« Gardasil....One Less? | Main | What would you do? »

HIPAA

What is HIPAA? How do you think it has changed medicine? What role will it play in your future career? Also, what is it?

Comments

HIPAA stands for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and it covers workers and their families for health insurance when they change or lose their jobs. It also makes hospital visits and health data confidential to ensure the security and privacy of patients. I think it is very valuable for every day people because it allows workers and their family members to be covered with health insurance if they were to lose their job. It provides so much help to families if a family member were to get sick or injured when they were not covered. It also makes doctors, nurses, pharmacists, etc. unable to discuss medical cases with other people and if they are not complient to this law, they will be fined. I think this is good for patients because some people may not want their case broadcasted for it may be embarrassing or for whatever the reason. It is not good for medical research however. With the confidentiality that HIPAA enforces, medical researchers have a harder time being able to do research because I believe there has to be consent from the patient or the patients family. This could be bad in trying to find major break throughs in different cancers or diseases. It will play a major role in my future career as a pharmacist because I will not be able to disclose information to other peolple such as the type of medication someone would be taking or the reason why.

HIPAA for the first time sets a standard for the protection of certain health information. It makes sure our individual health information is kept safe and our health and well being is also taken care of. The Rule strikes a balance that permits important uses of information, while
protecting the privacy of people who seek care and healing. I'm not exactly sure what this all means but I will look further into it. I, as well as everyone else, want my health information kept private. I know it helped my mother last about three years ago when she moved from Gundersen Lutheran in La Crosse, Wisconsin to St. Francis which is also located in La Crosse. Her insurance was fully covered while she changed jobs. My dad also lost his job this New Year's. This law also protected him for the 6 months he was allowed to collect unemployment and search for a new job.

HIPAA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Title I of HIPAA protects health insurance coverage for workers and their families when they change or lose their jobs. Title II of HIPAA, known as the Administrative Simplification provision protects patients privacy and confidentiality.
I think HIPAA has changed medicine for the better. Now, legally, patients are protected from others knowing about their health history, aside from the doctors. So, now patients probably feel more comfortable going to the doctor.
I am hoping to become a medical doctor, possibly in the E.R. or I.C.U. So, HIPAA will play a large role in my career. I would be dealing with a lot of patients and a lot of information that, under HIPAA, is protected. I won't be able to give out any information about the patient unless it's a family member or the patient gives consent for someone else to know.

HIPAA is the acronym for The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Title I of HIPAA aids workers and their family members for health insurance when they lose their job or change to a different one. Title II requires national standards for electronic health care transactions and national identifiers. The purpose of HIPAA is to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the health care system throughout the United States. If I choose to follow the path of radiology then HIPAA could play an important role in affecting my job. X-rays and cat scans could be delivered twice as fast which would help doctors diagnose the problems quicker. I believe it would also help greater America if we could make HIPAA effective for dental and vision plans. As long as HIPAA keeps expanding then the medical professionals will be able to provide care for those less fortunate. The only issue though is where should all this money for the program be taken from.

HIPPA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. I think that is very good we have this form for patients to fill out. Important parts of hippa’s are confidentially and used in hospitals, doctors, and dentist offices. In the dentist office I worked at we had to have every single patient sign a hippa to just protect there record and have it be our property. It has also helped out a lot of families keep their records safe from other people. It has changed medicine for the better, because then people can feel like their identity and information is safe. Basically it is designed to make health care better and more organized. If I become a dentist it will still be important to use hippas everyday. IN dentist offices, each patient does sign them not only for the safety of the patient but also for the safe of the doctors and their practices. If people want healthcare when they become unemployed or lose their job hippa’s also play an important role in that.

