Recently in service learning Category

The annual Student Awards Program, a celebration of student service, leadership, and academic and athletic achievement, was held recently at the University of Minnesota Crookston.

To view or download photos, visit the photo gallery

ward recipients include the following students:

CSA Student Senators and Officers
Back row, left to right: Jesse Jennings, Trevor Buttermore, Kisun Kim, Ross Sigler, Jiwon Park, Brennan Andreas, Justin Goodroad. Middle row: Drew Underdahl, Monika Sweet, Sarah Muellner, Delaney Kohorst, Emily Campbell, Natalie Tym. Front row: Ashley Hoffman, Laura Gabrielson, Alexmai Addo, Kayla Bellrichard, with Lisa Sameulson, advisor. 

Outstanding Ambassadors
Back row, left to right, are Brant Moore, Dustin Smith, Rochelle Herzog, Randi Bethel, Cassie Hagg (Rookie Ambassador of the Year), Justin Goodroad, with Lisa Loegering
Front row: Michelle Boateng, Sarah Muellner, Toynell Delaney, Emily Caldis, Catlin Kersting (Ambassador of the Year), and Sarah Morris. Not pictured: Chris Kohloff, Karli Anderson, Shaolei (Sorry) Jin, Kevin Lamp, Alisha Grams

Outstanding First-Year Biology Award
Kary Sheppard and Sierra Trost with Katie Sheetz

Outstanding Future Educator Award
Amanda Overman, Alyssa Schneider with Marsha Odom

Marketing/Management Outstanding Leadership Award
Brooke Hoffman and Kayla Bellrichard

Outstanding Accounting Student
Abdou Niang with Scott Leckie

Outstanding Sport and Recreation Management Student
Brennan Andreas with Scott Leckie

Outstanding Communication Student
Steffanie Berg, Haley Weleski, and Ruth Navarro with Kevin Thompson

SOS Service Award
Katie Nenn, Kevin Lamp, Kayla Bellrichard, and Ross Sigler

Outstanding SOS Leader
Cody Current

Norman Pankratz Memorial Conservation Award
Cayla Bendel with Dan Svedarsky

John Polley Soil and Water Conservation Award
Mark Koep with Dan Svedarsky


Outstanding Horticulture
Justin Goodroad with Theresa Helgeson

Outstanding Ag Systems Management Student
Alex DeBoer with Paul Aakre

NACTA Recognition
In the photo, left to right, back row: Dylan Pratt, Cody Thompson, Brian Oachs, Andrew Clark, Justin Goodroad, Emily Goff. Middle row: Dustin Smith, Ashley Hoffman, Jared Nowacki, Ben Genereux, Eric Derosier, Emily Campbell.  Front row: Mitzi Marlin, Haley Weleski, Cassie Jo Adams, Sarah Morris, Ashley Radke with Margot Rudstrom. 

Outstanding International Student Scholar Award
Brennan Andreas with Kim Gillette

Multicultural and International Student Recognition
Rae French with Chia Moua, and Young A Choi

Support of Diversity Award
Anthonette Sims

Achievement in Music and Theater Award
Back row, left to right, are Justin Goodroad, Alex Conwell and front row TJ Chapman, band director, Tyler Lowthian, Alissa Hernandez, and George French, director of music and theater. 

Computer Help Desk
Isaac Osei with Thea Oertwich

Student Employee of the Year
Marissa Dempsey with Ken Mendez

NSIC Student Athlete Award
Josh Perea, Alyssa Schnieder with Natasha Kuhle and Stephanie Helgeson

Female and Male Student Athlete of the Year
Katie Sheetz and Jesse Jennings with Natasha Kuhle and Stephanie Helgeson

Female and Male Outstanding Athlete of the Year
Matt McClure and Katrina Moenkedick with Natasha Kuhle and Stephanie Helgeson

Justin Knebel Memorial Award
Natasha Kuhle and Tomas Parker with Stephanie Helgeson

Dale Knotek Community Service Award - National Society for Leadership and Success (NSLS)
Top left to right: Brennan Andreas, Brandon Schmidy, Alyssa Schneider
Bottom left to right: Rochelle Herzog, Emily Caldis, Alissa Hernandez


Presidents Volunteer Service Award
Front row, left to right:  Gyungyoun "Ann" Baek, Julia Rinn, Emily Caldis, Kaylina Paulley, Kevin Lamp, Alissa Hernandez, Katie Nenn, with Lisa Loegering. 2nd Row:  Stephanie Lane, Laura Gabrielson, Ashley Hoffman, Katelyn Johnson, Alexmai Addo, Andrew Buell. 3rd Row:  Adam Roerish, Kayla Bellrichard, Faith Benassi, Megan Luxford, Joanie Melichar, Karly Spohnholtz. Back Row:  Jesse Jennings, Isaac Ossei, Dominic Becker, Cody Current, Tyler Lowthian, Ross Sigler

Student Volunteer of the Year Award
Adam Roerish, Andrew Buell, with Lisa Loegering

Student Programmer of the Year
Emily Cauldis with Lisa Samuelson

Outstanding CSA Senator
Kayla Bellrichard with Alexmai Addo

Outstanding CSA Voting Delegate Award
Justin Goodroad with Aaron Bengston and Alexmai Addo

Student Achievement Awards
Back row: Andy Albertsen, a senior majoring in natural resources from Nelson, Minn.; Alexandra Skeeter, a senior majoring in health sciences from Milwaukee, Wis.; Justin Goodroad, a senior majoring in horticulture from Lindstrom, Minn.; and Alissa Hernandez, a senior majoring in animal science and equine science from Savage, Minn.
Middle row: Kevin Lamp, a junior majoring in natural resources from Long Lake, Minn.; Michael McMahon,a senior majoring in natural resources and aviation from St. Paul, Minn.; Tiffany Breth, a senior majoring in animal science from Albany, Minn.; Rowenna Fillmore, a senior majoring in animal science from Lake Nebagamon, Wis.; and Gyungyoun (Ann) Baek, a senior majoring in health sciences from Seoul, South Korea.
Front row: Cayla Bendel,a senior majoring in natural resources from Lakeville, Minn.; Man of the Year, Sean Rozell, a senior majoring in management from Eveleth, Minn.; Woman of the Year, Kayla Bellrichard, a senior majoring in management and marketing from Elk River, Minn.; Alexmai Addo, a senior from Monrovia, Liberia, majoring in communication; and Chancellor Fred Wood.

Man and Woman of Year
Sean Rozell and Kayla Bellrichard 

Athletic All-Academic Team (no photograph) - 3.2 GPA or higher and lettering in the same sport for two years

Softball         Women's Basketball
Cateline Fafard Avery Jackson
Alexis Khoshaba Kenzie Church
Kaylin Beatty Ashley Martell
Shelby Hollinger         Lindsey Lahr
Josee Plante Ericka McRoberts
Brooke Vatthauer Katrina Moenkedick
Allison Foley Alexa Thielman

Men's Basketball
John Hughes Soccer
Lucas Reller Erin Mears
        Delaney McIntyre
        Cayla Bendel
Football         Rachel Halligan
Ben Bucholz Samantha Berglin
Myint Maung Amanda Crook
Keith McBride
Josh Perea Baseball
Martin Throne Ryan Haggstrom
Jordan Manahah         Trevor Buttermore
Drew Selvestra Marcus Campbell
Andrew Steinfeldt Jesse Jennings
Matt Borowicz Travis Magdzas
Tennis Jon Mittag
Casey Paris Richie Navratil
Annaleis Yuhala         Equestrian
Emily Caldis Paige Clark
        Sabel Bettencourt
Women's Golf Hannah Nedrud
Mary Mikutowski Amanda Overman
Kelly Gustofson Amanda Guimont
Rikki Roscoe Emily Steeley
Katie Sheetz Chloe Nelson
        Amanda Stadtherr
Men's Golf
Zach Cymbaluk Volleyball
Matt Bjorgo Brittany Looker
Michael Roedl Mary Mikutowski
Jesse Roscoe Stephanie Pearson
        Alyssa Schneider
        Alexandra Skeeter
        Chelsea Wiesner

Faculty and Staff Awards

Outstanding Educator
Matt Simmons, Ph.D. 

Most Supportive of Students
Lyle Westrom, Ph.D.

Outstanding Service to Students
Laura Bell

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director, student activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

IRS Certified Free Tax Service Available at U of M Crookston

Students in the University of Minnesota Crookston Accounting and Finance Society are ready to help with tax preparation. The VITA/TCE site will operate from Monday, February 24 through Monday, April 14, on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from noon to 4 p.m. in 110M Sahlstrom Conference Center. For more information, contact Wm. Scott Leckie at 218-281-8174 (wsleckie@crk.umn.edu) or Abdou Niang at 309-333-4787 (niang003@umn.edu). 

Through the VITA Program, IRS-certified volunteers provide free basic income tax return preparation and tax help to people who make $51,000 or less and who need assistance in preparing their own tax returns. The TCE Program offers free tax help for all with priority assistance to people who are 60 years of age and older, specializing in questions about pensions and retirement issues unique to seniors. 

Leckie, a certified public accountant and accounting instructor in the Business Department on the Crookston Campus, prepares students in his Income Tax Preparation class for the opportunity to assist in tax preparation. 

Background
The Crookston campus offers a bachelor of science degree in accounting designed to provide students with both the theoretical and the analytical framework required to work effectively in public, private or governmental accounting. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/bus/accounting. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 20 minors, and 36 concentrations on campus--as well as 13 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from more than 20 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Wm. Scott Leckie, lecturer, (218) 281-8174 (wsleckie@crk.umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual Student Awards Program, a celebration of student service, leadership, and academic and athletic achievement, was held recently at the University of Minnesota Crookston. Assistant Professor Denis Maier, who teaches in the Business Department, was the 2012 Outstanding Educator and hosted this year's recognition.


