the team must demonstrate involvement with a multidisciplinary team of collaborators with complementary skills and interests and implement a science-based conservation strategy, strengthen the scientific basis for the conservation opportunity, and increase efficiency and likelihood of success, and the results must be shared so others may learn from the approach.
 
"One key benefit to this large-scale collaboration is that our potential management recommendations can be implemented broadly across the country," Loegering says.  "The research program is in its 4th year and as a part of the research team, I received a portion of the grant for field research during the past three summers. "

During the time he has been working as a member of the group, Loegering has employed six U of M, Crookston undergraduates, two of whom conducted undergraduate research as part of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program through the University of Minnesota. A third student, Senior Mike Johnson, will be presenting a portion of the work at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research in Ithaca, N.Y., at the end of March. 

Loegering is jointly appointed to both the U of M, Crookston campus where his focus is on undergraduate education and the U of M, Twin Cities campus where he is focused on outreach and research as a wildlife specialist for the U of M Extension Service.

The Golden-winged Warbler Working Group involves work in the states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.  While much of the research is in the Midwest, it also includes a few East Coast states including New York, New Jersey, Tennessee, and Pennsylvania out of Region 3. Team members received a certificate and Challenge Coin, a specially minted coin that historically symbolized loyalty, and over the years, has come to represent camaraderie and teamwork.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Photo of John Loegering by Patrick O'Leary, University of Minnesota, Office of University Relations.
 


Contact: John Loegering, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A mini-grant from the University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment will help fund a series of bi-weekly, "sustainability supper seminars" designed to educate the campus and the local community on sustainability applications.  In June of 2010, Chancellor Charles Casey approved an Action Plan for Climate Neutrality and Sustainability and this will be the primary focus of the seminars. The plan sets a target date of 2030 to achieve a balance between carbon released (primarily in the form of carbon dioxide) and the amount trapped or not produced; primarily by conserving energy and shifting to renewable sources.

The plan is far reaching and extends not only to energy conservation and efficiency issues directly, but also to transportation, communication, local foods, recycling, and interdisciplinary education approaches. All campuses of the University of Minnesota have or are developing such an action plan which better positions the University to not only model environmental stewardship but also save money through enhanced operation efficiencies. Numerous other campuses across the country are engaged in similar efforts.

Another over-arching goal of the seminar series is to better connect the campus to the community by creating a more functional, "Communiversity." Hopefully, participants will reach a deeper understanding of the system dynamics approach to problem solving, sustainability and its many applications; to strive toward a more functional "learning community"; and to seek ways for better synergy in the use of common resources.

Dan Svedarsky, professor and director of the Center for Sustainability and Scott Johnson will co-lead discussions and will launch the first seminar on Thursday, March 24, 2011, at 5 p.m. Svedarsky will address, "The broad brush of sustainability, global and local" and Johnson, a systems design consultant from Grand Forks, will outline the application of the systems approach to complex campus-community sustainability initiatives. The session is scheduled for Bede Ballroom on the UMC campus.

A meal from the campus dining buffet line, will allow participants to spend the evening in conversation around a specific topic and engage others in the exploration of ideas relative to sustainability. Interested students, faculty and staff, community leaders, ministers, agency personnel, farmers, and business and industry representatives are welcome to participate by contacting Michael Knudson, Minnesota GreenCorps member, at 218-281-8128 (knud0189@umn.edu) by March 22 for reservations.

Upcoming sessions will include; International dimensions of sustainability (presented by UMC international students and faculty); an Earth Week presentation on April 20 on urban ecosystems; Implementing climate neutrality plans for campuses; Peak oil implications for broad-scale planning; Energy efficiency and renewable energy perspectives; The many values of local food production; and Faith-based approaches to sustainability.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Michael Knudson, Minnesota GreenCorps member, 218-281-8128 (knud0189@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Are you: 1.  An involved citizen?  2.  A believer in volunteerism?  3.  Someone who likes to speak to your neighbors?  4.  A lover of trees?  Yes, yes, yes, yes?  Then we need you!

Be a part of Minnesota's one-of-a-kind program to prepare communities for the Emerald Ash Borer.  You may not be able to stop the borer, but you can help prevent catastrophic losses to your leafy communities.

The Emerald Ash Borer training is scheduled in Crookston from 6 - 8:30 p.m. on Friday, March 25 and from 8:45 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 26 in Kiehle 116.

eabadult.jpgThe University of Minnesota, University of Minnesota Extension, Minnesota Department of Agriculture and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has funded a program that helps communities get the best information for identifying and combating the nasty borer as well as replanting the streets and parks with a more diverse palette of trees.  However, we can't do it without you!

We are looking for a few good volunteers that will become EAB-Community Outreach Volunteers.  You will be the source of information for your community, the information that will help your town or county make the best decisions about managing the pest, recovering from the damage it causes, and planting a more diverse and healthy community forest for the future.

You will receive training on the use of a standardized Power Point program on emerald ash borer identification, management and recovery.  This training is 100% funded by the agency partners...we ask nothing more than your willingness to volunteer and help your community by providing the best, unbiased, research-based information.

The details:
1.    Training will consist of 8.5 hours of class activities and exercises.

2.    Small classes: 6-12 people.

3.    You will be provided with a compact disk of the standardized Power Point program on emerald ash borer identification, management and recovery for your use.

4.    You will receive ongoing support from the community preparedness team at the University of Minnesota, Department of Forest Resources and Extension.

5.    Training will be conducted in March and April in a community near you.

6.    Your role will be to voluntarily present the information to any group in your community that is looking for the best, University research-based information: county fairs, school programs, Arbor Day programs, city councils.  Yours will be the voice of accurate information.