HIPPA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. HIPPA plays a huge role in the medical world. Not only does it provide health coverage when someone becomes unemployed, sick or injured but it protects the rights of the American citizens. The whole confidentiality part is crucial as it keeps health records and other information private. Only you can disclose your health information. No one can just come in off the street or go online and view your records. It does, however, slow down research in the sense that doctors cannot legally share information about their patients with others unless disclosed by the patient him/herself. This will play a huge role in my profession as a neurosurgeon. I will be required to not disclose information about my patients. I feel patients are more likely to visit the doctor about their issues if they know it is confidential. Therefore, making the world a healthier place.

HIPAA stands for The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. I found this act very interesting considering I've never heard of it before until this assignment. The main purpose of the HIPAA is to protect health insurance coverage for our hard workers and their families while they're going through a rough patch. This rough patch I speak of could be anything from changing jobs to perhaps losing a job. The HIPAA also keeps the patients information confidential among many other things. One of these other uses is to have health care while unemployed which I mentioned earlier. It really provides a great convenience to them and their families. After school, I would like to become a dentist so I would be dealing with the HIPAA on a daily basis. Knowing your patients have HIPAA is great. You don't have to worry about them not having coverage. I would love to put more research into the HIPAA to understand it more especially with the profession I intend to go into.

HIPPA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which is an act that protects the health insurance of families who must change their jobs or lose them. This act was created in hopes of improving the nation’s health care system. Those who are forced to be removed from their job and are the health care providers now have granted protection. This act is also beneficial because it ensures coverage to those who were injured on the job, plus many other accidents or issues in the work force. This act also ensures confidentiality for one. All information kept in health records can only be viewed by authorized physicians, yourself and those other you permit. As great as confidentiality may sound it also hinders research for many new medical medications, etc. The only way one’s information can be utilized by researchers is if there is consent signed allowing the information to be used for any medical purpose. This can change the medical field because it will hinder the amount of breakthrough drugs discovered in a period of time. This act does not really affect my job first string, but down the line it could. I want to become a biology teacher in the high school level. The only way I can see this affecting me is if a student’s family member has lost a job. The loss of the job could prevent the student from continuing enrollment in my class because they must move or otherwise. With this act though, the member with the loss job still receives coverage and can claim the unemployment money while looking for a job. Other than that, I do not really know how else I would come close to that situation.

HIPPA, also known as, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, was created in 1996 to hopes of improving our nation's health care system. The Act was the first Federal protection of personal health care information. HIPPA has two titles and combined, both titles, protect your health insurance if you ever change or lose your job, while keeping your information private, confidential and secure. Among other things HIPPA gives patients more control of their health care records and sets the boundaries on when the information should and can be released. Knowing this, keeps patients minds at ease when going to their doctors, therapists, etc. knowing they will be the only one administered to their records. HIPPA has definatley changed medicine forever. The health care sytem is now more organized and has better security. The only downfall is, this Act allows for less research to be done which will consequence in less medical discoveries. Obviously in any health care position our class holds HIPPA is going to play a role. It is our job as health care providers to provide quality care while keeping all records to ourselves. As an Occupational Therapist I will need to keep business to myself unless consent from my patients. Also, for any chance I myself lose or change my job my health insurance will be covered.

That was my post before, but I forgot to put my name on it. Sorry!

HIPPA, also known as, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, was created in 1996 to hopes of improving our nation's health care system. The Act was the first Federal protection of personal health care information. HIPPA has two titles and combined, both titles, protect your health insurance if you ever change or lose your job, while keeping your information private, confidential and secure. Among other things HIPPA gives patients more control of their health care records and sets the boundaries on when the information should and can be released. Knowing this, keeps patients minds at ease when going to their doctors, therapists, etc. knowing they will be the only one administered to their records. HIPPA has definatley changed medicine forever. The health care sytem is now more organized and has better security. The only downfall is, this Act allows for less research to be done which will consequence in less medical discoveries. Obviously in any health care position our class holds HIPPA is going to play a role. It is our job as health care providers to provide quality care while keeping all records to ourselves. As an Occupational Therapist I will need to keep business to myself unless consent from my patients. Also, for any chance I myself lose or change my job my health insurance will be covered.

