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September 30, 2008

My take

Art can be a catalyst for conversation that meanders through the work. This approach provides differing perspectives on content the work it is addressing.
Often in an artist studio we address questions of how would I remake their work or what direction do I feel the artist should go. I am leery of the power position of critic in the studio. Although it can be comforting for others to tell us what to do or not, it can be disruptive to the process of discovery.

September 29, 2008

Critiques- jazz, jason, linsey, primo

I thought our critiques were great. I know for me it was one of the better critiques I've had here. It was also the first time I have had someone outside the ceramic department encourage me to stay in ceramics. I have felt often like I had to keep defending my choice of materials. They both gave me a lot of things to think about which is what you want critiques to do. I also found it interesting that they brought up the folk art reference. I think it's interesting what creeps into your work from your background that you don't even think about.

As for the rest of the crew I think they all had good critiques. Jason seemed excited about the idea of props. As well they gave him some exciting directions to think about. I Think Jason may have found his niche. I was glad to see that Clive was picking up what Lindsey was putting down. I have found in the past people have struggled with her content. It was great to see someone understand that quickly. I think Primo really needed that crit I know she has been questioning how literal she needs to be and she got some good answers.

our crits-Laura

I thought our crits went really well! I wish that we (the grad students) had talked more in Jason's but maybe it was hard to jump in when the conversation was going well with our guests. I agree that Jason needs to really utilize his studio as a place of happenings. I also wonder how his performances would transform if done in an alternative space. It was refreshing to hear someone outside the ceramic area push Jasmine to keep working more in clay. I am curious to see the clay forms in a larger scale and see what details could be gained. It was also refreshing to see someone pick out Lindsay's references to other artists. One thing that I have still been thinking about is how important the narrative is on the thimbles and if it can play a more dominant role in them. It seems less important on the thimbles than on her work in the past.

I am satisfied with how my critique went. Earlier in the week, I gathered questions both from previous critiques as well as ones that I had been thinking about. However when it came to it I ended up not even look at my notebook, due to being a little nervous. I wish that I would have explained some points better because some question came up about how the icebergs would be finished. Overall I found this critique to be insightful, stimulating and served as a good compass for the direction of my work. I greatly appreciate my fellow grads input as well as our guests. I will now light some candles and lock myself in my studio...

Laura, Jasmine, Jason...and me too.

Laura, I thought some really great stuff was said in your critique. Especially the part about the imagery being enough of a signifier to get you message across, and that maybe you should just make the big beautiful ice-burg. Jasmine, I was so happy to hear both Andrea and Clive speak about your Freshworks piece and say that it was that particular approach to materials that seemed your own. You don't have to be married to clay forever, but you also don't have to reject it. You do have a way of working with it that is all your own. Jason, I'm really excited about your dive into performance. I really had a great time participating in that piece. Clive and Andrea said some great comments to you that should give you lots of confidence to move forward and keep going with this stuff. I felt like my own crit was informative. I needed to think about a lot of the things that Clive said in terms of not seeing all these isolated projects, and focusing a bit. I always really love it when people look at my work and get all the influences, but I'm also trying to be more aware of the idea of being in conversation with the artists I love.

Rashad, Peter and Josh

It was great to get in and see what the three of you have been up to. Josh, your prints just keep getting more and more refined. I would love to see them in a book, and I feel excited to see what your writing could add to the project. I also am really interested in the smaller objects you are beginning to explore. Rashad, I like the idea of seeing your work move into a place where there could be some more contrast between materials. I always get a lot out of seeing what motivates you, especially all the Louisiana cultural stuff like the Mardi Gras indians etc. Peter, I'm inspired by the way you appreciate place in your work. All the stuff around your studio interests me as someone who is also striving to communicate a relationship to place (especially cold places).

September 26, 2008

critique

My critique was great, i found it helpful. The word "prop" was something i had never thought of, yet something clicked during its use. I also found Laura, Jasmine, Lindsay's critique very informative. For me what makes a good critique is when i can also gain information about myself through someone else and their work.

What was said seemed relevant and thoughtful. Our time slots were a bit short, although i still feel like i gained something.

I'm very excited to see everyones work now and in the near future.

thanks
jason (damn cat just scratched)

The senSEs

Depending on the situation i make an effort to omit the senses as well as enliven them. What i and others feel and think are important, however i do find that the senses can get in the way of a creative drive. Just so i clarify myself when i say "senses" i am only referring to the brain and its ability to try and make "sense" out of everything (this is a funny play on words).