For more information:  please contact Deborah Zak, Campus Regional Director, University of Minnesota Extension, Extension Regional Office, Crookston.  Call 1-888-241-0781 or e-mail, dzak@umn.edu.

Photo of adult emerald ash borer from www.extension.umn.edu/issues/eab/.

Contact: Deborah Zak, Campus Regional Director, University of Minnesota Extension, Extension Regional Office, Crookston, 1-888-241-0781 (dzak@umn.edu)

The last weekend in January celebrates the theme "Country Strong" during the 36th annual Ag Arama at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Scheduled for Friday and Bigger_Cindy.jpgSaturday, January 28-29, 2011, Ag Arama is hosted by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and includes fun for the entire family. This year's event is dedicated to 1979 graduate Cindy Bigger (In photo at left) who served as a judge for Ag Arama for many years.
 
Most of the activities take place on Saturday, Jan. 29, in the University Teaching and Outreach Center (UTOC) located on the north edge of the campus. The weekend begins with contests for students in agronomy, horticulture and natural resources beginning on Friday, January 28 at noon. Friday evening from 6-8 p.m., the Animal Science Association will host a chili feed for $5 per person in UTOC.

Contests in agronomy, animal science, horticulture, and natural resources highlight AgAg_Arama_2010.jpg Arama weekend. They serve as an opportunity for students to showcase their knowledge and skills and have a chance to interact with alumni and faculty members. Ag Arama is planned and operated by a committee of students advised by Terrill Bradford, animal science instructor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department.

On Saturday morning from 8:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m., the animal showmanship contests are held and the public is welcome to watch the competition as it unfolds in both novice and experienced categories. Students compete in western and English horse showmanship, lamb lead, and dairy, beef, sheep, and swine showing.  The novices are paired with experienced students prior to the contests to prepare for the competition.

From 9 a.m. to noon, there is an ag industries show and a picnic style lunch is served at 12:30 p.m. Coronation of the Ag Arama royalty begins at 1 p.m. with the presentation of awards to follow. Several games and competitions, including men's and women's crosscut saw contests and log splitting, will be held beginning at 2:15 p.m.

Alumni from the U of M, Crookston are invited to a social at the Irishman's Shanty in Crookston from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Capping off the weekend is a dance with the band Silverado to be held at the Crookston Eagles Club.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 applied-science undergraduate degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; math, science and technology; and natural resources. To learn more, visit www.UMCrookston.edu.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In photo at bottom right: Alumna Cindy Bigger, '79, visits with students during sheep judging at Ag Arama 2010. 

Contact: Terrill Bradford, agriculture instructor, 218-281-8108 (tbradfor@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Hundreds of rooted poinsettia cuttings arrive in August in anticipation of another holiday season. For seven students involved in the commercial floriculture class at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, those cuttings have developed into a beautiful poinsettia crop under their skill and coaxing.

This year's poinsettias create a beautiful and colorful display including varieties such as Freedom Fireworks, Monet Twilight, Salmon Star and Orange Spice, a new exciting color.  Most greenhouses grow a large percentage of red, but the UMC students grow more of the novelty colors.

In the photo are members of the fall semester class including: back row (l to r):  JordanPoinsettia Class2010 2475-1.jpg Jacobson, a senior from Thief River Falls, Minn.; Brandon Pinnow, a senior from Minot, N.D.;  Mike Field a senior from Spicer and Tammy Cruz, a sophomore from Gary.  Front Row: Bethany Jenkins, a sophomore from Grand Forks, N.D.; Tammy Wroblewski, a senior from Milwaukee, Wis.; and Alisha Aasness, a sophomore from Fergus Falls, Minn.

The students started the process of forcing the plants to bloom in time for the holiday season in October. Following a specific procedure to control the light, the students covered the plants with a dark cloth at 4 p.m. and uncovered them at 8 a.m. each day to regulate the length of daylight the plants receive. The students are responsible for greenhouse chores on the weekends as well. Although the class is taught by Sue Jacobson, the crop is in the hands of the students. The work and production of the poinsettia crop is entirely the responsibility of the class.  Jacobson says "It's better to learn expensive lessons in school than at your job.  We don't fire the students."

The Agriculture and Natural Resources Department offers commercial floriculture as part of the horticulture program to teach students to produce quality plants for a specific date - a skill necessary for employment in a greenhouse or garden center. "Poinsettias form their colored "flowers" when the light is regulated," explains Jacobson. "The poinsettia really doesn't have a blossom like most flowers. Instead, the colorful red, pink, or white petals are modified leaves known as bracts. The blossoms are actually the small yellowish clusters in the center."

Jacobson often allows problems to develop to see how the students will solve them--something they would have to do in an employment situation and giving them an opportunity to apply what they have learned. The class demands hard work, dedication, and a strong team effort to grow the best poinsettias. Leadership and responsibility are two of the qualities that develop in this type of teaching and learning environment.

"Students learn so much from applying their classroom learning to real-world experience," Jacobson explains. "By taking responsibility for the crop, the students are accountable for the outcome making the commercial floriculture class one of the most memorable for the students." The class is excellent training for a career in horticulture, a multi-billion dollar industry in the U.S. To learn more about the horticulture program with emphases in environmental landscaping, production horticulture or urban forestry, visit www.UMCrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor, 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

High school students have a chance to compete with their peers during Agriculture and Natural Resources Day scheduled for Friday, December 3, 2010, at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. With more than 20 contests ranging from horticulture and forestry to ag mechanics, livestock and sales, the day is fraught with excitement for students from some 50 high schools who participate in the competition.

An awards ceremony highlights the day beginning at 1:15 p.m. in Lysaker gymnasium in the Sports Center on the Crookston campus. Scholarships, plaques and certificates are awarded to school teams and individuals for each contest. More than $32,000 in scholarships are available to award-winning students. Last year, $750 UMC scholarships were awarded for the high individual in each contest; $600 UMC scholarships were awarded for the second place individual; and $450 UMC scholarships were awarded to third place individuals.  