HIPAA is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It was created to improve the continuity of health insurance coverage, fight fraud and abuse in health insurance/coverage, promote the use of medical savings, improve access to long term care and coverage, and simplify the administration of health insurance, along with much more. HIPPA has made sure that everyone in health care is trained so that we are protecting health information against people who do not have any right to see it. If I become an RN, I will have access to people's personal health information. This is very confidential information and HIPAA is a good way of ensuring it stays private and keep patients at ease. One of the only disadvantages of HIPAA is that less medical research can be done, so less advances in medicine. I have actually had some experience with HIPAA already. As Health Advocates, we all had to take a HIPAA privacy training and at my job we had a basic HIPAA information session.

HIPAA stands for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. HIPAA protects the privacy and health insurance of people who change their jobs, and also protects privacy of health care information in general. It gave the patient more power over their own records. health insurance, and health care. If a patient wants any information on their own health, payment history, etc., they can request it and they must be informed within thirty days. It also protects the general privacy of patients, and it is a fairly recent law so it takes into account a lot of today's information technology. I think it is a good law and makes people feel more at ease when going to the doctor's office when they know that anything that they say to their doctor is confidential. If people feel more comfortable with health professionals, perhaps they are more likely to report symptoms they would have otherwise ignored, and therefore more lives get saved. I am probably not going to be a health professional, but in my opinion it is still important to know your rights as a patient and HIPAA is what protects those rights.

HIPAA stands for the American Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It is a set of rules to be followed by doctors, hospitals and other health care providers. HIPAA helps ensure that all medical records, medical billing, and patient accounts meet certain standards with regard to documentation, handling and privacy. Also, HIPAA requires that all patients be able access their own medical records and other important documents, and be informed how personal information is shared. It is very valuable to clients because it gives them health insurance if they were to lose their job. It is beneficial to people because it guarantees that certain private information to be kept without discussion with other doctors. On the other hand, it may reduce the research conducted on a particular diagnosis because I believe researchers will need the permission of the patient to conduct experiments. It plays a significant role in the future because doctors won’t be able to discuss certain information with anyone else except for their specific patient.

In regards to Brandon Van Amber's post, I agree that HIPPA is a safe way to keep certain documents private information. If someone does lose their job, or get injured, HIPPA is an ideal policy to have. It makes patients feel safe about their private information and guarantees their protection. Also, Brandon is right about the possible slowing process of research that HIPPA may inhibit. If information is kept confidential, how will researchers be able to conduct experiments if they are uninformed of the diagnosis? I also agree with the restraints on HIPPA. If doctors decide to release information without the consent of the patient, he or she should be fined. Overall, I agree with Brandon that HIPPA provides a good sense of security and privacy for patients.

HIPAA has played a large in medicine by protecting people from the release of their person information and from losing health coverage. Health insurance companies cannot change a customer’s plan simply based on their health, which protects the patient from having dramatically increasing payments. Because of this, patients do not have to be scared to go into the doctor when they feel sick or may have a long term illness. Patient records are also not available to the public, so other people cannot see them without consent. In the past, records were more frequently passed around, without considering the patient’s privacy. Now when a patient leaves a medical office, they know that their records will not be shared unless they give consent. HIPAA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, and was passed by Congress to increase patient care and protect patients from overwhelming health care costs. If I do become an Orthodontist, I will have to deal with HIPAA regulations very frequently. Orthodontists often work with other specialists or dentists, exchanging patient files for x-rays or past dental records.

HIPAA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Acountibility Act. This act gives people with health care many rights and protections. It provides protection from discrimination based on their health status. This act, also, gives you privacy with your medical information. But this does not mean that it is 100% private. Public Health Authorities are allowed to look through your medical records if it is for public safety. It has changed the way people's medical information is handled. Now, to get someone's medical information, the patient needs to release it to others. Well, if my future career is pharmacy, then I don't think it will really affect me too much. I won't be able to tell others who is taking certain kinds of pills, but why would I in the first place. I think this act is very important for our health security. I, also, think that people can have more trust in their doctors with this act.

