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The Fall of America

The Mall of America is incredibly symbolic in its position as a tourist attraction and as a symbol of our society today. Looming above the city of Bloomington, Minnesota, the Mall of America is a sign of industrialism. Ever since the industrialization of America and the move from out to up, we have been going higher and getting bigger. The mall is the epitome of this change. In Ian Frazier’s article he describes how the mall stops time itself, it encourages visitors to live in the present. It is easy to see how the Mall achieves this status. With over 500 venues, the Mall is the second largest shopping place in the world.
In Frazier’s article, he talks of the Mall and the history it encompasses. He claims that history becomes feeble. Being in the Mall is like watching television. It is hard to remember anything other than what you’re seeing at the moment. Things come and go regularly, and it is not uncommon for stores to be moving in and out, sometimes in under a month. He talks of book tours at the Mall and how each time he goes there things have changed. One of the more recent changes is to the amusement park, Camp Snoopy’s transformation to Nickelodeon Universe is the most obvious mark of change in the Mall’s atmosphere. When inside the Mall, one can’t help but be taken aback by the atmosphere inside. It really is its own little world, and how it all works is largely psychological. Every day the Mall caters to those who can’t hold on to their wallets without throwing down some cash to buy the latest styles or trends. It seems as though the goal of the Mall and its hundreds of shops is indeed to create a shopping craze throughout the population.
Frazier talks about how the mall of America actually does incorporate history, though without trying. In a deep corner of Nickelodeon Universe, there is a plate in the shape of home where home plate lay when the old Metropolitan Stadium occupied that area. This history takes the imagination away if one lets it, it creates somewhat of a parallel universe where one can feel the energy, the hundred thousand eyes focusing on the plate. I think that it is interesting to consider this. The Mall is a place of the present, the psychology behind shopping is not often talked about, but indefinitely still existent. However, at the same time there is so much history encompassed in its being.
Halfway through the article Frazier mentions the mall as a terrorist target. Being the largest shopping mall in the country, with more than 45 million annual visitors, it’s something that cannot be denied. There are so many people at the mall on a daily basis, especially the weekends, that the mall is easily at the top of the list for possible strike zones. After the attack on September 11th, sales were down. The flow of visitors was visibly squenched, and talk of the possible effects on the Mall’s business numbers was pessimistic. But in reality, who could deny a visit to the Mall? After a period of time, of course visitors will come back. It’s the largest mall in America. A consumer giant of that scale couldn’t possibly go under. The talk of terrorism brings up an interesting point in Frazier’s article. He mentions the USA America Pride store, and how business there was incredibly steady. People were buying American paraphernalia and other goods that showed the United States stars and stripes or anything that one could proudly hold and claim they supported their country. However, upon looking at the labels on all of these items, Frazier could not find a single one that was made in the United States. Isn’t it ironic that people buying these “American” goods and symbols of USA pride are really supporting other countries? Things in the world of economics are never what they seem. Frazier’s article shows us insight into exactly what the Mall of America is, and even how its name may be miscommunicated. It is obvious that the Mall isn’t exactly innocent in its behavior, nor does it promote a positive message when it comes right down to the bones.

Works Cited
Frazier, Ian Frazier. "The Mall of America." Online posting. Aug. 2002. 12 Mar.
2009 .

Kinzer, Stephen. "A Nation Challenged." New York Times 20 Oct. 2001. 12 Mar.
2009 fullpage.html?res=9D05E3DC173FF932A25753C1A9679C8B63>.

Comments

I read information and insights on your paper that I and anyone else can easily agree with. It is the biggest mall in American and having over 500 stores to pick through and walking once around the mall equals out to a mile. The mall does not have to do anything to make money even through the hard times were having through our economy; people can easily walk in and buy whatever they want without the mall hassling people to buy. I have lived in Bloomington for 18 years of my life and have always gone there since I was a baby; so I know that the mall today is not only a shopping place but a social environment for teenagers and kids to hang out in or just walk around with friends.
Everything does change around the mall A LOT. For instance it used to be Camp Snoopy and now being Nickelodeon Universe; and now they are planning on making a connector to make a hotel connecting to the MOA from the parking lot across the street, right next to IKEA. The mall is constantly changing no matter what, if it is not their stores changing from month to month, they are putting in new areas and stores constantly. Also having historical pieces in the mall as the Golden plate brings a big historical part of the old MOA when it first came out back in 1990 and image of you being able to imagine what it would feel being a baseball player with millions crowded around watching you. So even though the mall changes things from time to time, they still have some historical pieces laying around this gigantic place.
And I do believe what you and Frazier explain about possible terrorist attacks pleading on the MOA. The MOA is an American icon that everyone knows about. Exactly like the World Trade Center was an American icon. Once we name a place that globalizes our countries name, people aim for it just like the terrorists did back on September 11th to hurt the U.S.’s pride. When Bush was in office and the war was going on hard, I worked at Metro Park in the MOA. Every single time I left home my parents cautioned me about work and asking me to get a new job because the MOA could have been a next target since it is the biggest mall in America. I believed in all of your beliefs that you and Frazier mentioned because not only do I believe your statement, but I have had the MOA since I was a baby and lived through it for so long.

I read information and insights on your paper that I and anyone else can easily agree with. It is the biggest mall in America and having over 500 stores to pick through and walking once around the mall equals out to a mile. The mall does not have to do anything to make money even through the hard times were having through our economy; people can easily walk in and buy whatever they want without the mall hassling people to buy. I have lived in Bloomington for 18 years of my life and have always gone there since I was a baby; so I know that the mall today is not only a shopping place but a social environment for teenagers and kids to hang out in or just walk around with friends.
Everything does change around the mall A LOT. For instance it used to be Camp Snoopy and now being Nickelodeon Universe; and now they are planning on making a connector to make a hotel connecting to the MOA from the parking lot across the street, right next to IKEA. The mall is constantly changing no matter what, if it is not their stores changing from month to month, they are putting in new areas and stores constantly. Also having historical pieces in the mall as the Golden plate brings a big historical part of the old MOA when it first came out back in 1990 and image of you being able to imagine what it would feel being a baseball player with millions crowded around watching you. So even though the mall changes things from time to time, they still have some historical pieces laying around this gigantic place.
And I do believe what you and Frazier explain about possible terrorist attacks pleading on the MOA. The MOA is an American icon that everyone knows about. Exactly like the World Trade Center was an American icon. Once we name a place that globalizes our countries name, people aim for it just like the terrorists did back on September 11th to hurt the U.S.’s pride. When Bush was in office and the war was going on hard, I worked at Metro Park in the MOA. Every single time I left home my parents cautioned me about work and asking me to get a new job because the MOA could have been a next target since it is the biggest mall in America. I believed in all of your beliefs that you and Frazier mentioned because not only do I believe your statement, but I have had the MOA since I was a baby and lived through it for so long.