The event, which has been held for more than 30 years on the campus, is sponsored by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at the U of M, Crookston. If you would like more information regarding Agriculture and Natural Resources Activities Day events, contact Amy Lubarski at 218-281-8101 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/ag/AAD.  

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Amy Lubarski, Agriculture and Natural Resources Dept., 218-281-8101 (lubarski@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

You are conducting an aerial census of bighorn sheep in mountainous terrain when a strong gust of wind causes a temporary upset of your aircraft.  Your response in the next few seconds can mean the difference between life and death.  Studies have shown that pilots exposed to such potential loss of control in training stand a much better chance of extricating themselves from an in-flight emergency.

Rich Stowell of Santa Paula, Calif., the 2007 National Flight Instructor of the Year, createdLo_Nongye.jpg his nationally acclaimed Emergency Maneuver Training ™ program specifically to help pilots avoid loss of control emergencies and to improve their odds of survival in the unlikely event that they find themselves in such a situation.  Stowell has been so generous as to permit the U of M, Crookston to use his training syllabus in offering this invaluable training to students.  Federal and State conservation and law enforcement agencies and many airlines now require this type of training of their pilots.

Recently, nine U of M, Crookston aviation students participated in Emergency Maneuver Training ™ at the Crookston Municipal airport.  Kaitlyn Linde, a junior from Apple Valley, Minn.;  Nik Jiran, a senior from Hayden, Idaho; Nongye Lo, a junior from St. Paul, Minn.; Kyle Sveen, a senior from Hoople, N.D.; Lucas Rosemeyer, a senior from Dorchester, Wis.; David Carignan, a senior from Walhalla, N.D.; Anthony Young, a senior from St. Cloud, Minn.; Jeff Sieger, a senior from Grand Forks, N.D.; Cody McLean, a junior from East Grand Forks, Minn., participated in the training.

The course involves three blocks of training, including introduction to spin training in partner UNDAF Cessna 172s, followed by two blocks of spin and unusual attitude recovery training in a Bellanca Decathlon.  The training includes spins, spin avoidance and recovery, recovery from rolling upsets (inverted flight), recovery from jammed or failed controls, and an introduction to aerobatic flight.

Rich Stowell took his first flying lesson in 1982 and earned his Private license in early 1984. He began his career as a full-time instructor in 1987. In February 2001, Stowell was designated the country's first Master CFI-Aerobatics and has served on the Master Instructors LLC Board of Review for Master CFI-Aerobatic applicants ever since. To learn more, visit www.richstowell.com.

To learn more about aviation on the Crookston campus, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Nongye Lo, seated in the pilot seat of a Cessna 172, prior to a spin flight, giving a thumbs up.


Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston co-hosted the National Intercollegiate Flying NIFA_airplane.jpgAssociation's Region 5 Regional Flying contest at Crookston Municipal Airport during the week of October 11, 2010.  For the first time in 20 years, the U of M, Crookston fielded a team in the competition. Team members included Senior Andrew Knapton, Rockford, Minn.; Junior Nongye Lo, St. Paul., Minn.; and Senior Anthony Young, St. Cloud, Minn.

The competition consisted of nine separate events, including both flying and ground-based competitions.  Contestants may compete in one or all of the contests.  Most of the competitors in this year's event had competed in past events, including several who have competed in the national championships.   Most of the teams practice all year for this competition.

The team members from the U of M, Crookston acquitted themselves superbly, especially considering a relatively short training period and the fact that none of them had past experience with these particular contests. Lo finished 6th overall out of 46 competitors, while Knapton finished 27th and Young finished 28th overall.   

For Mike Vivion, chief pilot on the Crookston campus, the results were a source of pride. "Our Flying Team performed extremely well, and we congratulate them and wish them good luck in next year's event, which will be held in St. Cloud, Minn.," Vivion says.  "All three of the team members are enthusiastic about participating in next year's regional competition, and with more time to practice and one competition under their belt, they should be even more of a threat to the top contenders.

"Most teams brought 10 or more competitors, so UMC is looking to grow its flying team prior to next year's event.  With Andrew, Nongye and Anthony, we've got a great core for a successful team."

To learn more about the opportunities in aviation on the Crookston campus, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics or contact Vivion at 218-281-8114.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Judges observe during the spot landing competition.

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Five colleges in the upper Midwest will be participating in a flight competition as part of the National Intercollegiate Flying Association (NIFA) in mid-October. The Region 5 Safecon will kick off with a briefing on Wednesday, October 13, 2010, in Youngquist Auditorium located at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center adjacent to the campus of the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The competition runs through Saturday, October 16 with much of the activity taking place at the Crookston Municipal Airport. The event is hosted by the University of North Dakota (UND) with assistance from Mike Vivion, chief pilot at the U of M, Crookston and his staff.

Students must meet eligibility requirements to compete in the wide range of contests designed to test skills such areas as navigation, message drop, computer accuracy, aircraft inspection, and others. The Region 5 Safecon will be the first time the U of M, Crookston will have a team in the competition. Members of that team include two seniors Andrew Knapton, Rockford, Minn., Anthony Young, St. Cloud, Minn., and a junior Nongye Lo, St. Paul, Minn.

Students at the Crookston campus majoring in aviation learn aviation fundamentals through a partnership with UND and the U of M, Crookston. Other colleges competing include Iowa State University; Minnesota State University, Mankato; St. Cloud State University; and the University of Dubuque.

NIFA sponsors the flying competitions which include both flight and ground-based competitions for member schools. The competitions are held first at the regional level and winners of the regional competition move on to a national contest.
For information about the competition, contact Mike Vivion at 218-281-8114.