How do i augment my senses with technology. If by augment you mean enhance i must say that technology is my devils advocate. For and against these systems, i engage and protest its abilities. Technology enlivens the senses as well as dulls them. Why do i say this? I say this because i find myself forgetting that birds live outside not in cages, animals need trees not suburbs and not everyone has the same engagement with technology as i.

In reference to the senses, what would i like to experience: another dimension, human compassion, aurora, rocky mountains, blue water, cleaner air, honesty, clear skies, smiles, grand canyon, poppies, clean water, rain, thunder, sunrises,sunsets, mars, contact with aliens, willie nelson up close, blue ridge mountain mornings and finally kick ass art. There is more however i would fill the entire blog with my blabber.

ps if i posted this entry twice i'm sorry

jason

September 25, 2008

CLA - Rarig Studio

The CLA-TV studios have extraordinary, broadcast quality studios and equipment available for your creative use and equipment that you can reserve as well.

Reflections on the Mediated Sensorium

Caroline A. Jones's chapter, the Mediated Sensorium will be posted in sections in the Readings category over the next few weeks.

(This chapter is excerpted from Sensorium: embodied experience, technology and contemporary art which is edited by Caroline A. Jones and published by MIT Press.)

The chapter discusses sensory perception including olefactory, echolocation, VisiTextual, psychosensorial and the technological mediation of our human sensorium.

In your Reflection, would you describe:

- how you engage your senses in the production of your work.

- the ways in which you augment your senses with technology

- an example of an existing or an imagined enhanced sensory perception that you would like to experience

September 24, 2008

Tetsuya says...

Tetsuya sent this to me in an email,

I thought about clarifying my attitude towards to the financial crisis of Jerome. I was focusing on the idea that artistic idea and artist's passion could exist without financial support, that probably made my impression less sympathetic toward to the condition of the foundation. Yes, I agree that their contribution to our community, through non-profit organization, artistic project and individual artist, is significant. Also the financial support encourage us to work, and it would be discouraging without it. Clearly, if the resource is not available, it would reflect on us as a part of our community and artists. I have my sympathy for it. You could put this message on the blog to share with the class, if you would like.

Once again, I enjoyed being a part of the class.

Tetsuya

September 23, 2008

Rashad

I enjoyed the atmosphere of the critique. I appreciated everything people had to say. Most of all the challenges to my content and the desire for grads to see a push in experimentation, I felt, was pivotal to the discussion. I left the crit with a some excitement on where i can take this body of work next. Being open not only to experimentation but to happenstance as an enriching part of the building process I think is important for all artists. I truly wish to reach a level, with my work, where once the work is complete my thinking and articulation are well refined.

September 22, 2008

Laura

I think that if our visitor has a prepared presentation or discussion that this could be an interesting part of our class. However I think that our class time last friday could have been used more for the critiques that seemed to be cut short. I know that it is the initial crit but I hope that we can get past the fluff.

jason G

Nice photo josh!
I'm in agreement with Josh, "thoughts are important." In response to the critiques, i do feel that time may become an issue. Although it was short i did find everyones comments useful (hope the artist's did too). I especially enjoyed listing to the artist's talk, this is always exciting.
Critiquing the critique is difficult, i wish we could spend 15 minutes in class discussing it. I hope i'm not repeating myself over and over again, i feel like i am.

Pht initial critique

well thanks to everyone for your feedback and time. I think that I set up a little bit of a hard scenario. It is more difficult when there is not so much work to critique, but more the idea of the work that has yet to be made. Plus it seemed in retrospect that I kind of set up this installation (for lack of a better word) that was about the 'brand' of Pht which you kept commenting on but then I kept saying 'I don want it to be about me'. So I apologize for being a little schizophrenic perhaps. I do want my work to be about me, but maybe more in a way that doesn't create some idea of me.

But all that helps because it reminds me to think more about how that stuff will be read. I do think more time would be ideal, it seems as though things get rolling and then it is over. I guess we need to continue the conversation here or in person.

In general I am appreciating the chance to be in a class with all of you again and have conversations that feel real. So thanks. If you want to read online something about Joshua Slocum, check this out, and TJ and my research can be found here.

