Recently in Northwest Research and Outreach Center Category

Faculty and Staff Day was held at the conclusion of spring semester at the University of Minnesota Crookston and celebrated excellence and service by faculty and staff. 

Those recognized with special awards included Terrill Bradford, instructor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, Distinguished Teaching; Linnea Barton, master tutor, Distinguished Civil Service/Bargaining Unit; and Chris Winjum, assistant to the chancellor, Distinguished P&A. 

Also recognized were those reaching years of service milestones and retirements. Susan Jacobson, instructor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department; Dee Anne Leines, an assistant professor and Extension educator; and Laurie Wilson, an assistant education specialist and coordinator of Disability Services were all honored on their retirement. 

Dan Svedarsky, professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and director of the Center for Sustainability was recognized for his 45 years of service to the University. 

For all the photos and awards, visit the photo gallery

Chancellor Fred Wood and Albert Sims, Director of Operations at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center, served as hosts for the annual event. 

 

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Prairie grouse conservationists from across the U.S. and Canada will gather at the University of Minnesota Crookston on October 10-12, 2013, to share knowledge and appreciation of prairie grouse populations throughout their range. The 30th meeting of the Prairie Grouse Technical Council Conference will commence with registration and a reception on Thursday, October 10, starting at 5:30 p.m. in the Prairie Room of Sargeant Student Center on the campus of the U of M Crookston. Registration for the full conference is $150 per attendee. For more information contact Dan Svedarsky, conference organizer, at 218-281-8129 or dsvedars@crk.um.edu.

 

The prairie grouse family includes the sage grouse, the lesser and greater prairie chicken, Attwater's prairie chicken, and the sharp-tailed grouse. Participants of the conference will hear of the impact of changing land use, energy development, and Farm Bill programs, such as the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), on prairie grouse populations across the range. Professional biologists and graduate students will present technical papers on research and conservation programs in efforts to reduce factors which are limiting to populations. In addition to various prairie grouse reports, the event will include a business meeting and a field trip to local prairie grouse habitat.

 

The meeting will include presentation of the Hamerstrom Award, which recognizes individuals and organizations for ongoing efforts in prairie grouse conservation. The award is named in honor of Fred and Francis Hamerstrom who were both students of the famed Aldo Leopold, the father of wildlife management. The Hamerstroms conducted research on prairie grouse in Wisconsin for decades and are credited with generating information that was critical to saving the prairie chicken in Wisconsin and other states as well.

 

"The biennial conference rotates to different parts of the grassland biome in North America to allow participants to experience the broad range of conditions where these magnificent birds live," notes Dan Svedarsky, Ph.D., conference organizer. The conference most recently was hosted in Hays, Kansas, in 2011 and last hosted in Crookston in 1987.

 

Svedarsky, a research biologist at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center and wildlife professor at the University of Minnesota Crookston, says, "We're fortunate in northwest Minnesota to have both sharp-tailed grouse and the greater prairie chicken living side by side and enjoyed by students, researchers, sportsmen, and nature lovers." The birds are especially notable for their spectacular courtship displays in the spring. Both species are classified as game birds in Minnesota and notably occur on the Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge east of Crookston and on other wildlife areas in northwest Minnesota.

 

In addition to primary sponsorship by the University of Minnesota, other sponsors include the Crookston Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Minnesota Prairie Chicken Society, Truax Company, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Nature Conservancy.


Contact: Dan Svedarsky, professor, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Dan Svedarsky was an invited speaker and conference co-summarizer at a recent conference 
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on, America's Grasslands: The Future of Grasslands in a Changing Landscape. Svedarsky is a research biologist at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center and director of the University of Minnesota, Crookston's Center for Sustainability. The meeting brought together researchers, natural resources professionals, farmers and ranchers, representatives of Native American tribes, and policy experts and conservationists from California to Washington, D.C. to discuss the outlook and opportunities to conserve North America's grasslands. 

The biennial conference was held in Manhattan, Kan., and was focused on working collaboratively with ranchers to conserve grasslands but also included presentations on prairie ecology, interpretation, and restoration techniques. 

Primary sponsors of the conference were the National Wildlife Federation and Kansas State University along with the World Wildlife Fund, Environmental Defense Fund, The Nature Conservancy, Ducks Unlimited, Sharp Brothers Seed Company, Grassland Heritage Foundation, and the Consortium for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability. 
In his paper entitled, Prairie restoration - up close and personal - on a University Campus, Svedarsky reported on his long-time work with restoring prairie at the Red River Valley Natural History Area of the Northwest Research and Outreach Center in Crookston and the use of prairie plants in interpretative demonstrations on the Crookston campus. 

He and other faculty, staff, and students have installed prairie plants in the Nature Nook, Youngquist Prairie Garden, and currently in a raingarden in front of Heritage Hall; the newest resident hall on the Crookston campus. "Prairie plants have the advantage of being adapted to local growing conditions, are readily available, low maintenance, and are the "architects" of the rich fertile soils of the Red River Valley," notes Svedarsky. A number of UMC natural resource graduates are currently employed in land management capacities where they use prairie plants in their work. Svedarsky has also worked closely with The Nature Conservancy in northwest Minnesota in projects such as the Pankratz Prairie, Pembina Trail Preserve, and the Glacial Ridge Project. He received the President's Stewardship Award from The Nature Conservancy in 1981.

Over 250 participants attended the conference which included field trips to the Konza Prairie Biological Station of Kansas State and the National Tall Grass Prairie Preserve. The regional setting was the Flint Hills region of the North American Tallgrass Prairie where limestone geology lies close to the surface thus favoring grassland development on the thin soils and a ranching culture. Kansas State has been the center of numerous research studies on tallgrass prairie ecology including vegetation and animal interactions including the Greater Prairie Chicken.

"Native grasslands and the wildlife that depend on them are disappearing at alarming rates," said Aviva Glaser, agriculture policy specialist at the National Wildlife Federation and conference co-organizer. Recent surges in grain prices have prompted the extensive conversion of native grasslands and CRP grasslands in the Dakotas, many of which are erosion-prone due to steep slopes and droughty soils. "We want to do what we can to help the conservation and careful management of the American grassland," said Dr. John Briggs, Kansas State professor of biology and director of the Konza Prairie Biological Station who also helped organize the conference. "It's going to take all of these groups working together. We can't just work in a vacuum."