The National Intercollegiate Flying Association was formed for the purposes of developing and advancing aviation education; to promote, encourage and foster safety in aviation; to promote and foster communications and cooperation between aviation students, educators, educational institutions and the aviation industry; and to provide an arena for collegiate aviation competition. For more information, visit www.nifa.us.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: : Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

A grant awarded to the University of Minnesota, Crookston will allow the campus to host a member of Minnesota's statewide initiative to help preserve and protect the environment, known as the Minnesota GreenCorps. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) coordinates the Minnesota GreenCorps, which is an environmental AmeriCorps program.

Knudson_Michael 9329.jpgMichael Knudson (pictured,left) was appointed as the green infrastructure and stormwater management specialist and will be trained for his role as part of a new generation of environmental professionals under the program. He will be located on the Crookston campus and assist with the campus and the city of Crookston in addressing storm water management. He will develop and help implement action steps that will have an immediate effect as well as look at how to invest in the future in an environmentally conscious way. Knudson is a 2009 graduate of the U of M, Crookston, where he majored in natural resources.
    
The Center for Sustainability at the U of M, Crookston was also successful in hosting a GreenCorps member in 2009-10 when Chris Waltz was an energy conservation specialist.  Dan Svedarsky, Ph.D., director of the Center for Sustainability, is enthusiastic about hosting another Minnesota GreenCorps member and what it means, "This opportunity connects the Crookston campus and community in an effort to become more environmentally conscious in managing stormwater in a responsible way," Svedarsky says. "Furthermore, it will help the community and campus have baseline data in place in preparation for future regulations that may be required."
The mission of the Minnesota GreenCorps is to provide its members with opportunities to contribute to improve Minnesota's environment, while gaining experience and learning valuable job skills. Local governments and community organizations statewide host Minnesota GreenCorps members and provide day-to-day supervision for members working on projects in the areas of local government energy conservation, school waste prevention, living green outreach, local food systems, and urban forestry. To learn more, visit the MPCA's NextStep sustainability Web site at www.nextstep.state.mn.us.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

It's serious, it's funny, it's about making a difference, and it's all happening at the University of Minnesota, Crookston this week. The campus will take both a serious as well as a lighthearted look at saving energy with Bill LeBlanc, president of the Boulder Energy Group. The events are free and public is welcome to attend.

The usual What's on Wednesday (W.O.W.) event takes on the topic of energy saving with "Watt's on Wednesday" on Wednesday, September 1, 2010. LeBlanc will blend his comedy insights with his career in energy efficiency and technology in a program at 7 p.m. in Kiehle Auditorium. The event is co-sponsored by U of M, Crookston student activities, the Center for Sustainability, and Otter Tail Power Company. Otter Tail Power Company  selected the university of Minnesota, Crookston last year to participate in the Campus Energy Challenge, which is an effort to reduce electric energy use on campus by as much as 15 percent by the end of 2010 through behavior changes, equipment upgrades, and education.

On Thursday, September 2, LeBlanc will take a more serious tone as the guest speaker during the Thursday Commons at 12:30 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. A recognized leader in energy efficiency programs, LeBlanc has particular expertise in program design, marketing, market research, branding, and strategy. He assists utility and public clients in understanding their customer markets, providing tools and messages to sway customer demand, and creating overall market strategies. He has also done extensive work on social marketing.

LeBlanc recently won the Energy Outreach and Branding contract for the state of Colorado and is a senior advisor for the California state energy rebranding effort. He has been a leader and innovator in energy efficiency and load management throughout his 20 year career, working for PG&E, EPRI, E Source, and consulting firms. In 1990, he founded the Association of Energy Services Professionals, still the industry's major society.

Using his comedic talents, LeBlanc travels around the U.S. talking with people about their energy use habits, but there's always a twist because humans manage to screw things up and often lack knowledge about energy, which is true, sad, and funny. LeBlanc, also a standup comedian, performs primarily at larger clubs in Denver and around the state of Colorado. He recently won the Boulder Comedy Contest, and has been a two-time finalist in Colorado's New Faces Contest.

LeBlanc is known for his creativity and problem-solving ability and is a sought-after public speaker. He holds both master's and bachelor's degrees in mechanical engineering from Stanford University as well as a bachelor of arts in management economics from Claremont McKenna College.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact:  Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Minnesota is home to 40% of the Golden-winged Warbler population, yet very little is knownGWWA-Dennis Malueg.jpg about this small forest songbird. Research by a professor at the University of Minnesota will help answer questions about the species currently under consideration for placement on the Threatened Species list by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Four undergraduate students worked with Associate Professor John Loegering over the summer in an effort to gather information about the golden-winged warbler and its habitat. The project is part of the Golden-winged Warbler Conservation Initiative, a 4-year, 11-state collaboration to conduct research and develop conservation strategies throughout the range of the species. Loegering, who teaches ornithology on the Crookston campus, is widely known for his teaching and research in the field of natural resources.

"The golden-winged warbler can disappear quickly from an area once its habitat is threatened," Loegering says. "Our concern revolves around the declining population of this vulnerable species and developing effective strategies to preserve them. We need to bring this concern into the public consciousness."

Loegering and Johnson banding.jpgIn February 2010, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service received a petition to list the species as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. In the past, only a few studies have been conducted noting the presence and/or absence of the birds making this research of particular significance. Loegering is intent on gathering information to answer the basic research questions: where do the birds occur, how productive are they, how many survive the migration to and from Columbia each winter, and what vegetative characteristics are associated with the most productive habitat.  He is currently on a team to develop a conservation strategy and management prescriptions for the species throughout its range.