Oh also someone left a notebook in our studio, it is a U of M lined notebook, I don't see a name on the cover. Come by and claim it!

to add a little more to what I said above, I want to blur the boundary between art and life but in doing that I dont want to make me the art, but still use my curiosity and passions as the basis for the art. I guess that is what we all do isn't it?

Jazzman

It's good to see everyone's work although I agree with what Josh said the critiques were not quite long enough. We could of spent the first 45 minutes or so in the studios. I know for me I need more time to be with the work to experience it in order to get its essence (thats a lame word for it but I'm sure you know what I mean) . Overall the critiques were good introductions to the work and it was great to get in studios that I had not been in before. I also really enjoy hearing the varying perspectives that we have in our class.

front_july_2008.jpg
I was picturing T.J. when I took this picture in Jacksonville.

Overall, the crits were short. Maybe we should take advantage of extra time when it is upon us, like the misfortune of chad being ill. The 1st hour of class was enjoyable but we could have been in studios. The crits thus, for the most part, seem to be mostly introductions. As for my critique experience: I tend to talk too much, and not really say much of anything, when really what I'd like, is to hear other people talk. I should save the talking for my presentation. Just having humans in my space gives me thoughts, what they look at, don't look at, what they say, even their bored faces give me thoughts. Thoughts are important. Thanks for the thoughts. If anyone has more please send me an e-mail or stop by.

Josh

chips

Jessica

I really enjoyed seeing Juanita's early work and progression to her current work in relation to the outside experiences affecting her art. I'm excited about her motivations to convey human experience and condition without directly using the figure. The length of the presentation didn't allow for many comments in relation to critique, but everyone in the class now has insight into her process for future conversations.

David's installation allowed the class to experience a situation and talk about initial responses before he contributed to the conversation. This format of critique is very beneficial for the artist to get a read of how the work is communicating, as well as the audience to experience the work without limitations.

September 20, 2008

Time Travels Reflections

from Time Travels by Elizabeth Grosz.

The chapter The Nature of Culture explores what contemporary feminist philosopher Elizabeth Grosz describes as

" ...the ways in which time, movement, change, the irresistible push to the future - as fundamental biological and material forces - affect culture ..."


"... the ways in which nature does not contain culture but induces it to vary itself, to evolve, to develop and transform in ways that are not predictable in advance."

Continuing with our exploration of new and renewed modes of perception and our inquiry into the construction and perhaps transformation of the studio critique:

- select two concepts introduced in this reading

- post a new entry in the 9/19 weekly blog assignment category

- comment on how these ideas influence your thinking about the process of studio critique

September 19, 2008

The Mediated Sensorium part 1

0262101173-f30.jpg

This is the first section of the chapter, The Mediated Sensorium written by Caroline A. Jones, editor of Sensorium: Embodied Experience, Technology, and Contemporary Art

Thanks & Self-Critique

First, I want to thank you all for your comments (blog posts or emails), they are incredibly valuable.
I definitely admit that my first studio critique wasn't a real studio critique at all, and the presentation format I chose didn't quite leave space and time for a discussion, as some of you already mentioned. However, I must admit that making that presentation allowed me to organize, see and evaluate my ideas and practice from an objective perspective, which is now helping me to understand where I am in this ongoing process. I look forward to having some new work done and share it with you in a physical space, instead of a boring flat slide.

I also want to share my experience with David's critique. I enjoyed the fact that we went to an unexpected "hidden space" inside the art department to find his piece. I think that the intimate space and general set up easily invited us to interact with the installation and discuss about it. However, ironically, it also potentialized the necessity of avoiding such evident intimacy. I liked that ambiguity. For this reason, it made me question if the experience would be completely different if we were to see that piece individually and not as a group.