Award recipients include the following students:

CSA Student Senators and Officers
Brooke Novak; Ross Sigler; Bryce Gillie; Aaron Soltau, Heather Rodriguez; Mariah Gautsche; Emily Goff; Molly Sheehan; Anthonette Sims; and Gyaltso Gurung, Laura Gabrielson; Ashlynn Hartung; Alexmai Addo; Adam Switzer; Kayla Bellrichard; and Shaolei "Sorry" Jin. 


Outstanding Ambassadors
Catlin Kersting, Tashi Gurung, Sam Zuck, Katie Hagen, Sarah Morris, Jordan Melbye
Tony Taylor, Kevin Lamp, Alex Skeeter, Alissa Hernandez, Jessica Girgen, Mikala Guidinger
Sorry Jin, Danny Lee, Bryce Gillie, Justin Goodroad

Ambassador of the Year Award
Bryce Gillie


Outstanding First-Year Biology Award
Ashley Martell


Outstanding Future Educator Award
Dabitna Chung, Amy Van Treeck

Marketing/ Management Academic Achievement Award
Dain Park and Alex Buscher


Marketing/Management Outstanding Leadership Award
Dain Park, Abbey Wemimo, Hannah Reysen, Kayla Bellrichard

Distinguished Service to the Accounting Program
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee

Outstanding SRM Student
Kari Bodine

Outstanding Communication Student
Jessica Stuber 

Outstanding Communication Minor
Connie Vandermay 


SOS Service Award
Alexmai Addo, Catilin Kersting

Outstanding SOS Leader
Almir Krdzalik

Peer Connection Service Award
Alexmai Addo and Brooke Novak

Peer Mentor of the Year Award
Catlin Kersting

Regal Spirit Award
Kayla Bellrichard, and Tyler Lowithan

Outstanding Turfgrass Student Award
Kyle Kreklow, Kurtis Wacker, Joey Schmidt, with Kristie Walker

Norman Pankratz Memorial Conservation Award
Jenny DuBay 

John Polley Soil and Water Conservation Award
Trent Brenny and Andrew Albertsen with Dan Svedarsky

The Wildlife Society Travel Award
Alisha Mosloff 

Outstanding Animal Science
Sara Scott (pre-vet) 

Outstanding Equine Science
Jess Charles (pre-vet)

Outstanding Ag Business Student
Amanda Crook 

Outstanding ASM Student
Leonard Will and Matt Green 

Outstanding Horticulture
Ashlynn Hartung


NACTA Recognition
Meats  Team: Dustin Wiese,  Katie Hagen, Justin Goodroad and Derek Suhonen 
Ag Business Dustin Smith, Katie Hagen, Matt Green, and Kayla Erickson
Ag Computers: Cedric Citrowske, Amanda Crook, Drew Underdahl and Brian Oachs 

Outstanding International Student Scholars Award
Ashley Yun Zhor; Brennan Andreas; Danny Lee; and Tashi Gurung

Learning Abroad Office Ambassador Awards
Tim Baker; Amanda Corneliussen; and DeAndra O'Connell 

Support of Diversity Award


Outstanding Theater Student Award
Liz Massie
Tyler Lowithan
Nathan Anderson

Outstanding Music Service Award
Rebecca Apitz 
Miah Smith 

Outstanding Writing Tutor
Rowenna Fillmore

Computer Help Desk
Melissa Freitag 

Student Employee of the Year
Adam Hoff 

Female and Male Student Athlete of the Year
Chelsea Wiesner and Almir Kradzlik

Female and Male Outstanding Athlete of the Year
Brittany Wiese and Brittany Looker and Richard Haley

Justin Knebel Memorial Award
Broderick Schmidt

Dale Knotek Community Service Award - Delta Theta Sigma (DTS)
Joshua Bruggman, Tim Lee, Brett Carlson, Clayton Lenk, Aaron Soltau, Marcus Twaddle
Kasey Okke, Adam Switzer, Dan Kimm, Hannah Reysen, Sami Benoy, Evan Boreen, Amanda Corneliussen, Brittany Fox

Presidents Volunteer Service Award
Megan Luxford, Chia Moua, Kari Bodine, Bailey Stratton (online student), Katie Nenn, Kevin Lamp Tony Taylor, Krista Kenyon, Emily Goff, Alexmai Addo, Catlin Kersting, Kayla Bellrichard, Alissa Hernandez, Almir Krdzalic Kasey Okke, Sean Rozell, Tyler Lowthian, Bryce Gillie, Ross Sigler

Student Volunteer of the Year Award
John Niemczyk with Lisa Loegering

Student Programmer of the Year
Ashley Hoffman

Outstanding CSA Senator
Alexmai Addo 

Outstanding CSA Voting Delegate Award
Megan Luxford

Faculty and Staff Awards

Outstanding Educator
Ron Del Vecchio 

Most Supportive of Students
Phil Baird 

Outstanding Service to Students
Lisa Samuelson 

Student Achievement Awards
en Williams, Bryce Gillie, Almir Krzadlic, Matt Green
Krista Kenyon, Tashi Gurung, Abbey Wemimo, Brooke Novak
Alexmai Addo, Danny Lee, Sam Zuck- Roscoe, and Alex Skeeter

Man and Woman of Year
Dae Yuel Danny Lee and Sam Zuck-Roscoe 


Athletic All-Academic Team - 3.2 GPA or higher and lettering in the same sport for two years

Rachelle Alcini - Women's Soccer
Matthew G. Borowicz - Football
Carli Bunning - Women's Basketball
Karen Carpenedo - Equestrian - Western
Jessica Charles - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Jensen Crots - Women's Soccer
Zach D. Cymbaluk - Men's Golf
Amanda Krueger - Equestrian - Western
Kelly Gustofson - Women's Golf
Rachel Halligan - Women's Soccer
Shelby Hollinger - Softball
Jesse Jennings - Baseball
Caitlin Kelley - Equestrian - Western
Samantha Kramer - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Almir Krdzalic - Men's Basketball
Brittany Looker - Women's Volleyball
Stacey Marcum - Softball
Ashley Martell - Women's Basketball
Myint Maung- Football
Keith McBride - Football
Erin Mears - Women's Soccer
Mary Mikutowski - Women's Volleyball & Golf
Brooks Miller - Baseball
Hannah Nedrud - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Amanda Overman - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Casey Paris - Women's Tennis
Josh Perea - Football
Angela Peterson - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Josee Plante - Softball
Jordan Prill - Baseball
Jesse Roscoe - Men's Golf
Shannan Salm - Equestrian - Western
Hannah Schiller - Women's Volleyball
Broderick Schmidt - Men's Basketball
Alyssa Schneider - Women's Volleyball
Christopher Secrest - Football
Drew Selvestra - Football
Alexandra Skeeter - Women's Volleyball
Joseph Stearly - Football
Andrew Steinfeldt - Football
Annalee Sundin - Equestrian - Hunt Seat
Brooke Vatthauer - Softball
Chelsea Wiesner - Women's Volleyball
Yahna Zastrow - Equestrian - Western

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Samuelson, director of Student Activities, 218-281-8507 (samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota Crookston was named to the 2013 President's Higher Education 
03 honorroll_LOGO.jpg
Community Service Honor Roll. This designation is the highest honor a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement. The Crookston campus was one of 690 institutions of higher education to receive this honor. The 2013 Honor Roll recipients were announced at the American Council on Education's 95th Annual Meeting Leading Change on March 4, 2013, in Washington, D.C. 

According to the definition of community service defined for recognition on the honor roll, the U of M Crookston engaged in 39,481 services hours. Community service includes activities designed to improve the quality of life of off-campus community residents, particularly those deemed low-income, and includes both direct service to citizens and indirect service.

Applications for the recognition are evaluated on the university's three exemplary projects based on the scope of the project, evidence of project effectiveness, and impact on the community.  For each project, Lisa Loegering, assistant director of community engagement, is required to provide the number of students and staff who participated in the project, the total number of service hours, the number of individuals served, and the effectiveness of the project.

Background
Inspired by the thousands of college students who traveled across the country to support relief efforts along the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina, CNCS has administered the award since 2006 and manages the program in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, as well as the American Council on Education and Campus Compact. 

More information about the U of M Crookston's community service efforts can be found at www1.crk.umn.edu/services/ce. More information on eligibility and the full list of Honor Roll awardees can be found at nationalservice.gov.  

Today the University of Minnesota Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, Community Engagement, 218-281- 8526, (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Katie Schneider, a 2012 graduate of the University of Minnesota, Crookston from Delano, 
Schneider_Katie 2339.jpg
Minnesota, and former community adviser, has begun a one-year AmeriCorps VISTA appointment in the Office of Community Engagement, following training in Albuquerque, N.M., February 26 - 28, 2013. Schneider will assist with community service and service-learning efforts.  She will coordinate service days such as Meet Crookston through Service, National Youth Service Day, and MLK Day of Service. 

Her degrees are in equine science and agricultural business, but her passion has always been to work with a non-profit organization. Growing up on a hobby farm with sheep and horses along with her 14-year history as a member of 4-H, Schneider found herself donating time to help youth interested in horses and riding. The first time she received a thank you note from someone following an equine clinic she hosted, Schneider knew that working for a non-profit was her goal. "When the opportunity to work as an AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer on the campus opened, I was interested immediately," she says. "It is the chance to get students involved in service and make a difference and for me to do the kind of work I love." 