The small, gray songbird with its striking yellow and white markings arrives early in the spring and begins its migration early in the fall to its winter home in southern Central America andClaire Hanson with GWW.jpg northern South America.

Loegering's research was conducted in the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge, located near White Earth, Minn. It centered on locating singing golden-winged warbler males, mapping their territories, capturing and color-banding birds for subsequent identification, finding nests, documenting reproductive productivity and quantifying the habitat.

Loegering credits his field crew for their dedication. "Nests are incredibly difficult to find.  It takes great patience and observation skills.  This year we found more nests than were previously discovered in Wisconsin and Minnesota combined," he says.

Hanson (l) and Haarstad banding.jpgWork started early for the students beginning 30 minutes before sunrise often in the midst of intolerable attacks by insects and constant threat of Lyme Disease, a tick borne illness, but the students relished their work. Involved in the project were two recent graduates, Ben Haarstad, Pelican Rapids, Minn.; and Claire Hanson, King, Wis.; along with Senior Mike Johnson, Centerville, Minn.; and Freshman Josh Bruggman, Cologne, Minn. All are natural resources majors on the Crookston campus.

Loegering is jointly appointed to both the U of M, Crookston campus where his focus is on undergraduate education and the U of M, Twin Cities campus where he is focused on outreach and research as a wildlife specialist for the U of M Extension Service.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top, right: Golden-winged warbler
Middle, left: John Loegering (left) and Mike Johnson band a 4-day-old golden-winged warbler chick.
Middle, right: Claire Hanson shows off a golden-winged warbler she just finished banding.
Bottom, left: Claire Hanson (left) and Ben Haarstad (right) put unique color bands on a male golden-winged warbler. 





Contact: : John Loegering, associate professor and extension wildlife specialist, natural resources, 218-281-8132 (jloegeri@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Field work begins long before kick-off. Research by a university professor will determine the best mix for managing a quality athletic field with a smaller budget and crew - a serious Michalski_M.jpgconsideration in the current economy.

For Assistant Professor of Agronomy Kristie Walker, preparing a soil-based athletic field for both athletes and aesthetics on a budget is a delicate balance. Walker is spending her summer working on the football practice field at the University of Minnesota, Crookston where she teaches students in the agronomy and the golf and turf management programs.

Along with Mark Michalski, a senior double majoring in golf and turf management and horticulture, Walker is examining the effects of cultivation practices on three varieties of grass seed: Kentucky bluegrass , perennial ryegrass, and a mix of the two, all donated by Rivard's Quality Seeds Inc. in Argyle, Minn.  The bluegrass, which spreads through rhizome production, germinates slowly but is the most aesthetically pleasing with its rich blue-green hue.  The ryegrass, a bunch- type grass, has quicker germination but is less desirable in look and color.

"Football fields, like the one on the Crookston campus, are under a significant amount of traffic," Walker says. "With use by both the local high school and the university, we need a speedy recovery of the turf to be ready for play, but we also wanted the best looking field possible with a smaller staff and budget." This situation is common across the region in the parks and school districts with soil-based athletic fields under heavy use.

Best Mix of Seed, Practice, and Price

hollow_tine_aerator_merged copy.jpgWalker is testing hollow-tine and solid-tine cultivation methods along with verticutting on a variety of plots she has marked out for the study. The most disruptive, but probably the most beneficial to the soil, is the hollow-tine aeration which removes soil in cylindrical cores across the profile. The solid-tine aeration punches holes into the soil surface rather than removing cores. The least disruptive to the soil surface is the verticutter, which slices small furrows in the turf canopy and heals more quickly.

Following the weekly cultivation, half of the plots are top-dressed, a method of spreading sand over the turf filling the cuts and holes so water can flow easily through the profile and compaction is reduced.

Measuring the outcome of the seed variety, cultivation technique, and the top dressing against the control will help determine the best method for maintaining football and soccer fields, as well as a baseball outfield. The research will take place over the next two years during the summer months and throughout the fall.

"We are looking for the best overall quality with consideration of cost," Walker says. "The best mix of cultivation practice and price will be the winning combination for us and for our athletic fields."

For more information on the golf and turf management program, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 17 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top, right: Senior Mark Michalski, Silver Bay, Minn., spreads the top dressing as part of the research on the athletic field.

Bottom, left: The hollow-tine cultivation technique leaves cylindrical cores (inset) across the turf's profile.
 

 

Contact: Kristie Walker, assistant professor, agronomy, 218-281-8116 (kswalker@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Fragile monarch butterflies migrate some 2,500 miles every year to overwinter in the samemonarch.jpg trees they have visited for generations. In order to understand the migration habits of the monarch and protect precious habitat, the butterflies are tagged in late August just before they begin their fall migration.

The public is invited to a Monarch Tagging Open House on Saturday, August 28, 2010, hosted by the U of M, Crookston's Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC). The open house will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Red River Valley Natural History Area. The natural history area is located west of the Crookston campus and signs will mark the route.

Visitors to the open house will have an opportunity to capture and tag monarch butterflies while learning more about their amazing migration and contributing to a scientific study. For more information, contact Laura Bell, lab services coordinator at the U of M, Crookston at 218-281-8131. Nets will be provided, but guests may bring their own.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 17 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Laura Bell, lab services coordinator, 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu) Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Svedarsky Service Award 2010.jpgDaniel Svedarsky, professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and the director of the Center for Sustainability at the University of Minnesota, Crookston is a 2010 recipient of the University of Minnesota President's Award for Outstanding Service. Recipients of this award have gone well beyond their regular duties and have demonstrated an unusual commitment to the University community. Svedarsky was one of 11 to receive this year's award.