HIPAA (American Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) is an act that was created in 1996 to protect the confidentaility of hospital patients. HIPAA makes it unable for someone to come into a hospital and demand information about you and your procedure. HIPAA also protects families. It does this by making sure that a family has insurance if there is a lost job or a job transfer. Every health care provider, no matter the size, is covered under HIPAA. This means that no matter where you go, you are protected. I believe that HIPAA is going to help the medical field tremendously in the future. This has a direct impact on me because I want to be a doctor. I think that HIPAA is going to be beneficiary in the future because it does a lot with electronic exchanging. This will help with how efficient the health care system is now. It has already changed the health care system in efficiency and effectiveness. I believe that we are only going to see good things in the future :)

HIPAA is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It was enacted by the United States Congress in 1996. The act consists of two titles. Title I protects health insurance coverage for workers and their families when they are going through a change of jobs or when they lose their job. Title II of HIPAA is known as the Administrative Simplification provisions. It requires an establishment of standards for electronic health care transactions and national identifiers for providers, health insurance plans, and employers. There is also a privacy rule that sets regulations for the use of protected health information. I think HIPAA has helped the field of medicine because it provides privacy for patients and health insurance security for workers in the field. This will affect me if I become a doctor because I will have to keep my patients' information private. It will also provide health care for me if i lose my job or change jobs.

The HIPAA is essentially a summary of an individual’s rights and protections under the federal health information privacy law. An individual has the right to ask their provider or health insurer questions about how health information is used or shared and about their rights. The law must be followed by all doctors, nurses, pharmacies, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, health care providers, health insurance companies, HMOs, Medicare and Medicaid. Providers and health insurers who are required to follow this law must comply with the individual’s right to ask and see and get a copy of their health records, have corrections added to their health information, and receive a notice that tells how health information is used and shared. Providers who do not comply with these laws will be severely reprimanded. It is up to the provider to run an ethical practice and abide by the guidelines of patient privacy. I feel that the HIPAA has not changed the ethical practice of medicine, but has added paperwork and bureaucracy. In my future in medicine, I feel it will be my obligation to respect the privacy of my patients while abiding by the HIPAA.

HIPAA stands for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, enacted in 1996. Title I of the act basically insures that people will have health coverage for themselves and their families in the event that they change or lose their jobs. Title II of the act requires the use of electronic data interchange in the nations health care systems. The idea is to improve efficiency, but will also help with security and privacy of patients health care information. Medical information involving patients has definitely become more private than it previously was. Privacy for patients, prevention from fraud and abuse within the health care system, and an overall improvement of medical information and records are all important advantages of this act. The attraction of this act may be greater for patients than it is people in the medical field. Because of the difficulty medical researchers have accessing patient information including follow up information it has created negative impacts on the cost and overall quality of medical research. Dr. Kim Eagle of the U of Michigan said, "Privacy is important, but research is also important for improving care..." I agree with the implementation of the HIPAA, but it is hard to say whether it is a help or a hindrance. I don't think that this will affect me much in my career. I plan on entering a realm of medicine that is viewed with great skepticism, i think because of the general lack of funding a system like the HIPAA has required would not come into play for many years for a naturopathic doctor.

In regards to the post by Alex Fleming, I agree with their overall synopsis of the HIPAA. Alex mentioned the many ways in which this act ensures the privacy of patients due to the many stipulations the HIPAA has enforced. I agree with this. On the other hand I think it may be problematic to say that the HIPAA has not changed the ethical practices of doctors. Although it is a strong claim to say that many doctors are unethical, it is also unrealistic to say that without the implementation of HIPAA all doctors would be 100% ethical in their practice. I also have to comment on the fact that you said, "I have an obligation to respect the privacy of my patients.." It seems to me that without the HIPAA a doctor that felt respect and privacy towards a patient to be obligatory, may have practiced unethically without consequence. ?

