Quick Chalk animation lesson

Sarah Wiesner
Lesson Plan for tweed


Topic: Chalk animation in the tweed

Ages: all ages

Materials:
- Chalk (colored and white)
- Chalk Board
- Camera
- Tripod
- Other random objects
- Flash cards
- Bucket for water
- Damp wash cloth

Plot line:
I want to create a character that will interact with its surroundings. I will zoom out the camera so I not only get the animal or person in the shot but also the participant who is creating them.
1. First I will start with a blank slate and a person will come up and draw their character. The character will respond to the artist who has made them then another person drawing their character will take its attention. Both will look over to the character being made and then they will respond to one another.
2. More and more creatures will be added to the board until it starts getting crowded. Then the creatures will start pushing each other for more room on the chalkboard.
3. After a while creatures will start falling of the chalkboard and the students watching will react to the situation.
4. In the end there will be two left pushing each other on the chalkboard until both of them fall off and one of the students writes "The End" on the board.

Instruction:
1. The first people who come in will get an introduction. I will introduce chalk animation to the students.
a. Chalk animation is a lot like a flipbook where you draw each image slowly progressing throughout the animation. However unlike a flipbook you only use one surface, and erase the last picture you had.
2. When they first come into the activity room I will hand them a flash card so they can plan out what they are going to draw when they get their turn as well as a basic plan of how their character is going react with the others as the chalk board gets filled.
3. If some people have to leave half way through, his or her animation can be assigned to someone else and that new person can decide what happens to it.
a. This change in artists may add an interesting morph in styles as the video goes on.

4. The students can choose to do more than one character just as long as everyone has gotten a turn. I would like all the character designs photographed at the end of the program.

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This page contains a single entry by wies0128 published on October 26, 2010 8:19 PM.

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