Lisa Loegering, assistant director for Community Engagement is looking forward to having Schneider on board. "We run community service and service learning out of the same office, and having Katie here is an opportunity to develop new programs, new projects, and to really move this office forward," Loegering says. The AmeriCorps VISTA appointment is for one year with an option for a second year. Schneider lives on campus and will be working with community service in the residence halls as well. 

schneider_loegering2.jpg
Loegering and Schneider will work as a team, but Loegering hopes to have people see Schneider as the face of community service on the campus. That idea sounds good to Schneider, "I am excited to get students involved in volunteering," she says. I know the campus and it is exciting to be back in this capacity. I am looking forward to working with Lisa and building on what is going on here."

Background
The U of M, Crookston has a history of community engagement that began long before the office by that name was established.  Faculty realized early on that many of the courses taught on the Crookston campus were best taught beyond the doors of the classrooms. In 1996, the Office of Service-Learning was established and housed under student activities. In addition to coordinating the service-learning program, this office also coordinated community service projects and America Reads. In 2011, the name was changed to the Office of Community Engagement to better describe the goals and more accurately define the activities. They work directly with local agencies, organizations, and individuals to address community needs.

The mission of the Office of Community Engagement is to serve as a resource for faculty for the integration of service-learning, support students in their development as engaged citizens and scholars, and foster mutually beneficial campus-community partnerships to address community needs. To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu/services/ServiceLearning. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, right, Katie Schneider, and at left, Katie Schneider (left) visits with Lisa Loegering about her new role as a AmeriCorps VISTA Volunteer.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, Community Engagement, 218-281- 8526, (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston is launching a project in Fosston, Minn., to design a natural play space somewhere along the Fosston Inspiration Trail (FIT). Eric Castle, assistant professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, teaches landscape design and construction courses on the Crookston campus.  Castle and Mitch Sledge, a junior majoring in horticulture from St. Louis Park, Minn., will be assisting Fosston in this project.  A design workshop to engage the community is scheduled for March 5 in Fosston starting with supper at 6 pm.  All are welcome.  Contact Chuck Lucken at City Hall for details at 218-435-1959. 

Funding for the design project comes from the U of M's Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership (RSDP) and Polk County Public Health's Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP).  

Polk County Public Health is focusing on active living through its Statewide Health Improvement Plan work, and natural play spaces are an excellent way for families to be active together.  

A natural play space is a playground that uses things found in nature - the kind of things that children used to find on their own.  Getting help with the design of the space will ensure that it is not only fun, but also safe, and aesthetically pleasing.  The design portion of the project will be completed by May 1 in time for the community to move from design to action during the summer of 2013.  This coincides with progress on the FIT trail.  

"Fosston aspires to be one of the best communities in the state of Minnesota to live and do business.  That's why the Fosston Economic Development Authority (FEDA) went after the natural play space grants," said Mark Finstad, FEDA board chair.  Fosston City Administrator Chuck Lucken agrees, saying "Fosston has a long tradition of finding ways to improve the community.  This project will provide a safe natural play space for children and their families and friends of all ages."  

The Fosston Athenian Club, a member of the General Federation of Women's Clubs, voted at their December meeting to take the lead for engaging the community in the process of designing the natural play space.  Club president Sue Balstad said, "This project is a perfect match with our Club Collect to be large in thought, word, and deed.  We look forward to convening a meeting to engage the Fosston community in this important project."  

The Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP) serves the people in northwestern Minnesota as they experiment with innovative ideas, build and strengthen relationships and take practical steps into a hopeful future.  For more details see http://rsdp.umn.edu/northwest. 

Contact: Linda Kingery, executive director, U of M Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, 218-281-8697 (kinge002@umn.edu)

Sleep deprivation affects learning making it vitally important for children to get a good night's 
Lisa's Bed Project 0081.jpg
rest before they go to school. Many take for granted the comfort of a bed, but for some area children a bed would be considered a luxury. Providing those children with beds has become a special project under the direction of Lisa Loegering, assistant director of community engagement at the University of Minnesota, Crookston and a collaboration with community partners. 

Loegering first saw a project for providing beds to needy children on another university's Web site. She decided to contact Karen Broekemeier at Polk County Social Services to see if such a need existed here. "I was surprised to learn of just how great the need was in Polk County," explains Loegering. "We have children who desperately need a bed, and the thought of a child without a bed spurred me forward with the goal of finding beds for 20 children in our county."

Lisa's Bed Project 0085.jpg
On Wednesday, January 30, 2013, the first ten beds will be delivered to children from ages 6 to 16 in the county. The needs of children were prioritized by Broekemeier and her social workers and a list was developed to help get the beds to the neediest children first. 

Loegering began the work by putting together a list of different components needed for the project, and she was met with enthusiasm from those interested in participating. Included in the project were bed frames from the University of Minnesota, Crookston which were in storage because they had been replaced by a new style of bed for campus use; quilts and stuffed bears made by volunteers in the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP); sheets and pillows donated by the Salvation Army; and toothbrushes, toothpaste, and floss donated by Dr. Jensen at Renu Dental.

With everything but the mattresses in place, Loegering began to have some concern about the project. "We desperately needed the mattresses, but the donation I was hoping to have come through was taking longer than expected," she said. "Fortunately, when community people heard about this need, they opened their hearts and their checkbooks to help." Those generous gifts purchased the first 10 mattresses, but Loegering is still hoping to provide 10 more beds to area children in need. It will take another $1800 for the purchase of those 10 additional mattresses. 

Broekemeier shared stories with Loegering about the need for beds and how families lack 
Lisa's Bed Project 0082.jpg
financial resources and struggle to provide for the most basic needs of their families. This week children in Crookston and several other area communities will have a bed of their very own and the opportunity to get a good night's sleep before they head off to school. 

To learn more about the project or to donate money for purchasing mattresses, contact Loegering at 218-281-8526. 

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 27 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 39 concentrations on campus--as well as 10 degrees online--in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,800 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Jan Aamoth, director of RSVP; Karen Broekemeier, Polk County Social Services, Brooke Novak, representing U of M, Crookston students; and Lisa Loegering, assistant director of community engagement at the U of M, Crookston


Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, Community Engagement, 218-281- 8526, (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The annual Student Awards Program, a night celebrating student service and achievement, 2012_4-19-Service Awards 0277.jpgwas held recently at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. Associate Professor Kevin Thompson, who teaches in the Liberal Arts and Education Department, was the 2011 Outstanding Educator and hosted this year's recognition.

Award recipients include the following students:
(Numbers correspond to the number of the photo in the online photo gallery.)

1.    Fall 2011 CSA Senators and Officers
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Hannah Frey, junior, communication, La Crosse, Wis.
Kate Holmquist, senior, communication, Middleton, Wis.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Jennifer Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Anthonette Sims, sophomore, communication, Robbinsdale, Minn.
Michelle Boateng, junior, applied studies, Bloomington, Minn.
Adam Switzer, junior, sport and recreation management, Apple Valley, Minn.
Brooke Novak, junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.
Hannah Reysen, sophomore, double major marketing and business management, Adell, Wis.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Kayla Bellrichard, freshman, business management, Elk River, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
Emily Goff, sophomore, double major animal science and equine science, Danvers, Minn.
Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.

2.    Spring 2012 CSA Senators and Officers
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Kate Holmquist, senior, communication, Middleton, Wis.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Anthonette Sims, sophomore, communication, Robbinsdale, Minn.
Michelle Boateng, junior, applied studies, Bloomington, Minn.
Adam Switzer, junior, sport and recreation management, Apple Valley, Minn.
Brooke Novak, junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.
Hannah Reysen, sophomore, double major marketing and business management, Adell, Wis.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Kayla Bellrichard, freshman, business management, Elk River, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
Emily Goff, sophomore, double major animal science and equine science, Danvers, Minn.
Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.

3.    Student Ambassadors
Kourtney Brevik, sophomore, animal science, Erskine, Minn.
Jessica Stuber, senior, natural resources, Hill City, Minn.
Samantha Zuck, junior, animal science, Jamestown, N.D.
Rachel Keimig, senior, ag systems management, Princeton, Minn.
Alexandra Skeeter, sophomore, health sciences, Milwaukee, Wis.
Victoria Martin, sophomore, animal science, Worland, Wyo.
Tony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridan, Wyo.
Amanda Pihlaja, junior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management,  Duluth, Minn.
Erica Nelson, junior, double major animal science and equine science, Carols, Minn.
Whitney Lian, junior, agricultural education, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Bryce Gillie, junior, agronomy, Hallock, Minn.
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Samantha Lahman, senior, animal science, Parkers Prairie, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
Josh Lunak, advisor

4.    Ambassador of the Year
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.

Campus Ministry Award (No photograph available)
Jenna Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.

5.    Outstanding Leadership in FCA Award
 Jensen Crots, junior, health management, Chesterton, Ind.

Outstanding Achievement in Math and Physics Award (No photograph available)
Tyler Brazier, senior, software engineering, Greenbush, Minn.
Tyler Berglund, junior, health sciences, Warren, Minn.

6.    Outstanding First Year Biology Award
Brittany Looker, freshman, health sciences, Rochester, Minn.
Ashley Martell, freshman, health sciences, Somerset, Wis.

7.    Excellence in Early Childhood Education Award
Megan Eul, senior, early childhood education, Rosemount, Minn.
Janie Bauer,  senior, early childhood education, Durand, Wis.