HIPPA stand for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It insures that a patient will have full privacy from the public about any medical conditions that they may have. Personally as an aspiring dentist this has much less of an effect on me than it does on the average doctor. Rarely when putting braces on someone do you encounter a medical emergency in the first place. The only real problems that i may run into on a semi regular basis would be bad oral hygiene and maybe even cancerous sores. Much less than say a surgeon would encounter while preforming life or death surgery on a patient. I do, however, feel that these laws are important and that they should be kept in place because the privacy of a patient is vital. I wouldn't want the world to know if i had cancer before i even told anyone. So i believe that the HIPPA laws are good but their impact on my practice will be minimal.

HIPAA stands for helath insurance Portabliliy and Accountablility Act. Title I states that people will continue to have health insurance in the event that they lose or change Jobs. Title II, Preventing health care fruad or abuse. Now all your health records and charts are to be transported electronicly, which it much more efficent and it is also more safe. Doctors used to have to wait for charts and info on a patient to come in via the mail. Now they recieve the information almost instantly via computer. I believe this will have a great impact on pharmacy because we no longer have to have a patient come in with there prescription, it is just sent to our data base. We will be able to fill the prescription and it will be waiting for them when they arive, rather than having them come in give us their prescription and then waiting around while we fill it. So i believe that the HIPAA laws are good and the impact on my practice will be Substantial.

The Health Insurance Portability and Acountability Act was enacted by congress in 1996. Title one prvides insurance coverage for workers and their family if they have lost or are switching jobs. Title two of HIPAA prevents health care fraud or abuse. It keeps your information, your information. That is nice for patients to know that everything talked about and/or treated is completely confidential. Also, everything will now be transported electronically instead of looking up different files for different people. That especially will be nice for a nursing career. It will be very convenient to be able to pull up people's files through the computer versus searching for papers or sending someone to go find a file. I think that HIPAA is a great Act, however I do think that on medical advances it is holding us back some. Scientists, Pharmacists, MD's, etc., could become more advanced in finding cures for differents diseases, or different treatments for illnesses if they were able to access previous cases more efficiently. They could learn different responses with different patients, they could learn about diffrent drugs, treatments, etc. by looking at past records. All in all I think that HIPAA slows scientific advances down, but does it with bennefits to patients and to any health care professional.

HIPAA is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It insures that health care insurance will still be provided through a loss of job or a change in job. It also helps prevent fraud and abuse within the health care system. HIPAA has changed medical care by keeping health care records/charts more confidential and health care more accessible through tough job transitions. HIPAA has made confidentiality a problem for health care professionals, however. Health Care providers are over protective about disclosing information in order to comply with the 'Privacy Rule.' HIPAA has also hindered research in the medical field. After HIPAA was implemented, the ability for researchers to collect data about new practices and survey patients/physicians was much more difficult. I think HIPAA will not change my future career in the medical field as much as it has the current practicing health care providers, but HIPAA will start my career with patient and case confidentiality on the top of my priority list.

HIPAA, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, is a set of regulations that works to protect health insurance and health care delivery from fraud or abuse. The first title of this Act states that workers and their families will continue to be protected with health insurance coverage upon changing or losing his or her job. Title II deals with privacy provisions. In it, patients are given access to their records, have the right to correct any possible errors, and are advised of who their information is being shared with. These regulations are forced upon many medical field professions, as well as care homes and insurance companies. In talking with my Dad, who is a pharmacist and the owner of two pharmacies, I gained an even deeper knowledge of the HIPAA. In my eyes, this act has done great things for patients. The only negative thing that my Dad mentioned was the fact that much more work has to go into the process of forwarding on information to other facilities, but I'm sure this privacy aspect is greatly appreciated by patients. With that said, I can also see the point being debated that it is and probably will continue to be harder to attain research to better human disease and such. As for my future career in Pharmacy goes, and as I referred to earlier, I think the HIPAA will play a role in obtaining and sending out patient information. But again, I believe it's all for the benefit of the patient and is just a greater step in gaining privacy.