Svedarsky has been at the University of Minnesota, Crookston since 1969. He is a certified wildlife biologist and researcher with the Northwest Research and Outreach Center where he specializes in tallgrass prairie restoration and management, especially for greater prairie chickens. At UMC he teaches wildlife habitat management techniques and integrated resource management. Publications include; editing the book, The Greater Prairie Chicken; A national look, and senior author of land management booklets entitled; A landowner's guide to prairie management in Minnesota, and Effects of management practices on grassland birds: the greater prairie chicken.  

As the first Director of the Center for Sustainability, Svedarsky is the Crookston campus advocate for sustainability issues and led efforts to develop the campus Action Plan for Climate Neutrality and Sustainability in response to the signing of the President's Climate Change Commitment by U of M President Robert Bruininks.

Described as a visionary, Svedarsky has spent four decades promoting UMC and the University of Minnesota nationally and internationally, most recently in the area of sustainability. In December of 2009, he represented the 8,000-member The Wildlife Society as an official observer at the United Nations Conference on Climate Change in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Over the years, Svedarsky has been involved in the development of several degree programs and numerous courses in wildlife management and natural resources at UMC. He has advised hundreds of students and served as a peer mentor. He is a true promoter of others and has successfully nominated and/or developed many nominating portfolios for faculty, staff, students, and professional colleagues as he promotes a culture of encouragement, positive growth, and recognition.

He has served on numerous University committees including the UMore Park Planning project in Rosemount, All-University Honors Committee, and the Executive Committee of the Academy of Distinguished Teachers. He is a past board member of the Minnesota Zoo in Apple Valley.

Svedarsky served a 3-year term as the North Central Section Representative of The Wildlife Society (TWS) and is immediate Past President of TWS at the national level. He was recently appointed to a Blue Ribbon Panel to study the future of the wildlife profession in North America.  Svedarsky is a recipient of several awards; National Stewardship Award of The Nature Conservancy, The Hamerstrom Award of the Prairie Grouse Technical Council, The Minnesota Award of the Minnesota Chapter of The Wildlife Society, and the Torch and Shield Award to recognize leadership in the development of UMC, Northwest Research and Outreach Center, and Extension.

Nominators wrote; "Dan embodies a living history of the evolving mission and work of the University of Minnesota in northwestern Minnesota. He will forever be a part of UMC as much as UMC is a part of his being." They referenced Professor Svedarsky's own words ...."How do we serve? We start as individuals, by doing good work, and the work that needs to be done. We must model integrity as we brighten the corner where we are." They concluded with the following statement. "Dan has certainly brightened the lives of those who have passed through UMC."

Also receiving the 2010 award were two individuals from the Morris campus, one from the Duluth campus, one from the Carlson School of Management, and six from the Minneapolis and St. Paul campuses. "The credit they bring to the University of Minnesota is simply beyond measure," President Bruininks said in his e-mail announcement.

The University of Minnesota President's Award for Outstanding Service was established in 1997 to recognize faculty and staff who have provided exceptional service to the University. It is presented each year in the spring and honors active or retired faculty or staff members. For more information, visit http://uawards.umn.edu/Awards/Presidents_Award_Outstand.html.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo (l to r): Clyde Allen, chair, U of M Board of Regents; Svedarsky; Robert Bruininks, president, University of Minnesota. 


Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

It is time to think about summer by checking out one or more of the summer camps offered at the University of Minnesota, Crookston in 2010. If you are interested in horses, honing your leadership skills, participating in River Watch, exploring robotics, or designing a computer game, the Crookston campus has what you are looking for.  For registration forms and more information, visit the U of M, Crookston Web page for campers at www.umcrookston.edu/camps. Following is a list of camps offered for the summer of 2010.

Wednesday, June 2, repeated Wednesday, June 9 - Equestrian Day Camp for Beginner Riders. This is an exciting day camp designed for learning about riding and caring for horses. It is appropriate for young riders with one year or less of lessons or formal riding in any discipline. Campers must be 8 years old or older. All activities during camp are designed to introduce and explain the equestrian industry to campers in a fun and interactive way. The fee for this camp is $60 for those who register before one week prior to camp date ($75 after the one week deadline). The fee is due at the time of registration. Contact ADawn Melbye at 218-281-8125 for details.

June 7 and 8 - It's Fishy! Discovery Day Camp.  A camp for 7th and 8th grade students that teaches the math and science behind some interesting everyday phenomena regarding fish -- and some unusual science as well.  For example participants will mummify their own fish and learn the science that allowed the ancient Egyptians to accomplish this extraordinary ritual.  The fee for this camp is $40 and includes all meals and activities. Check-in is at 8 a.m. on Monday and Tuesday, and parents can pick attendees up at 4:30 p.m. both days.  For more information, contact Brian Dingmann at 218-281-8249.

June 14 - 16 (Session 1: CANCELED), repeated July 19 - 21 - Robotics Camp.  A camp for 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students, who will learn about the math, science, and technology associated with robotics.  Over three days attendees will work in teams to design, build, and program a Lego MINDStrom NXT 2.0 robot from a kit.  The fee for this camp is $225 and includes meals and activities.  At the end of the camp, students may purchase a Lego MINDStorm robot kit for $250.  Check-in is at 8:45 a.m. daily, and parents can pick camp attendees up at 4:30 p.m. on each of the three days

June 20 - 24 - River Watch Boot Camp for Resource Managers, Educators, and Teachers. This companion River Watch boot camp is designed for all levels of science teachers--from the reluctant biologist to the intrepid field explorer--as well as resource managers and other education professionals. The lesson plans will be based in part on curriculum of the River Watch Citizen Monitoring Program developed by River Watch Coordinator Wayne Goeken. The program engages K-12 teachers and citizens in developing an understanding of the natural and human-built environment of the Red River Basin of the U.S. and Canada with special reference to watershed dynamics, river monitoring, and ecological and sustainability principles as they interact with various land uses. Cost for the camp is $500, and additional options are available for undergraduate or graduate credit through the U of M, College of Education and Human Development.  Contact Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability at 218-281-8129 to learn more.