In his summary remarks, Svedarsky posed the question of why people should care about prairies in the first place, with their rich diversity of plants and animals; large and small. "I think often of the following words of Larry Kruckenberg, former North Dakota Game and Fish Commissioner:  for people to care about something, they must; feel it is of consequence, believe that it affects them, and believe they can do something about it. Does an unemployed single mom in the Bronx care about the conversion of South Dakota grassland to row crops? I doubt it, but before real consequential action is taken at the regional and national level, the base of caring constituency must be broadened."

Svedarsky believes in educational solutions and also quoted the Central African Conservationist, Baba Dioum. "For in the end we will conserve only what we love, we will love what we understand, and we will understand only what we are taught." Being a college natural resources conservation professor, Svedarsky adds to this his mantra for teaching, "So let us teach often, and well."

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 28 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 11 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Dan Svedarsky by a raingarden of mostly native prairie plants in front of the Flint Hills Discovery Center in Manhattan, Kansas. Svedarsky and assistants are installing a similar raingarden in front of Heritage Hall on the University of Minnesota Crookston campus.

Contact: Dan Svedarsky, professor, 218-281-8129 (dsvedars@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Red River Valley Development Association Schedules 75th Annual Honor Banquet

The 75th Annual Honor Banquet sponsored by the Red River Valley Development Association will be held on Saturday, March 16, 2013, beginning at noon in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center, University of Minnesota, Crookston.  Tickets for the noon banquet are available for $15 from the Extension Regional Office, Crookston and can be reserved by calling 1-888-241-0781.  Payment can be made at the door.

Individuals from northwest Minnesota will be honored as Valley Farmers and Homemakers for the good example they have set with their family life, community service, farming or agribusiness operations and their efforts to conserve natural resources.  Funding for the Red River Valley Development Association is provided by the 14 counties in northwest Minnesota.

The Northwest Minnesota Youth Leadership Awards will be presented to several outstanding young adults from the area.

The Red River Valley Development Association includes directors from 14 northwest Minnesota counties.  

The 2013 Directors and Honored Couples are:

County

Director

Honored Couple

Town

Becker

Bruce Hein

Roger and Anita Schaefer

Frazee

Clay

Clarice Schmidt

Harold and Irene Schenck

Sabin

Clearwater

Allen Paulson

Tom and Corrinne Anderson

Clearbrook

Kittson

Gary Johnson

Roger and Bernice Anderson

Drayton, ND

Lake of the Woods

Ken Horntvedt

Darrell and Doris Nelson

Baudette

Mahnomen

Jean Nelson

David and Jean Haugo

Waubun

Marshall

Gary Satre

Brian and Betsey Jensen

Stephen

Norman

Burton Rockstad

Lowell and Borgie Gunderson

Ada

E Otter Tail

Roger Fremming

Marion and Donna Gill

Perham

W Otter Tail

Daniel Roehl

Al and Jean Boyum

Battle Lake

Pennington

Gladys Hallstrom

Tom and Kaylynn Wold

Thief River Falls

E Polk

Jerry Erickson

Neal and Jolene Anderson

Fosston

W Polk

Curt Knutson

Kevin and Patti Lien

Fisher

Red Lake

Larry Johnson

David and Peggy Miller

Red Lake Falls

Roseau

Buddy Erickson

Ray and Lillian Christianson

Greenbush

Wilkin

Milan Drewlow

Milan and Laurie Drewlow

Breckenridge


For more information, contact Deborah Zak, Regional Director, Northwest, Extension Regional Office, Crookston.  Phone:  218-281-8684 or 1-888-241-0781.  E-mail:  dzak@umn.edu

Contact: For more information, contact Deborah Zak, Regional Director, Northwest, Extension Regional Office, Crookston. Phone: 218-281-8684 or 1-888-241-0781. E-mail: dzak@umn.edu

A retirement reception honoring Carol Windels, Ph.D., professor/faculty member at the 
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Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) and in the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul is slated for Wednesday, December 5, 2012. The reception will be held from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Windels (at right) is retiring on December 31 following 28 years at the NWROC. Coffee and cake will be served and everyone is invited to attend the reception in her honor.

Windels is a world renowned expert in sugar beet root diseases and has made major contributions to the understanding of sugar beet root diseases and their control or management in the sugar beet industry of Minnesota and North Dakota.  Previous to that, she made significant contributions to the understanding of Fusarium Head Blight (scab disease in small grains) and the organism that causes it.  

Her professional career began with the University of Minnesota as a junior scientist rising through the rank of scientist.  In 1984, she came to Crookston and the Northwest Experiment Station as an assistant professor.  In 1998, she was promoted to full professor and has been a valued member of the faculty at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center. She is also an adjunct professor at North Dakota State University's Department of Plant Pathology.

Windels has been teacher and mentor to several graduate students as well as numerous undergraduate students who have worked in her lab and on her projects these many years.  She has co-edited two books and authored/co-authored over 200 publications and 16 book chapters along with serving on the editorial boards of three journals. 

A member of several professional societies, Windels has served as an officer in various capacities, including president, of the American Phytopathological Society.  She has earned several awards and honors including the Sugarbeet Distinguished Service Award by the Sugarbeet Industry of Minnesota and North Dakota, the Meritorious Service Award by the American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists, and is a Fellow in both the American Phytopathological Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

In 2011, Windels was recognized for her work with the Torch & Shield Award, the highest honor given by the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The award honors contributions of significance to higher education, the Crookston campus, and the region; recognizes champions of the U of M, Crookston, NWROC and Extension for their impact on the region through teaching, research, and outreach; and distinguishes both high profile individuals and those who have been "quiet" contributors to the success of the Crookston campus. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Maureen Aubol, Northwest Research and Outreach Center, 218-281-8602 (aubo0002@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Torch & Shield Award Recipients for 2012 Honored

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Honoring those who have aided in the development of the University of Minnesota, Crookston, the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC), and Extension is the purpose of the Torch & Shield award. This celebration of leadership is the highest honor presented by the Crookston campus and a special recognition event was held on Wednesday, November 7, 2012, on the campus.

The Torch & Shield award recipients for 2012 include Alan Cattanach, general agronomist at American Crystal Sugar Company in Moorhead, Minn.; Wayne Goeken, director of the International Water Institute's Center for Watershed Education; and Otter Tail Power Company, whose headquarters are located in Fergus Falls, Minn.