In response to Erin Roehl's post, I do not so much agree that the HIPAA's regulations are over protective. Yes, they have heightened privacy laws, but looking at it from a patient's view, I do not believe it's something they look down upon. A patient's best interest should come in first, because without patients, what kind of practice would a doctor, for example, have? On the contrary, it is a little bit easier for me to understand the fight that this Act makes it harder to do extensive research. I think Erin was right in saying that the HIPAA probably won't effect upcoming health careers as much as current ones, because we will know no other way.

In response to Kate Nelson's post, it was really interesting hearing about HIPAA from the perspective of someone who actually is a health care professional. I personally think that you can read and learn about something all you want, but nothing comes close to actually experiencing something and seeing how it applies in the real world. I can see how it is a lot more manual labor and paperwork to forward those records to new facilities, but I think that at the heart of HIPAA is concern for the patient's rights. I think that some of the negativity that comes from health professionals that now have to deal with HIPAA is that people are naturally resistant to change, especially change that requires them to do extra work for presumably no extra pay. As future health professionals, I think we should look at HIPAA as just another way of helping people, which is what health care really is.

HIPPA stands for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. This right ensures that the records of all patients are kept confidential from the public. For those who loses their jobs, both their family and themselves are guaranteed to ongoing health insurance. As a future doctor, I believe this law is fundamental to our practice. We try to be as discreet as we can relaying our message to our patients. They are entitled to that privacy, and their personal health information should not be leaked in any way. It is a little overbearing, but in return for its guarantees, this law is adequate in it's purpose without causing any serious problems.

In responds to Kate’s blog, I agree with her definition of hippa, how it protects health insurance and health care delivery from fraud or abuse. I also feel though that every person should have the right to affordable and quality health care. I think that if a parent of a household that is supporting their whole entire family, looses their job, the family should still be entitled to have healthcare. Especially if there are children involved. She also mentions title two, which is very important in privacy issues. I also agree with her when she mentions that a hippa is a great thing for patients. It gives them security and insurance that there personal information can be safe, and that they don’t have to worry about identity fraud. I really like the perspective she got from her dad, about the amount of work it takes to do all the paperwork. It takes time away from patients and can cause some unnecessary organization problems.

In response to Alexandra Allard’s post, I feel that we are arguing the same side of the issue! I don’t think that the HIPPA has changed the ethical practice of medicine, only added a consequence to doctors that do not comply with the law and who do not feel liable for keeping patient information confidential. In general, if I were a doctor I would choose to do the right thing even if the HIPPA did not exist, because it would be my responsibility as a doctor to keep patients’ information private. It is true what you are saying that without the HIPPA, a doctor may have an unethical practice without consequence…I know I sure wouldn’t want to have a doctor that told my information to John Doe! As far as research, the same confidentiality applies because as a patient, you have to sign a form that gives people the right to use your information in a study. I don’t feel that the HIPPA has greatly affected research because it is already limited by other laws that limit the release of patient information to the public.

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act(HIPAA) gives health insurance options to those who have lost jobs or are in between jobs. I think it is important that those in this situation get proper care and also protection when it comes to their personal health information and history. The confidentiality of a patient is crucial in some situations and the use and disclosure of personal information should be regulated and protected. It does create more paper work and sometimes more ‘red tape’ when a healthcare provider needs to treat an individual but taking those extra steps for authorization and consent forms is important. Another aspect of HIPAA that is essential is the emphasis on ethics and good judgement when an indidvidual needs treatment and the provider needs to use or disclose information critical to their treatment. Research and government records is something that requires information without 'individually identifiable health information'. This sort of information should be released while protecting the individual. HIPAA does just this while also require the 'minimum necessary' when it comes to releasing information.