8.    Outstanding Academic Achievement Award - Business Department

Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.
Sheila Lynch, senior, business management, Inver Grove Heights, Minn.
Alisha Hillstrom, senior, business management, Maple Grove, Minn.
Christopher Bargsten, senior, double major business management and quality management, New Brighton, Minn.
Michael Cloutier, senior, business management, Zimmerman, Minn.
Bryan Boutain, senior, marketing, Alexandria, Minn.
Adam Grahek, senior, marketing, Minneapolis, Minn.
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal

9.    Outstanding Leadership Award -  Business Department
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Julie Trotter, senior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management, Eagan, Minn.
Tony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridan, Wyo.
Brittany Bergemann, senior, marketing, Good Thunder, Minn.

10.    Outstanding Accounting Student
Hwee Kim, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea

11.    Hotel, Restaurant & Tourism Hospitality Award
Amoy Carty, senior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management; Sandy Point, Saint Kitts.
Lauren Ferrara, senior, hotel, restaurant and tourism management; Eden Prairie, Minn.

12.    Outstanding Communication Student Award
 Kristine Neu, senior, double major, horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.

Outstanding Communication Student (Minor) Award

Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal

13.    Outstanding Sport and Recreation Management Student
Paul Adelman, junior, sport and recreation management, Bellingham, Minn.
Danielle Rueter, senior, sport and recreation management, Burlington, Wis.

14.    SOS Service Award
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Alysia Osowski, senior, double major in agricultural business and agronomy, Grafton, N.D.

SOS Leadership Award
Katelyn Zins, senior, communication, Starbuck, Minn.

15.    Peer Connections Service Award
Kristine Neu, senior, double major in horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Brooke Novak,  junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.

Peer Connections Peer Mentor of the Year (No photograph available)
Samantha Zuck, junior, animal science, Jamestown, N.D.

16.    Outstanding Turfgrass Student Award
Trenton Waters, senior, golf and turf management, Rush City, Minn.
 
Turf Bowl Team Members
Trenton Waters, senior, golf and turf management, Rush City, Minn.
Nick Walters, senior, golf and turf management, Plymouth, Minn.
Nick Harreld, senior, golf and turf management, New Brighton, Minn.
Kyle Rick, senior, double major golf and turf management and manufacturing management, Coon Rapids, Minn.

17.    Norman Pankratz Memorial Conservation Award
Ben Williams, senior, natural resources, Excelsior, Minn.

John Polley Soil and Water Conservation Award
Bob Guetter, sophomore, natural resources, Miltona, Minn.

18.    Minnesota Soil and Water Conservation
Kelsey Kaiser, junior, natural resources, Streeter, N.D.
Austin Link, senior, natural resources, Sebeka, Minn.

19.    June Shaver /The Wildlife Society Scholarship
Krista Kenyon, junior, natural resources, Sanford, Manitoba, Canada
Austin Link, , senior, natural resources, Sebeka, Minn.

20.    Outstanding Animal Science Student of the Year
 Kayla Klehr, senior, animal science, Richmond, Minn.

Outstanding Equine Science Student of the Year
 Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.

21.    Outstanding Dedication to the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department
Sara Wells, senior, double major equine science and biology, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

22.    Outstanding Ag Business
Alysia Osowski, senior, double major agricultural business and agronomy, Grafton, N.D.

23.    Outstanding Ag Systems Management Student
 Matt Green, senior, triple major agricultural systems management, agronomy, and ag business, Greenbush, Minn.

24.    Hort Club Award and Exceptional Service to the Hort Club Award
Catlin Kersting, sophomore, horticulture, Cloquet, Minn. (Hort Club Award)
Kristine Neu, senior, double major horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn. (Exceptional Service to the Hort Club

25.    Study Abroad Seniors
Emily Caillier, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Crookston, Minn.
Sheila Carleton, senior, double major agronomy and natural resources, Baxter, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Jennifer Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Trista Halland, senior, business management, Crookston, Minn.

26.    International Student Scholars Awards
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Tashi Wongdi Gurung, junior, environmental sciences, Mustang, Nepal
Amoy Carty, senior, hotel, restaurant and tourism management, Sandy Point, Saint Kitts
Nana Sarkodie Boaten, senior, marketing, Accra, Ghana

Outstanding achievement by an International Student
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal

27.    Outstanding ESL Student    
Han Gyu Kang, Busan, South Korea

Outstanding ESL Tutor
Tashi Gurung, junior, environmental sciences, Mustang, Nepal


28.    Together Everyone Achieves More
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal
Shirley Osborne, Crooskton, Minn.

29.    Support of Diversity Award presented by the Black Student Association
Ashley Crowe, Circle of Nations Indigenous Association, senior, sport and recreation management, Long Prairie, Minn.
Rae French, coordinator of study abroad
Alvin Killough, assistant professor, Liberal Arts and Education Department
Gary Willhite, director of residential life
Peter Phaiah, associate vice chancellor for student affairs
Charles H. Casey, chancellor
Kristie Jerde, assistant director residential life and advisor for the Black Student Association

30.    Achievement in Music
Tyler Lowthian, freshman, business management, Richfield, Minn.
Bryce Gillie, junior, agronomy, Hallock, Minn.
Miah Smith, freshman, health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Liz Massie, sophomore, communication, Eagan, Minn.
Nathan Anderson, freshman, agricultural education, Appleton, Minn.
Chelsea Swenson, senior, software engineering, Fertile, Minn.
Beth Motley, sophomore, equine science, Vadnais Heights, Minn.
Casey Paris, sophomore, agricultural business, Fairmont, Minn.
Mark Frenzel, sophomore, agricultural systems management, Blackduck, Minn.

31.    Computer Help Desk Award
Kelsey Kaiser, junior, natural resources, Streeter, N.D.

32.    Student Employee of the Year Award
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.

33.    Athletic Department All Academic Team
To be eligible for this honor, the student-athlete must be a member of the varsity traveling team and have a cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or better.  Furthermore, the athlete must have reached sophomore athletic and academic standing at her/his institution (true freshmen, red-shirt freshmen and ineligible athletic transfers are not eligible) and must have completed at least one full academic year at that institution.

Janie Bauer, volleyball, senior, early childhood education, Durand, Wis.
Jonathon Blazek, men's golf, senior, business management, Owatonna, Minn.
Kari Bodine, women's golf, junior, sport and recreation management, Babbitt, Minn.
Carli Bunning, women's basketball, junior, natural resources, Boone, Iowa
Karen Carpendo, equestrian, senior, equine science, Bessemer, Mich.
Jessica Charles, equestrian, senior, animal science, Belgrade Lakes, Maine
Jensen Crots, soccer, junior, health management, Chesterton, Ind.
Megan Eul, women's basketball, senior, early childhood education, Rosemount, Minn.
Amanda Flint, equestrian, senior, double major equine science and agricultural business, Aberdeen, S.D.
Megan Flynn, soccer, senior, hotel, restaurant, and tourism management, Chanhassen, Minn.
Jessica Goodrich, soccer, sophomore, communication, Munster, Ind.
Kelly Gustofson, women's golf, junior, early childhood education, Hermantown, Minn.
Rachel Halligan, soccer, junior, early childhood education, Duluth, Minn.
Theresa Hamel, women's golf, senior, double major agronomy and agricultural business, Lakota, N.D.
Lauren Kessler, women's basketball, senior, early childhood education, Albertville, Minn.
Megan Kramer, equestrian, senior, equine science, Owatonna, Minn.
Almir Krdzalic, men's basketball, junior, biology, Sioux Falls, S.D.
Stacey Marcum, softball, junior, communication, Merrill, Wis.
Keith McBride, football, junior, double major business management and accounting, Lodi, Wis.
Addie O'Neil, equestrian, junior, agricultural education, Redwood Falls, Minn.
Amanda Overman, equestrian, junior, early childhood education, Lindenhurst, Ill
Casey Paris, tennis, sophomore, agricultural business, Fairmont, Minn.
Josh Perea, football, sophomore, criminal justice, Pico Rivera, Calif.
Angela Peterson, equestrian, senior, double major equine science and animal science, Detroit Lakes,  Minn.
Melanie Rodriguez, equestrian, senior, animal science, Minneapolis, Minn.
Danielle Rueter, volleyball senior, sport and recreation management, Burlington, Wis.
Alyssa Schneider, volleyball, senior, early childhood education, Racine, Wis.
Rachel Schoenborn, softball, sophomore, biology, Anchorage, Alaska
Christopher Secrest, football, junior, criminal justice, Hollywood, Fla.
Alexandra Skeeter, volleyball, sophomore, health sciences, Milwaukee, Wis.
Joseph Stearly, football, junior, health management, Hamlake, Minn.
Andrew Steinfeldt, football, sophomore, health sciences, Green Bay, Wis.
Annalee Sundin, equestrian, junior, double major equine science and animal science, Deer River, Minn.
Denise Thompson, equestrian, sophomore, equine science, Rochester, NY
Amy Van Treeck, equestrian, junior, early childhood education, Sheboygan Falls, Wis.
Kaytlin Weiger, equestrian, senior, equine science, Duluth, Minn.
Sara Wells, equestrian, senior, double major equine science and biology, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Chelsea Wiesner, volleyball, sophomore, double major health sciences and biology, Rochester, Minn.
Yahna Zastrow, equestrian, senior, equine science, Easton, Minn.