June 20 - 26 - Equestrian Camp. The Equestrian Camp is designed to teach high school students about riding and caring for horses. This hands-on camp will have participants riding up to twice a day, but riders do not need to have riding experience, just a passion for horses. The camp will be challenging enough for experienced riders. Both Hunt and Western styles will be taught. The fee for this camp is $650 and is due at the time of registration.  It includes all meals, activities, room and board. Contact ADawn Melbye at 218-281-8125 for more information.

June 20 - 26 - Computer Game Design Camp. A camp for both experts and beginners, Game Design Camp participants will learn the fundamentals of game design, modeling, simulation, and will receive hands-on training of commercial game editors in an engaging workshop setting. By day, learning and workshops, by night, game competitions and fun. Registration is $595 for this week-long camp, which includes meals, activities, room and board. It is recommended for students in grades 9-12 (15-19 years old). This camp has limited room available; interested students should register early. Contact David DeMuth at 218-280-9322 to learn more.

July 26 - 30 - River Watch Boot Camp for Students. Students can sharpen their water skills during this three-day camp designed specifically for them. Learn more about protecting our valuable water resources through activities designed to enhance student knowledge of our ecosystem. For more information, contact David DeMuth at 218-280-9322.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Jacoba De Boer-Wiersma, administrative specialist, 218-281-8380 (jacoba@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Twenty natural resources students from the University of Minnesota, Crookston recently planted some 2,700 pine, spruce, and fir seedlings on the Deer River District of the Chippewa National Forest.

The four-day trip, a strong tradition for students in the Natural Resources Club at the U of M, tree planting 1.jpgCrookston, marks the 28th  consecutive time student volunteers from the campus have assisted the U.S. Forest Service with the tree planting project. The students were accompanied by club advisors Phil Baird, Tom Feiro, and Laura Bell.

Baird, an associate professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department at the U of M, Crookston, said, "This was one of the wettest trips we've had in 28 years! It rained nearly every other hour for the entire time we were there!  We've been snowed on, rained on, and hailed on in the past, but not so continuously.  

"It was also a very different trip from our previous 27 years in that we saw trees and shrubs in full bloom that have never been at that stage in early May before. It was only two years ago that we had to wrap up the trip early due to the area receiving 20 inches of snow!"

The student volunteers also removed the more than 5,000 budcaps they had installed last October on white pine seedlings and saplings to protect the small trees from overwinter deer browsing. On the return trip the group toured the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Air Tanker Base in Bemidji, Minn.

Since 1983, students, faculty, and staff from the natural resources program on the Crookston campus have planted a total of more than 165,000 trees in the Chippewa National Forest.

For more information about natural resources, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Phil Baird, associate professor, 218-281-8130 (pbaird@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Anderson_Top_Ciub.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston Junior Christopher Anderson, from Becker, Minn., majoring in natural resources aviation, completed flight training in the U of M, Crookston's Top Cub, including a solo flight.  The Top Cub flight training is an integral component of the natural resources aviation degree program at the Crookston Campus.
 
The Top Cub airplane exposes students to the demands of flying a high performance conventional- landing-gear equipped airplane which is commonly used in natural resource aviation programs.  The Top Cub is also used to train students in low level reconnaissance missions and animal telemetry. 

Anderson is a recent transfer from the University of Montana, and will complete flight and academic training next academic year in instrument flight as well as continuing his academic course work in natural resources. 

The Natural Resources Aviation degree program at the U of M, Crookston is the only degree of its kind in the United States. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Junior Chris Anderson recently completed his Top Cub Flight Training including a solo flight. 

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Parks_Vivion.jpgUniversity of Minnesota, Crookston Freshman Tim Parks, a law enforcement aviation major from Baltimore, Md., successfully completed the final training requirements to be issued a private pilot certificate on April 19, 2010. 

Parks has worked very hard this academic year to fulfill the requirements of the Federal Aviation Administration approved private pilot course at the U of M, Crookston.
 
The course includes both rigorous academic and flight training programs.  Parks completed his final stage check in this course in a Piper Warrior III at the Crookston Municipal Airport on the evening of the April 19.
 
Parks will proceed to instrument pilot training in his sophomore year while continuing his criminal justice academic studies.  The University of Minnesota, Crookston is one of only a few institutions of higher learning offering a degree in law enforcement aviation.  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Freshman Tim Parks (left) is congratulated by Chief Pilot Mike Vivion on the completion of his training requirements to be issued a private pilot certificate on Monday, April 19, 2010.
 

Contact: Mike Vivion, chief pilot, 218-281-8114 (mvivion@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Create a miniature plant world during a workshop presented by horticulture students at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. A terrarium, or dish garden, is a collection of compatible plants in a clear container, and you can create one of your own on Wednesday, April 28, 2010, in the UMC Production Greenhouse. The workshop begins at 6 p.m. and registration is $20. Attendees should pre-register and decide if they want to create a terrarium or a dish garden by calling 218-371-1332. If you provide your own container, the registration price will be reduced.

The cost for the workshop covers soil mixture, growing tips, and instructions, along with a container, if needed. Jada Ellenberg, president of the Horticulture Club, is excited to offer the workshop to the community and campus. "With such a variety of plants all in one container, it is like having a mini dessert right there on your desk," Ellenberg says.