In response to Erin's post, I thought she hit the main points of the HIPPA perfect. But the only thing I disagree on, is that she said it was over protective. I think that the medical field and how they treat their patients should be "over protective." Without this protection giving under the HIPPA, medical iformation of patients could get to the public and then the patients will lose their trust in the medical field. I think patient confidentiality is very important to the patients. But I think that there should be a change in the HIPPA to allow researchers to get information from the patients files. I think research is very important and the HIPPA stands in the way of researchers gathering information. One solution could be that researchers have access to patients' files, but not there names and personal information.

In response to DJ's post, I agree that there should be a way for researchers to access information in order to learn and make conclusions from studies. But I still believe the same as earlier stated, HIPAA may cause medical providers to be over protective about sharing information. Patient confidentiality is very important, I do not disagree with that at all. But if a physician or a nurse has to take more time out of their busy schedule to make sure everything is being transferred according the strict guidelines of HIPAA as to not fear persecution for a simple mistake, this is making them over protective and not as willing to participate in surveys or even have as much time to spend with their patients. I don't mean to sound like I don't respect patient confidentiality, but the guidelines that HIPAA has placed on the transfer of files seems, perhaps, a bit strict.

In response to Jon Korum's post, I agree with you that it is so much better for information to be transported electronically. It will be so much more efficient and safe. I agree with you that the new law has a huge impact on Pharmacists. It will be a lot more beneficial for this will speed things up and get people there prescriptions faster because as you said before people had to bring in there prescription and then wait for it to be filled. As a fellow pharmacist hopeful, I am really glad that this law was instated for it will be a lot more organized and quicker and as you said it will have a substantial impact.

I agree with David's idea that HIPAA is integral to our future practice. It is important for both the doctor and the patient to feel secure while the rights of the patient are protected. I am also on Erin's side when it comes to research. It would be more useful if certain information could be made available and more anonymous in protection of the patient. Releasing certain information for records and research can be important to the general public and also to see what health issues are most important. I believe some imformation should be made available but without violating the patients needs. This way the patients can continue to trust health proffessionals while they use good judgement when using a patients information in a reasonable way.

After looking through the arguments posted i really felt that christy expressed a very similar view on HIPPA as i do. It is good to have around because it ensures that a patient won't get their rights abused. without such a law there would be information that any person off the street could access. I do, however, feel that some of the information should be made available to at least the family of the patient. Without the family knowing what is going on it is hard to properly treat a patient. Each patient should be allowed to choose how much information and to whom that information is accessable. In this way they will be able to regulate what information is provided.

In response to Alex’s post, I think he did a good job in explaining what HIPPA is and different procedures that came from the laws. Although I disagree that it has not change ethics of medicine. I believe HIPPA has set new standards of ethics by not releasing patients’ personal information and protecting them from heath insurance companies. On the hand, because I plan on becoming an orthodontist, it may add extra paper work that is not necessary. Before braces or other appliances are used, the patient’s dental history is obtained to make sure the correct device is used to correct the teeth. Most dental work is not life threatening and typically is seen by the public anyway if any work is being done, such as a patient having braces. I think HIPPA is essential for hospital work though. In hospitals more patients may have life altering issues that need to be kept private.

In response to Erin Roehl's post, i don't believe that HIPAA is over protective. I really don't think there is such a thing when i comes to our personal data. I think that if we want people to konw certain things about us it should be up to us. I don't want some insurance company to deni me insurance because they looked up my medical record and i have an eleveated riske for skin cancer because my grandma had skin cancer. So i guess in general i don't think there is such a thing as being to protective when it comes to my personal information

In response to Brandons post, I totally agree that some people may not want their case broadcasted due to embarrassment. Every point he made is clear and I totally follow the same side. It is nice that if someone does lose their job or becomes injured the policy allows them to still earn an income and help protect their coverage. He also is right about the research idea. If too much information is kept private, to further scientific studies would be really hard. Experiments need to be conducted and people should want to further benefit the community of people. HIPPA allows patients to not feel worried when they become injured, fired, or anything that could possibly come from a job.