34.    Student Programmer of the Year
 Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.

35.    Dale Knotek Community Service Award
Student  Athletic  Advisory Committee (SAAC)

36.    President's Volunteer Service Awards
Alexmai Addo, sophomore, communication, Minneapolis, Minn.
Sabra Amundson, sophomore, animal science, Crooks, S.D.
Chris Anderson, senior, natural resources, Missoula, Mont.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Gyungyoun "Ann" Baek, sophomore, health sciences,  Seoul, South Korea
Samm Blees, senior, criminal justice, North St. Paul, Minn.
Nana Boaten, senior, marketing, Accra, Ghana
Michelle Boateng, junior, applied studies, Bloomington, Minn.
Tiffany Breth, junior, animal science, Upsala, Minn.
Kourtney Brevik, sophomore, animal science, Erskine, Minn.
Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.
Sophie Cross, freshman, animal science, Farmington, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Bryce Gillie, junior, agronomy, Hallock, Minn.
Katie Hagen, sophomore, agricultural business, Epping, N.D.
Alissa Hernandez, freshman, double major animal science and equine science, Savage, Minn.
Catlin Kersting, sophomore, horticulture, Cloquet, Minn.
Moysey Kutsev, sophomore, business management, Erskine, Minn.
Dae Yeul "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul,  South Korea
Whitney Lian, junior, agricultural education, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Nongye Lo, senior, business management, St. Paul, Minn.
Jordan Melbye, senior, communication, Crookston, Minn.
May Nabirye, junior, software engineering, Eagan, Minn.
Erica Nelson, junior, double major equine science and animal science, Carlos, Minn.
Kasey Okke, junior, agricultural education, Hawley, Minn.
Isaac Osei, sophomore, software engineering, Cottage Grove, Minn.
Alysia Osowski, senior, double major agricultural business and agronomy, Grafton, N.D.
Jennifer Rasmussen, senior, health sciences, Dalton, Minn.
Amanda Reineke, senior, double major, equine science and agricultural business, Fisher, Minn.
Hannah Reysen, sophomore, double major marketing and business management, Adell, Wis.
Donovan Rupprecht, freshman, undeclared, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Allison Schumacher, senior, sport and recreation management, Crookston, Minn.
Anthonette Sims, sophomore, communication, Robbinsdale, Minn.
Karlie Sorrell, senior, animal science, Altona, N.Y.
Anthony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridean, Wyo.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Abbie Westby, senior, agricultural education, Erhard, Minn.
Anton Young, senior, senior, natural resources, St. Cloud, Minn.
Katelyn Zins, senior, communication, Starbuck, Minn.

37.    President's Student Leadership Award
Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) representing SIFE are
Tony Taylor, senior, business management, Sheridan, Wyo.
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria
Alexandra Buscher, senior, business management, Merrifield, Minn.
Dae Yuel "Danny" Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea

38.    Outstanding CSA Senator
Adam Switzer, junior, sport and recreation management, Apple Valley, Minn.

Outstanding CSA Voting Delegate Award, in memory of Karolyn Joop (No photograph available)
Victoria Martin, sophomore, animal science, Worland, Wyo.

39.    Outstanding Educator
Dennis Maier, assistant professor, Business Department

Most Supportive of Students
Kim Cousins, student personnel coordinator, Academic Assistance Center

40.    Student Achievement Awards
Alisha Aasness, senior, horticulture, Fergus Falls, Minn.
Angela Bartholomew, senior, double major business management and equine science, Maple Grove, Minn.
Sheila Carleton, senior, double major natural resources and agronomy, Baxter, Minn.
Jackie Dullinger, senior, double major biology and health sciences, Hutchinson, Minn.
Megan Eul, senior, early childhood education, Rosemount, Minn.
Yangchen Gurung, senior, business management, Mustang, Nepal
Samantha Lahman, senior, animal science, Parkers Prairie, Minn.
Whitney Lian, junior, agricultural education, Thief River Falls, Minn.
Kristine Neu, senior, double major, horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Brooke Novak, junior, communication, Dahlen, N.D.
Samantha Zuck, senior, animal science, Jamestown, N.D.
Chris Anderson, senior, natural resources, Missoula, Mont.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.
Matthew Green, senior, triple major agricultural systems management, agronomy, and agricultural business, Greenbush, Minn.
Dae Yeul Lee, junior, accounting, Seoul, South Korea
Abbey Wemimo, junior, business management, Lagos, Nigeria


41.    Man and Woman of the Year
Kristine Neu, senior, double major in horticulture and communication, Pelican Rapids, Minn.
Austin Czichotzki, senior, communication, Barnesville, Minn.

42.    Student Volunteer of the Year Award
Alissa Hernandez, freshman, double major animal science and equine science, Savage, Minn.

43. Outstanding Service to Students
Phil Baird, associate professor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department

From the group of students received the Student Achievement Awards, two students were chosen as the "Man and Woman of the Year," the year's top academic, service and leadership award. Honors for 2012 go to (pictured l to r) UMC Man of the Year, Austin Czichotzki, a senior from Barnesville, Minn., majoring communication; and Woman of the Year Kristine Neu, a senior from Pelican Rapids, Minn., who is a double major in horticulture and communication. Czichotzki is the son of Terry and Sandi Czichotzki and Neu is the daughter of Mark and Karen Neu.

Special thanks to the Crookston Noon Day Lions Club for their continued support of the awards reception and program.

Members of the Student Awards committee are Lisa Samuelson, Sue Jacobson, Lynne Mullins, Patti Tiedemann, Terrill Bradford, Christiana Boadu, Kayla Bellrichard, and Emily Goff.

Visit the Student Awards Program photo gallery.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Student Achievement Award recipients
Back row: Brooke Novak, Abbey Wemimo, Chris Anderson, Megan Eul, Dae Yuel "Danny" Lee, Alisha Aasness, and Angie Bartholomew.


Front row: Whitney Lian, Matt Green, Austin Czichotzki, Kristine Neu, Jackie Dullinger, and Yangchen Gurung.



 

Contact: Lisa Sameulson, director, student activities, 218-281-8507(samue026@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Students in Courtney Bergman's retail management class had an opportunity recently to retail_management_class.jpgshare research results with area farmers on promoting their products at regional farmer's markets. The research was focused on how individual farmers can increase sales and grow their business. Bergman is an instructor in the Business Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston and her students were involved in the research as part of a service-learning project in the classroom.

The students conducted research on six different areas for the project including display and design; payment options; communication and marketing; customer relations; and presentation. The work the class conducted was a spinoff of an earlier service-learning project by U of M, Crookston marketing students who developed a marketing plan for Minnesota Grown.

These two projects are an example of the use of service learning as a tool in the classroom to provide an opportunity for experiential learning while serving a real community need. It combines academic classroom curriculum with meaningful community service. Lisa Loegering serves as the coordinator and director for service learning on the Crookston campus.

Members of the class included Katelyn Zins, a senior from Starbuck, Minn., majoring in communication; Hwee Kim, a junior from Seoul, South Korea, majoring in accounting; Allen Shaw a senior from Ulen, Minn., majoring in agricultural business; Brooke Novak, a junior from Dahlen, N.D., majoring in communication; Kate Holmquist, a senior from Middleton, Wis., majoring in communication; and Shanel Finke, a senior from Grand Marais, Minn., majoring in communication.

Each of the students presented on a specific aspect of the project followed by a question and answer session. The formal presentation allows participants in the audience to have their questions answered and provides valuable feedback for students.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo, left to right: Courtney Bergman, instructor; Hwee Kim; Shanel Finke; Brooke Novak; Kate Holmquist; Allen Shaw; and Katelyn Zins

Contact: Courtney Bergman, lecturer, Business Department, 218-281-8188 (cbergman@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston was one of five campuses in Minnesota named to the Honor Roll with Distinction as part of the President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for 2012. The campus has been on the Honor Roll every year since 2006 with the exception of one, but this is the first year the campus has been recognized on the Honor Roll with Distinction. Other Minnesota campuses honored with the distinction designation include Augsburg College, College of St. Benedict, Metropolitan State University, and Winona State University.

To be named to the Honor Roll, a school must demonstrate that its students, faculty, and staff HigherEdCommServHonorRoll-thumb-180x180-82211.jpgare engaged in meaningful service that achieves measurable results in the community.  This national level honor recognizes a college or university for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement. A total of 642 campuses were recognized on the 2012 Honor Roll from across the country.

Honorees are chosen based on a series of selection factors, including the scope and innovation of service projects, the extent to which service-learning is embedded in the curriculum, the school's commitment to long-term campus-community partnerships, and measurable community outcomes as a result of service.

At the U of M, Crookston in 2011, students tallied 59,683 hours of service through academic service-learning courses, club and individual community service, community-based work study primarily through the America Reads Program, community service internships, and AmeriCorps.  They served on their campus, in Crookston, in their local communities, and across the country. Service-learning courses are found across all departments, and each of the nearly 40 student clubs and organizations strives to complete two service projects per semester.

Lisa Loegering, who directs efforts in service learning and civic engagement on the Crookston campus, says meaningful service in the lives of students is invaluable. "Students engaged in service learning or in community service gain context for study in the classroom," Loegering says. "Their student experience is enriched as they discover the power of commitment to helping others and improving the community in which they live. We hope our students take these service experiences with them wherever they go."

The Corporation for National and Community Service and the U.S. Department of Education announced the 2012 Honor Roll recipients at the American Council on Education's 94th Annual Meeting "Ahead of the Curve" on March 12, 2012, in Los Angeles, Calif. The President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, launched in 2006, annually highlights the role colleges and universities play in solving community problems and placing more students on a lifelong path of civic engagement by recognizing institutions that achieve meaningful, measureable outcomes in the communities they serve.  For more information, visit www.NationalService.gov/HonorRoll.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 26 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and 36 concentrations, including 10 online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of 1,600 undergraduates from 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning, 218-281-8526 (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Preliminary design concepts for nature-based play spaces for the cities of Crookston and Warren, Minn. have now been completed, and community feedback is needed. The children's play space for Crookston is being designed for Castle Park, which is located off Castle Street to the west of the Crookston hospital complex. The play space for Warren is being designed for Island Park located off Warren's South Division Street.  