Schedule

Sketch of the Fall Semester 8410 Schedule:


September:

5th Diane + all

Introduction to Studio Critique:

Class discussion

Intro to the blog

Visit HANSON HALL 1 -109 space


12th Diane +

Guest: Dawei Xu Artist, Curator & Lecturer, Beijing Film Academy

Studio Critique 1: David Donovan

Studio Critique 2: Juanita Berrio

19th Diane +

Guest: Tetsuya Yamada Artist & Associate Professor of Art

Studio Critique 1: Rashad Butler

Studio Critique 2: Peter H T

Studio Critique 3: Josh Winkler


26th Diane in New England

Guests: Andrea Stanislav Artist & Assistant Professor of Art and visiting artist Clive Murphy

Studio Critique 1: Jason Gaspar

Studio Critique 2: Jasmine Wallace

Studio Critique 3: Laura Primozic

Studio Critique 4: Lindsay Montgomery


October:

3rd Diane +

Guest: Eleanor Savage, Independent Curator and Jerome Foundation Program Officer

Studio Critique 1: Jessica Teckemeyer

Studio Critique 2: T J Barnes

Studio Critique 3: Meng Tang

Studio Critique 4: Chad Rutter


10th Diane +


17th Diane +

Guest: Scott Stulen, Artist & mnartists.org Director

HANSON HALL 1-109

Artist Presentation 1: Rashad Butler

Artist Presentation 2:Peter H T

Artist Presentation 3: Meng Tang


24th Diane +

Guest: Patricia Briggs - Associate Professor @ MCAD, Art Historian, Critic, Independent Curator

HANSON HALL 1-109

Artist Presentation 1: Jessica Teckemeyer

Artist Presentation 2: Jason Gaspar

Artist Presentation 3: Laura Primozic

Artist Presentation 4: T J Barnes

Artist Presentation 5: Josh Winkler

31st Diane in China


November

7th Diane +

Guest: Chris Larson Artist & Instructor in Sculpture, UMN

HANSON HALL 1-109

Artist Presentation 1: Juanita Berrio

Artist Presentation 2: Lindsay Montgomery

Artist Presentation 3: Jasmine Wallace

Artist Presentation 4: Chad Rutter

Artist Presentation 5: David Donovan


14th Diane +

Guest: Diane Mullin, Art Historian and Associate Curator @ The Weisman Museum of Art

Studio Critique 1: Jason Gaspar

Studio Critique 2: TJ Barnes

Studio Critique 3: Josh Winkler

Studio Critique 4: Lindsay Montgomery


21st Diane +

Steve Dietz, Yproductions, Zero One, Northern Lights,

Studio Critique 1: Rashad Butler

Studio Critique 2: Meng Tang

Studio Critique 3: David Donovan



December:


5th Diane +

Yasmil Raymond, Assistant Curator @ Walker Art Center

Studio Critique 1: Jessica Teckemeyer

Studio Critique 2:Peter H T

Studio Critique 3: Juanita Berrio

Studio Critique 4: Chad Rutter


12th Diane +

Guest: Alexis Kuhr Artist & Associate Professor of Art

Studio Critique 1: Jasmine Wallace

Studio Critique 2: Laura Primozic

Studio Critique :: Philosophy and Guide to Practice

Sharing each person's Philosophy and Guide to the Studio Critique :: concepts and practices
as synthesized from in class and out of class critiques, readings and documentation on the blog.

We will share each person's blog post of their Philosophy and Guide to the Studio Critique.

Laura -The nature of culture

I am kind of confused by this article but also intrigued. Grosz talks about three characteristics of nature: the force of development, the force of variation and the force of differences in sex and race. She then goes on to state that "Culture can be regarded as the varying innovative responses to the problems that nature poses to the living". Doesn't this imply that nature must come first in order to have cultural responses to it? Nature is then the force or framework of culture.
However at the end of the article she poses questions that seem to have been already answered. She asks "What would the study of culture, cultural studies, look like if nature was regarded as the framework and provocation of culture rather than its retardation?".

Jessica

Critiques are an exchange of ideas, experiences, and personal expression that allow for further perspective to form. The quote offers a fundamental possibility of elevating understanding through a clean slate. Within this context, the conversation can liberate new thinking.

September 18, 2008

Lindsay

I felt like I really got a much more in-depth idea of who Juanita is, and what her art is about through her presentation. I felt like I was in the same space as her in terms of knowing what it is out there in the world that motivates me to make art, but feeling somewhat unsure of what kind of art or practice is best going to communicate those motivations. I think she is doing the best thing by experimenting during her time here. I've realized that this is really such a rich environment of opinions, and this is what it's all about. Testing things out.
David's critique was a more traditional format, and that seemed to work for him as well. It seemed like he wanted us all to really get in and experience the work with him to see how we reacted. The atmosphere within the piece, and then the discussion taking place there was fun for me. I love work that removes me in a big way like that. Even if it's to a place that I don't necessarily want to go.