In response to Brandons post, I totally agree that some people may not want their case broadcasted due to embarrassment. Every point he made is clear and I totally follow the same side. It is nice that if someone does lose their job or becomes injured the policy allows them to still earn an income and help protect their coverage. He also is right about the research idea. If too much information is kept private, to further scientific studies would be really hard. Experiments need to be conducted and people should want to further benefit the community of people. HIPPA allows patients to not feel worried when they become injured, fired, or anything that could possibly come from a job.

In response to Erin's post, i believe she did a very good job of explaining what HIPPA is and what her opinion is of HIPPA. Since her dad is a Pharmacist, and he explained to her how he felt about HIPPA, i feel she is well informed. I agree with her that HIPPA is a good act and can help people a lot. I also agree that it can make obtaining research information more difficult.
I feel that without HIPPA, patients wouldn't feel as comfortable going to the doctor. For one, they know their information is kept private, and two, they are protected under it if they were to lose their job. Without HIPPA, patients wouldn't come to the doctor as much and then more people would be sick, which would cause a big problem. The End.

In response to Sara's post, I agree that without this act, patients wouldn't feel as comfortable going to the doctor. It is true that the medical world is becoming more and more confidential as the years go on. This is good in the sense that people will feel safer going to the doctor, which will lead to more patients seeing the doctor leading to a healthier lifestyle. This is also benefiting the community. If there are more people going to the doctor, doctors become more informed on symptoms and causes of viruses..etc. This leads to a better understanding of different health conditions and finally cures to these conditions.

In response to Alex's post, I have to agree that HIPAA has not changed the ethical practice of medicine, but has added paperwork. I do not feel doctors, nurses, etc have essentially changed what they do, they just have to be more careful about what they say and give. The paper load has changed too, just like Alex said. Patients, doctors, and insurance companies have to sign more things and keep records of more and more paper because of this act. It is definately helping to give everyone more privaqcy and the feeling of being more secure with your important information.

After looking at all the posts made I agree with JT. Although he wants to be an orthodontist, and I want to be a general dentist the situation is pretty similar. This act will affect our careers not that much. I agree with JT though that this is a good act because of the confidentiality it brings to the table for all patients. We just won't have to be dealing with that as much. Personally, my dad is a dentist and I remember when I was little. He would tell me if he saw one of my friends at his dental office that day, and I was always curious what work they had to have done, but he could never tell me. Just another example of what HIPAA brings to the table.

In response to Kate's post, I think she did a good job stating the facts about HIPAA correctly. I also thought it was very interesting to hear about the act from someone who works in the health care field. I definitely agree that HIPAA has done a great thing for the medical field by providing insurance for workers and their families and by protecting the privacy of patients. I also agree that the act will make it much more difficult to transfer patient information because of the privacy act. I think Kate was right that HIPAA is overall a benefit for patients and I think it is a good thing for the medical field

HIPAA is the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Title I of HIPAA basically insures that people will have health coverage for themselves and their families in the event that they change or lose their jobs. TItle II is about privacy. It makes sure that people can have full privacy from the public of any illness they have. An individual has the right to ask their provider or health insurer questions about how health information is used or shared and about their rights. Also, HIPAA states that doctors can't reveal any information about their patients. This is more of a benefit for the patients because it keeps their business confidential. It doesn't really affect the doctors. They just can't go talking about all their patients. It is a security measure that makes patients feel more secure about their personal information.

I agree with Brandon's blog. He states that HIAA is very valuable for every day people because it allows workers and their family members to be covered with health insurance if they were to lose their job. It provides help to families if a family member were to get sick or injured when they were not covered. I think it is a good thing for patients because it enforces the confidentiality the patient and doctor relationship. I also agree with Christine's blog. She talks about the paperwork that goes along with HIPAA. Doctors and insurance companies alike have to go through more documents and sign a lot more things which might get a little annoying for them. The main thing is that it increases the sense of security for the patient in being able to go to a doctor with an illness or disease that may be embarrassing and not have to worry about people finding out.