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Not the End of White America, Just the Dawn of Post-Racial Age

The America today is much different from the America in the 1950’s and 60’s from the change in technology, views on change, what’s on the media, etc. After reading “The End of White America?? by Hua Hsu, the article talks about a change that really differentiate the America today from the America in the 1950’s and 60’s. A change that gradually affects the Americans today, that change is call “the post-racial age or the end of white America.? It is a change that I do see but never think about, but believe that it is a post racial age and that it is normal.

I am Hmong, an Asian ethnic group from the mountainous regions of southeast Asia. Hmong people were granted a life of freedom in America in the mid 1970’s for helping America fight communism in the Vietnam War. I do not feel that it’s the end of white America, but I am not white, I do not understand the meaning of being the majority of America even though I grew up going to school and being the only Asian family in a suburban neighborhood in Minnesota. In that suburban neighborhood there were no African Americans that went to my school too. About five years later, the high school in that same suburban neighborhood that I went to became very diverse, I would say that two of every five students were of a colored race.

In the article “The End of White America??, Hua Hsu tried to prove that the end of white America is coming by using famous African American hip-hop mogul, Sean Diddy Combs. He was part of the rise with hip hop in the 90’s and now is one of the wealthiest in America. One thing that really surprises me with the change in America that really shows the “ending? of white America is soon to be coming is sports in America. I am talking about the number one sport organization in America, The NFL. The NFL is a very popular sport in America. Comparing the NFL in the 60’s when the Green Bay Packers were unstoppable, African Americans were rarely seen in the NFL. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, today white non Hispanic represents 66% of America, but when watching the NFL today, I see about 60% of the NFL players are African American and/or colored minorities. Also take a look at the NBA, I see about 75% of the NBA players are African Americans and/or colored minorities.

On the night of November 4th, 2008 America found out that the next President of America is Barack Obama, a half Kenyan and a half American. That moment proved not just to the country that struggled with segregation between blacks and whites in the 60’s but also to the world to see that that was the dawning of a post-racial age in America. According to an August 2008 report by the U.S. Census Bureau, those groups currently categorized as racial minorities like blacks and Hispanics, East Asians and South Asians will account for a majority of the U.S. population by the year 2042. This proves that the “White Supremacy? is slowly decaying as the years roll by.

I see no negative affect on being a more diverse country and I still wonder why some white Americans are so against it. The white Americans who sees it that way is holding on to too much pride of what America was use to be. They don’t realize that change is good and it happens. Like what Hua Hsu put in his article, white Americans have no culture of there own. They came to America and pretty much threw their original culture away when they arrived in America. Today most minorities are still holding on to there culture and language that they carried to America from their original country.

America has changed a lot from the 1950’s and 60’s to the present day. It is a change that I do see but never think about, but I believe that it is a post-racial age that we will go through with the next generation and that it is just a change that we as humans live through and like Karl Carter, of Atlanta’s youth-oriented GTM Inc. (Guerrilla Tactics Media) said, “We came along in a generation that didn’t have to follow that path of race,? he goes on. “We saw something different.? This moment was not the end of white America; it was not the end of anything. It was a bridge, and we crossed it.?

Comments

I definitely agree with the author's as well as your point of view. It's pretty tough to see any kind of racism these days. Like you, although I’m Caucasian, I grew up in a neighborhood that was predominately white as well as going to a school that for the most part white. Then when I got to high school, it was about one African American student to every two white students. Personally, I never noticed any acts of racism there or in general anywhere.
You also make a great point in connecting the article to sports. Anyone can see that basketball is famous for its African American celebrities in addition to the rise of the Chinese players like Yao Ming and Yi Jianlin. Although baseball is dominantly white, there is an escalation in players from Central American countries like the Dominican Republic and Venezuela. On top of that players such as Ichiro Suzuki and Daisuke Matsuzaka have brought Japan’s best to America. Baseball has even gone as far as to introduce the World Baseball Classic (WBC). It’s basically the world cup of baseball for 16 countries from The Netherlands to Chinese Taipei.
One thing that I’ve noticed is the increase in Hispanics in our country. Not just in the south but even up here in Minnesota someone will see some people working at subway or as janitors or something like that. Even here at the University of Minnesota I might have a couple of my professors and Teacher Assistants originate from different countries.
Clearly now, America has finally reached the age that is “post-racial age?.

I agree that the end of white America is coming. Every day there are people immigrating to US, from other countries and calling America their home. We can see how far we have come within the last hundred years, but we won’t be able to say that “white America? has ended for a very long time.

According to a report released by the US Census Bureau in August of 2008, the American population only consists of one third minorities. That is clearly evident going to school in Minnesota, and growing up in Wisconsin. Although the metro area may be slightly more diverse, here in the Midwest we have a long way to go until we reach the “end of white America.?

A great example is here at the U. According to the university of Minnesota Website, there were a total of 66,099 students that were enrolled at the University in the 07-08 school year (that’s including undergraduate, graduate, first professional, and non-degree seeking students), and out of that number only 12,816 of them are considered to be a minority, less than twenty percent. So basically there are over four times the amount of white kids as there are African American, American Indian, Asian Pacific/Islander, Chicano/Lationo, and international Students combined!

I don’t disagree with you saying that the end of white America is coming, but I think it might take a little longer than you talk about.

According to the US Census Bureau, minorities are not expected to become the majority until 2042. With the nation becoming 54 percent minority by the year 2050. So, we white America isn’t projected to end until I am old enough to have grandchildren.

The end of white America is coming, it just might take a while.