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Alan Cattanach (left) has worked in cooperative research efforts in the past with 8 scientists from Northwest Research and Outreach Center and 6 from the University of Minnesota, St. Paul. He has served on U of M search committees and Extension planning teams and committees. He has participated in numerous sugarbeet and soil fertility extension meetings with other U of M Extension specialists and county extension agents and served as liaison to NWROC and St. Paul campus scientists for Sugarbeet research programs of interest to American Crystal Sugar Company.

Working as part of the Sugarbeet Research and Education Board of Minnesota and North Dakota, Cattanach has helped to provide extensive funding of projects at the NWROC and to St Paul campus scientists, as well as involved in an EPA grant partnership with NWROC (Biological control of Cercospora Leafspot) and provided gift funds to NWROC in support of sugarbeet research projects.

He earned his doctorate in soil science from the University of Minnesota, and master's of science, and bachelor's of science also in soil science from North Dakota State University (NDSU) and University of Wisconsin-Madison respectively. He has been general agronomist at American Crystal Sugar Company since July 1998 and prior to that worked for North Dakota State University and the U of M as Extension sugabeet specialist. 

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Over the years, Wayne Goeken (left) has worked with a number of personnel at the U of M, Crookston primarily with River Watch and watershed education and monitoring efforts. Recently he has worked with associate professors Katy Smith and Brian Dingmann on a river sediment research project involving high school and university students. 
Goeken has been involved in ongoing work with the Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership and Executive Director Linda Kingery in promoting the Red Lake River Enhancement Project, including leading a canoe/kayak trip of the entire 195-mile length of the Red Lake River to raise awareness of its cultural attributes and recreational potential. He continues to work with the NRSDP on development of initiatives to connect people to nature, especially children, including promoting nature-based interactive play spaces for children.

He coordinates the annual River Watch Forum on the U of M, Crookston campus during spring break, with high school River Watch teams coming from 25 schools throughout the Red River Basin to share their results and learn about current topics in watershed science. He also conducts annual training and certification workshops each spring for personnel from natural resource agencies who are involved in water quality monitoring, the only certification program of its type in Minnesota.

Goeken earned his bachelor of science in agribusiness and his master of science in economics from South Dakota State University in Brookings.
 
Named for the river that provided its first source of power, Otter Tail Power Company was 
OTP 2 color.jpg
incorporated in 1907. The company began producing electricity in 1909 at Dayton Hollow Dam on the Otter Tail River near Fergus Falls, Minnesota, and home to the company's headquarters.

Today, Otter Tail Power Company is a subsidiary of Otter Tail Corporation. Its approximately 790 employees provide electricity and energy services to more than 129,000 customers in 422 communities and in rural areas in an un-crowded 70,000-square-mile service area in western Minnesota, eastern North Dakota, and northeastern South Dakota. The company has customer service centers in Crookston and ten other communities in its service area.

Otter Tail Power Company's mission is to produce and deliver electricity as reliably, economically, and environmentally responsibly as possible to the balanced benefit of customers, shareholders, and employees and to improve the quality of life in the area in which we do business. To learn more about Otter Tail Power Company visit www.otpco.com.

Otter Tail Power Company has supported the University of Minnesota, Crookston over the years through scholarships, the Campus Energy Challenge, and various sponsorships. 
Cris Oehler director of public relations for Otter Tail, accepted the award on behalf of Otter Tail Power Company. 

The Torch & Shield Award honors contributions of significance to higher education, the Crookston campus, and the region; recognizes champions of the U of M, Crookston, NWROC, and Extension for their impact on the region through teaching, research, and outreach; and distinguishes both high profile individuals and those who have been "quiet" contributors to the success of the Crookston campus. For more information, visit www.umcrookston.edu/torchandshield.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, at top, Fred Wood, chancellor of the U of M, Crookston, Goeken, Oehler, Cattanach, and Albert Sims, director of operations at the NWROC. 

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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The annual Faculty and Staff Day Program was held Tuesday, May 8, in Bede Ballroom.  Faculty and staff from all units across campus attended the luncheon and program that followed.  The theme for the day was "We're from Everywhere," and faculty and staff commemorated their heritage by donning clothing representing some part of their heritage. Hosting the event were Rachel Lundbohm, instructor in the Business Department, and Kristie Jerde, assistant director of residential life.

Kenneth Johnson, MBA, instructor, Business Department, was presented with the Distinguished Teaching Award.  Donna Larson, accountant, Business Affairs Office, received the Distinguished Civil Service/Bargaining Unit Award.  Two individuals received the Distinguished Professional & Administrative Award: Melissa Dingmann, MEd, director, Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships, and Kenneth Bulie, JD, CPA, lecturer, Business Department.  

The Outstanding Service Learning Faculty Award was presented to ADawn Melbye, MEd, instructor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, and the Outstanding Community Service Award went to Jamie Fagerholt, MBA, tutor and testing coordinator, Academic Assistance Center.  Rachel Lundbohm, MBA, instructor, Business Department, was recognized for her Presidents Civic Engagement Stewardship Award from the Minnesota Campus Compact.  

2012_5-8_F-S Day-40 yr 1117.jpgJim Schaar, MDiv, lecturer, Liberal Arts and Education Department, was recognized with the Support Award for Students with Disabilities.  And Tom Feiro, environmental health & safety specialist, presented the campus with a special award of recognition from the Crookston Fire Department.

Chancellor Charles H. Casey and Albert Sims, director of operations  at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center recognized faculty and staff for their years of service. Dale Kopecky, 2012_5-8_F-S Day-35 yr 1121.jpgfarm foreman at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center was recognized for 40 years of service. Paul Aakre, assistant professor in the Agricultural and Natural Resources Department; Susan Brorson, professor and head of the Business Department; Tom Feiro, environmental health and safety specialist; Krista Proulx, library assistant; John Schleicher, building and grounds worker; and Deb Zak, campus regional director for Extension were all honored for their 35 years of service. Recognition was also given for 25, 20, 15, and 10 years of service.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos at top: Jim Schaar, Donna Larson, Kenneth Johnson, ADawn Melbye, Rachel Lundbohm, Melissa Dingmann, Jamie Fagerholt, and Kenneth Bulie.