Lindsay

Sounds like something that should have been written on a banner at the convention last week. It's really the thing that ultimately leaves so many people unsatisfied with studying art in an institution. School makes us aware of power structures through bureaucracy, and then we become critical of them and long for change. The structures themselves need to become more flexible, (and maybe that starts with the minds taking this advice), so that they can evolve and start again as the values and needs of society change.

critique

I thought Davids critique method was effective . I enjoyed being led into a space that I was uncertain of. I like that element of surprise. Davids silence allowed for our own interpretations. I feel he got a pretty thorough critique. I never think critiques are thorough enough though. I hope that in this class we can push that a little further.

It was nice to learn about Juana's background it gave me a much better understanding of where she is coming from in her work. This method though didn't allow for much time for responses.

I too would of liked to hear more from Dawei in both critiques

Nature and Time

Culturally i have grown to understand "nature" as the "great outdoors", is this what Grosz is referring to when she refrences "nature"?

Nature does provoke cultural evolution; however can culture generate evolution in "nature" ? Nature's wrath and passivity: storms, famine, droughts, sun, rain, animals, do cause change, here i agree with Grosz, but what about human intervention, pollution, farming, cloning, and building? I would like to borrow Micheal Pollan's thoughts and believe that nature may be evolving more than we think.

Because i care about the world and its state Grosz's questions should be considered. Most importantly her question regarding nature and its framework regarding cultural evolution. How important is it that we not separate the two?

thanks
jason

Rashad

Freire's quote reads as an attempt to quantify the meaning of life. I interpret "to begin always anew" as a reference to the start of a new day, new lifestyle, new relationship or any kind of significant or inconsequential paradigm shift. "To make, to reconstruct, and not to spoil" could be Freire's description of cyclical nature of life. "To make" as in making new connections or following a calling, a purposeful act in life. "To reconstruct" as in repairing torn connections or reevaluating ones decisions. "Not to spoil" goes back to making and reconstructing. The conscious effort and act of making, then reconstructing reveals ones understanding of spoiling or taking pivotal aspects of life for granted. Not spoiling inherently causes reflection and reconstruction. Bureaucratizing the mind creates modes of thinking that collide and modes that can impede upon progressive thought, development, and cultivation. If life is a process, humanity exists as the epitome or embodiment of process. Living to understand this principle is living to become it. I find Freire's observation poignant and impactful.

September 17, 2008

tj

The clouded mind with its interesting meandering synapses, the complexity of the human situation, and taste mixed with motive
old tricks for new generations, cycles of fashion, and reacquiring answers to the universe.
Live to become
If you live your art does this elevate your life?
If you separate life from art does this elevate art?
Does art really need to take a shit?
Does art need to be elevated?

September 15, 2008

Critique

Given the short amount of time to prepare, i thought Juana and David's critique went quite well.

Established by both artist's questions, i believe they received usable insight. Two good conversations the commentary aimed at both artist's felt very thoughtful. While i am a fan of the artist run critique, i also question when and where the artist should withdraw. Not to say that Juana or David did this, it is only a question to consider.

thanks
jason

comments on the 2 critique processes on 9/12

Before your observations and responses fade, post your comments on the two modes of studio critique introduced by Juanita and David on Friday 9/12.

You will find David 's reflections and Juanita's reflections on the experience of the studio critique posted within the category:

Initial Critique

this is found nested within the category:

Critiques and Presentations

David and Juanita will each reviewing their approach to the initial critique and assess the experience in terms of how well it provided useful critique, what they may have experimented with in the process and how, why, where, and what - if anything - they would imagine approaching differently in the future.


Select "comments" to respond to David's reflections and "comments" to respond to Juanita's reflections.


Your comments to the post by David and the post by Juanita ncludes:

What about this particular studio critique approach was meaningful to you?

How did the artist elicit critique from the group?

What might enhance or extend the flow of critique in this context?

Jazzman

After reading this quote I agree with a lot of the other comments, in regard to studio critique one should always approach work with fresh eyes with out personal agendas or opinions but with a fresh slate attempting to forget their biases, and their own history. Having said this it is often a very difficult thing to do I find I frequently have to fight my first reaction to things and to dig deeper to get to a richer experience and understanding.

