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Why Men and Women Argue Differently-An Article Made Up Of Stereotypes

I read the article, “Why Men and Women Argue Differently,? written by Damian Whitworth from The Times. The first thing that I noticed about this article was that this article was in the Men’s category in Life and Style section. So before I even started reading the article, I was already making assumptions about what this article was going to be about. After reading it through a couple of times, I have mixed feelings about this article. It seems to me that this topic is a pointless one, but being in a relationship and having been in past relationships, I am kind of intrigued by some of the things Whitworth talks about in the article, but more than being intrigued, i am just plain annoyed.

I read the article, “Why Men and Women Argue Differently,? written by Damian Whitworth from The Times. The first thing that I noticed about this article was that this article was in the Men’s category in Life and Style section. So before I even started reading the article, I was already making assumptions about what this article was going to be about. After reading it through a couple of times, I have mixed feelings about this article. It seems to me that this topic is a pointless one, but being in a relationship and having been in past relationships, I am kind of intrigued by some of the things Whitworth talks about in the article.

Damian Whitworth starts the article out with a little anecdote about an interaction between a husband and wife in Gapun. The wife fell through the floor and after blaming it on the husband, he hit her with some sugar cane and then she threatened to chop him up with a machete. The argument ended with the husband leaving and the woman screaming hurtful things at him as he walked away. This example of how couples argue may have been a bit extreme, but it got Whitworth’s point across that all couples argue in similar ways, whether it is “submissive, passive, aggressive, abusive, abusive-passive, aggressive-abusive, submissive-aggressive or submissive-passive-aggressive-abusive.?

After this statement, Whitworth starts giving us research after research about how men and women fight differently, never once stating whether he has an opinion on this particular debate. Personally, I do not think it really matters whether or not men and women argue differently, and I do not think that the ways in which we argue make a difference either. The “evidence? that Damian Whitworth supplied does help one choose a side of the “men versus women? and the ways we argue debate, if one wishes to choose a side.

Whitworth has evidence supporting both sides of the debate, the debate being that men are usually the ones in the fight that withdrawal from it, while women are more vocal. For this side of the debate, he provides some interesting research that has been done that supports this idea. Elaine D. Eaker had her research published in Psychosomatic Medicine, and she found that “more men than women had a tendency to bottle up their feelings during confrontations with their partners.? I thought that US research into marital stress on the heart was kind of a joke. “US research into marital stress on the heart has thrown up an intriguing finding about the way some are prone to “self-silencing? during arguments.? Not to be too critical, but in my opinion that is just common knowledge. There are some people in the world that just are not capable of confrontation, while on the opposite end of the spectrum there are “drama-queens? and “drama-kings? who live for the chance to fight. The idea that people are wasting time and money researching something that everyone in the world knows, or at least most people in the world know, is just annoying to me.

The other side of the debate is that women are capable of the “withdrawal technique? too. The argument for this is completely lacking fact or research offered by Christine Northam. “’They change the subject or rubbish it or cry. Crying is a good one…’? Being a female who does not cry every time or even a third of the time she gets into an argument with her significant other, this “evidence? really gets on my nerves. It is completely ridiculous to make a generalization about all women when in fact there are a small number of women who fit into this category. Some more information that Northam provided is about the way that men and women argue. “‘Men tend to resort to aggression very quickly, whereas women are more manipulative and try and present a problem and go on and on about it rather than being succinct.’? This seems to be just more stereotypical information that most men and women have babbled about throughout the years. This so-called debate is not really a debate; it is just “experts? spouting off the stereotypes that cause controversy between the sexes.

The only “evidence? that I actually agree with was given at the near-end of the article and is not in fact evidence, but a very sound opinion by Deborah Cameron. “’You can’t generalize about men and women. Cultural differences are much bigger than gender differences. You need to specify what culture and what community within that culture.’? This is the most intelligent information given to Whitworth’s readers in the entire article. This “debate? is a ridiculous topic and should not be researched anymore. There is no way to get realistic results from research on this subject. It is just not possible, and I think that the people who are researching it should stop wasting time and money on a pointless project.