At left, center, Dale Kopecky

At bottom, right (left to right): Deb Zak, Paul Aakre, Sue Brorson, Tom Feiro, Krista Proulx, and John Schleicher.

Contact: Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Jason Brantner, research fellow at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center Brantner_Jason 237.jpg(NWROC) located in Crookston, Minn., was recently recognized with the Sugarbeet Distinguished Service Award. The award is based on recent significant contributions to the success of the sugarbeet industry in Minnesota and North Dakota. The award was presented on Thursday, December 1, 2011, by the Red River Valley Sugarbeet Growers Association during their annual meeting.

Brantner has been actively involved in the NWROC sugarbeet plant pathology project since January 1995.  He works closely with Carol Windels, Ph.D., in setting up and maintaining experiments; collecting data; summarizing research results; and helping to write reports.  He also helps coordinate trials with grower-cooperators, and other cooperating scientists at the NWROC, North Dakota State University, sugarbeet cooperatives, and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) laboratories.  The sugarbeet industry and growers have benefited from the quality of his work and consequently, the value of data related to disease management of soilborne pathogens, especially Rhizoctonia and Aphanomyces.  

He has taken particular interest in working with registered and non-registered fungicides for control of Rhizoctonia and Aphanomyces and has screened products with potential for pathogen control, as well as practical information on products, rates, and application.  Brantner took the initiative in identifying Verticillium dahliae as the cause of yellows on sugarbeet and determined the disease occurred when sugarbeet was grown in rotation with potato (also susceptible to the pathogen).  

Throughout the summer, he is involved in the accurate and timely identification of pathogens on diseased sugarbeet samples submitted to the laboratory. Brantner also maintains an extensive culture collection of sugarbeet pathogens, which is a resource for the plant pathology project as well as researchers and teachers in industry, USDA, and other universities, who often request cultures. In recent years, Brantner regularly presents research papers and posters at professional meetings of the American Phytopathological Society (national society of plant pathologists) and the American Society of Sugarbeet Technologists. He has authored 59 technical articles, 5 refereed journal articles, 1 book chapter, and 23 abstracts presented at professional meetings as oral papers or posters at the American Phytopathological Society and the American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists.  
 
In 2006, Brantner was awarded the University of Minnesota Department of Plant Pathology  Professional and Academic Award of Excellence, and in 2007, he received the University of Minnesota, College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Distinguished Professional and Academic Award. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Maureen Aubol, 218-281-8602 (aubo0002@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Early registration deadline for Soybean College Monday, December 12.

Soybean producers and agriculture professionals interested in practical and in-depth management information to help maximize profits in soybean production are encouraged to participate in the Soybean College at the University of Minnesota, Soybean Logo Long1 copy.jpgCrookston. The interactive combination of hands-on lab experiences and lectures will be held on Tuesday, December 20, 2011, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:10 p.m. Registration is $40 before December 12 or $50 at the door the day of the event. Lunch will be provided for participants.

The Soybean College is a joint collaboration between University of Minnesota Extension, College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences; Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council; University of Minnesota Crookston; and the Northwest Research and Outreach Center. Payment must accompany registration $40 registration before December 12. Checks should be made payable to University of Minnesota Extension. Registration with payment can be mailed to UMN Extension RO - Moorhead, Amanda LeGare, 715 11th Street No., Ste. 107C Moorhead, Minn., 56560-2083.

Registration begins at 8 a.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center, with a welcome at 8:30 followed by a general session on the Soybean Trade Mission to China and MSGA: Facing Policy Issues Together with Kurt Krueger, farmer and President of Minnesota Soybean Growers Association.

The opening session will be followed by a series of lectures and laboratories to be repeated during the day at least once. The concurrent sessions begin at 10:05 a.m. and run until 3:10 p.m. with a break for lunch at noon.

Lecture session topics include: Soybean Fertility Program for Northwest Minnesota with Dan Kaiser from the University of Minnesota; Soybean Agronomics with Seth Naeve, University of Minnesota; Addressing Soil Compaction with Jodi DeJong-Hughes, University of Minnesota; Developing Weed Management Plans with Jeff Gunsolus, University of Minnesota; and Soybean Cost of Production and Market Considerations for 2012 with Bill Craig and Bret Oelke, both from the University of Minnesota.

Laboratory sessions are designed to provide participants with hands on experiences and exposure to a variety of current production issues. Topics of the labs include: Soybean Disease Recognition and Challenges with Dean Malvick, University of Minnesota; Insect Issues in Soybeans with Phil Glogoza, University of Minnesota; Matching Soybean Growth Stages with Crop Management with Doug Holen, University of Minnesota; Beyond the Soil Survey Book with Kristina Walker, University of Minnesota; and Soybean Cyst Nematode Lab: How to Determine Egg Counts from Soil Tests with Kasia Kinzer, North Dakota State University

The brochure and registration form can be downloaded. Sponsors of the 2011 Soybean College are Pioneer Hi-Bred, Farm Business Management - Northland Community and Technical College, REA Hybrids, Hyland Seeds, Triangle Ag. LLC, AgCountry Farm Credit Services, SunOpta Grains and Foods Group, Thunder Seeds Inc., Dairyland Seeds / Heartland Seeds.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Deb Zak, director, Extension Regional Office, Crookston, 218-281-8684 (dzak@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Filled with more than 200 guests, Bede Ballroom was the site of the annual Torch & 2011_10-26_Torch & Shield group 2530.jpgShield Recognition held at the University of Minnesota, Crookston on Wednesday, October 27, 2011.  The highest honor given by the campus, the Torch & Shield Award, celebrated the leadership of four individuals who have aided in the development of the Crookston campus, the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) and Extension. The evening, hosted by Charles H. Casey, chancellor at the U of M, Crookston and Albert Sims, director of operations at the NWROC, also was an opportunity to recognize and thank donors.

This year's Torch & Shield honorees included  Robert Nelson, registrar and director of institutional research, U of M, Crookston;  Kathleen O'Brien, vice president for university services, University of Minnesota; Li Shuming, president of Zhejiang Economic and Trade Polytechnic, Hangzhou, China; and Carol Windels, professor of plant pathology, Northwest Research and Outreach Center.

President Li addressed the crowd via Skype from Hangzhou, China. The U of M, 2011_10-26_Torch & Shield Li Shuming 2600.jpgCrookston collaborates with ZJETP and a number of students from that institution currently attend the Crookston campus, where they are working to complete their bachelor's degrees.

