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December 4, 2006

Alternating Table Row Color Problem

I've been struggling with finding a good way to create a table that works cross browsers with alternating row colors. I don't want each row identified with a different class - because I don't want future inserts into the table to require changing the classes of each subsequent row.

This is where the script I used came from:

<script>
function alternate(id){
if(document.getElementById){ //check that browser has capabilities
if(document.getElementsByTagName){ var table = document.getElementById(id); var rows = table.getElementsByTagName("tr"); for(i = 0; i < rows.length; i++){ //manipulate rows
if(i % 2 == 0){
rows[i].className = "even";
}else{
rows[i].className = "odd";
}
} }
}
}

</script>

Then I set two classes with CSS:
.odd{background-color:#FFEBAE;}
.even{background-color:white;}

Then in the HTML:
<body onLoad="alternate('ContactTable')">

This seems to work on IE and NOT on Firefox. I think there's an error in the code. What I did was take the code the site gave - and stripped it down so it didn't have the other alternating row color options. I'm not enough of a javascript person to trouble shoot.

The page with the code I started with works fine in Firefox (I downloaded this from the site mentioned above).

This CSS table gallery gives some very good ideas about ways to make CSS tables look good.

Stellent Developer Bex Huff Strikes Off on His Own

Bex Huff at Stellent has a blog.

He's very positive about Stellent:

It feels great to be a part of something bigger than myself... like helping to create a product as uniquely innovative as the Stellent Content Server. Down in development, we were contrarians about everything. We used Java when nobody else would. We had a web based interface before most people had email. We had a data-driven framework for quickly adding features, while others used ivory tower OOP that was impossible to customize. We had a service-oriented architecture (SOA) seven years before there was even a word for it! Most of that was Sam White's vision... we were just the lucky ones who extended it to include our vision.