Sources:
http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/012496.html
http://www1.umn.edu/twincities/assets/pdf/eFacts08.pdf



I agreed with the article “Not the End of White America, Just the Dawn of Post-Racial Age? that vangx686 wrote. Vang is Hmong and he felt different from everyone else in his neighborhood. I understood how he felt when he said he is a different race than being white. I understood how he felt I am Korean and Mexican, I was born and raised in the suburbs of the Twin Cities and I currently live in the suburbs of Shakopee, Minnesota. Vang went to a suburban school that had a lot of teenagers of different ethnicities; that was the only place where the diversity was accepted was in Vang’s school.
In the article, the part of America having so many different racial athletes was very true. There is a metaphor that is used called “borderless athletes.? In other words, many of the athletes in the United States are individuals who are recruited by the professional leagues and are all of ethnic minority. The leagues will do everything in their power to recruit anyone in the world for their team with the idea of “borders? not affecting their chances. Individuals who want to work in order to support their families in third world countries are not allowed in the United States, but to give America entertainment, these same borders are nonexistent. The MLB recruits mostly Japanese and Dominican Republicans, the NFL and NBA is almost all African Americans, and our NHL is mostly Canadians and Europeans. Even the U.S. college coaches recruit an increasing amount of foreign players. Without these borderless athletes, America would not be entertained by sports.
Towards the end of the article, Vang discussed of times in the 60’s where all white people in America were racist towards African Americans. America, as a country, has matured and grown over the last 48 years, enough that our current president is half Kenyan and white. The United States is known as a “melting pot? that perfectly describes how diverse it truly is. The United States has many different races, ethnicities, backgrounds, cultures and languages and it all fits into one country; one of the most powerful of all the world. The diversity of the United States has given hope to all countries in the world; it is a change that everyone needs. Instead of it just being a black and white picture, it is changing to something much more. Karl Carter wrote, “This moment was not the end of white America; it was not the end of anything. It was a bridge, and we crossed it.? 40 years ago, the idea of racism not being an issue would have seemed impossible and not a reality. However, that was a very long bridge that has been built and crossed, there are still many more bridges that need to be built in the United States and have yet to be crossed.

I agreed with the article “Not the End of White America, Just the Dawn of Post-Racial Age? that vangx686 wrote. Vang is Hmong and he felt different from everyone else in his neighborhood. I understood how he felt when he said he is a different race than being white. I understood how he felt I am Korean and Mexican, I was born and raised in the suburbs of the Twin Cities and I currently live in the suburbs of Shakopee, Minnesota. Vang went to a suburban school that had a lot of teenagers of different ethnicities; that was the only place where the diversity was accepted was in Vang’s school.
In the article, the part of America having so many different racial athletes was very true. There is a metaphor that is used called “borderless athletes.? In other words, many of the athletes in the United States are individuals who are recruited by the professional leagues and are all of ethnic minority. The leagues will do everything in their power to recruit anyone in the world for their team with the idea of “borders? not affecting their chances. Individuals who want to work in order to support their families in third world countries are not allowed in the United States, but to give America entertainment, these same borders are nonexistent. The MLB recruits mostly Japanese and Dominican Republicans, the NFL and NBA is almost all African Americans, and our NHL is mostly Canadians and Europeans. Even the U.S. college coaches recruit an increasing amount of foreign players. Without these borderless athletes, America would not be entertained by sports.
Towards the end of the article, Vang discussed of times in the 60’s where all white people in America were racist towards African Americans. America, as a country, has matured and grown over the last 48 years, enough that our current president is half Kenyan and white. The United States is known as a “melting pot? that perfectly describes how diverse it truly is. The United States has many different races, ethnicities, backgrounds, cultures and languages and it all fits into one country; one of the most powerful of all the world. The diversity of the United States has given hope to all countries in the world; it is a change that everyone needs. Instead of it just being a black and white picture, it is changing to something much more. Karl Carter wrote, “This moment was not the end of white America; it was not the end of anything. It was a bridge, and we crossed it.? 40 years ago, the idea of racism not being an issue would have seemed impossible and not a reality. However, that was a very long bridge that has been built and crossed, there are still many more bridges that need to be built in the United States and have yet to be crossed.

I don’t blame anybody for feeling optimistic about the large representation of African Americans in U.S. professional sports. The history of American sports is actually filled with records of African American athletes capable of participating in the broad sports arena, but not given the chance due to their race. In fact, most sporting events were separated by race until at least the 1940’s. The few African Americans who were ready and able to cross that line initially had a heavy price to pay; they became prime symbols for their entire race in that individual sport, and it was not uncommon for them to be harassed and belittled while demonstrating their skills in the sports arena. Looking at the representation of African Americans in our sports community today could likely make anyone feel hopeful about how far we have come and could possibly even give you a sense of a “post-racial” society.
I, however, am a bit less optimistic, and a bit more critical when looking at this subject. There’s no doubt that ethnic, particularly African American, participation in pro-sports has increased over these last several decades. African Americans make up approximately 79% of NBA rosters, 65% of NFL lineups and 18% of MLB teams. But does that really tell us we have reached a “post-racial” age? I won’t argue that seeing so many minority faces in sports and entertainment doesn’t show diversity, and yes, great progress from previous times, however as an indication that we have transcended race as a society, I think it’s an incredibly superficial, even irrelevant, marker. I think we’re taking things in far-too simplistic terms if, upon seeing many black men on TV, though not necessarily in our suburban neighborhoods or high school, as you said, we can happily assume that racism is dying, diversity is concurring all, and everyone can just get along.

*Sources:
Racial Composition of NBA, NFL and MLB Teams and Racial Composition of Franchise Cities
Journal article by Wilbert M. Leonard II; Journal of Sport Behavior, Vol. 20, 1997

http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/aaitsa.htm

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