Greetings from the University of Minnesota Foundation were brought by Frank Robertson, director of planned giving. Robertson was joined by Corby Kemmer, director of development and alumni relations at the U of M, Crookston, to recognize members of the Presidents Club.

2011_10-26_Torch & Shield students 2582.jpgThe evening included a second focus showcasing student achievement. Brooke Hamilton, a junior from Adams, Minn., majoring in business management, opened the evening with the solo Silent Noon from "House of Life" accompanied by George French, director of music and theater on the Crookston campus. Ben Williams, a junior from Excelsior, Minn., majoring in natural resources, spoke to the audience about the importance of student academic scholarships. The evening was captured on video by Tony Taylor, a junior majoring in marketing from Sheridan, Wyo., who works as a student assistant in Media Services.

Concluding the evening was a research presentation by Katy Smith, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Math, Science, and Technology Department. Joining her were two students, Tyler Brazier, a senior from Greenbush, Minn., majoring in software engineering; and Beth Walters, a senior from Crosslake, Minn., majoring in environmental science. Together with Smith they presented their work on the impact of wetland plants on the restoration of contaminated soil sediments and the construction and design of a greenhouse gas collection chamber.

Allison Noll, a senior double majoring in agricultural business and agricultural education from Mahnomen, Minn., works as a student assistant in the Office of Development & Alumni Relations and was an integral part of the evening's activities. The string trio playing during the social included two student musicians, and a number of students attended the event as representatives on advisory committees. Students in the Horticulture Club were responsible for the floral arrangements and Student Ambassadors assisted during the evening. A number of students also were involved in serving the banquet following the program.

For more information on Torch & Shield, visit www.umcrookston.edu/torchandshield.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:
Top right photo: (left to right):Carol Windels, professor of plant pathology, Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC);  UMC Chancellor Charles Casey; Robert Nelson, registrar and director of institutional research, UMC; Albert Sims, director of operations, NWROC;  Kathleen O'Brien, vice president for university services, University of Minnesota.


Center right photo: President Li addresses the audience at Torch & Shield via Skype.

Bottom left photo:
Students featured at the Torch & Shield Recognition were (left to right): Ben Williams, Beth Walters, Brooke Hamilton, Tyler Brazier, and Tony Taylor.


Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer @umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

lab_duhamel_macrae.jpgJoseph Duhamel, a student from outside of Rouen in the region of Normandy, France, completed his agriculture internship by conducting research on soybean aphids at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC). He worked under the supervision of Extension Entomologist Ian MacRae. Duhamel is a fourth year student from École d'Ingénieurs en Agriculture (Esitpa), the school of engineering in agriculture in Rouen.

Duhamel was one of two students from Esitpa who spent the summer months completing research internships in Minnesota. A fellow student worked with the West Central Research and Outreach Center in Morris, Minn. Both students arrived in early June as part of an emerging exchange program between the University of Minnesota, Crookston and Esitpa; they will return to France at the beginning of September.

This summer was Duhamel's first experience in the United States. He chose the University of Minnesota for the completion of his required internship because he wanted the opportunity to study in an English speaking country. Working at the NWROC fulfilled a required component of his internship to develop and perform research. He has previous research experience working with agro forestry for five weeks in India, but that process was more about theory and did not include anything practical. At the U of M, Crookston, he is engaged in hands-on research, something he enjoys.

Under the direction of MacRae, Duhamel designed an experiment to test the research_plot.jpgeffectiveness of various insecticides on controlling soybean aphids. He was responsible for carrying out the experiment through sampling and coordinating the collection of data. The final process was analysis of results. MacRae explained that a chemical trial was a great project for Duhamel as it served as a relatively simple model on which to learn about research. MacRae also commented on how Duhamel's past experiences were evident during his time with NWROC, "Joe came with a lot of knowledge and was able to hit the ground running." MacRae was pleased with Duhamel's contributions this summer adding that he was a great addition to the crew.

Working with the effects of insecticides on soybean aphids was not the only project that kept Duhamel busy this summer. He also assisted with a project examining the management of the pesticide-resistant potato beetle. While at NWROC he expanded his research knowledge base and will be returning to France with a greater understanding of the agricultural processes in the United States.

research_plot_leaf.jpgDuring his time in fields, Duhamel noticed both differences and similarities between France and the United States. He grew up in a small village half an hour from Rouen in the deep countryside of the hills of Normandy. He considers himself "almost a farm kid," since he lived right next to a farm where cows grazing in the pasture was an everyday occurrence. This past experience helped Duhamel understand farming in Minnesota, "All that is going on around Crookston makes sense to me," explains Duhamel.

Something different for Duhamel was the scale of agriculture in the area. He was impressed by the tractors, fields, and crop planes, noting that everything here is big compared to his home country. In Europe, farming is very intensive because of the small amount of agricultural land available to support the population. For this reason, soil nutrient management and chemical laws that are a hot topic in the United States now were being addressed by Europe several years earlier.

Once he overcame the initial culture shock, living in rural Minnesota for the summer duhamel_alone.jpgallowed Duhamel the opportunity to experience the true "Minnesota nice." He noted that there were always people waving at the research crew when they were out on the road.  During trips to research plots across the state, he was able to experience long drives on straight roads. He described this experience as really American compared to travel on the winding roads through France.

Upon his arrival in Minneapolis, Minn., his first experience in an American city, Duhamel admitted he was surprised the city was laid out with the roads and buildings in perfectly straight lines. In Duhamel's opinion, it was something that looked like it was straight out of a Hollywood movie, "I kept thinking to myself where are the cameras?" commented Duhamel with a laugh.

While Crookston is a farming community he can relate to, there were items from home he occasionally missed aside from family and friends. French bread was something he could not find a replacement for in rural Minnesota. He also found himself missing the traditional French cheese, which most people describe as "smelly cheese," but Duhamel contests its name should be "tasty cheese" instead.

Surrounded by the flat prairie of the Red River Valley, Duhamel also found himself longing for the traditional Normandy picture of cows grazing on the hillsides. Occasionally traveling south to Morris to visit his fellow French student allowed Duhamel some opportunities to see rolling hills dotted with livestock. Other excursions around Minnesota included two different canoe trips. One of the things he noted from his time on the river was the amount of wildlife, something he does not see as much of in his home country.

