Consuming Kids

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I found this video to be very interesting. As someone mentioned in class, I watched it from the other angle and thought about how smart these companies are doing this to children. Besides the fact that one of the guys getting interviewed related these youth marketers to pedofiles, they are geniuses. A couple things that stood out to me were the "Nag Factor," "Cradle to Grave" and just how technology is a huge factor of todays marketing.

It's funny they threw up a Simpson's Episode with Bart and Lisa asking to go to Mount Splashmore because that exactly was thinking about. Also the part about Sponge Bob Mac and Cheese being the best made me laugh. When the lady asked how one could argue with a 5 year old about that...and you simply cant. Another aspect of that is in commercials at the end there is something like "Ask your parents.." or "With parent approval visit our website." (or something like that) So not only do the kids want the product and ask their parents, but potentially both the kid and parent are visiting the website. Smart. Like the Nag Factor, it connects the product to the kid to the parent.

Another thing that was portrayed in a negative way was the idea of Cradle to Grave. Again, looking at this in a positive way, why wouldn't you want someone buying your product for their whole life?

Technology is taking over. The documentary showed us how things like online games are a huge help to their marketing scheme. "Kids are either playing on the playground or on the computer." They said that in 2010 5.3 million kids betweent he ages of 8-12 owned a cell phone and in 2011 that number was predicted to double. I cant image what it will be like in 5 years from now. Kids are being acclimated to technology at a very early age. I saw a commercial the other day for playskool or something and they were selling tablets for kids. Colorful, easy to hold, plastic tablet with a plug at the end for their website offering apps. Toddlers with apps?


2 Comments

Bennett,

I liked how you took the opposing POV on this video and praised advertisers on how they have been able to successfully market to not only kids, but their parents, especially when you mentioned that parental permission clause to access certain websites. I also mentioned briefly how the nag factor can ultimately win out when it comes down kids getting their way--same thing with the Spongebob mac and cheese--you can't argue with the 5 year old that it tastes better; it just does. I mean Spongebob is the mac and cheese, and Kraft and Nickelodeon did everything right; they put what kids love to watch with what they like to eat--how can you lose if you're those companies? I didn't get my first cell phone until I was in the 8th grade, back in 2004. Times are certainly changing, and you wonder too on a separate note, with more kids getting cell phones at a younger age what effect that will have on other main concerns, like texting while driving. Isn't it ironic that Apple will advertise the latest iPhone and then the next commercial you see is a 17 year old boy who can't walk and can hardly speak telling the viewers at home that he wasn't so lucky, because he was on his phone texting while behind the wheel. We'll see what the future holds.

I like how you made a case for the marketers. In the documentary all people did was bash the practice but didn't bring on anyone to argue the case for doing what they do. In my blog I pointed out that they have incentives to do what they do. But instead, people were arguing that's its wrong. But who says it is wrong? And what makes it wrong? Usually people make this argument and it can be traced back to values. And since people have this value, they think everyone else shares it and they don't say why it is wrong. That was one thing that bothered me in the documentary. Only a couple people people actually gave "Whys." Someone compared it to child predators, but certainly a lot the people that make these ads have kids, so they somehow can reconcile their actions. If you don't like ads on TV, no one says your kids have to watch TV.

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This page contains a single entry by rust0147 published on September 20, 2012 10:34 AM.

consuming Kids was the previous entry in this blog.

How to Change the Reality of Consuming Kids is the next entry in this blog.

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