Two preliminary designs were prepared for each community. All four designs were a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota, Crookston and Twin Cities campuses. The Warren designs are being displayed at the Marshall County Fair from July 27-31 while the Crookston designs will be displayed on Tuesday, August 2 at National Night Out held in Crookston's Central Park.

The nature-based play space preliminary design concepts were created by Kristen Murray, U of M, Twin Cities landscape architecture graduate student, and Kristine Neu, U of M, Crookston environmental landscaping undergraduate. Both students were advised by Eric Castle, landscape architect and U of M, Crookston assistant professor of horticulture.

A nature-based play space is not the average playground. It looks more like woods, prairie, or garden. Unlike the open woods, the designs have a border, so that parents know where their children are, and children can play freely in the space. The designs incorporate plants and materials native to the area, with the intention of highlighting local stories and the talents and skills of people who live in the area.

Nature-based play puts kids in touch with nature by encouraging them to play with rocks, water, sand, leaves, sticks and other materials found outdoors. Nature-based play includes everything from active play (climbing, jumping, running) and creative play (make-believe, building, art-making). Usually this play is unstructured: kids can choose what they want to do, unlike in a structured group activity or class. Research is demonstrating that this is necessary for healthy child development.

The design process for both Castle and Island Park has been ongoing since early summer. In June there was a gathering of community members in each city to share ideas about how to transform a portion of their community's park into a nature-based play space. Further input was gathered from small group interactions with parents and children. The ideas gathered, along with countless hours of research, turned into the two preliminary designs for each community. The June brainstorming sessions were part of a larger process to develop plans, create, and install the play spaces.

Displaying the preliminary designs at the Marshall County Fair and National Night Out is part of the process of gathering community feedback about the designs. In the coming weeks the project team will be using community feedback to draft final designs for each site to be revealed in the end of August. Installation of the nature-based play spaces will begin this fall and carry over into next spring. The projects will likely be completed in phases.

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Members of the Children Discovering Nature in Northwest Minnesota project team at the Marshall County Fair in Warren, Minn. with two preliminary design concepts for a nature-based play space for the city of Warren. A similar presentation of designs for Castle Park in Crookston, Minn. will be made Tuesday, August 2 at National Night Out.  Pictured are (L to R) Daniel Handeen, U of M, Twin Cities Center for Sustainable Building Research; Kristen Murray, U of M, Twin Cities landscape architecture graduate student; Frances Tougas, North Valley Public Health SHIP coordinator; Kristine Neu, U of M, Crookston environmental landscaping undergraduate; and Eric Castle, landscape architect and U of M, Crookston Assistant Professor of Horticulture

In addition to creating new play spaces for children, the project is investigating how the process of designing these spaces can influence public health.  Assistant Professor Eric Castle remarked, "a main objective of this project is to stimulate people to start thinking about children's health as well as their own health, and getting people outdoors is a great way to do that."   

The nature-based play spaces in Crookston and Warren are two of several regional installations under the Children Discovering Nature in Northwest Minnesota Project, which is providing design and financial support for nature based-play spaces in six area communities. The project team also includes Daniel Handeen and Virajita Singh, both research fellows at the U of M, Twin Cities Center for Sustainable Building Research (CSBR), and Linda Kingery, executive director of the Northwest Minnesota Sustainable Development Partnership (NWRSDP). Kirsten Fagerlund, interim Statewide Health Improvement (SHIP) coordinator on behalf of Sarah Reese, SHIP coordinator, is serving as the liaison between the community of Crookston and the project team. Frances Tougas, North Valley Public Health Statewide Health Improvement (SHIP) coordinator, is serving a similar role in Warren.

The team is working with city officials who will be instrumental in the approval of the design and installation of the space. In Warren, the team is also working with the Jaycees as the group will be providing a portion of the financial resources and volunteers to make the installation of their community's play space a reality. A portion of the financial support for the planning and implementation of both play spaces is being provided by a grant received from the Otto Bremer Foundation.

The project team is interested in forming a core advisory committee for the nature-based play space in each community. This committee would be comprised of a group of volunteers who will help make decisions, organize other volunteer efforts, and generally help create a vision for the play space into the future. If interested in being a part of the advisory committee in Crookston, community members are encouraged to contact Kirsten Fagerlund 218-281-3385 kfagerlund@pcphealth.org for more information. Community members of Warren should contact Frances Tougas 218-745-5154 ftougas@nvhc.net.

 

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Concepts for Castle Park in Crookston (above)
Concepts for Island Park in Warren (below)

 

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All community members and their children are encouraged to give feedback about the preliminary design concepts for Castle and Island Park . A short online feedback form is available at www.umcrookston.edu/childrenandnature; simply click on "Share Your Feedback" to give your much appreciated input.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

 

Contact: Eric Castle, assistant professor, castl047@umn.edu; Kristine Neu, communications assistant, neuxx019@umn.edu; Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

HigherEdCommServHonorRoll.jpgThe University of Minnesota, Crookston has been named to the 2010 President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS).  This is the fourth time the campus has earned the honor.  To be named to the Honor Roll, a school must demonstrate that its students, faculty, and staff are engaged in meaningful service that achieves measurable results in the community.  This national level honor recognizes a college or university for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement.

 

The CNCS, which has administered the Honor Roll since 2006, has recognized more than 600 colleges and universities for exemplary, innovative, and effective community service programs.  It named 511 colleges and universities to the Community Service Honor Roll for 2010.  For a full list of recipients and descriptions of their service, visit www.NationalService.gov/HonorRoll.

 

Honorees are chosen based on a series of selection factors, including the scope and innovation of service projects, the extent to which service-learning is embedded in the curriculum, the school's commitment to long-term campus-community partnerships, and measurable community outcomes as a result of service.

 

At the U of M, Crookston in 2010, students tallied over 8,400 hours of service learning through their academic courses and nearly 9,500 hours of community service on their campus, in Crookston and their local communities, and across the country.   Additionally, the campus continued a commitment to designate 10 work study students in the community to serve as America Reads tutors at Crookston's Washington Elementary School, Highland School, and Our Savior's Lutheran Day School. 

 

Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning at the U of M, Crookston, confirms the positive influence on students who get involved in service projects, "Our students who choose to get involved with their community through service-learning and community service not only feel more connected to their community but also have a better context for the material they learn within the classroom."  Service-learning courses are found across all departments, and each of the nearly 40 student clubs and organizations strives to complete two service projects per semester.

 

"As members of the class of 2011 cross the stage to pick up their diplomas, more and more will be going into the world with a commitment to public service and the knowledge that they can make a difference in their communities and their own lives through service to others, thanks to the leadership of these institutions," said Patrick A. Corvington, chief executive officer of CNCS.  "Congratulations to the University of Minnesota, Crookston and its students for their dedication to service and commitment to improving their local communities.  We salute all the Honor Roll awardees for embracing their civic mission and providing opportunities for their students to tackle tough national challenges through service."

 

The Corporation for National and Community Service is a federal agency that engages more than five million Americans in service through its Senior Corps, AmeriCorps, and Learn and Serve America programs, and leads President Barack Obama's national call to service initiative, United We Serve.   The agency is a strong partner with the nation's colleges and universities in supporting community service and service-learning.  CNCS oversees the Honor Roll in collaboration with the U.S. Departments of Education and Housing and Urban Development, Campus Compact, and the American Council on Education.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning, 218-281-8526 (loege005@umn.edu); Andrew Svec, director of communications, 218-281-8438 (asvec@umn.edu)

Eighteen members of the University of Minnesota, Crookston Natural Resources Club treeplanting.jpgalong with several natural resources faculty and staff members returned to the Little Cutfoot Sioux region of the Chippewa National Forest the weekend of April 30-May 1 for the 29th consecutive tree planting trip for the U.S. Forest Service.  The Crookston Crew, as they've come to be known by Forest Service personnel, planted 4,500 red pine seedlings on a clearcut area near Talmoon, Minn.

Phil Baird, associate professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department knows the impact of these trips on students. "This is something students will remember for the rest of their lives," says Baird."Each year we have a number of alumni returning to join us from across the region and country. It's hard to believe that the club first hoisted their dibble bars on the Chippewa more than 12 years before this year's incoming freshman class was born!"

treeplanting2.jpgThe crew was joined by former students from Washington and Wisconsin who couldn't pass up another shot at this rite of spring for the club. The club returns to the forest each spring to plant trees and again each fall to budcap some of their younger plantings to protect the seedlings from deer browsing.

For more information on the natural resources program at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/agri/natr.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Phil Baird, associate professor, 218-281-8130 (pbaird@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Representatives of local agencies, organizations or interested individuals are invited to attend a Community Dialogue sponsored by the Office of Service Learning at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. The dialogue will center on community needs and the types of projects that faculty may use to match their course curriculum goals to help meet those needs. The session runs from 2 - 4:30 p.m. in Bede Ballroom, Sargeant Student Center at the U of M, Crookston.

Anyone with an idea that might be addressed through a course service-learning project is encouraged to attend. Service learning combines academic classroom curriculum with meaningful community service. Additionally, information on community-service opportunities and other community-university partnerships will be discussed.

For more information, contact Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning at 218-281-8526 or visit www.umcrookston.edu/services/ServiceLearning.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, service learning, 218-281-8526 (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

In the United States, it is the season of giving thanks for the abundance so many enjoy, pottery.jpgbut for others, it is only a gnawing reminder of the suffering caused by hunger. A project at the University of Minnesota, Crookston will provide a way to help those who suffer and to remember the many empty bowls there are in this country and around the world.