Duhamel was grateful for his time in Crookston and reflects that while he was not used to the American way of life, it was a nice change of pace for the summer months. As he returns home to France, he will be completing his final year of studies. His future plans include another internship, this time working with organic farming. Afterwards he would like to work with extension services in France as he affirms, "I want to work with the farmers." Looking into the future, there is also the potential for Duhamel to start a farm of his own.

Educational and career goals aside, Duhamel will continue to travel. With India, Poland, and now the United States under his belt, next on his list of destinations is Russia. Duhamel shared that he really enjoyed how he was able to feel the spirit of the world while in the United States, and it is a spirit he will continue to encounter beyond the fields of the Red River Valley.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,450 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos:

Top, left: Joseph Duhamel (left) from Rouen, France served as a research assistant at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center under the supervision of research entomologist Ian MacRae.

Center, right: Associate Professor Ian MacRae (left) and research assistant Joseph Duhamel search for aphids on a soybean plant in the research plot located west of the U of M, Crookston.

Lower, left: Duhamel examines a soybean leaf for aphids.

Bottom, right: Duhamel, from Rouen, France, designed and conducted an experiment to test the effectiveness of various insecticides on controlling soybean aphids, the number one insect pest of soybeans.

Contact: Neu, communications assistant, (neuxx019@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists (ASSBT) recently honored Albert Sims, Sims_Albert 9788.jpgassociate professor and director of operations at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) with the Meritorious Service Award. Sims was recognized at the organization's 36th annual awards banquet held in early March in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

One of three to receive the award in 2011, Sims was recognized as a member who made significant contributions to the beet sugar industry and for his role in the development of the industry.
Sims' background is in nutrient and fertilizer management in crop production.  He has been with the NWROC since 1995 and was appointed director of operations in October 2010. He earned tenure and was promoted to associate professor in 2001 in the Department of Soil, Water and Climate in the University of Minnesota's College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences. Sims holds a doctorate from North Carolina State University in Raleigh in soil science and both his master's and bachelor's degrees are in agronomy from University of Nebraska in Lincoln.

Along with Sims, other award recipients were John A. Lamb and Mark. W. Bredehoeft. The mission of the ASSBT is to foster all phases of sugarbeet and beet sugar research, to promote the dissemination of resultant scientific knowledge, to strive to maintain high standards of ethics, and to cooperate with other organizations having objectives beneficial to the beet sugar industry. To learn more, visit http://www.bsdf-assbt.org/assbt/assbt.htm.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.


Contact: Maureen Aubol, NWROC, 218-281-8602 (aubo0002@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Svedarsky_Dan 2.jpgUniversity of Minnesota Wildlife Professor Dan Svedarsky was among 8 individuals recognized as  fellows at the fall annual meeting of The Wildlife Society in Snowbird, Utah.   Svedarsky is a research biologist at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) and professor of natural resources at the University of Minnesota, Crookston.

The title of fellow recognizes members of The Wildlife Society who have distinguished themselves through exception service to the wildlife profession.  Svedarsky received the Minnesota Award from the Minnesota Chapter of The Wildlife Society in 1999 and served as national president of the 9,000 member organization in 2007-08. He currently chairs the College and University Wildlife Education Working Group of The Wildlife Society which organized a symposium at the Utah meeting on educating the wildlife professional.  Svedarsky presented a paper at the symposium along with U of M, Crookston colleagues, Phil Baird and John Loegering.  Svedarsky also serves on a USDA-sponsored, Blue Ribbon Panel with 17 representatives from universities and conservation agencies in the U.S. and Canada who are reviewing the future of the wildlife profession and identifying recruitment strategies for new employees.

In his research involvements, Svedarsky and his graduate students study prairie and wetland ecology and management with one of his favorite subjects being greater prairie chickens.  Most of his studies have been conducted on the Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge, the largest prairie and wetland restoration project in North America located just east of Crookston. Recently, one of his graduate students studied the summer ecology of female prairie chickens at Glacial Ridge and then fall trapped radio-tagged birds for translocation to Wisconsin where numbers are dangerously low. The study was sponsored by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Svedarsky joined other Minnesotans who were honored in Utah with national awards.Svedarsky TWS Fellow.jpg
 Dr. Doug Johnson, a federal biologist in the Department of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at the U of M, St. Paul, received the Aldo Leopold Memorial Award. This is the highest honor bestowed by The Wildlife Society in honor of the founder of the profession. John Moriarty, biologist with Ramsey County, (Minn.) received the Jim McDonough Award to recognize a certified wildlife biologist who has made a significant contribution to the profession by implementing wildlife programs and developing new techniques. Meadow Kouffeld, a doctoral student working with Dr. Ralph (Rocky) Gutierrez at the U of M, St. Paul, received the Donald Rusch Memorial Game Bird Research Scholarship for her work with ruffed grouse.  

The Northwest Research and Outreach Center is part of a system of research centers in different regions of Minnesota conducting research on soils, agronomy, entomology, and natural resources affiliated with the College of Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS) of the University of Minnesota. To learn more, visit http://nwroc.crk.umn.edu.

In the photo (l to r): John Moriarty; Bruce Leopold, President of The Wildlife Society; Doug Johnson; Dan Svedarsky; Meadow Kouffeld; and Rocky Gutierrez.  


Contact: Maureen Aubol, office supervisor, NWROC; 218-281-8602 (aubo0002@umn.edu); Dan Svedarsky, research biologist, NWROC, 218-281-8129, (dsvedars@umn.edu)

The Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) is pleased to announce theSims_Albert 9788.jpg appointment of Dr. Albert Sims, Ph.D. (photo, at right), as Director of Operations effective Monday, October 4, 2010. Sims' background is in nutrient and fertilizer management in crop production.  He has been with the NWROC since 1995; he earned tenure and was promoted to associate professor in 2001 in the Department of Soil, Water and Climate in the University of Minnesota's College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences.

Greg Cuomo, associate dean of the college, says Sims will provide solid direction and leadership for the NWROC. "Dr. Sims is recognized throughout the region and the state of Minnesota for his work in the areas of soil fertility and nutrient management and we are pleased to have him as the new director of operations in Crookston."

