Role of TV on Child Development

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TV, computers and video games are deeply entrenched in modern life but what effect does all this screen time have on how children develop?
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One thing is clear, screen time is sedentary behavior and too much can replace the physical activity necessary for children to grow healthy and maintain normal weight.
sedentary jpg

Less clear are the cognitive and emotional effects on development. A recent NY Times article reports on recomendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics to limit the screen time of children.


TV Limits for Children Urged by American Academy of Pediatrics - NYTimes.com.pdf

In class you will be investigating the influence of video games on aggressive behavior of children but there are several other concerns parents may have about their children's viewing habits.

For example, television often portrays males and females in gender-stereotyped ways. As you watch clips from Barney and Power Rangers in lab you may also want to think about what influence these portrayals likely have on the development of gender identity and gender role awareness in children?

Certain shows might influence gender identity but often commercials play up gender stereotypes even more.

A recent study estimates that children 4-11 years old spend on average 2-4 hours a day in front of a some type of electronic screen.

A question we might ask is "What are children missing out on while watching television?"

Can you imagine life without TV or video games? What would you have done during your childhood and adolescence with the time you spent watching television? Would you have turned out any different?

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Children learn from what they hear- on TV, computers, radio. There is an epidemic of foul language and sex. Parents need to turn off the noise, as this is a false sense of excitement. When children don’t hear it –they are bored. Parents need to replace TV by going to parks, museums, picnics, hiking etc.. Most of these activities stimulate children. They are relatively free, are good for their health and are a great way to spend quality time with your children.
Lucia
http://disciplineandchildren.com

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This page contains a single entry by wlas0006 published on November 3, 2011 11:59 AM.

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