An Empty Bowls Dinner, a combination service learning and community service project, is slated for Tuesday, November 16, 2010, from 5-7 p.m. The dinner, to be held in Bede Ballroom, brings to fruition a project that began more than a year ago under the direction of Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning. Tickets for the event are $15 and available at the Krazy Kiln in Crookston, at the 2nd floor administrative desk in the Sargeant Student Center, or at the door.
 
EmptyBowls_20100327_048.jpgStudents in a pottery class at the U of M, Crookston taught by Assistant Professor Sonia Spaeth, high school students in Gary Stegman's pottery class at the Crookston High School (CHS), along with community members joined together last spring for a "Bowl-a-thon" and "Glaze-a-thon" at the CHS.  In addition to Spaeth and Stegman, Jenn Steinbrink, artist and owner of the Krazy Kiln, collaborated to head up these events.  In about 5 hours, about 65 community members created about 200 bowls.  Some of them were thrown, some were hand-built, but each one is unique. Those who come to the dinner will take home their bowl as a reminder of all the empty bowls there are in the world.

Students in the Hospitality Association Club at the U of M, Crookston will be creating the soup, bread, and dessert served at the dinner. "This event really brought together a lot of collaborators and is truly a joint effort," says Loegering. "The whole idea for the project was brought to my attention about five years ago, but there wasn't enough funding to make it happen until one of our students was awarded grant funding to help support the project."

Sophomore Katya Zepeda, Crookston, Minn., was one of two college students selected to receive a $1,000 Carter Academic Service Entrepreneur (CASE) grant supporting innovative service-learning projects. Zepeda's funding helped make the Empty Bowls project a reality. An additional aspect of this project was a partnership between UMC and about 10 students from CHS.  On days when classes were released early, students were bused to UMC for some educational opportunities, and included preparing for this event.

"It took the willingness and work of Katya combined with the expertise and passion of Gary Stegman, Jenn Steinbrink and Sonia Spaeth to make this dinner happen," Loegering says. "It simply would not have been possible without them and I am very grateful."

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers 29 bachelor's degree programs, 18 minors, and more than 40 concentrations, including several online degrees, in the areas of agriculture and natural resources; business; liberal arts and education; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,400 undergraduates from more than 25 countries and 40 states, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photos: The bowl-a-thon held last spring helped create 250 bowls for use during the Empty Bowls dinner.

 

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, service learning, 218-281-8526 (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

After several successful service-learning projects, Rachel Lundbohm, an instructor in the Business Department at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, engaged her classes in anEagles Presentation 8910.jpg effort to further previous research and to engage students in new learning opportunities. The projects her marketing classes took on involved the development of marketing plans for the Northwest Minnesota Area Health Education Center (AHEC), a continuation of work begun in fall semester 2009, and a new project working with the Crookston Eagles Club.
 
The marketing service-learning project her online integrated marketing communications class worked on this spring built on the research conducted last fall in her marketing research class for AHEC. The 25 students taking the course online developed a marketing plan for AHEC to help address high school students' perceptions of career choices in general and healthcare related careers specifically. Service learning combines academic classroom curriculum with meaningful community service.

"To help students work on the project, we created a forum for the students to do an analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for the organization, known more commonly as a SWOT analysis," explains Lundbohm. "Essentially we had an online brainstorming session."

Since members of the class were located all over the country including Idaho, California, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Minnesota, the class will present their marketing plan in a formal document without a presentation. With that marketing plan in hand, AHEC will determine which parts of the plan they can implement now and in the future.
A marketing plan for the Crookston Eagles Club, a client-based project, was the goal for students taking Lundbohm's marketing strategies class, a capstone course for business students at the U of M, Crookston. Sue Brorson, Ph.D., head of the Business Department put Lundbohm in touch with Bruce Meyer from the Eagles Club to determine the suitability of the project for her class. Meyer presented background information to the students and they were divided into working groups to take responsibility for different aspects of the project.

"Our class conducted research and developed a series of recommendations that are all strategy based," Lundbohm said. "We looked at both the membership and customer aspects for the Eagles. Students engaged in both external and internal analysis and how to best leverage the strengths of the business."

The class of 18 students did reading and homework online and then met in the classroom to work together on the Eagles' project. Feedback from classmates provided important information for each of the working groups.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Front Row (l to r):  Treasure Clemons, Minneapolis, Minn.; Abbie Tosh, Climax, Minn.; Yiyun Zhu, Zhejiang, China; Stephani Onken, Round Lake, Minn.; and Cynthia Weber, Crookston, Minn. Middle Row:  Krista Nelson, Cokato, Minn.; Rachel Lundbohm (instructor), Martin Husicka, Vsetin, Czech Republic; Jessica DeBoer, Crookston, Minn.; Sung Soo Lee, Gyeong-Gi Do, Korea; Kyu Tae Kim, Seoul, South Korea; and Jack Bone, representing the Eagles. Back Row:  Mike Larsen, Bluffdale, Utah; Collin Perry, Grand Forks, N.D.; Adeboye Adeyeye,  Bromley, Kent, England; Jared Hendricks, Owatonna, Minn.; Nicholas Nelson, Cold Spring, Minn.; Brett Wright, Cortland, N.Y.; and Jake Fee, Eagles manager.

 

Contact: Rachel Lundbohm, marketing instructor, 218-281-8190 (rlundboh@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Two faculty members at the University of Minnesota, Crookston participated in a project with SHIP_shape.jpgtheir classes involving collaboration with the Statewide Health Improvement Program (SHIP) staff in Northwest Minnesota, including Polk County. Assistant Professor Kevin Thompson, Ph.D., and Nancy Shay, a teaching specialist, who both work in the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences Department, coordinated the service-learning project.  Students in the design and management class and visual communication and editing class worked together to develop the pamphlet titled, SHIP Shape, which focuses on healthy food choices. Sarah Reese, Polk County SHIP coordinator worked closely with the students on the project.

SHIP Shape features schools in the county and region, such as East Grand Forks, who are making healthy food the easy choice for their students and staff.  An integral part of Minnesota's nation-leading 2008 health reform law, SHIP strives to help Minnesotans lead longer, healthier lives by preventing the chronic disease risk factors of tobacco use and exposure, poor nutrition and physical inactivity. SHIP seeks to create sustainable, systemic changes in schools, worksites, communities and health care organizations that make it easier for Minnesotans to incorporate healthy behaviors into their daily lives.

For more information about SHIP, contact Reese at Polk County Public Health at 218-281-3385 (sreese@pcphealth.org). For more information about the statewide efforts, visit http://www.health.state.mn.us/healthreform/ship.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo (l to r):  University of Minnesota Crookston students, Tammy Wroblewski, senior, Milwaukee, Wis.; and Jess Seibel, senior, Crookston, Minn.; along with Sarah Reese, Polk County SHIP coordinator; and Stephanie Onken, senior, Round Lake, Minn.


Contact: Sarah Reese, Polk County Public Health, 218-281-3385 (sreese@pcphealth.org); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Everyone is invited to a special 'Glaze-a-thon" on Saturday, April 17, 2010, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will take place at the Crookston High School art room in an effort to glaze some 200 bowls for the Empty Bowls project coordinated by Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning at the University of Minnesota, Crookston. A dinner will be held in the fall at the U of M, Crookston using the bowls with proceeds benefiting the Crookston area food shelf. Everyone is welcome to come to the Glaze-a-thon to decorate a bowl.

Abowl-a-thon.jpg "bowl-a-thon" was held in late March when the efforts of Sonia Spaeth, art instructor at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, CHS art teacher Gary Stegman, and local potter Jenn Steinbrink, owner of the Krazy Kiln, helped lead the creation of the bowls in an effort to raise hunger awareness. It doesn't matter if you were a part of the effort to create a bowl or not, you are welcome to come and decorate one.
 
Assisting Loegering in coordinating the event is Freshman Katya Zepeda. As recipient of a $1,000 Carter Academic Service Entrepreneur (CASE) grant, Zepeda wrote her grant proposal with Loegering's help specifically for an Empty Bowls Dinner on the Crookston Campus.

For more information on the glaze-a-thon or the Empty Bowls Project at the U of M, Crookston, contact Loegering at 218-281- 8526.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, service learning, 218-2818526 (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Service learning has given students in the equine management class at the University of Minnesota, Crookston an opportunity to develop a business plan to help open a new Red River Valley Equestrian Center in Crookston. In 2009, a group of stakeholders investigated the potential for revitalizing the former Red River Valley Winter Shows building as an equestrian and agricultural educational and community center. An advisory committee was formed and recently engaged the help of the equine management class to help develop a business plan that includes updating the facility and the sustained use of it for both entertainment and education in the years to come.

While the U of M, Crookston is in no way affiliated with the Red River Valley Equestrian Center, the faculty, staff, and students have been volunteering time to help in its establishment. The equine management class, taught by ADawn Melbye, an instructor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department on the Crookston Campus, is working closely with Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning, on the aspects of the project. There are currently five phases to the students' business plan that will eventually encompass the entire building. Committees formed by students in the class work on the areas of boarding, finance, and marketing.

equine mgmt class.jpgMembers of the class include: Leah Stroot, a sophomore from Crookston, Minn.; Loraleigh Freer, a senior from Red Lake Falls, Minn.; Casey Wollangk, a senior from Reynolds, N.D.; Elsa Lunden, a junior from Annandale, Minn.; Steph Roland, a senior from East Grand Forks, Minn.; Mindy Nieuwboer, a senior from Kenneth, Minn.; Ashley Allen, a senior from Buffalo, Minn.; Jess Biddle, a senior from Elburn, Ill.; Nicole Veres, a senior from Random Lake, Wis.; Megan Hannon, a senior from Green Bay, Wis.; Brittney Skoien, a senior from Wannaska, Minn.; Tandra Klein, a junior from Hazen, N.D.; Melinda Baszczynski, a senior from Earlham, Iowa; and Joy Hilliard, a senior from Andover, Minn.