Sims replaces Larry Smith, who stepped down as head of the NWROC after 27 years of dedicated service. Smith will remain a member of the research faculty as sugar beet agronomist. His work in the area of sugar beets and small grains has enabled increased crop production and regional viability. "Dr. Smith has provided such dedicated service over the years," Cuomo said. "His role as a member of our research faculty will give him the opportunity to continue that unprecedented leadership to both agriculture production and to northwest Minnesota."

Sims is a member of the American Society of Agronomy, Soil Science Society of America, Crop Science Society of America, Soil and Water Conservation Society, and the American Society for the Advancement of Science. Sims holds a doctorate from North Carolina State University in Raleigh in soil science and both his master's and bachelor's degrees are in agronomy from University of Nebraska in Lincoln.

For more information on the NWROC, visit http://nwroc.crk.umn.edu.

Contact: Maureen Aubol, Northwest Research and Outreach Center, 218-281-8602 (aubo0002@umn.edu)

The Torch & Shield Award recognizes the leadership of individuals and organizations who have been influential on the development of the University of Minnesota, Crookston; Northwest Research and Outreach Center; and Extension. It is the highest recognition awarded by the campus and this year three individuals and an organization will be honored with the award. A social, program, and banquet celebrating the award recipients will be held on Tuesday evening, October 26, 2010. The evening also  honors the donors who have given in support of the campus over the past year.

The event will be live streamed that evening at http://www3.crk.umn.edu/people/services/MediaServ/Stream.htm. Click on "Connect to Live Event"


The 2010 Torch & Shield Award recipients are:

Sue pic 1.jpgSusan Brorson, Ph.D., is a professor and head of the Business Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. She has served as head of the department for the past six years.  Brorson has embraced and nurtured educational innovation.  First, through teaching as the U of M, Crookston transitioned to a technology-focused baccalaureate campus in the 1990s, and most recently, through her work as an administrator. Under her leadership, the Business Department has grown to offer five baccalaureate degrees online and serve more than 400 degree-seeking students. Her work on the campus spans more than 30 years, and she has served as a role model for young women and consistently championed the role of women through her support and encouragement. She has twice been honored by the U of M, Crookston with the Distinguished Teaching Award, and in 2001 she was recognized by Women in Technology International for contributions to the advancement of technology. Brorson holds a doctorate in teaching and learning and a master's degree in marketing education from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, and a bachelor's degree in marketing education from Minnesota State University Moorhead.

Phil Baird
is an associate professor in the Agriculture and Natural ResourcesBaird_Phil_lg_color.jpg Department at the U of M, Crookston where he has served since 1979. An innovative and dedicated instructor, Baird has served as an adviser to countless students. He has received Crookston campus recognition including UMC Student Association awards for Academic Adviser of the Semester, Outstanding Educator of the Year, and Outstanding Service to Students, as well as the Distinguished Teaching Award. He has also received the University of Minnesota's President's Award for Outstanding Service and the Horace T. Morse University of Minnesota Alumni Association Award for Outstanding Contributions to Undergraduate Education. For the past 28 years, Baird and Tom Feiro have taken his students each spring to the Deer River District on the Chippewa National Forest for a long weekend of planting trees and experiencing the meaning of service, hard work, teamwork, and responsibility. Their crews have planted more than 155,000 trees. Baird has also coordinated the Northwest Urban Forestry Workshop for the past 27 years; designed to provide training and the advancement of urban forestry for cities and counties in northwestern Minnesota and the region. Baird holds a master's degree in forest administration and management and a bachelor's degree in outdoor recreation resources management, both from Iowa State University in Ames.

Hoff.jpgDavid Hoff joined the teaching staff at the University of Minnesota Technical College in Crookston in 1967. He is responsible for starting the ag business program in 1970, served as interim chair of the Ag Division in 1988-89, and was involved in many of the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA) Judging Conferences over the years serving as judging team coordinator from 1988-2004. Hoff initiated the discussion leading to a cooperative agreement with the Agricultural Education Department at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul which allowed students to earn their agricultural education degrees on the Crookston campus. In 1978-79, he was part of a teacher exchange to Berkshire College of Agriculture in England. He holds a master's degree in agricultural economics and a bachelor's degree in agricultural education, both from North Dakota State University in Fargo.

KROX AM Radio 1260 is only the second organization to be recognized with the Torch &
krox logo IN BLUE TIFF.jpg Shield Award. Founded in April 1948, the
station has been broadcasting everyday for more than 62 years. It is owned and operated by Gopher Communications Company, which is comprised of Frank and Jeanette Fee. A community-minded radio station, KROX works in cooperation with the University of Minnesota, Crookston and covers news stories from the campus as well as broadcasting Insight Radio, a weekly radio program featuring students, faculty, and staff on the Crookston campus. The station is also dedicated to the broadcasting of Golden Eagle athletics and has traveled countless miles to bring athletic action to the fans. Staff members at KROX include: Frank Fee,  general manager, sales, news and sports; Jeanette Fee, office manager; Chris Fee, traffic director, announcer, Web site and sports; Tom Helgeson, sales; Raymond Lee, morning announcer and host of Valley Talk; MaryAnn Simmons, news director; Jacob Fee, announcer and Web site coordinator; Joshua Leyh, afternoon/evening announcer; Cecil Malme, Alisa Cardinal, Mark Anderson who serve as weekend and part-time announcers; and Stan Mueller, station engineer.

The purpose of recognizing someone with a Torch & Shield Award is to honor contributions of significance to higher education, the Crookston campus, and the region; recognize champions of UMC, NWROC, and Extension for their impact on the region through teaching, research, and outreach; and distinguish both high profile individuals and those who have been "quiet" contributors to the success of the U of M, Crookston. For more information or to view past recipients of the award, visit www.umcrookston.edu/torchandshield.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Corby Kemmer, director, development and alumni relations, 218-281-8434 (ckemmer@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Fragile monarch butterflies migrate some 2,500 miles every year to overwinter in the samemonarch.jpg trees they have visited for generations. In order to understand the migration habits of the monarch and protect precious habitat, the butterflies are tagged in late August just before they begin their fall migration.

The public is invited to a Monarch Tagging Open House on Saturday, August 28, 2010, hosted by the U of M, Crookston's Agriculture and Natural Resources Department and the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC). The open house will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Red River Valley Natural History Area. The natural history area is located west of the Crookston campus and signs will mark the route.