Students will use the funds raised to benefit the Horticulture Club on the Crookston Campus.  For information about the terrarium workshop, contact Ellenberg at 218-371-1332.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Sue Jacobson, horticulture instructor, 218-281-8118 (sjacobso@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston welcomes international lecturer and expert in personal rapid transit (PRT) Edward  Anderson, Ph.D., as a guest  on Thursday, April 29, 2010. Anderson will speak during the regular Thursday Commons session beginning at 12:15 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center. The public is invited to attend Anderson's lecture entitled, "The Role of Science, Technology, and Perception in the New Age of Resource Scarcity," and there is no admission charge.

Anderson is recognized the world over as a strong proponent of PRT systems. For the past 40 years, he has dedicated himself to the field by designing, presenting, and writing about PRT. His numerous contributions to PRT technology include chairing both national and international conferences. This international lecturer and expert has testified before the Minnesota legislature and the U.S. Congress. The author of three books and more than 100 engineering papers, Anderson serves as the editor of "Personal Rapid Transit" and holds 10 patents.

From 1963-86, Anderson taught at the University of Minnesota in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and from 1986-92, taught aerospace and mechanical engineering at Boston University. Over the years, Anderson has been recognized for his achievements and most recently was named a 2010 recipient of the Charles W. Britzius Distinguished Engineer Award. This recognition is the highest honor given by the Minnesota Federation of Engineering Science and Technology Societies. His educational background includes a doctorate in aeronautics and astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a master of science in mechanical engineering from the University of Minnesota, and a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from Iowa State University.
 
"Dr. Anderson developed and taught a course dealing with society, technology, and energy over 30 years ago which was very futuristic and was actually a holistic course in "sustainability," according to Dan Svedarsky, director of the U of M, Crookston Center for Sustainability. "He is truly a renaissance thinker and sees the world not as it is but how it could be."

This special presentation will be a follow-up to Earth Week activities. This year marks the fortieth anniversary of Earth Day and the Crookston campus has planned a week of events to create awareness, encourage involvement, and educate the campus and community about the opportunity we have to take action on behalf of the planet. For more information on activities scheduled on the Crookston campus, visit www.umcrookston.edu/today.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Gentele_Lisa 0132.jpgSeven times in the last nine years a University of Minnesota, Crookston student has been awarded the Student Conservationist and Scholarship Award from the Minnesota Chapter of the Soil and Water Conservation Society. Carrying on this outstanding tradition, Senior Lisa Gentele, Omaha, Neb., a natural resources management major at the U of M, Crookston, is set to receive the prestigious award for 2010.

The award, presented in April at the professional organization's annual meeting, consists of a plaque and a $500 cash award. Last year's recipient was Holly Sandberg, a 2009 graduate of the U of M, Crookston, who is currently a park ranger with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Alaska. Sandberg was the co-recipient with Junior Sheila Carleton, Baxter, Minn., who is currently double majoring in natural resources and agronomy.

According to Gentele, "The Soil and Water Conservation Society stands apart from many professional organizations in my eye in that it emphasizes a more integrated approach to living conditions for both urban residents and rural land owners.  Working for both The Nature Conservancy and Crookston's Park Department in the past has taught me many important ethics about the land, how we chose to manage it, and also how to work with everyone from politicians to local people.   My priority right now is a student but it's easy to look past education and into the working field where real life obstacles can be overcome and environmental changes can benefit everyone, now and in the future."

 Along with completing her degree at the U of M, Crookston in May of 2010, Gentele is the student sustainability assistant in the Center for Sustainability and coordinates student activities in connection with the Otter Tail Energy Challenge grant.  

"One of my areas of responsibility is to increase awareness about our current energy consumption and compare it to what we could save and the dollar amount associated with that savings," according to Gentele. "We've set a high goal on the Crookston campus to become climate neutral in the next 20 years by cutting carbon emissions related to energy consumption and considering alternative energy sources such as  wind, geothermal, biomass, biodigestion, and solar."

"After graduation Lisa plans to start a career in land, water, or energy management to give her an opportunity to practice her conservation passion," according to Dan Svedarsky, Ph.D., one of Gentele's professors and director of the Center for Sustainability on the Crookston campus. "We're so proud of Lisa's enthusiasm and leadership here on campus and for continuing the award-winning tradition of our conservation students." Gentele also serves as vice president of the Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society at the U of M, Crookston.

The Soil and Water Conservation Society (SWCS) is a nonprofit scientific and educational organization, founded in 1943, that serves as an advocate for conservation professionals and for science-based conservation practice, programs, and policy. To learn more about the work of the Minnesota Chapter of the Soil and Water Conservation Society, visit www.minnesotaswcs.org.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@ umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Learn more about climate change from a world prospective and how we can make a difference locally by attending a special presentation by Dan Svedarsky, Ph.D., director of the Center for Sustainability at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Svedarsky will address the Alternative Energy Committee meeting in Crookston on Thursday, January 28, 2010, at 7 p.m. Following the presentation, which will be held in the Seminar Room in the Agriculture Research Building at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center, there will be a question and answer session.  The public is invited to attend the presentation.

Svedarsky's presentation, Global Climate Change Perspectives From Copenhagen And Recommendations For Local Applications will present information on the design landscape of Denmark and Sweden and its application to Crookston and the world. Svedarsky recently returned from Copenhagen, Denmark, where he represented The Wildlife Society at the United Nations Climate Conference.

Maathai+Svedarsky-webedit.jpgThe conference, held in December 2009 was attended by thousands and included 119 heads of state from around the world. Svedarsky, a professor, wildlife biologist, and director of the Center for Sustainability at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, represented the 8,000-members of The Wildlife Society as an official observer. As noted by 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner, Wangari Maathai, the primary value of conferences such as these is to provide information and inspiration to attendees to return home and make a local difference.   

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In photo above: Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai with U of M, Crookston Professor Dan Svedarsky at the Danish Film Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, director, Center for Sustainability, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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