The class is also putting in some hands-on time working to restore parts of the facility including the middle barn and the north arena. The middle barn is being set up with stalls for boarding horses and on April 24, 2010, as part of National Youth Service Day, an effort will be undertaken by students to paint the building.

"We are excited to assist in this revitalization of the Red River Valley Winter Shows building as the Red River Valley Equestrian Center," Melbye says. "The facility will be a great place for equine activities as well as cattle shows, rodeo events, car shows, or for use by community clubs and other activities. This opportunity gives our students an opportunity to develop a real-world business plan that has the potential to impact not only the community but the region as well."

During the 84-year history of Red River Valley Winter Shows, Inc., the building has been dedicated to use for the advancement of agriculture.  Over the years, numerous events and educational experiences have been made available to residents of Polk County and the 14 surrounding counties of the Red River Valley.  In 1997, the building was closed due to financial concerns and a declining economy. To learn more about the revitalization project, visit http://valleyequestriancenter.yolasite.com.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

In the photo: Equine Management Class Back row, (l to r): Leah Stroot, Loraleigh Freer, and Casey Wollangk. Middle Row: Elsa Lunden, Steph Roland, Mindy Nieuwboer, Ashley Allen, and Jess Biddle. Front Row: Nicole Veres, Megan Hannon, Brittney Skoien, and Tandra Klein. (Not pictured: Melinda Baszczynski, Joy Hilliard)
 


Contact: ADawn Melbye, instructor, Agriculture and Natural Resources Department, 218-281-8125 (amelbye@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The Crookston High School (CHS) Art Room will be humming with the sound of pottery wheels on Saturday, March 27, 2010--not just one wheel but eight of them. The public is invited to join the efforts of Sonia Spaeth, art instructor at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, CHS art teacher Gary Stegman, and local potter Jenn Steinbrink, owner of the Krazy Kiln, in the creation of some 200 bowls in an effort to raise hunger awareness. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the CHS Art Room, local potters and those with experience are invited to participate in throwing pottery on the wheel and members of the community are encouraged to hand build a bowl for the event.

There is no charge for participating in the bowl-a-thon and all bowls will be donated to the Empty Bowls Dinner to be held during fall semester 2010 at the U of M, Crookston. The entire event is designed to raise awareness about issues of hunger and food security.

Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning is coordinating this first ever bowl-a-thon in Crookston, and she is excited about the way the community and the campus are coming together for the cause. "We are signing up both high school and college students to help us make bowls, and we are excited to have as many campus and community members as possible come and join us," Loegering says. "We have 60 bowls made already, but we will need the hands of many to create all the bowls we need for the Empty Bowls Dinner. Please join us if you are available and help create a bowl that will make a difference in the fight against hunger."

Assisting Loegering in coordinating the event is Freshman Katya Zepeda. As recipient of a $1,000 Carter Academic Service Entrepreneur (CASE) grant, Zepeda wrote her grant proposal with Loegering's help specifically for an Empty Bowls Dinner on the Crookston Campus. All proceeds will benefit the Crookston area food shelf.

During April, a "glaze-a-thon" will be held to glaze all the bowls in preparation for the dinner. Currently scheduled for Saturday, April 17 in the CHS Art Room, everyone is encouraged to come back to glaze the bowls from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. that day.

For more information on the bowl-a-thon or the Empty Bowls Project at the U of M, Crookston, contact Loegering at 218-281- 8526.
 
Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.
 

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, Service Learning, 218-281- 8526, (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

The University of Minnesota, Crookston has been named to the 2009 President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll by the Corporation for National and Community Service. The honor is the highest federal recognition a college or university can receive for its commitment to volunteering, service-learning and civic engagement.

The Corporation for National and Community Service, which administers the annual Honor Roll award, recognized more than 700 colleges and universities for their impact on issues from poverty and homelessness to environmental justice. On campuses across the country, thousands of students joined their faculty to develop innovative programs and projects to meet local needs using the skills gained in their classrooms.

The Honor Roll includes six colleges and universities that are recognized as Presidential Awardees, with an additional 115 named to the Distinction List and 621 schools named as Honor Roll members. Honorees are chosen based on a series of selection factors including the scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service, and the extent to which the school offers academic service-learning courses.

College students make a significant contribution to the volunteer sector. In 2009, 3.16 million students performed more than 300 million hours of service, according to the Volunteering in America study released by the Corporation. Each year, the Corporation invests more than $150 million in fostering a culture of service on college campuses through grants awarded by its programs; the education awards that AmeriCorps members receive at the conclusion of their term of service to pay for college; and through support of training, research, recognition, and other initiatives to spur college service.

Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning attests to the positive influence on students who get involved in service projects, "By getting involved with their community through service learning and community service, many of our students not only feel more connected to their community but also have a better context for the material they learn within the classroom." 

At UMC, students tallied over 5,600 hours of service learning through their academic courses and 12,700 hours of community service on their campus, in Crookston and their local communities, and across the country.   Service-learning courses are found across all departments.  Additionally, UMC has made a commitment to designate 10 work study students in the community to serve as America Reads tutors at Washington Elementary School, Highland School, and Our Savior's Lutheran Day School.

The Corporation oversees the Honor Roll in collaboration with the Department of Education, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Campus Compact, and the American Council on Education.

The Corporation for National and Community Service is a federal agency that engages more five million Americans in service through its Senior Corps, AmeriCorps, and Learn and Serve America programs, and leads President Obama's national call to service initiative, United We Serve. For more information, visit www.nationalservice.gov.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."  To learn more, visit www.umcrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director, Service Learning, 218-281- 8526, (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

U of M, Crookston Accounting Students Assist with Tax Preparation

Preparing to file income tax isn't necessarily a task one looks forward to, but accounting students at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, are honing their skills to assist others. Ken Bulie, a certified public accountant and accounting instructor in the Business Department on the Crookston Campus, has been preparing his Income Tax II class for this very opportunity.

During fall semester 2009, the students began working with the specialized software Tax Prep Class lr 7200.jpgnecessary for preparing taxes, and recently, they completed a two-day training session with an IRS representative. Following their exam, these newly certified income tax preparers will help the elderly or those with low income with their taxes preparation at the Golden Link Senior Center. Bulie has worked closely with Al Chesley, who runs the AARP Tax-Aide program in Crookston and supervises the student volunteers.

"This service is something students have been doing for the last several years," Bulie says. "It is an opportunity for our students to gain the skills and confidence they need as they work with people and with income tax preparation as well as to provide a valuable service to the community."
 
Instead of the class meeting three times a week, Bulie and his students work out a schedule that includes two regular class sessions per week, and the rest of the time is devoted to helping residents in the community filling out their tax forms.

To learn more about the accounting program at the U of M, Crookston, visit www.umcrookston.edu/academics/bus/accounting.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 bachelor's degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture and natural resources; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; and math, science and technology.  With an enrollment of about 1,300 undergraduates, the Crookston campus offers a supportive, close-knit atmosphere that leads to a prestigious University of Minnesota degree.  "Small Campus. Big Degree."

In the photo, front row: (l to r) Jordan Triestram, a senior from Shakopee, Minn.; Krista Nelson, a senior from Cokato, Minn.; Lincoln Messner, a senior from Winthrop, Minn.; and Jennifer Lund, a senior from Manvel, N.D. Back row: Jeremy Reinitz, a junior from Wadena, Minn.; JerryAnn Thomas, a junior from St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands; Bradley Kappes, a senior from Borup, Minn.; David Sumner, a senior from Warren, Minn.; Gwanwoo Yi, a senior from Seoul, South Korea; Erin Shaw, a senior from Lancaster, Minn.; and Eddie Hanson, a junior from Apple Valley, Minn.  

Contact: Ken Bulie, lecturer, 218-281-8140 (bulie001@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

Zepeda_Katya 9901.jpgKatya Zepeda, Crookston, Minn., was one of two college students recently selected to receive a $1,000 Carter Academic Service Entrepreneur (CASE) grant supporting innovative service-learning projects.  Zepeda, a first-year student at the University of Minnesota, Crookston, will use her CASE grant to raise funds for the Crookston food shelf by hosting an Empty Bowls Dinner.

Zepeda will partner with students from a local high school to plan and implement the project, while at the same time increasing students' exposure to the University of Minnesota and higher education.

Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning at the Crookston campus, guided Zepeda through the grant proposal process and will serve as her advisor for the project.  Zepeda, an organizational psychology major, also will work closely with her academic advisor, Alvin Killough, Ph.D., on developing parts of the project into an independent study within her academic program.

Throughout the project's development, community and campus partners will play an integral role in the planning and execution of the many aspects of Empty Bowls Dinner, which will be held in fall 2010.
Zepeda was among several students from Campus Compact institutions to propose inventive projects serving their communities. The other CASE grant recipient was Christin Tomy, a senior at the College of St. Benedict, St. Joseph, Minn. Tomy and Zepeda are the fifth and sixth students to receive CASE grants from Minnesota Campus Compact.

Minnesota Campus Compact is proud to support the work of students in their community. More information about Zepeda's project is available at www.emptybowls.net.

Today the University of Minnesota, Crookston delivers more than 25 applied-science undergraduate degree programs and 50 concentrations, including several online degrees, in agriculture; arts, humanities and social sciences; business; math, science and technology; and natural resources. To learn more, visit www.UMCrookston.edu.

Contact: Lisa Loegering, assistant director of service learning, 218-281-8526 (loege005@umn.edu); Elizabeth Tollefson, assistant director, communications, 218-281-8432 (ltollefs@umn.edu)

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