September 13, 2008

donovan, david c

.......Just looked at the site and noticed I forgot to comment on some of the things asked.
I structured my critique with initial responses for my peers followed with me describing my process of the creation and ended with discussion. I chose this mode of critique because it allows me to see how others interpret my work. I am able to see if it has the ultimate effect that I am looking for. Then explaining my process I am able to get feedback in ways to improve. The critique went as i thought it would for the most part. Based of the initial responses and discussion I feel as though I am at the right place in my research and developing in the right direction. One thing that surprised me is there wasn’t much of any hard line critiquing. no "negative" feedback. One thing I would like to add is how Juanita showed a time line of development. I think that having the background helps the viewers understand the scope of the artists work.

donovan, david c

First i would like to thank you guys for giving me your insight. I always find it helpful to hear what others see and feel from my art. After mulling over what was discussed, i have come up with a few ideas on the way i want to further develop my process. One thing that stuck with me was Peters comment on the melodramatic nature that manifests its self in the objects i choose to use. This notion initially bothers me. I don’t want to seem cliché or have an emo-ism. I want my art to be serious and thoughtful. But on the other hand pushing this absurdity could give my work a larger scope and a twisted humor of sorts. That ludicrous exaggeration brings up the ideas we talked about dealing with breaking away from the horror flick mentality that people tend to bring to my work when they view it without a placed context. I’m not sure which way I want to lean, maybe both, striped down for some work and over the top for other pieces. Over all I think the process of hearing what the viewer has to say about the art without knowing what fuels it conceptually and how the materials represents the concept and then with a description of how I processed the information, followed by a discussion is an effective mode of critique.

Time Travels

This chapter is excerpted from Time Travels by Elizabeth Grosz.

Titled, The Nature of Culture, it explores what contemporary feminist philosopher Elizabeth Grosz describes as

" ...the ways in which time, movement, change, the irresistible push to the future - as fundamental biological and material forces - affect culture ..."


"... the ways in which nature does not contain culture but induces it to vary itself, to evolve, to develop and transform in ways that are not predictable in advance."

Continuing with our exploration of new and renewed modes of perception and our inquiry into the construction and perhaps transformation of the studio critique:

- select two concepts introduced in this reading

- post a new entry in the 9/19 weekly blog assignment category

- comment on how these ideas influence your thinking about the process of studio critique

donovan, david c

The ideas presented in this quote speak directly to the ways in which I approach making art. Having fresh ideas and energy with ever work even when it was done once and then again. To learn from what was created and then to push the ideas further. Not to be bound by the norm. To be an artist who lives their work. In the pursuit to understand what is being conveyed in my work, the studio critique becomes vital to the process. Paulo Freires ideas lend them self’s to the critique in that an artist must approach their own work from another’s point of view. They should embrace the critiques that are given from their peers. Learning what others see in the work will broaden the scope of the art and the practice behind it. With that said, I feel as though Freire beliefs as so do I, that an artist shouldn’t give up on some thing they feel is worth researching. One should take in as much as they can and then filter that into their work

September 12, 2008

josh w

It seems that quote is a hint of life as many artists or a people or people-artist-hybrid-persons might see it. It sounds like something to think about over breakfast. I like what Laura said about baggage. I should approach a crit. with the same blind freshness with which i approach a new piece of my own work.

jason gaspar- my comment

in the "spirit" of studio critique this statement acts as a catalyst for inspiration and thought. Freire's statement declares freedom, a "kind" of liberation that begins and takes place within the mind. By "kind" i am referring to the thoughts that make up who we are, the thoughts that go seen and unseen, the thoughts the create evolution, the thoughts that declare change, the thoughts that manifest beauty, the thoughts that challenge, the thoughts that no one can regulate. When we "live to become," we LIVE, when we live we create, when we create we "reconstruct," when we "reconstruct" we end and begin new life.

P.S. Somewhere confusion set in, then anxiety, then even more confusion so if my post is incorrect and in the wrong location of the blog i apologize.

thanks have a good day

Laura

I am not a blogger so I hope that I am doing this right... I would say that within a studio critique this quote suggests to start with a clean slate and also not to applaud the work for all that is good. It suggests that in a studio visit, to understand the work you should try to approach the work without baggage that might inhibit you from really seeing the work. Also that referencing only positive aspects in a studio critique will in a sense ruin the critique and will also not help us to advance farther in our work.

