March 3, 2008

2/27-2/28

2-27-2-28.jpg

2/22-2/26

2-22-2-26.jpg

2/19-2/22

2-19-2-22.jpg

2/14-2/18

1190.jpg

class sketch

1195.jpg

2/9-2/13

2:9-2:13.jpg

2/6-2/8

2-6-2-8.jpg

2/1-2/5

2-1-2-5.jpg

1/31-2/1

1-31-2-1.jpg

I don't carry my computer around

So I have to admit that I gave up with the blogging online daily but not recording my consumption. I never carry my computer with me so I decided to just keep track of everything in my sketchbook since I carry that around everywhere and I kept forgetting things by the end of the day or the next day when I'd get to my computer. So.... here goes the rest of my entries. In the end this probably took more work since scannings a pain in the butt!!!

January 30, 2008

Barthes/American Gladiators Analysis

In “The World of Wrestling� Barthes’ describes wrestling as the “spectacle of excess� where the roles of good vs. evil compete in a way so calculated that a wrestler “actions will perfectly correspond to the essential viscosity of his personage.� What Barthes means by this is that each action or gesture is expected because the roles that wrestlers portray are formed by society.

This becomes very true in the new version of American Gladiators. The characters portray stereotypes which stem from the very reality of our society, although in a much more exaggerated form. The audience is enthralled with the battle between the Contenders or real people vs. the Gladiators because it represents the idea of good vs. evil steming back to the story of David and Goliath. The show tries to play on this idea through the physical forms, names, and histories of their Contenders and Gladiators, but also through the language with which they use to describe each. Contenders are described in a way that makes them ordinary, mortal, optimistic or down and out while Gladiators are described as great, bigger, badder, unstoppable, and honored. The attachment that viewers get with the Contenders is based on their histories, like the New York City firefighter, which post 911 has been seen as one of the most heroic figures in America. The Gladiators are all forms of figures similar to mythological or super hero characters, making them seem immortal.

The calculated actions of wrestlers like the Contenders and the Gladiators are like theatre, and appear to be real but in reality are not. Their roles are similar as well because the audience knows the Gladiator will, in most cases, beat the Contender. It is the few Contenders or the few good that overcome evil in wrestling that make the spectacle worth watching. The audience wouldn’t watch if the characters were not what they were familiar with or expected and that includes Contenders and Gladiators. In this way, society is presented with a spectacle to watch in which was formed based around our previous and current actions and beliefs.

stuffed up

ate two pieces of peanut butter toast and a giant glass of water this morning

feeling: tired
where: my apartment

yesterday....whoops

so in between falling on black ice three times in 24 hours I managed to buy a few things and eat...

Purchases: Strategic Media Decisions, $72.00 @ Coffman Union, Bagel & Cream cheese, Smart Water, 2 granola bars, $3.09 @ Gopher Express, Assorted groceries (angel hair pasta, granola bars, mountain blast poweraid, triskets, sharp cheddar cheese, & turkey, $24ish @ Rainbow Foods

Feeling: cold, it dropped 45 degrees in the last 24 hours brrrrr

January 29, 2008

10:20 PM....starting a paper due tomorrow

Dinner: market pantry spaghetti and prego spaghetti sauce, $? cents
Feeling: tired, sick
Location: my apartment

January 28, 2008

monday morning new rituals

Consumed: 2 eggs over easy, 2 pieces of whole wheat toast with rasberry jam, coffee, $unsure
Business Section of the New York Times, $1.50
Feeling: older than my age but happy to not have class