Visitors to the open house will have an opportunity to capture and tag monarch butterflies while learning more about their amazing migration and contributing to a scientific study. For more information, contact Laura Bell, lab services coordinator at the U of M, Crookston at 218-281-8131. Nets will be provided, but guests may bring their own.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 17 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Laura Bell, lab services coordinator, 218-281-8131 (lbell@umn.edu) Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Windels-2.jpgThree University of Minnesota professors have been named Fellows to American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). These professors have been elevated to this rank because of their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. Election as a Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. Carol Windels, a professor in the Department of Plant Pathology at the Northwest Research and Outreach Center (NWROC) in Crookston, will be honored as one of the 2010 Fellows and welcomed into the prestigious society at its annual convention in February.

Windels was recognized for her definitive research on ecology of soil borne plant pathogens on field crops and integrated control of diseases and for national professional leadership. Windels is one of three from the University of Minnesota to be named a 2010 Fellow. Joining her are Marc A. Hillmyer, a professor in the Department of Chemistry in the Institute of Technology, and David J. Norris, a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science in the Institute of Technology.
 
This year 531 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. New Fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pin during the AAAS Fellows Forum from 8 to 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 20 at the 2010 AAAS Annual Meeting in San Diego.

This year's AAAS Fellows were announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science this month.

The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874. Currently, members can be considered for the rank of Fellow if nominated by the steering groups of the association's 24 sections, or by any three Fellows who are current AAAS members (so long as two of the three sponsors are not affiliated with the nominee's institution), or by the AAAS chief executive officer. Each steering group then reviews the nominations of individuals within its respective section and a final list is forwarded to the AAAS Council, which votes on the aggregate list.

The council is the policymaking body of the association, chaired by the AAAS president, and consisting of the members of the board of directors, the retiring section chairs, delegates from each electorate and each regional division and two delegates from the National Association of Academies of Science.
The NWROC is located 300 miles from the St. Paul Campus and offers unique opportunities for plant pathology research in the agriculturally rich Red River Valley.  The Center has a plant pathology research laboratory, greenhouses, controlled environment chambers, and field facilities.  To learn more, visit www.nwroc.umn.edu.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 applied-science undergraduate degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; math, science and technology; and natural resources. To learn more, visit www.UMCrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Maureen Aubol, Northwest Research and Outreach Center, 218-281-8602 (aubo0002@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Smith_Larry 5125.jpgLarry Smith, Ph.D., head of the Northwest Research and Outreach Center has been named a recipient of the Sugarbeet Distinguished Service Award for 2009. The Sugarbeet Research & Education Board presented the award to Smith at the American Crystal Sugar Company annual meeting on Thursday, December 3, at the Holiday Inn in Fargo, N.D.

Smith joined the staff at Crookston in 1971 as an agronomist and was later appointed to the sugarbeet agronomist position that was created in 1978. He is widely known across the country for his field research and extensive education in sugarbeet production. His appointment as head of the NWROC began in 1983.

The Sugarbeet Distinguished Service Award recognizes individuals for their recent,  significant contributions to the success of the sugarbeet industry in Minnesota and North Dakota. A recipient must demonstrate excellence in sugarbeet research, and/or sugarbeet education programs that have made a significant impact on the industry.

American Crystal Sugar Company is a world-class agricultural cooperative specializing in the production of sugar and related agri-products. American Crystal is owned by approximately 3,000 shareholders who raise 500,000 acres of sugarbeets in the Red River Valley of Minnesota and North Dakota. To learn more about American Crystal Sugar, visit www.crystalsugar.com.

The NWROC serves the prairie and adjacent land area of northwestern Minnesota.  Its activities are a part of the total agricultural research program for the University of Minnesota. The Research and Outreach Center, located adjacent to the UMC campus, owns approximately 1,500 acres of land.  The center provides laboratories, fields, and herds for use by U of M, Crookston students enrolled in agriculture programs. For more information, visit www.nwroc.umn.edu.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 applied-science undergraduate degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; math, science and technology; and natural resources. To learn more, visit www.UMCrookston.edu.

Contact: Maureen Aubol, office supervisor, Northwest Research and Outreach Center, 218-281-8602 (audo0002@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Crookston, Minn.  - Associate Professor Charla Hollingsworth at the Northwest Research and Hollingsworth_Charla.jpgOutreach Center (NWROC) recently accepted a position with the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) in the capacity of National Science Program Leader for Plant Pathology and Weeds at the Center for Plant Health, Science, and Technology in Raleigh, N.C.  A farewell for Hollingsworth will be held on Thursday, October 8, 2009, at 1 p.m. in the Bede Ballroom located in the Sargeant Student Center on the U of M, Crookston campus. She will begin her new post with the USDA on November 8, 2009.

The Center for Plant Health, Science, and Technology supports regulatory decisions and operations through methods development work, scientific investigation, analyses and technology.  In her new position, Hollingsworth will have responsibilities for planning, coordination, and oversight in support of the APHIS and PPQ missions.  Utilizing technologically advanced investigative approaches will be a primary focus.

Hollingsworth began her career at the U of M in July 2002 as the small grains plant pathology extension specialist located at the NWROC.  Through her hard work, dedication and expertise, Hollingsworth established highly effective extension and research programs for addressing plant disease problems of small grain growers in northwestern Minnesota and North Central U.S.  She produced an impressive number of research articles, extension bulletins, fact sheets and educational articles, contributed to numerous grower and ag professional events, and was the original co-editor of the much read newsletter, Cropping Issues in Northwest Minnesota. She collaboratively maintained the website for the Minnesota Fusarium Head Blight Forecasting System.  

In cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, Hollingsworth trained plant pest surveyors in identification and estimation of disease incidence and severity for major diseases of wheat and barley.  She played a central role in five successful applications for EPA Section 18 Specific Exemption Requests, which provided growers with fungicide options for managing Fusarium head blight on wheat and barley.  Data she provided for the Minnesota exemptions has been used for other state's exemption requests, which have had far reaching impacts on the management of Fusarium head blight nationally.

For more information about the NWROC, visit http://nwroc.crk.umn.edu.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 applied-science undergraduate degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; math, science and technology; and natural resources. To learn more, visit www.UMCrookston.edu.


Contact: Maureen Aubol, office supervisor, NWROC, 218-281-8602 (aubo0002@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director of communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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