Juana

The way I understand and translate this quote into my own life and work is through the idea of movement, therefore, of change.
Personally, I've been very interested in the "alchemist" way life can be approached and how this is strongly related with art. I consider it has been important for me to acknowledge the cyclical rhythm of life as a constant process of transformation. In this sense, the way I think an artist work (or at least I try to work) is by opening a process where while the artist materially transforms something, there is also an intellectual and even a spiritual transformation taking place in his/her own existence.
Now, the reality is that it is very easy to "fall in love and get married" just with one idea and that is the easiest way to stop the cycle.

September 11, 2008

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Pht

Not to sound too new agey but I guess one of my core values (can't believe I am using that term) is to try to have a beginner's mind. Meaning to approach things I am already familiar with as a beginner (hard!) and to always try new things that I know nothing about (easier and often fun). In the context of the studio critique this quote seems to be advocating a similar idea; the studio critique should be one more step in art making, not the ultimate step. That is difficult though, to think about a critique as not being a judgment but more equal with every other aspect of one's process.

Paulo Freire

Comment on this quote from Paulo Freire that comes to us by way of bell hooks in her work Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom


.... to begin always anew, to make, to reconstruct, and to not spoil, to refuse to bureaucratize the mind, to understand and to live life as a process - live to become ....


Would you comment on the spirit of this proposition in the context of the studio critique?

To make this post choose

New Entry

select as the category: 8/12 under blog assignments

enter your name as the title

September 8, 2008

description

Final Studio Critique:

In contrast to the initial critique, the final critique gives you complete control over how you prepare the context for the critique. Once the group enters into the critique, you have complete control over your state of receptivity and benefit from hearing unmediated responses to your work.

Following this period of receptivity, you are free to share your perspectives, ask questions, or respond to the feedback that you received. You will receive two written comments from each student. The first communicates an initial impression of / response to your work, the second a lingering question or observation at the close of the critique.

purpose of the Readings

Selected readings will be posted periodically along with a description of the assignments for a written reflection related to each reading.

The selected readings will focus on:

- perception in general
- constructed modes of perception as they relate to the experience and critique of art
- examples of artist interviews
- insights into the origins and intentions of the studio critique.

An initial bibliography will be presented as a conceptual infra sturcture that the group will add to over the course of the semester.

description

Initial Studio Critique:

The initial studio critique is your opportunity to determine the focus of your critique and the process of your critique. This is your opportunity to determine what you what to present or make available for critique and how you want the group to participate in the process. I encourage you to experiment with the studio critique concept and modes of engagement. Your will have 30 minutes

These experiences will contribute to our collective, semester-long, creative research related to the studio critique – including it’s origins, functions, biases, power dynamics, unique benefits, and its relationship to context.

Following your critique, post your refections on the blog including:

- how you chose to focus and structure the experience
- why you chose this particular focus
- how you determined the structure that you introduced
- what proceeded as you expected
- what surprised you
- what if anything you would advise others to include in the studio critique process.

September 6, 2008

Hanson Hall presentation equipment guide

Here are the ins and outs
of using the equipment in the presentation space, Hanson Hall 1-109.


Download file

Art(ists) On the Verge - NEW new media art funding


Steve Dietz who conceived of the current UnConvention , Zero One, YProductions, and was the founding Director of New Media Initiatives at the Walker Art Center, including Gallery 9 , has launched Northern Lights and the new initiative Art(ists) On the Verge. AoV was made possible with generous funding from the Jerome Foundation and the support of Forecast Public Art as the fiscal agent.

The call for submissions is here.

UMN Equipment Access

Department for Art Equipment Checkout here.


Studio B and Equipment Checkout here.


CLA Laptop loaners here.

Funding for Graduate Students

Creative Research funding links - UMN + external funders:

Funding for Graduate Students here.


University-wide Funding Opportunities here.


Institute for Advanced Studies grants and programs here.

September 5, 2008

Syllabus

ARTS 8410 is described as a “Studio based critique to foster critical dialogue about art practice across media/disciplines. Colloquium for ideas/theories that migrate between artistic practices and influence studio work.?

This semester we will shape this course through full engagement with and participation in critical dialogue, studio critiques, formal artist presentations, readings, and active, thoughtful responses in conversation and via the class blog.

A series of studio critiques at the beginning and end of the semester will provide a shared reference for each person and the group and will contribute to an increased understanding of the concerns and modes of manifestation of each artist. Formal artist presentations and the related construction of artist statements will further develop the articulation and critical dialogue central to this course.

