Main

March 4, 2009

Inspirations for artist presentations

The Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium

Interactive Architecture.org

we-make-money-not-art

Stephen Wilson's links

Amy Young's links

Rhizome.org

UbuWeb

March 11, 2009

Video clip Archive

Lumen Eclipse has an archive of video clips from an extensive range of contemporary artists that you can view as small format quicktime videos.

May 13, 2009

Artist Presentation: Charles Woodman by Anita Wallace

This presentation is an exploration of the work of Charles Woodman whom I met as an undergrad at Ripon College in the 1970s. Charles Woodman is an electronic artist who teaches at the University of Cincinnati. This power point presentation examines his work in the context of his artistic family comprised of Betty Woodman, George Woodman, and Francesca Woodman.

To see more of his work visit: http://www.videosavant.org/viDEO_sAVant/main.html

May 14, 2009

Decasia (Bill Morrison) by Anita Wallace

Decasia is a 2002 found footage film by Bill Morrison, featuring an original score by Michael Gordon. The film is a meditation on old, decaying silent films and is similar in spirit to Lyrical Nitrate by Peter Delpeut, a Dutch filmmaker. It begins and ends with scenes of a dervish and is book-ended with old footage showing how film is processed. Some of the deterioration was enhanced with computers to create more meaningful abstract imagery in the manner of Stan Brakhage. Nothing was done to the actual film prints, most of which were borrowed from facilities such as the Museum of Modern Art, to accelerate their decomposition. The film's musical soundtrack features several detuned pianos and an orchestra playing out of phase with itself, adding to the fractured and decomposing nature of the film.
(from Wikipedia)

To view film go to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08gr2EYTc1Q

I am fascinated with the effects of the decomposing film from an aesthetic viewpoint. However, from the preservation and conservation perspective it is a bit alarming that they would borrow films from facilities such as the Museum of Modern Art to "accelerate their decomposition".