We will also engage in a collective creative research project regarding the construct of the studio critique. We will delve into the origins of this practice and its modification over time and context. We will assess our experiences with the critique process and experiment with new forms.

Over the course of the semester, each student will be responsible for articulate, blog entries that contribute to the intellectual growth of the group and the extended blog readership.

Each week there will be a blog posting that requires participation in a cycle that includes: a reading or writing assignment, a response to this assignment, and a minimum of two blog commentaries on the responses made by other class members.

This course is typically co-taught. For tangled reasons, I am teaching it solo. To create a dynamic environment for teaching and learning within this focus of the studio critique, I have invited a guest to each class. This is a strategy for introducing the multiple perspectives, varied modalities, and stylistic proclivities that contribute to a more meaningful experience of the studio critique and a greater awareness of the particulars of the context of each critique.

Sketch of the Fall Semester 8410 Schedule:


September:

5th Diane + all

Introduction to Studio Critique:

Class discussion

Intro to the blog

Visit HANSON HALL 1 -109 space


12th Diane +

Guest: Dawei Xu Artist, Curator & Lecturer, Beijing Film Academy

Studio Critique 1: David Donovan

Studio Critique 2: Juanita Berrio

19th Diane +

Guest: Tetsuya Yamada Artist & Associate Professor of Art

Studio Critique 1: Rashad Butler

Studio Critique 2: Peter H T

Studio Critique 3: Josh Winkler


26th Diane in New England

Guests: Andrea Stanislav Artist & Assistant Professor of Art and visiting artist Clive Murphy

Studio Critique 1: Jason Gaspar

Studio Critique 2: Jasmine Wallace

Studio Critique 3: Laura Primozic

Studio Critique 4: Lindsay Montgomery


October:

3rd Diane +

Guest: Eleanor Savage, Independent Curator and Jerome Foundation Program Officer

Studio Critique 1: Jessica Teckemeyer

Studio Critique 2: T J Barnes

Studio Critique 3: Meng Tang

Studio Critique 4: Chad Rutter


10th Diane +


17th Diane +

Guest: Scott Stulen, Artist & mnartists.org Director

HANSON HALL 1-109

Artist Presentation 1: Rashad Butler

Artist Presentation 2:Peter H T

Artist Presentation 3: Meng Tang


24th Diane +

Guest: Patricia Briggs - Associate Professor @ MCAD, Art Historian, Critic, Independent Curator

HANSON HALL 1-109

Artist Presentation 1: Jessica Teckemeyer

Artist Presentation 2: Jason Gaspar

Artist Presentation 3: Laura Primozic

Artist Presentation 4: T J Barnes

Artist Presentation 5: Josh Winkler

31st Diane in China


November

7th Diane +

Guest: Chris Larson Artist & Instructor in Sculpture, UMN

HANSON HALL 1-109

Artist Presentation 1: Juanita Berrio

Artist Presentation 2: Lindsay Montgomery

Artist Presentation 3: Jasmine Wallace

Artist Presentation 4: Chad Rutter

Artist Presentation 5: David Donovan


14th Diane +

Guest: Diane Mullin, Art Historian and Associate Curator @ The Weisman Museum of Art

Studio Critique 1: Jason Gaspar

Studio Critique 2: TJ Barnes

Studio Critique 3: Josh Winkler

Studio Critique 4: Lindsay Montgomery


21st Diane +

Steve Dietz, Yproductions, Zero One, Northern Lights,

Studio Critique 1: Rashad Butler

Studio Critique 2: Meng Tang

Studio Critique 3: David Donovan



December:


5th Diane +

Yasmil Raymond, Assistant Curator @ Walker Art Center

Studio Critique 1: Jessica Teckemeyer

Studio Critique 2:Peter H T

Studio Critique 3: Juanita Berrio

Studio Critique 4: Chad Rutter


12th Diane +

Guest: Alexis Kuhr Artist & Associate Professor of Art

Studio Critique 1: Jasmine Wallace

Studio Critique 2: Laura Primozic

Studio Critique :: Philosophy and Guide to Practice

Sharing each person's Philosophy and Guide to the Studio Critique :: concepts and practices
as synthesized from in class and out of class critiques, readings and documentation on the blog.

We will share each person's blog post of their Philosophy and Guide to the Studio Critique.